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    Christian Pulisic has been on a roller coaster. America's top player won the Champions League, then was sidelined for nearly two months. He battled for inclusion in Chelsea's lineup and been shifted from his usual wide midfield role to center forward and even wingback. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "It’s been up and down this year, for sure," he said ahead of the United States' frosty World Cup qualifier against El Salvador on Thursday night. "Not exactly where I want to be and how I want things to be right now. But, yeah, I’m just going to keep going." Wearing long trousers and gloves, a few topped by ski hats, U.S. players practiced Wednesday in 10 degree weather (minus-12 Celsius), a contrast to the 72 degrees (22) in San Salvador for the opening 0-0 draw on Sept. 2. They face three games in an eight-day span, two of them at home, and with two wins would move into commanding position to clinch a berth during the final three qualifiers in March. Canada leads North and Central America...
    KENNESAW, Ga. (AP) — Demond Robinson had 16 points to lead five Kennesaw State players in double figures as the Owls topped Jacksonville 76-68 on Monday night. Terrell Burden added 14 points, Jamir Moultrie chipped in 13, Spencer Rodgers scored 11 and Isaiah Reddish had 10 for Kennesaw State (9-9, 4-1 Atlantic Sun). Mike Marsh had 17 points for the Dolphins. Kevion Nolan added 12 points, nine assists and six rebounds, and Osayi Osifo had 12 points and eight rebounds. ___ For more AP college basketball coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/college-basketball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ This was generated by Automated Insights, http://www.automatedinsights.com/ap, using data from STATS LLC, https://www.stats.com Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    ATLANTA (AP) — A 6-month-old baby was fatally shot Monday while riding in a car in Atlanta, authorities said. The shooting happened near a convenience store and a school in northwest Atlanta, news outlets reported. The child’s mother told WSB-TV that she was driving when she came upon a gunfight between people in two cars. She said a bullet traveled into the back of her car and hit the baby. The child was pronounced dead at Grady Memorial Hospital, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. There was no immediate word on arrests. Police Chief Rodney Bryant did not provide details at the scene but said the mother was “riding down the street and became a victim to gun violence,” the newspaper reported. Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens, who went to the scene, remarked that “children are bearing the burden and the pain of adults who are choosing to use guns to solve disputes,” the Journal-Constitution reported. “The children are bearing this burden with their lives and I’m here to ask and demand that it stop right now,” he said. ...
    On Thursday’s broadcast of ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Vice President Kamala Harris said that “you would probably not be surprised to know how many people in the midst of the everyday burden of life are unaware of what’s happening” on voting laws. Harris said, “There is work that we will continue to do that is about convening folks around the country to uplift the message and to include what we need to do to expand the ability of all Americans to understand what’s at stake. Because, George, I’ll tell you, and that’s why I’m glad we’re having this conversation, you would probably not be surprised to know how many people in the midst of the everyday burden of life are unaware of what’s happening. And so, part of our mission is to ensure that folks know what is happening to their neighbor, what is happening in their neighboring states, and ultimately, what will contribute to a weakening of our democracy.” Follow Ian Hanchett on Twitter @IanHanchett
                 Michigan Senator Wayne Schmidt (R-Traverse City) on Wednesday introduced a bill with the goal of easing the financial burden placed on first responders throughout the state. Senate Bill 821 amends a current law to allow local governments to purchase real or personal property, like fire trucks or ambulances, under an installment purchase agreement. Currently, the organizations can sign lease agreements that potentially include the option to purchase a vehicle at the end of the agreement. Schmidt contends this method is costly and ineffective. “Townships, villages, and cities finance fire trucks, ambulances, land and other acquisitions through installment purchase agreements,” said the state lawmaker. “However, emergency authorities are not able to use these types of agreements and are often saddled into a deal that is not as cost-effective or beneficial to the purchasing authority.” The measure, which was referred to the Senate Committee on Local Government, will need to be approved by both chambers of the legislature and Governor Gretchen Whitmer. Roy Griffitts, president of the Lake Charlevoix Emergency Medical Services Authority board of directors, praised the new legislation,...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker announced a new COVID testing plan for schools. But some parents believe the plan will only place more of a burden on families. Starting this week, schools can sign up to get at-home rapid antigen tests. The tests will be distributed weekly to students and staff in participating districts. “The new program that the governor announced yesterday that districts will have the option to choose between these different scattered approaches, all of which seem to be designed to place more responsibilities on families that are already struggling to keep up with public health information,” Cara Berg Powers, interim executive director of Massachusetts Education Justice Alliance, said during a virtual press conference on Wednesday. The group said it wants an in-school vaccination program for every school with a vaccination rate under the statewide average of 75%. It also wants the state to distribute high-quality masks to every school district that requests them.
