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    Glandular fever may be the biggest cause of multiple sclerosis, a major study has concluded. Harvard scientists say they have 'compelling evidence' the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – which causes the 'kissing disease'/mononucleosis – is to blame. They tracked the prevalence of MS among 10million soldiers in the US military over the course of two decades. Volunteers regularly had blood tests taken to see if they had EBV.  Almost 1,000 were diagnosed with the crippling condition, which can leave victims struggling to walk and see. Analysis of the patients revealed that those who had EBV were 32 times more likely to get MS. No other infection raised the risk. Professor Alberto Ascherio, study author, said: 'The hypothesis that EBV causes MS has been investigated by our group and others for several years. 'But this is the first study providing compelling evidence of causality. 'This is a big step because it suggests that most MS cases could be prevented by stopping EBV infection.' He added: 'Targeting EBV could lead to the discovery of a cure for MS.' A graphic showing a 3D...
    Psychological stress may contribute to flare-ups of Crohn's disease by impeding the body's ability to fight off bad gut bacteria like E. coli, a study has suggested. Crohn’s disease is a long-term condition which can cause inflammation, scarring and ulcers within the body's digestive tract — most often in the small or large intestine. It is a debilitating gut condition that affects around 115,000 people in the United Kingdom and almost 3 million globally.  Working with mice, researchers from McMaster University in Ontario Canada found that stress hormones could suppress the rodents' innate immune system. This left them vulnerable to a family of invasive bacteria — 'Enterobacteriaceae' — whose members, especially E. coli, have previously been linked to Crohn's disease. Psychological stress may contribute to flare-ups of Crohn's disease by impeding the body's ability to fight off bad gut bacteria like E. coli, a study has suggested (stock image) 'The main takeaway is that psychological stress impedes the body's ability to fight off gut bacteria that may be implicated in Crohn's disease,' said paper author and biochemist Brian Coombes of McMaster University. 'Innate immunity...
    A New York family is experiencing the unimaginable as they watch an artificial heart keep their one-year-old son alive while he awaits a heart transplant — just two years after their daughter underwent surgeries for the exact same rare heart condition. Brian and Ashley Cotter's daughter Ruby was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy — an enlarged heart condition that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood — in 2019, two months after she was born. She nearly died from the condition, but was kept alive with an artificial heart for three months until she could undergo a heart transplant. Now two-and-a-half, Ruby is thriving — but just a couple of weeks ago, Brian, 37, and Ashley, 31, noticed their son Everett exhibiting some of the same symptoms that had first troubled them in Ruby. Now Everett, who turns one on December 30, is surviving with the help of his own artificial heart as his family anxiously awaits news that he, too, will be the recipient of a donor heart.    Both of Brian and Ashley Cotter's children have had the same rare heart condition - and...
    TAKING Viagra slashes Alzheimer’s risk by two-thirds, research suggests. Scientists claim the love drug may help boost brain health and cut levels of toxic proteins that trigger dementia. 2A research has found that Viagra may help to boost brain healthCredit: Getty - Contributor Experts analysed data on 7.2 million U.S. adults and found regular users had a 69 per cent lower chance of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s over the next six years. Medics say the findings, published in the journal Nature Aging [corr/pls keep], suggest the little blue pill could soon be prescribed to tackle dementia. They are now planning a fresh study to test the benefits of sildenafil – the generic version of Viagra – in early Alzheimer’s patients. A team from Cleveland Clinic looked at whether any of 1,600 approved drugs could be repurposed to tackle the underlying causes of the disease. Lead researcher Dr Feixiong Cheng, from Cleveland Clinic’s Genomic Medicine Institute, said: “Sildenafil, which has been shown to significantly improve cognition and memory in preclinical models, presented as the best drug candidate. “Sildenafil may have neuroprotective...
    A Maryland resident has tested positive for the rare virus monkeypox after a recent trip to Nigeria. The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) says the patient has not been hospitalized and is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms.  No details are available regarding the resident's name, age, sex, where he or she lives, and where he or she traveled to in Nigeria. Currently, health officials say that the general public does not need to take any special precautions.  A Maryland resident traveling back to the United States from Nigeria has been confirmed to be infected with monkeypox. Pictured: Skin lesions, which are are a common symptom of monkeypox The unnamed resident is currently recovering in isolation with mild symptoms and has not been hospitalized. The virus can cause skin spots, which then turn to blisters and can take weeks to clear up (above) 'Public health authorities have identified and continue to follow up with those who may have been in contact with the diagnosed individual,' Dr Jinlene Chan, deputy secretary for public health at MDH, said in a statement.  'Our...
