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    DETROIT (AP) — A Michigan professor asked a judge Wednesday to immediately reinstate him, two weeks after he was suspended for a sarcastic, profanity-laced video introducing students to his classes at Ferris State University. Attorneys for Barry Mehler said his First Amendment rights were violated. The professor and his supporters characterized the 14-minute video as an “irreverent” attempt to encourage critical thinking. Ferris State President David Eisler said it was “profane, offensive and disturbing and in no way reflects our university or its values,” and some viewers speculated publicly that Mehler was having a mental breakdown. Among other things, Mehler, 74, told students that grades would be randomly assigned without regard to classwork and that “no [expletive] … is going to tell me how to teach my classes because I’m a [expletive] tenured professor.” He posted the video on YouTube on Jan. 9 and was suspended with pay two days later. He was told that he was being investigated for violating the faculty contract and the university’s employee dignity policy. Ferris State had no comment on the lawsuit. Mehler...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Their bags are filled and the suitcases are rolling as students at Temple University started moving back onto campus on Saturday. The school has made some COVID-safety changes for the spring semester, which starts Monday. There are now three options for masks – a surgical mask with multiple layers of material, a surgical mask with a cloth mask over it, or a KN95 mask. READ MORE: Teenage Boy Shot 7 Times In West Philadelphia, Police Say“I’m glad to be back it sucked being at home all cooped up,” one student said. Like many, students at Temple studied virtually for the first three weeks of the spring semester due to a rise in COVID cases. “Monday we’re gonna open and we’re fearing that it’s going to be business as usual but the virus hasn’t gone anywhere yet,” Will T. Jordan, of the Temple Association of University Professionals, said.  The decision to return to in-person learning is striking a chord with TAUP – the union that represents university faculty. In a letter, they called the move reckless. READ...
    FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — A University of Arkansas professor pleaded guilty Friday to lying to the FBI about patents he had for inventions in mainland China. Simon Saw-Teong Ang pleaded guilty in federal court in Fayetteville, Arkansas, to one count from a 58-count federal indictment. Prosecutors say 24 patents bearing Ang’s name were filed with the Beijing government but that he failed to report the patents to the university and denied having them when questioned by the FBI. The university requires disclosure of all faculty patents, which the university would own. The plea deal calls for a one-year prison sentence, but the crime could be punishable by up to five years in prison. The 64-year-old Fayetteville resident was suspended from the university faculty when he was initially indicted in July 2020. The university website no longer lists him on its faculty directory. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — In a decision that made a withering comparison to Communist China, a federal judge on Friday temporarily prohibited the University of Florida from enforcing a policy that restricted faculty members from providing expert testimony in cases that conflict with positions taken by the state of Florida. U.S. District Judge Mark Walker granted a preliminary injunction on a conflict-of-interest claim brought by six faculty members, but he left in place for the time being a school policy that in some cases prohibits faculty from citing their university affiliation when serving as expert witnesses. “Our society would be immeasurably poorer without Plaintiffs’ speech,” the judge wrote. The six professors had sued the University of Florida, claiming it infringed upon their First Amendment rights by requiring them to get approval before serving as expert witnesses in outside cases. They claimed their requests were rejected by the university because they conflicted with the administration of Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and were asking for a preliminary injunction to block the university’s policy. Last fall, the university prohibited three professors from testifying...
              by Stuart Reges   How do you make the progressives on campus so “horrified” that they spring into action to defend their sacred ideology?  Make an indigenous land acknowledgment that doesn’t match their view of history and watch them lose their minds.  Let me describe how that happened to me. Indigenous land acknowledgments have been common in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and they are now starting to crop up on college campuses in the United States.  At the University of Washington, they are showing up all over the place.  The diversity experts in the university’s Allen School of Computer Science—where I teach—have produced a “best practices” document that encourages faculty to include these on their course syllabus.  The document also suggests replacing the phrase “you guys” with “ya’ll,” but that’s a topic for a different piece. At first, I ignored these land acknowledgments, but the more I observed how they were used, the more they reminded me of a prayer.  At our annual faculty retreat this year our director opened with a solemn land acknowledgment.  Why?  As with a prayer, a land acknowledgment...
    An Iranian Princeton scholar has sparked fury for smirking during an interview where he discussed how a US diplomat's wife was unable to sleep over fears she'd be murdered in revenge for the assassination of an Iranian general.   Hussein Mousavian, 65, gave a smile during a recent interview on Iranian TV while discussing the terror former US special envoy for Iran Brian Hook and his spouse are said to fear in the wake of the January 2020 assassination of Qasem Solemani. Mousavian said: 'I went to America and an American told me that Brian Hook's wife can't sleep, she cries and trembles, she told Brian, 'They'll kill you,' since Hook was a partner in the death of Haj Qassem [Soleimani], that's how much they were trembling,' Mousavian said. He was referring to Iran's vow for revenge after the Trump administration carried out drone strikes that killed Iranian extremist officer Qasem Soleimani two years ago.  Mousavian, the former senior negotiator of Iran's nuclear committee who now works as a Middle East security and nuclear policy specialist at Princeton University. There have...