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Navient, a large student loan servicer, has settled allegations of predatory lending practices for $1.85 billion, Pennsylvania’s attorney general announced Thursday. The settlement includes $1.7 billion in debt cancellation and $95 million in restitution, state Attorney General Josh Shapiro said in a news release. Today I’m here to announce Navient has taken accountability for their actions. And will pay. PA borrowers will receive over $70 million in life changing relief. — AG Josh Shapiro (@PAAttorneyGen) January 13, 2022 READ MORE: LISTEN: 'Everybody Is Conscious': 911 Call Gives Glimpse Into Terrifying Moments After Drexel Hill Medical Helicopter Crash“Navient repeatedly and deliberately put profits ahead of its borrowers – it engaged in deceptive and abusive practices, targeted students who it knew would struggle to pay loans back, and placed an unfair burden on people trying to improve their lives through education,” Shapiro said in the release. The settlement involves 39 state attorneys general and resolves claims that Navient led student borrowers into long-term forbearances instead of giving them advice on less costly repayment plans, Shapiro said. READ MORE:...
    Navient, a large student loan servicer, has settled allegations of predatory lending practices for $1.85 billion, Pennsylvania’s attorney general announced Thursday. The settlement includes $1.7 billion in debt cancellation and $95 million in restitution, state Attorney General Josh Shapiro said in a news release. “Navient repeatedly and deliberately put profits ahead of its borrowers – it engaged in deceptive and abusive practices, targeted students who it knew would struggle to pay loans back, and placed an unfair burden on people trying to improve their lives through education,” Shapiro said in the release. The settlement involves 39 state attorneys general and resolves claims that Navient led student borrowers into long-term forbearances instead of giving them advice on less costly repayment plans, Shapiro said. Navient said it did not act illegally, and it did not admit any fault in the settlement, The New York Times reported. “The company’s decision to resolve these matters, which were based on unfounded claims, allows us to avoid the additional burden, expense, time and distraction to prevail in court,” Mark Heleen, Navient’s chief legal officer said, according...
    An Albany judge dismissed a criminal groping charge against former New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (D) on Friday afternoon. Brittany Commisso, a former aid to Cuomo, alleged that he groped her in the Executive Mansion in 2020. Commisso is one of eleven women who brought forward allegations of sexual harassment against Cuomo. However, her allegations are unique in that they are the first to result in a criminal charge against the former governor. Last month, district attorneys in Nassau and Westchester counties declined to prosecute Cuomo over allegations found in New York Attorney General Letitia James’s report on Cuomo’s alleged sexual harassment. However, the federal government is reportedly looking into the allegations against Cuomo. Cuomo resigned from office last August after the findings of James’ report were published. Albany City Court Judge Holly Trexle dismissed and sealed the case against Cuomo. Trexle’s decision comes days after Albany County District Attorney David Soares said Commisso’s allegations against Cuomo were “credible,” but would not meet the requisite burden of proof at trial. “While we found the complainant in this case cooperative and credible, after review of all the available evidence we have...
    When Sidney Poitier became the first African-American man to win an Academy Award – Best Actor in 1963's Lilies Of The Field – Anne Bancroft presented him with his Oscar and a congratulatory kiss on the cheek. For some horrified Americans, it was an unforgivable display of interracial contact in a country in which segregation remained rife. For others it was a long overdue historic moment that the actor acknowledged in a short and modest acceptance speech in which he thanked others for the 'long journey to this moment'. Before Poitier, black actors had had to be content with merely supporting roles – entertainers and servants – that were easy to edit out for versions shown in parts of the country that didn't want to see black faces on screen. But Poitier was the first black leading man, a matinee idol, and usually the reason a film had been made in the first place. He played intelligent, quietly-spoken professional men – doctors, teacher and detectives – and after Poitier, Hollywood was never the same again. The pioneering star, who has...
    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin’s state tax burden increased slightly last year for the first time in a decade due largely to a pandemic-related economic surge, according to a report released Wednesday. The nonpartisan Wisconsin Policy Forum’s study found total state and local taxes in Wisconsin grew to $34 billion last year, up 7.1% from 2020. Overall, combined state and local taxes rose to 10.5% of income in Wisconsin last year, up from 10.3% in 2020. The 2021 burden was still the fourth-lowest in Wisconsin Policy Forum records dating back to 1990. Revenue from the state individual income tax rose 6.2% to $9.3 billion in 2021. Revenue from the state sales tax jumped 9.2% to $6.4 billion, the largest year-over-year increase since 1983. Corporate franchise and income tax revenue grew almost 60% to $2.6 billion, the biggest jump since 1961, according to Wisconsin Policy Forum archive data. The report attributed the increase not to higher taxes but to a surge of pandemic-related economic activity, including the influx of federal stimulus dollars. The report also noted the growth is linked to...
    Disgraced former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo will not be prosecuted on a misdemeanor sexual harassment charge for forcibly touching an assistant, Brittany Commisso, during a 2020 interaction at the Executive Mansion in Albany. In a statement on Tuesday, Albany County District Attorney David Soares said, “While many have an opinion regarding the allegations against the former Governor, the Albany County DA’s Office is the only one who has a burden to prove the elements of a crime beyond a reasonable doubt. While we found the complainant in this case cooperative and credible, after review of all the available evidence we have concluded that we cannot meet our burden at trial. As such we have notified the Court that we are declining to prosecute this matter and requesting the charges filed by the Albany County Sheriff be dismissed.” Soares noted that he, “like most New Yorkers,” is “deeply troubled by allegations like the ones at issue here.” “Such conduct has no place in government or in any workplace,” Soares’ statement went on. “Although avenues for criminal prosecution in these cases...