    Decryption – In ten countries the situation is considered “very worrying”. Those in the west and south, including France, are still preserved at this time. Many factors come into play. The Covid 19 epidemic continues to grow in the EU, and it is considered “Very annoying” Ten of its member countries, according to the European Disease Agency. “The epidemiological situation in the EU is currently characterized by an increase in rapid and significant cases and a low but slow increasing mortality rate.”On Friday, November 12, the European Center for Disease Control (ECDC) summarizes its final risk assessment. “The number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths are all expected to increase in the next two weeks.”, The company in Stockholm also warns. Read moreCovit-19: Should we be afraid of the fifth wave in France? Of the 27 countries, Belgium, Poland, the Netherlands, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary and Slovenia are of concern – “Very annoying”. Other countries are classified in the classification “Trouble”: Germany, Austria, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, This article is for subscribers only. You have...
    In this article FIXXThe Merck logo is seen at a gate to the Merck & Co campus in Rahway, New Jersey, U.S., July 12, 2018.Brendan McDermid | ReutersLONDON — An antiviral pill found to be effective at treating Covid-19 has been approved by Britain's medicines regulator Thursday in a potentially game-changing way of treating the virus. Britain's medicines regulator said it had approved the world's first antiviral oral pill, known as molnupiravir, having found it to be "safe and effective at reducing the risk of hospitalisation and death in people with mild to moderate Covid-19 who are at increased risk of developing severe disease." The U.K.'s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency said the decision "follows a rigorous review of its safety, quality and effectiveness" and made it the "first oral antiviral for the treatment of Covid-19 to be approved." Developed jointly by Ridgeback Biotherapeutics and Merck Sharp & Dohme, the pill works by interfering with the virus’ replication. This prevents it from multiplying, keeping virus levels low in the body and therefore reducing the severity of the disease,...
    A 51-year-old woman in Colombia will become the first person suffering from a non-terminal illness to be allowed to die by euthanasia this Sunday.  Martha Sepúlveda has been battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease,  since November 2018, and received approval two months ago to die by euthanasia. 'I know that the owner of life is God, meaning that nothing moves without His will,' the devout Catholic told Noticias Caracol in an interview that ran this week. 'Suddenly for many people I am very wrong, but I think He is allowing this. He is rewarding me in a certain way because I am not going to be bedridden.' Sepúlveda first sought medical care after she started feeling weakness in her thumb, which caused her problems with doing simple tasks such as holding a pen or a computer mouse, according to the Washington Post. In the months that followed her diagnosis, Sepúlveda's nervous system disease weakened her muscles. By 2020, her condition had worsened to the point that she was contemplating dying by euthanasia, a practice legally recognized in the...
    American-born neurologist Lyme diseaseBorrelia is caused by a tick bite caused by the bacterium Bacteria There are automation cases in Argentina. “Argentina has Lyme and the evidence is huge. It is a very serious disease” is one of its main symptoms. Bull-eye-shaped rash that appears after a bite, Comprehensive Melkor Rodrigo (MN 115,792). According to the expert, Lyme disease was “described in the United States many years ago” but “now it has spread around the world.” Colombia, Paraguay and Chile “Some time ago they admitted to having Native Lyme cases.”, He said. “In our country”According to their research, “There are cases from the north to the south, but” most of them had to be diagnosed outside because of the medical community’s incomprehensible denial of the existence of the disease. “. By 2020, the National Administration of Laboratories and Health Institutions Dr. Carlos G. “Until now, only patients who have traveled to local areas such as the United States, Europe or Russia associated with various epidemiological and medical variables can have suspicious cases.”, Then said Malphron. Lyme disease The first symptoms...
    An otherwise healthy eight-year-old Minnesota girl who contracted COVID has been left paralyzed and fighting for her life after the virus triggered a rare auto-immune disease - and her doctor says there is a rash of similar cases around the world. While Avella Braun was a perfectly normal young girl living in the south Minneapolis suburb of Bloomington just six months ago, her whole life changed after she tested positive for the virus in early March. She initially only suffered from low fevers, until her mom, Lani Bauer, discovered her unconscious just days after her positive COVID test, taking the girl to a nearby hospital where she was rushed to the intensive care unit and intubated. Avella was diagnosed with a rare case of acute disseminated Encephalitis (ADEM), or inflammation of the brain, when the body’s immune system attacks itself, causing the spinal cord and brain to swell. ADEM is caused by viral infections, with the only virus Avella testing positive for being coronavirus, according to local news network KMSP.  'We have every reason to believe that COVID was the...