    PORTSMOUTH — Shawnee State University’s Teaching & Learning Center (TLC) focuses on providing support for university faculty to achieve their goals and enhance their professional development. Located in the Clark Memorial Library on campus, Christina Baker serves as the program’s director. “The overall goal in the center is to be able to support professors with what they need to be able to better connect with students within their classes,” Baker said. Baker, a 2012 alumna of SSU, develops program and supportive content for faculty members on campus, while working closely with Associate Provost Dr. Christine Raber to learn more about faculty needs. While the TLC focuses on providing faculty members with advanced and effective teaching skills, it also helps current students develop their own skillsets as well. “For students who want to learn how to teach, I give assistance to them as well with provide them with the best technology used at the moment,” said Baker, noting how this topic has become more relevant among virtual learning throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. SSU’s TLC offers opportunities for professors and students to...
    BIG RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan university professor has been placed on leave for a profanity-laced class introduction that included his warning that he randomly assigns grades before the first day of class. “I don’t even want to know your name,” said Barry Mehler of Ferris State University. “I just look at the number and assign a grade. That is how predestination works. … Take your complaints to God.” In the 14-minute video that was posted Sunday on YouTube, Mehler, 74, called students “vectors of disease” and said they shouldn’t attend class in person because “I don’t want to be anywhere near you.” “I will not take questions in class because I’m wearing this … helmet in order to stay alive,” he said, a reference to an astronaut-style helmet with air filters he wore briefly in the video. He also rails against the administration, saying that “no [expletive] … is going to tell me how to teach my classes because I’m a [expletive] tenured professor. So if you want to go complain to your dean, [expletive] you. Go ahead....
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — The University of Pittsburgh reported more than 400 new COVID-19 cases from Jan. 4 to Jan. 11. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Animal Rescue: Shelters 'Bursting At The Seams'According to the school’s COVID-19 Medical Response Office, 209 students and 205 faculty and staff tested positive for the coronavirus at the Pittsburgh campus. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Public Schools Announces More Closures Due To COVID-19The school said more than 96 percent of students across all campuses are vaccinated, while 98 percent of faculty and 94 percent of staff are fully vaccinated. Recently, some students were disenrolled for the spring semester for not complying with the university’s vaccine mandate. MORE NEWS: As Some Struggle To Find Child Care, Rutledge Institute Provides Unique OpportunityIn November, Pitt announced it would be following the Biden administration’s federal mandate, requiring all faculty and staff to be fully vaccinated by Dec. 6.
    CHICAGO (CBS) — DePaul University will require all students, faculty, and staff to get COVID-19 booster shots by March 1, after previously requiring them to be full vaccinated for the 2021-22 school year. The university said students, faculty, and staff will have to upload their proof of a booster to DePaul’s database by March 1. READ MORE: Another Contempt Of Court Order Issued Against Illinois DCFS Director Marc Smith For Violating Rights Of Teen“COVID-19 vaccines, including boosters, are widely available throughout the city, including at doctors’ offices, hospitals, pharmacies, community health centers, city-operated clinics, pop-up locations, and other special events. All COVID-19 vaccines are offered at no cost, regardless of ability to pay or immigration status. No government ID or insurance is required,” the university said in a statement on its website. READ MORE: Center For Covid Control To Halt Testing Operations For One WeekInformation and instructions on how to submit proof of boosters can be found on the university’s website. Anyone at DePaul with questions about vaccines can email DePaulCommunityHealth@depaul.edu. DePaul staff can answer questions about vaccine eligibility and...
    The University of Louisville is refusing to shift classes to a remote learning format, going against several major American universities opting to hold classes online for the beginning of the spring semester. In a message to students on Sunday, members of the University of Louisville administration wrote that classes will be held in person despite the emergence of the omicron variant. "After careful, ongoing review and significant discussion of the issues Omicron presents, we plan to continue in-person instruction and normal business operations this semester," the message read. The university administration members noted that more than 91% of faculty, students, and staff are vaccinated, with a large number having their booster shot as well. Additionally, the university noted that the risk of severe illness for people who are vaccinated "remains very low." MORE MAJOR AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES ANNOUNCE REMOTE START TO SPRING SEMESTER, CITING INCREASE IN COVID-19 CASES University of Louisville campus. (Credit: University of Louisville) ((Credit: University of Louisville)) "Research shows that the Omicron variant causes less severe disease than previous variants," the email states. Citing an Indiana University...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Some students at the University of Pittsburgh were disenrolled for the spring semester for not complying with the university’s vaccine mandate. In November, the University announced it would be following the Biden administration’s federal mandate, requiring all faculty and staff to be fully vaccinated by Dec. 6. READ MORE: State Legislature's Failure To Enact Bipartisan Congressional Map Means Courts Will Likely InterveneIn a statement on Nov. 9, the university said, “While we will begin progressive discipline for faculty and staff who are not compliant with the interim policy by that date, we will use the month of December to help those who want to become compliant do so for the start of the spring term,” a university spokesperson said. “We will similarly work with such students during that period.” On Tuesday, the University told KDKA all non-compliant students were disenrolled from classes and lost access to Pitt buildings and certain IT functions. Ninety-six percent of Pitt students and employees have been vaccinated. “In addition, non-compliant employees lost access to Pitt buildings and certain IT resources,” David Seldin...