    Getty The Lakers are interested in trading for Ben Simmons. A previous report claiming Ben Simmons was going broke was never proven true. It seems unfathomable to think that a guy earning $33 million this season could be in the poor house. However, Simmons has lost a lot of money due to his unwillingness to suit up for the Philadelphia 76ers. The disgruntled All-Star point guard – a player who may have legitimate mental health issues – has already been fined $10.3 million, according to Spotrac. The Sixers have been docking him a full $360,305 game check for every contest missed. Simmons was excused for roughly six games after he showed up to practice and tried to re-acclimate himself. That didn’t work out. Simmons wants to be traded, but the team who drafted him No. 1 overall in 2016 doesn’t want to let him go. The Sixers’ asking price remains insanely high and a lack of appealing offers has caused a stalemate. The NBA trading deadline is rapidly approaching on February 10 so expect things to heat...
    LITTLE People, Big World alum Jacob Roloff celebrated feeling “free of burden” after sharing his “experience with child sex abuse.” The 24-year-old opened up about his recent feelings of freedom one year after revealing the experience. 5Jacob celebrated feeling 'free of burden' after coming forward with his experience of 'child sex abuse'Credit: isabelsofiarock/Instagram 5He came forward with the allegations last DecemberCredit: Instagram/jacobroloff45 While taking to Instagram on Tuesday, Jacob shared a throwback photo of himself as a baby taken in April 1997. The Little People, Big World alum looked adorable in a baseball cap and overalls as he rested on his stomach on a blanket outdoors. He reflected on coming forward with his experience of child sex abuse in the caption, writing: “1 year and 11 days ago I posted my statement about my experience with CSA. “I said, ‘I am certain that this is a positive moment for me, and another step toward a brighter future.’ “I’m happy to say that I meant it!” Jacob continued: “I felt so free of a useless burden, felt so much closer to...
    Virginia’s two U.S. Senators have told the state Supreme Court that it will make the state’s three congresswomen shoulder the burden of redistricting. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported Friday that Democratic Senators Mark Warner and Tim Kaine shared their thoughts in a letter to the court. Virginia’s three Democratic congresswomen are Abigail Spanberger in the 7th District, Elaine Luria in the 2nd District and Jennifer Wexton in the the 10th District. The senators said the court’s proposed map for Virginia’s 11 congressional districts makes significant changes to the areas the women represent. For instance, Spanberger’s 7th District would be moved from its base outside Richmond to northern Virginia. Luria would be drawn out of her 2nd District on the coast. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Former North Jersey communications dispatcher and beloved father of three Robert Yeager died of COVID-19 complications at St. Claire’s Hospital on Dec. 22. He was 38. Born and raised in Chester, Yeager previously worked as a corrections officer for the Morris County Sheriff's Office and later as a communications dispatcher, according to a GoFundMe launched for his family. Yeager had most recently lived in Byram and worked for the township’s school district while pursuing his lifelong passion of photography, according to the campaign, which had raised more than $35,500 in less than 24 hours. Yeager was also known for his role as a devoted father to three girls, Caleigh, Shannon and Molly, as well as a loving husband to his wife, Erin, who are home battling COVID-19 themselves. Meanwhile, Erin was heartbreakingly notified that she will lose her job as a nurse in February, the GoFundMe says. “This along with the sudden passing of her husband Robert, will cause a tremendous financial burden on her and their three girls moving forward,” reads the campaign, launched by Morris County Corrections PBA...
    A local news team is helping an anonymous man give $1 million to deserving residents in Idaho, one of them being the Gast family. In November, Jason celebrated his eight-year anniversary of undergoing a heart transplant, but went to the hospital when he did not feel good for a few days, East Idaho News reported Friday. He was later transported by ambulance to the University of Utah to meet with doctors. Following multiple tests, Jason was placed back on the transplant list because his heart was not working anymore, which meant a long journey for their family. His wife, whose name is Jill, cares for their four children and keeps everyone together without asking for assistance. Meanwhile, the Gast’s received a rent increase and Jason’s health is uncertain. Jill is also employed part-time doing transcription to make extra money. The outlet’s Nate Eaton recently surprised the couple with a check for $2,000 to help with gas, $3,000 for groceries, and said the Secret Santa wanted to pay the family’s rent for the next six months. Inflation will cost families an...
    by Ashton Lattimore This article was originally published at Prism  Pregnancy is right up there with aging on the list of human experiences that will permanently change a person’s body. Scars and complications from C-section surgery, lasting pain and sexual dysfunction after some vaginal births, urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor problems, separation of the abdominal muscles, lingering high blood pressure, increased risk of heart problems, and more can await those who experience pregnancy and childbirth, to say nothing of the more “cosmetic” but no less lasting changes in bone structure, breast shape, and even shoe size. And that’s just for those of us who survive. For far too many pregnant people in the U.S., especially Black women and other women of color, carrying a fetus to term results in the most permanent and final body change of all: death. The U.S. maternal mortality rate is more than double that of most other high-income countries, and has been on the rise since 2000. Black women in the U.S. are at the highest risk, being three to four times...