    Health problems with the eye significantly raise the risk of dementia, a study shows. Patients with deteriorating vision are more likely to end up with an impaired ability to remember, think or make decisions, researchers said.  They analysed data on 12,364 adults aged 55 to 73 and found the risk of dementia was 26 per cent higher in those with age-related macular degeneration. The researchers, from the Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences in China, said they could not establish reasons for the links The equivalent figure was 11 per cent for cataract sufferers and 61 per cent for those with diabetes-related eye disease. The researchers, from the Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences in China, said they could not establish reasons for the links.  However it could be that eye conditions are associated with well-known risk factors for dementia such as heart disease. The results also revealed those who suffered from diabetes, heart disease, stroke and depression - known as systemic diseases - were at an increased risk of dementia. The risk was even higher if people also had issues...
    Adding half-a-cup of walnuts to your daily diet can lower your cholesterol levels by around 8.5 per cent and reduce the risk of heart disease, a study has found. Researchers from the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona recruited 628 adults and put half of them on a diet which included daily walnut consumption. After two years, the team found the walnut eaters also had modest reductions in their so-called low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. High levels of LDL — sometimes dubbed the 'bad cholesterol' — is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Study participants who ate walnuts daily saw a reduction in both the total number of LDL particles in their blood and, in particular, the number of small LDL particles. According to the American Heart Association, walnuts are high in omega 3 fatty acids — the heart-healthy fat famously found in oily fish. Adding half-a-cup of walnuts (pictured) to your daily diet can lower your cholesterol levels by around 8.5 per cent and reduce the risk of heart disease, a study has foundWHAT IS HIGH CHOLESTEROL?Cholesterol is a...
    A mysterious deadly disease that was killing thousands of blue jays, robins, starlings and other songbirds across the mid-Atlantic US this summer seems to be subsiding, according to wildlife experts. Ornithologists still don't know exactly what led to the strange syndrome, which caused crusty discharge in fledglings' eyes, as well as seizures, paralysis and death. The leading theory is the birds were poisoned by Brood X cicadas, whose geographical distribution — and emergence and retreat this summer— lines up nearly perfectly with the rise and decline of diseased bird carcasses being reported. 'The distribution of states where this spontaneously popped up was an exact match for the cicada emergence map, and it is a very strange distribution of states for this kind of outbreak,' Elizabeth Bunting with the Cornell Wildlife Health Lab told The Cornell Daily Sun.  'It was Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and then it moved over to Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana.' Experts have theorized the birds were eating the cicadas and suffered a toxic reaction, either because of the pesticides once-every-seven-year pests had been...
    Eating a largely vegan diet made up of plant-based foods can slash the risk of heart disease by up to 52 per cent, new research suggests.  A variety of fruit and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless fish and chicken, nuts and legumes are all key to staving off health problems later in life. Conversely, researchers advise that young adults limit saturated fat, salt, red meat, sweets and sugary drinks to prevent heart attacks in middle-age. While they didn't look at the reason behind the link, previous research suggests plant-based diets can lower your blood pressure, improve cholesterol and help you lose weight - all risk factors for heart disease.   Scroll down for video Eating a largely vegan diet made up of plant-based foods can slash the risk of heart disease by up to 52 per cent, new research suggests (stock image)  VEGETARIAN DIETS CAN LOWER YOUR CHOLESTEROL  Plant-based diets really do lower cholesterol, according to a review of nearly 50 studies. Vegetarians generally eat more greens, fruits and nuts which means they have a...
    Reducing air pollution could be the key to warding off dementia, according to a promising new analysis of scientific studies being presented today.  Researchers at Chicago-based non-profit Alzheimer's Association are detailing three papers that put pressure on governments to clean our air and help reduce rates of the debilitating condition.     The study's authors looked at the effect of reducing nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less – about 3 per cent the diameter of a human hair – known as PM2.5.   In one study, cutting NO2 levels by just 10 per cent over time lowered the chance of developing dementia by more than a quarter – up to 26 per cent.    When breathed in, it's thought microscopic particles in air pollution enter the bloodstream and travel to the brain where they provoke inflammation – a problem that may be the trigger for dementia. But more research is needed into how exactly air pollution exposure could cause different dementia conditions including Alzheimer's.     The new analysis is being reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International...