    TOWSON, Md. (WJZ) — Towson University is mandating COVID-19 booster shots for all students, staff and faculty who are eligible to receive them. The university’s administration notified the campus community of the changes in a letter Friday, saying all students, staff and faculty would be required to submit proof of their vaccination status by Jan. 31 or within 14 days of them becoming eligible for the booster shot. READ MORE: Hogan Expands 'Refund The Police' Initiative, Plans To Reintroduce 2 Crime Bills That Have Failed To PassThe change falls in line with a measure from the University System of Maryland, which is requiring all students who live on campus to get their booster shots. “We learn more each day about the virus and the omicron variant, which has proven to spread more rapidly than prior strains. We’re also seeing that those who are vaccinated and have had a booster are far less likely to become seriously ill or hospitalized,” the university’s letter said in part. As with vaccines, there are exemptions available for people who cannot get the COVID-19 booster...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lani Guinier, a civil rights lawyer and scholar whose nomination by President Bill Clinton to head the Justice Department’s civil rights division was pulled after conservatives criticized her views on correcting racial discrimination, has died. She was 71. Guinier died Friday, Harvard Law School Dean John F. Manning said in a message to students and faculty. Her cousin, Sherrie Russell-Brown, said in an email that the cause was complications due to Alzheimer’s disease. Guinier became the first woman of color appointed to a tenured professorship at Harvard law school when she joined the faculty in 1998. Before that she was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s law school. She had previously headed the voting rights project at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in the 1980s and served during President Jimmy Carter’s administration in the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, which she was later nominated to head. “I have always wanted to be a civil rights lawyer. This lifelong ambition is based on a deep-seated commitment to democratic fair play — to playing by the rules as...
    A major public university condemned one of its own former professors Monday after he said that many women are selected for engineering positions primarily on the basis of their gender. “Half of the female STEM faculty in the US were hired over more qualified men,” Pedro Domingos, a retired computer science and engineering professor who has garnered more than 55,000 citations to his published works, according to Google Scholar, posted to Twitter. In response, the University of Washington’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering admitted that they “cannot limit what emeritus faculty members say via private accounts” before admonishing Domingos’ claim as “meritless, sexist, inflammatory, [and] attention-seeking.” Meanwhile, former faculty member Pedro Domingos unfortunately used the holiday weekend to yet again tweet meritless, sexist, inflammatory, attention-seeking commentary that reflects poorly on him and everyone associated with him. We, once again, repudiate his views. 2/5 — Allen School (@uwcse) January 3, 2022 The University of Washington’s repudiation follows similar outcries against Domingos from alumni, academics, Google executives, the editor-in-chief of Science Magazine Holden Thorpe and the creator of the...
                 Senator Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) on Tuesday criticized the University of Memphis for awarding additional funds to educators as a part of its “Eradicating Systemic Racism and Promoting Social Justice Initiative.” The new initiative will provide a $3,000 stipend to professors who alter their courses to incorporate “diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice” curriculum. According to Blackburn, the university, which is taxpayer-funded, should be using courses to allow students to think for themselves, instead of promoting a certain set of ideals or concepts. “The University should be encouraging their students to be independent thinkers, expanding their world view, learning how to be lifelong learners and respectful of all,” said Blackburn in a statement to Fox News. “Taxpayer dollars should not be used to fund a woke social justice agenda.” In order to be picked, faculty members must submit a detailed plan to describe their course of action when including the preferred curriculum. According to an email from university leaders, 15-20 faculty members will be selected for the program, starting during the upcoming semester. The stipend opportunity is a portion...
    LEWISTON, Maine (AP) — Supporters of unionization efforts at Bates College have accused the school of flaunting its own COVID-19 rules by bringing an outside expert to hold in-person meetings with employees who’re set to vote this month on whether to join a union. Bates’ policy allows vendors, contractors and others to enter its buildings without violating the school’s COVID-19 protocols — but the union that’s looking to organize contends no visitors are allowed in campus buildings under those restrictions, The Lewiston Sun Journal reported Tuesday. “Anti-union meetings with an out-of-state consultant should be off the table” in order to help block the spread of the virus, said Julia Panepinto, a pro-union assistant softball coach, in a statement. The college has said this week’s “voluntary information sessions” aim to answer questions about unionization and that employees are “strongly encouraged” to attend, but not required. More than 600 hourly employees are eligible to affiliate with the Maine Service Employees Association, part of the Service Employees International Union, including nontenured or tenure-track faculty and college support staff, the newspaper reported. Bates has...
    (CNN)University of Florida President Kent Fuchs will step down, a decision he said was in the works for months, he announced in a video on the school's Twitter account Wednesday. Fuchs will remain until a replacement is appointed, he said, adding he expects the transition in early 2023.He did not mention any controversies of his tenure, focusing on his future, resume and achievements. He closed quoting the Bible, in which the apostle Paul told Timothy, "I have fought the good fight. I have finished the race. I have kept the faith.""I have planned that the final phase of my career would be as a member of the teaching and research faculty in my home academic department, electrical and computer engineering, here at the university," he said.Fuchs informed the chair of UF's Board of Trustees in August that he wanted this to be his last year as president, he said. The board agreed an announcement would be made in January, Fuchs said. Read MoreJUST WATCHEDUniversity reverses decision on professors testifyingReplayMore Videos ...MUST WATCHUniversity reverses decision on professors testifying 06:53The university is...
    The University of Memphis in Tennessee is offering its professors a financial incentive to inject "diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice" into their courses. It told faculty members they could receive $3,000 in funding if they rework their syllabuses to better incorporate the institution's commitment to social justice, the Washington Free Beacon reported. The institution was forced to make significant budget cuts and had to lay off staff in the fall of 2020 after facing over $50 million in losses it blamed on COVID-19, ABC24 reported. An anonymous professor expressed concerns about the funding of the grant in light of the university's financial situation to the Washington Free Beacon. "We've had a hard time retaining good faculty at our salary levels, so anytime you see money being spent on nonstudent or nonfaculty causes, it makes you scratch your head," the professor said. "It creates an incentive for a nonpartisan instructor to turn their students into activists for a few extra dollars." FORMING MINDS: CRT DEBATE HAS SOME CONSERVATIVES CALLING FOR A RETURN TO CLASSICAL EDUCATION ...