    A 30-year-old woman who died in a crash in the region is being remembered as a dedicated EMT and mother.  Erica Vilaca was killed in the rollover crash in the Sullivan County town of Neversink on Sunday, Dec. 5, New York State Police reported. Earlier report - 30-Year-Old Woman Killed In Rollover Crash In Region Vilaca was a resident of the hamlet Grahamsville in Sullivan County and she worked as an EMT with Mobilemedic EMS, according to her obituary. Vilaca previously volunteered with the Island Park Fire Department. According to her obituary, she had recently begun working a second job at the Ellenville Hospital. A GoFundMe created by Vilaca's friend to raise money for Vilaca's daughter, Avery, describes Vilaca as "an absolute amazing mother, daughter, outstanding NYS EMT and the best friend anyone can ever ask for." As of Wednesday morning, Dec. 8, the GoFundMe has reached more than $4,300, with a goal of raising $25,000 for Avery's education. "Erica, as a single mother; let us lessen this burden her family will have to face, as she lessened the burden of so many...
    A 30-year-old woman who died in a crash in the region is being remembered as a dedicated EMT and mother.  Erica Vilaca was killed in the rollover crash in the Sullivan County town of Neversink on Sunday, Dec. 5, New York State Police reported. Earlier report - 30-Year-Old Woman Killed In Rollover Crash In Region Vilaca was a resident of the hamlet Grahamsville in Sullivan County and she worked as an EMT with Mobilemedic EMS, according to her obituary. Vilaca previously volunteered with the Island Park Fire Department. According to her obituary, she had recently begun working a second job at the Ellenville Hospital. A GoFundMe created by Vilaca's friend to raise money for Vilaca's daughter, Avery, describes Vilaca as "an absolute amazing mother, daughter, outstanding NYS EMT and the best friend anyone can ever ask for." As of Wednesday morning, Dec. 8, the GoFundMe has reached more than $4,300, with a goal of raising $25,000 for Avery's education. "Erica, as a single mother; let us lessen this burden her family will have to face, as she lessened the burden of so many...
              more   Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed official guest host and Americans for Prosperity-Tennessee Grassroots Engagement Director Grant Henry in the studio for another edition of Grant’s Rants. Henry continued… On occasion, you will hear me speak on behalf of a particular organization in this program. This is not one of those days. This is completely my opinion. And I’ll tell you all right now, for the first time in 30 years, the future of abortion in America will face its most consequential test when Supreme Court convenes tomorrow to hear a high stakes showdown taking aim in nearly five decades worth of precedent. Here’s the CBS headline. I’m sure you’ll hear more about it. Supreme Court Prepares to Hear Biggest Abortion Fight in Decades. So for several decades, Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood vs. Casey has been the precedent that our Supreme Court turns to in regards to abortion in...
    For months much of the media downplayed the effects of inflation and the supply chain crisis, with some even calling the economic hardship "good" for Americans despite it being an expensive burden on families this holiday season. Most recently, Yahoo Finance wrote, "Maybe Christmas Shortages are a Gift." In his piece, senior columnist Rick Newman advocated for "partial Christmas" - not just in the current rocky climate, but for years to come. "Save money, time and aggravation by exploiting the pandemic shortages to slash your shopping burden," he wrote. "Collusion is illegal in business—but not in parenting," he later said. "So coax as many of your fellow parents into the scheme as you can. It’s a solid pitch: Save money, time and aggravation by exploiting the pandemic shortages to slash your shopping burden. Maybe you’ll actually enjoy the holidays for once. Use the money you save to buy something nice for yourself. If you’re nervous, keep some cash on hand for day-after clearance sales." "Maybe Partial Christmas is more like real Christmas than the Excessive version," he concluded. "Gutsy parents...
    President Biden's Department of Education has proposed rolling back reporting data on the number of alleged sexual assaults and rapes in schools.  The department's Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has proposed new rules to 'retire' data sets, and the proposal is now up for a 60-day period of public comment.    In order to 'reduce the reporting burden,' last week the OCR proposed eliminating accusations of rape or sexual assault. The OCR will still ask schools to submit data on the number of documented incidents of rape or sexual assault within their school system.     However, they will not be asked to report the number of accusations of sexual assault or rape, either student-to-student or staff-to-student, that resulted in resignation or retirement of the accused, or such allegations that resulted in a teacher's reassignment to another school district.    President Biden's Department of Education has proposed rolling back reporting data on the number of alleged sexual assaults and rapes in schools Public schools' mishandling of sexual assault was launched into the spotlight when parents alleged that a school district in Loudoun County, Virginia...
    NEW BOSTON — After 14 years of serving on the Village of New Boston Council, Councilperson Jon Mills has resigned from the village of New Boston Council. During a Village of New Boston Council Meeting Tuesday, Nov. 16, Mills announced his retirement effective directly after the meeting, citing personal financial debt. Mills shared with the council after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) a few years ago and losing his income from a teaching position, he developed a financial burden. “When I first ran and won this position, I ran on one thing and that was to run on biblical principles,” Mills said to the council. “When I was outback cutting my grass today, I was praying and It just came to me, the commandment ‘Thou shall not bare false witness.’” Mills shared with the council he had a financial burden he needed to take care of and that the only thing he had left that he could tap into was the Public Employee Retirement System (PERS.) “As you all know, you can’t be a public employee and tap into...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — In just two days, we’ll present our 12th annual Ronald McDonald House Charities telethon. We call it Give A Little Love, and we’ll be raising money to help the four Ronald McDonald Houses in our area. Kate Bilo has the story of a family who has stayed at the Ronald McDonald House off and on for almost 20 years. READ MORE: Cash-Checking Store Owner Shot, Killed During Robbery In Philadelphia's Ogontz Section, Police SayWhen families come to the Ronald McDonald House, the child is not the only one who receives care. Mom, dad, siblings — they’re all treated with kindness, understanding and peace of mind. One couple is so very thankful for the Ronald McDonald House and the love they feel every time they enter its doors. “Honestly, there is no amount of gratitude that could cover it,” Wayne Davidovich said. Wayne and Wendy Davidovich are so thankful for the Ronald McDonald House of Philadelphia. They’ve been staying at Ronald McDonald Houses for more than 18 years, ever since they found out their daughter had spina bifida....