    Snakes are being infected with a rare skin disease that causes crusted scales and cloudy eyes, an affliction that is ravaging the eastern US. Known as snake fungal disease (SFD), scientists at the US Geological Survey said the spreading of the rare, but mysterious disease - which is only prevalent in snakes - has 'increased substantially' since it was first detected in 2008.   'Recently, the number of reported cases of skin infections in snakes has increased substantially,' the agency wrote on its Facebook page.  Snakes are being infected with a rare skin disease, snake fungal disease, that is ravaging the eastern US. It causes the snake's scales to become crusted or ulcerated (with abnormal bumps) under the skin, as well as other afflictions like abnormal molting and a white opaque, cloudiness in their eyes Two snakes that were 'afflicted with lesions consistent with SFD, which is known from this site' were found in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, in April 2019 The USGS also found a healthy plain-bellied watersnake in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, in April 2019, despite...
    Cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins have proven controversial in the past, but they may cut your risk of dying from Covid-19, a new study suggests.   Researchers in San Diego analysed anonymised medical records from a national American registry during the pandemic. The sample consisted of people who either had or hadn't taken statins prior to contracting Covid-19 and being admitted to hospital. Researchers found that the drug – which is taken as a pill and can be bought over the counter in some areas – slashes the risk of dying in hospital from Covid-19 by 41 per cent.    Statins are a class of drugs that lower levels of 'bad' low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which can lead to lead to a hardening and narrowing of the arteries and therefore heart attacks and strokes.  Cutting LDL cholesterol by taking statins may have anti-inflammatory effects, because LDL itself strongly promotes inflammation, thereby possibly making patients more likely to survive the inflammatory symptoms of Covid.  Statins are a group of medicines that can help lower the level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the...
    Keeping your brain active in later life could delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease by as much as five years. This includes playing board games and card games, doing puzzles, reading and writing letters. A study asked almost 2,000 older people how long they had spent doing these and similar activities in the previous year. Among those who went on to get dementia, people who spent most time keeping their brain active developed the disease at the age of 93 on average. Reading and writing letters and playing card games or puzzles in later life may delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease by up to five years, a study by Rush University Medical Center in Chicago has found People who spent less time on mentally demanding activities were found to have Alzheimer's at an average age of 88 - five years earlier. Professor Robert Wilson, lead author of the study from Rush University Medical Centre in Chicago, said: 'The good news is that it's never too late to start doing the kinds of inexpensive, accessible activities we looked at in...
    Jon Stewart clashed with fellow late night TV titan Stephen Colbert on Monday when he suggested that COVID-19 originated in a Wuhan laboratory.  Stewart, who joined his friend on the first in-person The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in 15 months, was asked what he thought about the 'science' behind virus detection and prevention. To which the liberal host replied: 'I think we owe a great deal of gratitude to science.' 'Science has, in many ways, helped ease the suffering of the pandemic, which was more than likely caused by science,' he added, suggesting the virus was manmade. The comment earned him laughter from the crowd at the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York, and a confused look from the host. He then asked Stewart: 'Do you mean perhaps there's a chance that this was created in a lab?' 'A chance? Stewart responded. 'Oh my god, there's a novel respiratory coronavirus overtaking Wuhan, China, what do we do? Oh you know who we should ask? The Wuhan novel respiratory coronavirus lab.' Scroll down for video  Jon Stewart appeared on 'The...
    THE FDA announced their approval of an Alzheimer's disease treatment developed by Biogen that has been met with controversial reception. Nearly 6 million people in the US and many more worldwide have Alzheimer’s, which gradually attacks areas of the brain needed for memory, reasoning, communication, and basic daily tasks. 4A view of the Biogen Inc., (BIIB Nasdaq) headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts What is the Alzheimer's drug created by Biogen? Government health officials approved the first new drug called aducanumab for Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years, despite controversy over the trial results. It’s the only drug that regulators have said can likely treat the underlying disease, rather than manage symptoms like anxiety and insomnia. The new drug, which Biogen developed with Japan’s Eisai Co., did not reverse mental decline, only slowing it in one study. The drug is given as an infusion every four weeks. The new medicine is made from living cells that will have to be given via infusion at a doctor’s office or hospital. 4Biogen Idec is one of the Globe 100 featured businessesCredit: Getty - Contributor...