                 University of Memphis officials have offered a $3,000 stipend to professors to redesign existing courses to promote the tenets of social justice. This, as part of the university’s Eradicating Systemic Racism and Promoting Social Justice Initiative. The program, the school’s website went on to say, is scheduled to begin at the start of the Spring 2022 semester. “The Eradicating Systemic Racism and Promoting Social Justice Initiative at the University of Memphis is offering an opportunity for interested faculty to critically consider methods and approaches to redesign existing courses housed within their departments to better advance the tenets and charge of the university’s commitment to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Social Justice,” according to University of Memphis’ correspondence that The Washington Free Beacon obtained and publicized Monday. University of Memphis officials did not return The Tennessee Star’s request for comment before Monday’s stated deadline. University officials will select 15 to 20 faculty members to participate. Faculty will present strategies to redesign their courses. A grant offers a $3,000 stipend, awarded in two installments. The grant is available to full-time instructors...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – A federal judge on Monday refused to dismiss a lawsuit filed by University of Florida professors challenging a policy that gives the school discretion in blocking faculty members from testifying against the state in legal cases. Political science professors Sharon Austin, Michael McDonald and Daniel Smith filed the lawsuit after university officials denied their requests to serve as plaintiffs’ witnesses in a legal battle about a new state elections law (SB 90) that will, in part, make it harder for Floridians to vote by mail. READ MORE: Broward Health Suffered Data Breach That Exposed Personal Info Of Patients, EmployeesThe professors turned to the court after university officials told them that going against the executive branch of the government was “adverse” to the school’s interests. Three additional professors later joined as plaintiffs in the lawsuit. The professors contend that the university’s conflict-of-interest policy violates First Amendment speech rights and discriminates based on viewpoint and content. Amid a national spotlight on the policy, University of Florida President Kent Fuchs walked back the decision on the professors’ testimony in the...
    The University of Memphis in Tennessee has offered professors $3,000 to infuse their courses with diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice, according to a report Monday. An all-faculty email obtained by the Free Beacon shows the university offering a $1,500 stipend after professors redesign their curricula, with another $1,500 after teaching the redesigned course. According to the email, 15-20 faculty members will be selected for the program, which begins in the spring of 2022. "This announcement offers a competitive grant opportunity designed to support faculty who are interested in redesigning and aligning existing course syllabi with the goals established by the workgroup entitled, Infusing Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Social Justice into Existing Courses/Curriculum," the email reads. UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN FACES CRITICISM FOR ANTI-RACISM PLAN, REMOVES IBRAM KENDI REFERENCE That working group links to a report emphasizing the need for anti-racism, a term popularized by controversial author Ibram Kendi. It includes a call to "[e]stablish funding to incentivize faculty and instructors to enroll in cultural competency workshops focused on race and racism, designing anti-racist syllabi, and developing skills and appropriate dispositions...
               – – – Photo “Indiana University campus” by Indiana University.
    Marymount University students will begin their spring semester classes virtually due to COVID-19 concerns, the school announced Wednesday. The school will readopt a remote learning format for the first two weeks of the spring 2022 semester “in order to reduce the potential spread of the Omicron variant of COVID-19 on campus,” the school said in a statement. More Education News More Arlington News This change comes as COVID-19 cases soar in the region and nationwide. University President Irma Becerra said students will still be able to move back into on-campus housing on Jan. 8 as previously planned. The school is also requiring students and faculty who will be on campus during the upcoming semester to get booster vaccines by Jan. 18 or within two weeks of booster eligibility. Students and faculty will also have to submit a negative COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of returning to campus. Marymount University will also continue to enforce its indoor mask mandate policy.
    Nikole Hannah-Jones, the creator of “The 1619 Project” and a faculty member at Howard University, admitted Sunday to not being a “professional educator.” Hannah-Jones appeared on Sunday’s episode of NBC News’ “Meet the Press,” where she discussed critical race theory and its role in the gubernatorial election in Virginia. Host Chuck Todd asked his guest how people in an open society should decide to teach about their collective past, noting that “Virginia governor’s race was arguably decided on the strength of how influential should parents be on curriculum.” “I would say the governor’s race in Virginia was decided based on the success of a right-wing propaganda campaign that told white parents that they needed to fight against their children being indoctrinated … as being called racist,” Hannah-Jones replied. (RELATED: Virginia Education Department Promotes Pro-CRT Book, Despite McAuliffe’s Claims The Curricula Isn’t Taught In The State) Nikole Hannah-Jones: Parents shouldn’t be in charge of their kids’ schooling: “I don’t really understand this idea that parents should decide what’s being taught. I’m not a professional educator. I don’t have a degree in...