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Voters are deciding important city and school elections all across the area, but it’s Minneapolis that’s in the national spotlight this Election Day. It was in Minneapolis where riots and unrest followed the murder of George Floyd by former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who has since been convicted in Floyd’s death. Ten days after the incident, nine Minneapolis City Council members stood on a stage supporting the defunding of the police. READ MORE: Minneapolis Voters Feel 'A Bigger Burden' On Election Day 2021All tolled, 1,500 businesses were destroyed in the riots. By one estimate, only 21% are back. Business owners and workers along Lake Street WCCO spoke with all said they’re against the ballot question to remove the MPD requirement in the city’s charter. Tuesday’s vote on that very question is being watched across the country. The amendment passing would serve as a model for other progressive cities and be a big talking point for Republicans. If it doesn’t pass, it would be a major blow in one of the most liberal and progressive cities in...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Voters across Minnesota Tuesday are electing city officials, sometimes deciding school levies and weighing in on controversial questions. Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon said everything is “so far, so good” on Election Day. “I think there’s a pretty brisk traffic,” he said. “All the ingredients are there for a higher than normal turnout. We’ll see. There’s a lot of passion, there’s a lot of energy. And the election judges report that they’re sort of surprised with the morning traffic so far.” MORE: WCCO’s Full 2021 Election Coverage Voters in Minneapolis woke up early to get to the polls when they opened at 7 a.m. The race for mayor is what many have their eyes on this election. Seventeen candidates are running, including incumbent Mayor Jacob Frey. Besides the mayoral race, the amendment over the future of policing is getting a lot of attention. Voters will decide to keep the Minneapolis Police Department intact or reimagine it as a Department of Public Safety with mental health experts and social workers on staff. This is an issue...
    (CNN)After battling Covid-19 for almost a month and being released from Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, Richard Soliz returned to the hospital in late October. But it was not for medical treatment -- it was to apologize.Soliz, a graphic artist who had not received a Covid-19 vaccine, spent 28 days on a ventilator and heart monitor at the hospital in late August and much of September."I am certain that there is truth to this virus, and not being vaccinated leaves you vulnerable to the extent of possibly really taking a person's life," Soliz said. "I personally know that, because I was not vaccinated. I did not act, I wasn't certain, and I nearly lost my life."Soliz told CNN that he struggled to breathe and felt as though he could have died at any moment. But he wanted to say sorry to those who cared for him, thanking everyone he saw at the facility who played a role in saving his life.Meet the Florida coach who fought hard to beat Covid and now has a message for anyone who hasnt gotten...
                     
    A Trump-appointed federal judge has rejected a request from two Capitol insurrectionists to be sentenced via video, as Reuters reporter Jan Wolfe notes that the two had claimed traveling to Washington, D.C. would represent a "financial burden." "Defendants found the means to travel to Washington, D.C. to commit the crime to which they have pled guilty," U.S. District Judge Trevor McFadden wrote in his order Thursday. "Defendants can therefore find the means to return to Washington, D.C. to be held accountable for this crime." McFadden was nominated by former Donald Trump to serve on the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in 2017. Politico reporter Kyle Cheney observed that McFadden "has been comparatively less hostile toward 1/6 defendants than other federal judges in DC," adding that Thursday's order was a "notable rejoinder." The two Capitol rioters who asked to be sentenced via video are Rachel Lynn Pert and Dana Joe Winn, a couple from Middleburg, Florida, who pleaded guilty earlier this month to one misdemeanor count each of entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds. The...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Drive through almost any part the Bay Area, and you'll eventually pass from tree-lined streets to grittier cement-heavy neighborhoods with far less tree canopy. A so called green divide that's often visible in lower income areas with a higher percentage of people of color. But now, a new study is suggesting the consequences could also be a measurable health risk."What we found was that even once you account for the sort of demographic differences in in between low income and disadvantaged communities, and to more white and high income communities, there was still a relationship between nature and COVID outcomes," says Erica Spotswood, Ph.D., of the San Francisco Estuary Institute.RELATED: Poll finds minority business owners most negatively impacted by pandemic in CaliforniaSpotswood is a lead scientist at the institute. Along with colleague Rob McDonald of The Nature Conservancy, she compared data from 17 states that track COVID infections by zip code. They found that statistically neighborhoods with predominantly people of color typically had both less access to green space and higher infection rates. But to better...