    A headband that tickles a nerve in the forehead could help tackle insomnia. Up to 30 per cent of adults suffer from the condition at some point, which is defined as experiencing difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep, waking up too early and poor-quality sleep. If this occurs for three nights a week or more, and continues for more than three months, it is known as chronic insomnia, which is associated with depression, high blood pressure, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Chronic insomnia also increases the chance of an accident by four-and-a-half times because of daytime sleepiness. While stress and worry are the main causes of insomnia, other factors can play a part. Certain medical conditions are associated with insomnia including arthritis (because of the pain) and sleep apnoea (where your breathing stops and starts while you are asleep). Medicines, including cold remedies, steroids and some blood pressure drugs can also disturb sleep, putting people over the age of 60 at greater risk, because they are more likely to have health problems. Up to 30 per cent...
    Hundreds of thousands of people are dying from working long hours, according to a major World Health Organization (WHO) report. The global study, the first of its kind, found 745,000 people died in 2016 from heart disease or strokes as a result of working more than 55 hours per week.  The majority - or 60 per cent - were middle-aged or older men.  Experts said working long hours not only puts extra stress on the body, but it also leads to unhealthy behavious such as overeating, smoking, drinking alcohol and sleeping less. They found people who did overtime were more likely to suffer from obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes - all three conditions which dramatically drive up the risk of heart issues and strokes.   WHO scientists compared data from more than 4,000 global health surveys. They found people who did 55-hour weeks were 35 per cent more likely to have a stroke and 17 per cent more likely to die from heart disease, compared with a working week of less than 40 hours.  According to the analysis, this was...
    Consuming a moderate amount of alcohol daily can reduce the risk of dying from a major cardiovascular event by up to 20 per cent, scientists reveal. The researchers have linked moderate alcohol intake – defined as no more than one alcoholic drink for women and two for men per day – with a 20 per cent lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD), in a sample of more than 50,000 people.  Interestingly, this percentage decrease was in comparison to people from the sample who had low alcohol intake – defined as less than one drink a week.  The experts, from Harvard Medical School, think it's likely that moderate alcohol reduces stress signals from the brain.  Scientists at the institution previously made the link between stress in the brain with an increased risk of CVD events like heart disease and stroke.    The study authors stress that they're not encouraging people to boost their alcohol consumption – but that moderation is the key, just like official guidelines state.   Cheers to that! Alcohol in moderation may help the heart by calming stress signals in the...
    Low fat diets decrease can men's testosterone levels – which can increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer's, a new study warns.  In a sample of 206 men, nutritionists at the University of Worcester found low fat diets decreased testosterone levels by an average of 10 to 15 per cent. The testosterone decrease was even higher for men on vegetarian low fat diets – up to 26 per cent, the experts found.  Low fat diets typically predominantly contain whole grain foods, lean meats such as skinless chicken, fish, fruit, vegetables and pulses.  While these are healthy choices, the experts stress the importance of including fats in the diet for men, found in meats, nuts and dairy products like cheese and milk.  Men should ideally consume plenty of monounsaturated fats, which are found in olive oil, avocados and nuts, to boost their testosterone levels. While fat is an essential component of a healthy, balanced diet, experts generally advise against overdoing their intake of saturated fats, which is found in butter, fatty meats and treats like cake and pastries.  Too much fat...
    Just for a moment, imagine that you were about to be diagnosed with a terminal disease — and you could choose which one to have. Without the slightest hesitation, I’d opt for motor neurone disease. It’s often described as the world’s cruellest disease, because it destroys all the nerve cells that control your movement. Most sufferers die when they can no longer swallow or breathe. But I’m serious — it really is the best terminal disease you can have. There’s no chronic pain, no nausea and you don’t usually lose your mind. After I was diagnosed with motor neurone disease [MND] myself in 2017, I was told that most sufferers died within two years. I refused, however, to accept my death sentence. (Peter 2.0. Images provided by Peter Scott Morgan for book serialisation Peter 2.0) As a 58-year-old scientist — with degrees in computing, artificial intelligence and robotics — I quickly worked out that my life could be saved by a combination of pioneering operations and 21st century hi-tech Best of all, the terminal bit is negotiable. In...