    The 1619 Project founder said that she's not a "professional educator" despite being a tenured faculty member at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Nikole Hannah-Jones made the comment during her Sunday interview on NBC's Meet the Press, where she discussed the 1619 Project, the role that critical race theory played in the Virginia governor's race, and how much influence parents should have over what is taught to their children in schools.   After saying that the Virginia governor's race was  "decided based on the success of a right-wing propaganda campaign," Hannah-Jones went on to say that she's not a "professional educator." NIKOLE HANNAH-JONES DECLINES UNC TENURE, ACCUSES COLLEGE OF RACISM: 'JUST NOT SOMETHING I WANT ANYMORE' Nikole Hannah-Jones attends the 75th Annual Peabody Awards Ceremony held at Cipriani Wall Street on May 21, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/FilmMagic)  "And I don't really understand this idea that parents should decide what's being taught. I'm not a professional educator. I don't have a degree in social studies or science. We send our children to school...
              by Kerry McDonald   This year, for the first time since graduation some two decades ago, I did not donate to either of my alma maters. Like many of you, I have become disillusioned with the illiberalism on many college campuses and could no longer support them with an annual gift. While higher education has historically tipped to the political left, the gap has widened in recent decades. Analyzing data on faculty ideological leanings, the American Enterprise Institute reported that “in less than 30 years the ratio of liberal identifying faculty to conservative faculty had more than doubled to 5.” At Harvard, where I attended graduate school, the faculty political imbalance is particularly striking. According to a 2021 survey by The Harvard Crimson, the college newspaper, out of 236 faculty replies only 7 people said they are “somewhat” or “very conservative,” while 183 respondents indicated that they are “somewhat” or “very liberal.” A similar problem plagues my undergraduate college, Bowdoin. The absence of my meager donations won’t matter to the colleges I attended, each of which has billions of dollars in endowment money. But big alumni donors at...
    Dr. Monica Casper, a dean at San Diego State University has said described the 'right's agenda' to consist of racism, unintelligence, and inequality A dean at San Diego State University has described the 'Right's agenda' on Twitter as a 'stench' saying it consists of racism, unintelligence, and inequality.       'Just so we're clear on the Right's agenda: racism good, abortion bad, money good, women bad, capitalism good, sustainability bad, stupidity good, science bad, power good, equality bad, white people good, nonwhite people bad. Stench, indeed,' Dr. Monica Casper, SDSU's dean of the College of Arts and Letters, tweeted. In other tweets, Dr. Casper wrote about the acquittal of Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse calling it a victory for 'white supremacy'. 'No mercy, no justice – white supremacy wins again,' she tweeted.  A dean at San Diego State University has described the 'Right's agenda' on Twitter as a 'stench' saying it consists of racism, unintelligence, and inequality Earlier this month, she reacted to the opening arguments in the Supreme Court which is considering a Mississippi ban on abortions at 15 weeks; and could be used...
    HAYWARD (CBS SF) — California State University officials announced Wednesday that they will require faculty, staff and students who are accessing on-campus facilities to provide proof of a COVID vaccine booster shot by February 2022. The new requirement calls for boosters to be received by February 28 or six months after an individual received the final dose of the original vaccination. READ MORE: San Francisco's Popular Zuni Cafe To Require COVID Booster Proof From DinersHowever, officials said, individual campuses may establish an earlier date for compliance for students and non-represented employees based on local circumstances. “Vaccination, including a booster when eligible, remains our most effective strategy against infection and severe disease,” said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “This is particularly important in light of the rapid rise of cases of COVID-19 throughout the state and nation as the Omicron variant spreads. Implementing the booster requirement now will help mitigate the potential spread of the variant on campuses as they repopulate in January after the winter break.” READ MORE: 'Decaying Cyclone' Sending Waves Of Storms Into Northern CaliforniaAs announced previously, the...
    A Fairfield County juvenile has been arrested in connection with an alleged social media threat directed at an area middle school. The Stratford Police Department became aware of a social media threat directed toward students and faculty of the Stratford school system on Monday, Dec. 20. According to Captain Frank Eannotti, of the Stratford Police, investigators were able to quickly identify the suspect, and based on the investigation one juvenile was arrested for posting the threat.  Earlier Story: Social Media Threat Targeting Schools Under Investigation In Fairfield County Additional officers were posted at the schools as a precautionary measure during the school day, Eannotti said. He added that the department and the Board of Education take all threats seriously and work to ensure the safety of students and faculty. The juvenile's name was not released due to his age. 
    CSU professors, coaches, counselors, librarians and other eligible faculty will get pay bumps and a one-time bonus — for their work during the pandemic — under a tentative labor deal, the California State University announced Monday, Dec. 20. The agreement between the CSU and the California Faculty Association will cover 29,000 faculty across all 23 campuses and, if approved by the CSU Board of Trustees and CFA members, will run until June 30, 2024, a CSU statement said. The CFA is the union for Cal State teachers. The CSU is the nation’s largest public university system, educating more than 485,000 students annually in nearly every part of the state, with campuses in Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Bernardino and elsewhere. The CSU’s four-largest campuses, based on enrollment, are all in Southern California, according to 2020 data: Cal State Fullerton, Cal State Long Beach, Cal State Northridge and San Diego State University. “The CSU’s world-class faculty are critical to the success of our talented and diverse students,” Chancellor Joseph I. Castro said in a statement. “The new contract acknowledges the...
              by Ashley Stultz   Purdue University announced recently that it intends to hire 40 new faculty to “diversify the racial makeup” of its campus. The move is part of the Indiana school’s $75 million Equity Task Force strategy, a five-year project. Purdue’s website lists 14 open positions and explains that the first cluster hire will focus on the fields of “Public Health, Health Policy, and Health Equity.” Andy Sayles, the vice president of Purdue University’s Turning Point USA chapter, told Campus Reform that the amount of money the school is spending on the initiative is “alarming.” Sayles also added that skin color should never be a factor when it comes to hiring. “Skin color shouldn’t matter in the hiring process,” he said. “Whoever is best for the job should be hired, regardless of skin color.” In 2019, according to Journal & Courier, a USA Today affiliate, approximately 3% of both Purdue students and university staff and faculty were African American. Purdue’s Equity Task Force was created in August 2020 by the university’s board of trustees. The board assigned the task force to review the “current state of equity” on campus and...