    NBC News political director Chuck Todd railed against President Biden and White House amid the Democrat infighting over the two trillion-dollar spending bills being debated on Capitol Hill.  On "Sunday Today," host Willie Geist listed President Biden's stalled agenda in Congress from the failure to pass a voting bill and police reform along with the bipartisan infrastructure bill and the giant social spending bill being pushed by progressive lawmakers, asking Todd "when does this get done?" "President Biden has to get more involved," Todd responded. "The only one that's made any progress is the bipartisan infrastructure deal. Why did that make progress? Well, the White House ran the negotiations here." NBC'S CHUCK TODD SUGGESTS TRUMP IS TO BLAME FOR THE MEDIA NOT PUTTING A ‘SPOTLIGHT’ ON DEM ‘PROBLEMS’ The "Meet the Press" moderator recalled seeing a report about the White House "getting frustrated with Congress" and how "I'm sitting here going, ‘Well, you guys can do something about it!'" "At the end of the day, the power of the presidency is you're the leader of the party and you're also...
    LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization recommended Wednesday that the world’s first malaria vaccine should be given to children across Africa, in a move officials hope will spur stalled efforts to curb the spread of the parasitic disease. Following a meeting of the United Nations health agency’s vaccine advisory group, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus spoke of “a historic moment.” “Today’s recommendation offers a glimmer of hope for the continent which shoulders the heaviest burden of the disease and we expect many more African children to be protected from malaria and grow into healthy adults,” said Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, the WHO’s Africa director. The WHO said its decision was based on results from ongoing research in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi that has tracked more than 800,000 children since 2019. The malaria vaccine known as Mosquirix was developed by GlaxoSmithKline in 1987. While it’s the first to be authorized, it is only about 30% effective, requires up to four doses, and protection fades after just months. Still, given the extremely high burden of malaria in Africa — where the...
    A previous version of this article stated "increasing global temperatures now saves 166,000 lives each year" and cited a new study in The Lancet as proof of the claim. Facebook fact checkers have stated that this statement is false and cited two co-authors of the study who have explained that the study was not designed to test the influence of climate change on heat or cold-related deaths, hence the 166k figure is unsupported. 1Credit: Getty - Contributor This is the full response from second author, Professor Yuming Guo: Yuming Guo, Professor at School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University Cold-related mortality decreased and heat-related mortality increased from 2000 to 2019, causing a net decrease in total deaths. However, it is not correct to interpret that this net decrease was caused by climate change. We just estimated the trend of mortality burden related to non-optimal temperatures, but did not do further analysis to examine whether this change is due to climate change or other factors. To calculate the burden related to non-optimal temperatures, we need the following information: Temperature-mortality association (exposure-response relationship) at each location,...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Minneapolis begins testing a new strategy Monday to help lessen the load for police. Officers will no longer respond to overnight parking problems during the week. A new shift of Traffic Control staff is being added from 11 p.m. to 7:30 a.m., in addition to the regular daytime hours. Among its responsibilities, Traffic Control directs traffic, enforces parking and helps with road closures for construction or special events. They also respond to parking complaints like blocked driveways or alleys, obstructed bike lanes, fire lanes or crosswalks, as well as handicap parking violations. At about 6 p.m., police take over some of those calls, then all of those calls during the overnight. The new shift is supposed to alleviate that burden. (credit: CBS) Traffic Control staff are unarmed but not untrained, says Saray Garnett-Hochuli, Minneapolis’s interim director for regulatory services. “They go through weeks of training how to direct traffic. They have to understand code and ordinance and violations,” Garnett-Hochuli said. “They are pretty incredible individuals that are out working in the city in all weather.” Garnett-Hochuli says...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4)– Long hours and high stress are causing a surge in mental illness and suicides among federal wildland firefighters. They’re leaving the job in record numbers amid escalating fires that are increasingly putting their lives at risk, pulling them away from families for months on end, and leaving them with trauma that often goes untreated. (credit: CBS) READ MORE: Janitors At Denver International Airport To Return To Work Saturday Morning As Union Negotiations Resume Next WeekThe suicide rate among federal wildland firefighters is 30 times that of the general population. Kate Dillon was among those who reached a breaking point. Last year, after working three major wildfires over four months in Colorado, she walked away from a profession she loved. “I was experiencing some real mental health struggles with the hours of the job and the stress of the job,” said Dillon. Last year was the worst fire season ever and it came during a pandemic. Fourteen-hour days of risking their lives on a job that doesn’t pay a living wage took a...
                      by Justin Begley  As congressional Democrats push a $3.5 trillion social spending package, everyone is wondering: “How are we going to pay for that?” To President Joe Biden, the answer is simple: raise taxes. Included in Biden’s proposed tax plans — erroneously named the American Families Plan — are hikes in personal income tax and capital gains tax rates. The plan would raise the top marginal income tax rate from 37 percent to 39.6 percent and reclassify long-term capital gains and qualified dividends as ordinary income for those with taxable income above $1 million, resulting in a top marginal tax rate of 43.4 percent, according to the Tax Foundation. Despite the frustration (or excitement) that Americans have towards Biden’s income and wealth tax proposals in the midst of an economic recovery, Americans should be paying closer attention to his other proposals, the American Jobs Plan and the Made in America Tax Plan. Should these tax plans pass when sent to the House and Senate, corporations would be taxed at a rate of 28 percent rather...