    Having a single serving of ultra-processed food including crisps, sweets, chocolate and burgers can increase your risk of dying from heart disease by 9%, study shows.  Researchers from New York University used data from a study of 3,003 middle-aged adults to examine the role of processed foods on cardiovascular disease. The team found that the higher consumption of ultra-processed foods is associated with an increased risk of heart disease and it gets worse the more you eat.  'Our findings add to a growing body of evidence suggesting cardiovascular benefits of limiting ultra-processed foods,' said Filippa Juul, study lead author. Drinking low-calories soft drinks and other 'healthy' branded snack foods including cereal and protein bars, was also linked to an increased risk of heart disease.  Having a single serving of ultra-processed food including crisps, sweets, chocolate and burgers can increase your risk of dying from heart disease by 9%, study shows TYPES OF ULTRA-PROCESSED FOODS  Some ultra-processed foods are unexpected, included 'healthy' branded products. This includes protein bars, breakfast cereals and most industrially produced breads. Other examples of ultra-processed foods include carbonated...
    Tanzanian President John Magufuli, a staunch COVID-19 denier who discouraged the use of masks and even argued that his country was protected from this disease by divine intervention, He died on Wednesday at the age of 61 from heart disease, according to the vice president of the African country, Samia Suluhu, in a televised message to the nation. Magufuli, whose absence in public since last February 27 had sparked numerous rumors about his health, he died at around 6:00 p.m. local time (15:00 GMT) in Dar es Salaam, the economic capital of Tanzania, Suhulu said on state television TBC. According to the vice president, the president had entered a hospital for an ailment last week. “Had a heart disease for some years, “he explained. “The country will be in mourning for two weeks,” Suhulu stated, visibly saddened. Last Monday, the vice president asked her compatriots for unity and already hinted that Magufuli could be ill. Rumors that you contracted covid-19 Since his last public appearance on February 27, rumors have multiplied about the health of the head of state, who...
    A genetic treatment has been discovered that extends the lifespan of fruit flies by as much as nine per cent.  Two different therapies which target different proteins were created and found to also stave off signs of Alzheimer's.  While the findings raise the possibility of replicating the treatments in humans, such genetic treatments are currently prohibited on ethical grounds, despite an ongoing debate about potential benefits.  Scroll down for video   Pictured, a picture of a fruit fly brain that has been altered so that it certain proteins glow. In this picture the yellow dots are the damaging protein p62/REF2P and the magenta is poly-ubiquitin. A similar technique was used to track FKH and FOXO Genome editing is NOT yet ready to be tried safely in humans Editing the genes of embryos is not yet safe for humans, according to a new report published by the world's leading experts in fertility, ethics and biology.  Germline gene editing is a process where faulty, diseased, or undesirable genes in an embryo, sperm of egg are removed, altered or replaced by scientists.  This...
    A pill containing a tiny camera that can detect tumours is set to revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment of bowel cancer. The cancer cam – known as a colon capsule endoscopy – is swallowed by patients and takes pictures of the lining of the bowel to look for any signs of disease as it passes through the digestive system. The devices, which can give results within just five hours, are initially being sent to 11,000 NHS patients across the country for trial. If successful, it is hoped the new form of diagnosis could spell the end of more invasive colonoscopies as well as X-rays. Charities said that the camera capsules could be a potential game-changer for diagnosis. The cancer cam – known as a colon capsule endoscopy (pictured) – is swallowed by patients and takes pictures of the lining of the bowel to look for any signs of disease as it passes through the digestive system Genevieve Edwards, chief executive at Bowel Cancer UK, said: ‘This has the potential to make a huge difference for people with bowel cancer...
    Getty A nurse tends to a COVID-19 patient in the Intensive Care Unit at Providence St. Mary Medical Center in Apple Valley, California on January 11, 2021. A number of technologies and tools got a chance to prove themselves for the first time in the context of COVID-19. Three researchers working in gene-based vaccines, wearable diagnostics and drug discovery explain how their work rose to the challenge of the pandemic, and their hopes that each technology is now poised to continue making big changes in medicine. Genetic Vaccines Deborah Fuller, Professor of Microbiology, University of Washington Thirty years ago, researchers for the first time injected mice with genes from a foreign pathogen to produce an immune response. Like many new discoveries, these first gene-based vaccines had their ups and downs. Early mRNA vaccines were hard to store and didn’t produce the right type of immunity. DNA vaccines were more stable but weren’t efficient at getting into the cell’s nucleus, so they failed to produce sufficient immunity. Researchers slowly overcame the problems of stability, getting the genetic instructions where...