    The University of Michigan, Michigan State University, New York University, and Georgetown University are mandating that students, faculty, and staff get the COVID-19 booster shot as soon as they are eligible as cases of the coronavirus spike in the north. The University of Michigan announced on Dec. 17 that all students, faculty, and staff will be required to get the booster shot “as one of several enhanced mitigation measures to help reduce the spread of COVID-19,” according to a letter from the school’s Public Affairs office. Robert Ernst, the school’s associate vice president for student life, said that the campus already has a high vaccination rate, unvaccinated students are required to undergo weekly testing, an indoor mask mandate remains in place, and students must undergo contact tracing. The university updated its guidance to include the booster shot and students, regardless of vaccination status, must now wear face coverings in their residence halls. “All students will be expected to wear a face covering, regardless of vaccination status, while in common areas of their residence halls,” the announcement read. “This change will...
                 Michigan State University (MSU) announced on Friday that all students and faculty will be required to receive a coronavirus vaccine booster shot. Beginning in the upcoming spring semester, all individuals must have the additional shot to remain in compliance with the university’s policies, according to an email from MSU President Samuel L. Stanley. “All members of our campus community who were fully vaccinated either with a two-dose regimen more than six months ago or a one-dose regimen more than two months ago are now eligible for a booster and should immediately receive one. Those individuals who are still within the six- or two-month windows (depending on vaccine type) should make plans to receive a booster as soon as they are eligible. Those who fail to receive a booster when eligible will be considered noncompliant with MSU’s vaccine directives,” Stanley wrote the email to students and staff. The additional requirement will be an expansion of the university’s existing vaccine mandate, imposed earlier this year. Individuals who received an exemption during the first mandate will also be exempt from the...
    Louisiana State University (LSU) professor Gerald Myers has been placed on administrative leave after being arrested in connection with multiple charges, which include child pornography, sexual abuse of an animal, and possession of marijuana. Arrest records show that the Louisiana State University Police Department (LSUPD) was contacted by the school’s Agricultural Center saying that its IT department found files on an LSU computer — issued to professor Gerald Myers — that they believed might contain child pornography, reports WAFB. Police allegedly found more than 50 files that appeared pornographic. The university’s IT department said its search indicated an external hard drive was connected to the computer, and that the files were possibly transferred to it. Given that the material can be easily transferred and stored on multiple devices, detectives were able to obtain search warrants for LSU’s Sturgis Hall and Myers’ office, as well as the professor’s house and car for electronic devices that could possibly contain child pornography. Detectives reportedly searched Sturgis Hall on December 10, located Myers, and detained him. While searching the professor’s office, detectives also found an external hard drive, and investigators located...
    New York University (NYU) announced Wednesday that it would take action in response to what it said was a "considerable acceleration in the rate of new [COVID-19] cases" in its community.  In a letter to the NYU community, provost Katherine Fleming, executive vice president Martin Dorph and COVID-19 Prevention & Response Team executive lead Dr. Carlo Ciotoli said the news was a cause for concern, not alarm, as well as a prompt for "appropriate actions."  OMICRON COVID-19 VARIANT: CORNELL, PRINCETON SHIFT TO REMOTE FORMAT "Our foremost priority is the health and well-being of NYU community members. With that as a foundation and guide, our academic priority is to ensure that the academic progress of our students is maintained and crucial end of semester assessments (examinations, papers, etc.) can be smoothly and successfully completed," they wrote.  The group "strongly [encouraged]" that final examinations and assessments be changed to a remote and online format, giving faculty a deadline of Wednesday at 5 p.m. ET to notify students of their plans. "Only those assessments that are fundamentally unsuited to being conducted remotely (i.e....
    A transgender New York University faculty member said in a recent video trans activism is part of an overall effort to bring about a “communist revolution” in America. In a video from May, focused on “trans liberation,” Kay Gabriel, together with Jules Gleeson and Elle O’Rourke, were part of a series called “Rabbles of the World,” which features “talks with radical thinkers and agitators who are pushing the boundaries of revolutionary queer praxis.” Kay Gabriel, faculty member at New York University, asserts that trans activism is part of larger effort to bring about a “Communist Revolution”. “When we demand that society be arranged in certain ways, this is part of the project”. pic.twitter.com/bjZKXagHEy — Mythinformed MKE (@MythinformedMKE) December 15, 2021 Gabriel, a part-time faculty member with New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, is a “poet and essayist,” according to a bio, with some research centered on “trans studies.” Gabriel co-edited We Want It All: An Anthology of Radical Trans Poetics in 2020 with Andrea Abi-Karam, which was nominated for a Lambda Literary and Publishing Triangle award. “Ira” from Spain,...
    EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan State University is awarding $1,500 bonuses to campus employees. The bonuses, which will cost roughly $27 million, will go to regular and temporary faculty, support staff, and graduate students who teach, the Lansing State Journal reported. READ MORE: Michigan Legislature Poised To OK $725M In COVID, Other aid“Together we have faced unprecedented challenges in the wake of a global pandemic,” President Samuel Stanley Jr. said. “As we conclude this semester, I want to offer our deepest gratitude for all you have been doing every single day to advance MSU’s vital mission.” READ MORE: Pictured Rocks To Begin Charging Entrance Fee For The First Time In MarchMSU last month announced 2% raises for non-union faculty and academic staff hired before June 30. Winter break has also been extended by three days. Some faculty members welcomed the latest bonuses but said they don’t replace cuts made earlier during the COVID-19 pandemic. MORE NEWS: USA Gymnastics, USOPC Reach $380M Settlement With Larry Nassar Survivors© 2021 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,...