    The 'sandwich generation' is overwhelmed caring for both their children and parents simultaneously. During a scheduled c-section to have my second child in 2019, I got a surprise phone call: the home caregiver we scheduled for my father with dementia was not available. The timing could not have been worse, but scrambling to find care for my dad had become an everyday event. People like me, in the so-called "sandwich generation" are raising our children and simultaneously caring for our aging parents. My dad was diagnosed with dementia in June of 2015. He had to stop working, his car keys had to be taken away, and couldn't be home by himself for long periods. I moved in with him, along with my husband and our firstborn. I was about to return to full time work from maternity leave, and figured that we could find a home caregiver for my dad during the hours we worked. It wasn't that simple. Home care is severely underfunded and understaffed, in large part because...
    Democrats are looking for ways to pay for their $3.5 trillion spending plan, including raising corporate taxes. President Joe Biden’s original plan was to increase the corporate tax rate to 28 percent, up from 21 percent, though the figure has been revised slightly lower to 26.5 percent. The proposed rate is higher than Communist China’s corporate tax rate for perspective and would reportedly be the largest tax increase since 1968  “compared to the size of the economy and the largest tax increase ever in nominal dollars,” Americans for Tax Reform reported. According to the advocacy group: This tax increase will be passed along to working families in the form of higher prices, fewer jobs, and lower wages. This will give the U.S. a combined state-federal rate of 30.9 percent, higher than our foreign competitors including China, which has a 25 percent corporate tax rate, and Europe which has an average rate of 21.7 percent. Studies from a variety of sources have shown how increased corporate taxes directly fall onto laborers. On Tuesday, the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) confirmed that corporate tax...
    Conservative Christian radio host and former pastor of Denver Bible Church Bob Enyart died on Monday aged 62 after contracting Covid on September 1. Enyart was a staunch opponent of the Coronavirus vaccines and restrictions such as mask mandates, and is the latest in a string of anti-vax radio hosts to die from Covid in recent weeks. The radio host and pastor was a controversial figure due to his fierce religious beliefs that led him to ruthlessly criticise the LGBT community, the pro-choice movement, and public health policies. On his Real Science Radio show, the former pastor had railed against the 'imagined' burden of COVID-19 cases on hospitals and offered advice on treating the virus from the Bible before he died. Enyart's friend and co-host of the show Fred Williams announced his death on Facebook on Monday in a now-deleted post. 'It comes with an extremely heavy heart that my close friend and co-host of Real Science Radio has lost his battle with COVID,' said Williams.  Conservative Christian radio host and former pastor of Denver Bible Church Bob Enyart...
    White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki smacked down NBC News White House correspondent Peter Alexander’s absurd concern-trolling question about the “burden” President Joe Biden’s newest vaccine quasi-mandate might place on businesses. If anything, the mandate — which requires businesses with 100 employees or more to either mandate vaccines or testing — is long overdue, but no sooner had Biden announced it than members of the media were asking the responsible 70 percent of society to please spare a thought for the stupidity vectors who are prolonging the pandemic. Add Alexander to that dopey list. At Friday’s briefing, he tried to strike up a tiny violin chorus for the employers in question by asking Psaki about the “burden” businesses might face in having their employees take a free vaccine that’s available everywhere, or choose to do the testing thing instead. Psaki shut him down so well, he eventually felt the need to explain why he had even bothered to ask: ALEXANDER: Jen, what does the White House say to those businesses — some business groups are expressing this concern that this...
    Disney backs theatrical releases for remaining 2021 films These money and investing tips can help you when stock market leadership changes hands NEW YORK — Women’s tennis has seen its fair share of teenagers and prodigies ascend quickly to the top of the game, but Arthur Ashe Stadium will be the stage Saturday for something that’s never happened before in the history of the sport.  Novak Djokovic is close to winning the calendar year Grand Slam USA TODAY SPORTS See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Deion Sanders on never taunting, and College Football’s hottest hot seats | Sports Seriously USA TODAY SPORTS Jennie Finch: Softball deserves as much attention as baseball USA TODAY SPORTS Its gotten a little soft: Deion Sanders on NFL protecting offenses and quarterbacks USA TODAY SPORTS Five games that will shape the 2021 College Football Playoff USA TODAY SPORTS Five college football coaches are on the hottest seats for the 2021 season USA TODAY SPORTS Pro baseball...
    Rapper Burden is getting a lot of attention for his new song. Friday morning, his new song “F Biden” was listed among my new releases, despite the fact it appears to have initially dropped in late August, and I fired it up to check it out. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) Folks, I’m not even sure how to describe this song, which has been played more than a million times on YouTube. Just give it a listen below and decide for yourself what you think. Seriously, what the hell kind of song is this? I don’t care if you hate Joe Biden or love him, I think we can all agree that was a dumpster fire of a song. Imagine being so fired up about politics that you release a song pushing election conspiracy theories and calling for the President to be thrown in prison. If you find yourself rapping about Joe Biden in anything other than a funny fashion, then take a step back from the mic and relax.   View...