    Two prominent liberal colleges are set to enforce new mandates for students and faculty regarding COVID-19 booster shots and gatherings outside the classroom.  The George Washington University, in Washington, D.C., will require a COVID-19 vaccination booster dose for all eligible students, faculty and staff in "university-owned or operated facilities" beginning on Feb. 1, 2022, according to the GW COVID-19 dashboard. Those who do not submit documentation by that time will be required to test weekly and complete a questionnaire until they are in compliance with the mandate.  However, students who do not provide evidence of a booster by March 15 will not be eligible to register for the summer or fall semesters. Faculty and staff who have not received a booster shot by that same time will get a "warning message" and further "employment actions" may take place. PRO-CHOICE COLLEGE STUDENTS AVOID 'MY BODY, MY CHOICE' ARGUMENTS FOR VACCINE MANDATES "Good faith" religious and medical exemptions are accepted but must be properly uploaded and documented within the respective faculty or student online portals. Weekly testing will be enforced for those...
    Ten alumni from Howard University, a historically Black university (HBCU), filed a lawsuit on Monday claiming students, alumni and faculty were improperly excluded from the school's Board of Trustees. The group’s case claims that alumni, faculty and student affiliate positions have yet to be reinstated on the governing body while the board made major decisions for the university. The group states that bylaws require a full board to make these decisions, according to The Washington Post.  Specifically, the suit claimed that Howard's board of trustees was in violation of its bylaws when it no longer filled vacant spots on the board in April 2020. The board moved to nix the seats entirely in June and to amend its bylaws to do so in November, the Post added.  The suit said that Howard alumni have been “injured via their disenfranchisement at the highest level of the university’s governance,” the Post reported.  The issue was previously one of the reasons for a 34-day student protest that ended almost a month ago.  Now, the board has worked to "modernize" its operations, Frank Tramble, a spokesperson for the university...
    More than 60 faculty members at USC have signed an open letter urging the university’s leadership to “publicly and explicitly rebuke” a student for several inflammatory comments she made online earlier in the year, including a tweet saying she wanted to “kill every motherf---ing Zionist.” In the Dec. 1 letter addressed to USC President Carol Folt, Provost Charles Zukoski and board of trustees chair Rick Caruso — the latest in a series of letters from several of the same signatories — the faculty asked officials to rebuke Yasmeen Mashayekh, a 21-year-old civil engineering student, and “to distance USC from her hateful statements.” “The silence of our leadership on this matter is alienating, hurtful, and depressing,” the letter read. “It amounts to tacit acceptance of a toxic atmosphere of hatred and hostility.” On Dec. 3, Folt and Zukoski responded with a letter saying that the matter “has disturbed us deeply as we understand very well the hurtful impact of the statements on Twitter that you quoted, not only to those who are Jewish but also to those of us who know...
              moreby Abigail Streetman ’22   A recent FOIA request filed by Campus Reform revealed that the University of Illinois, Chicago (UIC) spent $80,000 on a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion training created by the Kardia Group, LLC. The agreement was signed in 2018 and included two series of meetings and workshops for the Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 semesters. The Kardia Group was founded in 2004 and describes themselves as a “leading strategic partner in the transformation of the culture, functionality, and success of the academic endeavor.” Its website lists resources and services ranging from Diversity, Equity and Inclusion to “transformational change for groups.” According to the contract between UIC and Kardia, the university sent a “proposal to HHMI for an Inclusive Excellence Award” to “build a truly inclusive environment at UIC.” UIC suggested two programs that would “lead to higher inclusion of transfer, first generation, and URM students in the UIC STEM community and provide a framework for systemic and enduring organizational change towards inclusive excellence.” UIC reached out to the Kardia Group in relation to one of their programs and specified that one of...
              more   The University of Florida is launching an internal investigation after a report came out showing a culture of fear, political influence, and pressure to destroy COVID-related research data. Vice President of UF Research David Norton made the announcement last week by email. “UF Research became aware of possible violations of the UF Policy on Research Integrity,” Norton wrote saying the possible violation relates “to the reported destruction of COVID-19 research data at UF.” The allegations were detailed in a Faculty Senate report. The report was originally published after a separate investigation into academic freedom on campus. The university has had to fend off allegations of suppressing professors’ testimonies in a high-profile lawsuit against the state. The Executive Summary of the report provides abbreviated comments regarding the allegations of COVID data destruction. “There were specific challenges reported that were related to research on Covid-19, a topic of study across a wide-range of academic units at the University of Florida. Some examples of challenges reported to the ad hoc committee include external pressure to destroy deidentified data, barriers to accessing...
    GAINESVILLE (CBSMiami/CNN) — The University of Florida has launched a formal investigation after an internal report detailed a culture of fear among faculty members claiming political influence on campus as well as instances of pressure to destroy and delay publication of COVID-19 research data. Vice President of UF Research David Norton announced the investigation in an email to faculty and staff Friday morning, according to the university. The email indicates the results of the investigation will be made public upon completion, but did not give a timeline. READ MORE: South Florida Philanthropist Michael Capponi In Kentucky Helping With Tornado Relief Efforts“UF Research became aware of possible violations of the UF Policy on Research Integrity,” Norton wrote in an email, saying the possible violation relates “to the reported destruction of COVID-19 research data at UF.” Asked if the university was aware of actual destruction of data, the school said the investigation would be looking into that. The allegations were detailed in the Faculty Senate report, released Monday. The committee did not name specific individuals, in order to protect the jobs of...
    (CNN)A formal investigation has been launched by the University of Florida after an internal report detailed a culture of fear among faculty members claiming political influence on campus as well as instances of Covid-19 research data being destroyed and delayed.Vice President of UF Research David Norton announced the investigation in an email to faculty and staff Friday morning, according to the university. The email indicates the results of the investigation will be made public upon completion, but did not give a timeline.The allegations were detailed in the Faculty Senate report, released Monday. The committee did not name specific individuals, in order to protect the jobs of faculty members, Dr. Danaya Wright, a professor at the University of Florida and one of six authors listed on the report told CNN."I don't know that we need a smoking gun, in particular, to say that this is coming from state government, governmental entities," Wright said.Read MoreThe report identifies challenges in the partnership with the State of Florida, with which the university worked jointly on Covid-19 research. University of Florida reverses decision, will allow...
    Researchers at the University of Florida allegedly felt pressured to delete COVID-19 data while working on a study for an undisclosed state entity, according to a report released on Monday by the Faculty Senate committee.  The report stated that staff felt "external pressure to destroy" data, and "barriers to accessing and analyzing" data in a timely manner. The document added that staff said there were "barriers to publication of scientific research which inhibited the ability of faculty to contribute scientific findings during a world-wide pandemic." Other challenges reported to the committee included "palpable reticence and even fear on the part of faculty to speak up on these issues." In addition, faculty "often engaged in self-censorship and chose not to 'rock the boat' for fear of retaliation," according to the report.  University of Florida employees were reportedly told "not to criticize the Governor of Florida [Republican Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisMore voters would pick Trump over Biden if election were held today: poll 17 Democratic state AGs back challenge to Florida voting limits The Memo: Media obsess over Trump's past as he eyes comeback MORE] or UF policies related to COVID-19 in...
    A professor's remarks on women in the workplace drew ire from students, faculties, and local politicians. Hundred of protesters demonstrated at Boise State University on Dec. 4 in protest of a professor who argued that universities should prioritize men over women in fields such as engineering, medicine, and law. "Every effort made must be made not to recruit women into engineering, but rather to recruit and demand more of men who become engineers," said Boise State political science professor Scott Yenor at the National Conservatism Conference on Oct. 31. "Ditto for med school, and the law, and every trade." IOWA TO PAY NEARLY $2 MILLION FOR CHR I STIAN STUDENT GROUPS IN RELIGIOUS LIBERTY CASES Yenor's remarks and the accompanying protest earned the ire of many students and faculty, who organized a rally on Dec. 4 to protest Yenor's comments. #MeddlesomeWomen a thread. .@BoiseBrooke and .@Walton_Emily did something big with all of you! Thank you for coming out and supporting women at #BSU and in all of Idaho! #idpol pic.twitter.com/jFlWGPWnXw— theidaho97 (@theidaho97) December 4,...
    A Missouri public school district — that is currently being sued by the state — forced its faculty to complete an “antiracist solo write” activity during a diversity training that attempted to explain the “complex issues of systemic racism and xenophobia” “and how we should address it in our school system.” A lawsuit filed by the Attorney General confirmed that the training was mandatory for faculty. Springfield Public Schools (SPS) issued a district-wide equity training in the fall of 2021. The district’s spokesperson is on vacation and was unable to confirm what month the training took place. A PowerPoint of the training, obtained by Parents Defending Education, uncovered that the district’s diversity office promised that staff would “learn about oppression, white supremacy, and systemic racism.” Staff were also asked to reflect on social issues such as COVID-19 and “protests against systemic racism towards the black community.” Educators received tools on “how to become Anti-Racist educators, leaders and staff members.” The training began with a “land acknowledgment” and included a “reflection video” on the death of George Floyd, whose death led...
              moreby Martin Catino   The 2021-2022 academic college year is nearing completion. Students have quickly forgotten the early apprehensions associated with dorm and housing arrangements, parking permits, class scheduling, and connecting and reconnecting with peers on campus. Winter break has nearly arrived on campus. But college students across the United States should not forget that Antifa will not be taking a winter break. Their agenda continues to oppose college students seeking knowledge and skill acquisition, job market competitiveness, and related material and social benefits critically important to the “pursuit of happiness.” These self-professed “anti-Fascists” have planned to do much more than just continue normal operations. In fact, through publications like CrimethInc (formerly Inside Front) Antifa has boldly asserted that violence, subversion, demoralization, and corruption will be their primary objectives for the academic year. Empowered by increased funds, new recruits, tactical experience, optimism created by victories won in battles on and off college grounds, and a permissive environment created by an increasingly politicized and defanged police force, these radical socialists are now calling for nothing less than a total undermining of the college system...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Tomorrow is a deadline day for Pitt students, faculty, and staff on all campuses. READ MORE: Part Of Fifth Avenue Shuts Down As Film Crews Work On 'Rustin'It is the day they all must provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or provide an approved exemption. READ MORE: Former Pa. Lawmaker Pleads Guilty To Double-Dipping ReimbursementsIn the fall, the university advised everyone to get vaccinated and comply with the guidance. MORE NEWS: Fire Marshal Investigating Cause Of House Fire In Upper HillAs of the last report from the university, at least 93 percent of students, staff, and faculty have submitted their status.