    “It reduces my trust in humanity” is how National Institute of Health (NIH) nurse and bioethicist Dr. Christine Grady describes her feelings about the abuse heaped upon her husband, Dr. Anthony Fauci, in Fauci. For those who’ve grown frustrated with their unvaccinated fellow citizens’ egotism, stupidity and recklessness, it’s a familiar and relatable sentiment, and one that colors John Hoffman and Janet Tobias’ documentary (in select theaters Sept. 10) about the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden. Driven by interviews with Fauci himself, it’s an insightful portrait of a man who’s dedicated his career to helping solve some of the world’s most serious disease-related crises, as well as a celebration of the selfless courage, compassion, and open-mindedness of a physician who’s stood tall in the face of unjust vilification and threats. Tucker Carlson, Laura Ingraham, and Lou Dobbs (remember him?) all appear in Fauci, slamming the doctor in various disgusting ways and, in the process, stirring up opposition to the very figure most responsible for guiding the...
    Sleep is key in the healthy aging process, with disruptions linked to outcomes like greater risk of depression, cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. But how much sleep is ideal as adults progress into late life? A recent study published in JAMA Neurology, stemming from PET scans among 4,417 older adults with normal cognition, indicated short sleep of 6 hours or less was linked to a higher burden of the amyloid-beta protein; toxic buildup of amyloid is believed to serve as a precursor for Alzheimer's disease. The study authors from Stanford University also found that both short and longer sleep of 9 hours or more were tied to higher body mass index (BMI), worse self-reported cognitive function and depressive symptoms. "The findings in this study provide further support to the theory that short sleep in aging is associated with early AD [Alzheimer’s disease] processes," study authors wrote, in part, adding, "We found no difference in association with Aβ [amyloid-beta] burden between long and normal sleep durations." ANTIBODY DRUG CUTS MODERATE ALZHEIMER’S DECLINE, SWISS BIOTECH CAUTIONS OVER RESULTS Data was obtained from...
    A new Texas law makes it easier to prosecute human smugglers by removing the requirement to prove the intent to obtain a “pecuniary benefit.” The bill also makes it a 3rd Degree Felony to “assist, guide, or direct” migrants to enter or remain on agricultural land without the consent of the owner. Senate Bill 576 eases the burden on Texas prosecutors to put human smugglers in prison by removing the state’s burden of proving the “intent to obtain a pecuniary benefit” from the elements of the crime, according to the bill authored by State Senator Juan “Chuy” Hinojosa (D-McAllen), and signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott (R). The new law went into effect on September 1. Previously, prosecutors had to prove the smuggler received or intended to receive some financial gain. The pecuniary clause can now be utilized by prosecutors to enhance the charge to a 2nd Degree Felony, the bill states. Carrying a firearm while smuggling migrants will now also increase the penalty level. The new law also makes it a 3rd degree felony if the smuggler “assists, guides,...
    LONDON (AP) — U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson plans Tuesday to fulfill a election promise to grapple with the rocketing cost of the long-term care needed by Britain’s growing older population. To do it, he appears set to break another election vow: not to raise taxes. Johnson is scheduled to tell Parliament how his Conservative government will raise billions to fund the care millions of Britons need in the final years of their lives. That burden currently falls largely on individuals, who often have to deplete their savings or sell their homes to pay for care. One in seven people ends up paying more than 100,000 pounds ($138,000), according to the government, which calls the cost of care “catastrophic and often unpredictable.” Meanwhile, funding care for the poor who can’t afford it is placing a growing burden on overstretched local authorities. Johnson has been tight-lipped about his plans, which are being unveiled to the Cabinet on Tuesday morning before he makes a statement in the House of Commons. But the prime minister said late Monday he would “not duck...
    The nominally conservative government of Prime Minister Boris Johnson may introduce the highest tax burden on the British public in 70 years, amid record spending during the coronavirus pandemic and plans to tax the young and working-class for new National Insurance subsidies. Boris Johnson’s government is reportedly planning on increasing National Insurance contributions in order to help fund the National Health Service (NHS) and care reforms. Should the changes go through, it would directly break 2019 Tory Party election manifesto commitments to not raise taxes. A report from the Taxpayers’ Alliance (TPA) found that if the government increases National Insurance (NI) contributions by one per cent, then the tax burden compared to gross domestic product (GDP) would reach 35.4 per cent by the 2024/25 fiscal year, The Telegraph reported. Should the government increase NI by two per cent, then the tax burden would reach 35.4 per cent by 2023/24. If the projections from the think tank holds true, then Johnson’s government would have imposed the highest tax burden on Britons since the government of socialist Clement Atlee in 1951, when...
                      by Bethany Blankley  The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a 2017 Texas law outlawing a second trimester abortion procedure called D&E (dilation and evacuation), or dismemberment. In 2017, the Texas legislature passed the Texas Dismemberment Abortion Ban with bipartisan support, making D&Es a felony and banning them from being performed except in the case of an emergency. After the law passed and before it went into effect, Whole Women’s Health, several Planned Parenthood groups, several doctors, and others, sued in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas. The district court ruled in their favor, blocking the law from going into effect. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office appealed, and a three-judge panel on the Fifth Circuit upheld the lower court’s ruling last October. Paxton then asked the full 17-member court to review the case, and in January, they agreed. Eight months later, in an en banc review, nine judges on the New Orleans-based appeals court ruled in favor of the Texas statute, five against, and three recused...