    Marisa Martín-Blázquez has revealed in her social networks that she suffers from a disease called myasthenia gravis, a “chronic and autoimmune” disease diagnosed when he was 23 years old, which affects the muscles and with which he lives “relatively well”. And he did so because, according to the collaborator of Live life, “many people speak without knowledge of the cause, make fun of something that is seen in my face“. “If you see in my face and body that asymmetry and not perfection, know that this is not why some, believing they know everything, they wrongly criticize“he explained. “Sometimes he comes to attack me and causes me great crises that I overcome with patience and paying little attention to him. It is when it is most reflected in my face and when more, ‘good people’ attack me because of the physical issue, “he explained. “My solidarity with those who suffer from any type of illness and are not well regarded by those who think they are perfect” “My solidarity with those who suffer from any type of disease and...
    Consuming a chemical found in sesame seeds can reduce the risk of Parkinson's by preventing neuronal damage that decreases dopamine production, study shows.  Scientists from Osaka City University tested the chemical sesaminol on Parkinson's cells, as well as feeding it to mice over 36 days to find out what impact it had on dopamine levels and neurons in the brain. Parkinson's is a neurological disorder that impairs movement, causes stiffness and can result in a loss of balance, tremors in the hands and slurred speech.  Study authors discovered that sesaminol protected against neuronal damage that caused Parkinson's disease and believe it could be a cure for the condition. They found that mice with Parkinson's that consumed the chemical saw an improvement in dopamine levels, balance and motor function. The Japanese researchers found their test so promising for reducing the risk of developing Parkinson's that they are quickly moving to start clinical trials. Consuming a chemical found in sesame seeds can reduce the risk of Parkinson's by preventing neuronal damage that decreases dopamine production, study shows PARKINSON'S: THE INCURABLE DISEASE THAT STRUCK...
    Boiled, fried, scrambled or in an omelette, whole eggs pose a threat to health and eating more of them increases your risk of death, a study warns.  Researchers found eating just half a whole egg — which includes the yolk and the white — increases the likelihood of dying by seven per cent. Risk of death increases by a further seven per cent for every half an egg on top of this, so a person eating one egg a day has at 14 per cent greater chance of death than someone who avoids the food.  Chinese researchers who led the study believe high fat and cholesterol levels in eggs are to blame.  They warned that people should use only the whites or switch to healthier egg substitutes, which lower the risk of dying.  Substituting an equivalent amount of nuts or legumes for half a whole egg reduced death rates by up to a third. Poultry, dish or dairy products had a similar effect. Scroll down for video   Boiled, fried, scrambled or in an omelette, whole eggs pose a threat...
    A new drug could help improve age-related hearing loss. Preliminary studies have shown that it may also ease tinnitus and Meniere’s disease, a neurological condition that causes hearing loss and dizziness. And the drug is now being tested in the U.S. as a potential treatment for patients with Covid-19. The new drug, known as SPI-1005, boosts levels of a natural compound that protects delicate hair cells in the inner ear. The role of these hair cells is to convert sound vibrations into electrical signals, which are then relayed along the auditory nerve to the brain. The number of auditory hair cells — there are normally around 15,000 in each ear — declines over time due to age, disease and exposure to loud noise. A new drug could help improve age-related hearing loss. Preliminary studies have shown that it may also ease tinnitus and Meniere’s disease, a neurological condition RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next UK's Super-COVID has 'got its hooks deep into America' and... JO ELVIN: Why I'm convinced supplements made of 'gymnast... ...
    There are still many wounds to heal and the capital of Hubei is still far from the same as before | 01/23/2021 | ionicons-v5-c10: 00 | . | Wuhan.- Wuhan, the great city China that overnight found herself isolated and confined by surprise, after being the first to suffer the virus that still hangs over the world, is still trying to recover his life with great caution today, amid wounds that will take time to overcome. At ten o’clock in the morning on January 23, 2020, this city of 11 million inhabitants woke up totally closed, with its entrances closed, the streets deserted and the people stuck in their houses, in the midst of the fear of a disease from which little was known. In the first moments of the unprecedented isolation, some were still able to go out to buy food in the few stores that remained open, but soon these also closed and no one moved from their four walls in weeks. The most terrible days arrived: the sick were multiplying and the hospitals, without means or...
    The coronavirus has now infected all 3,006 counties across the United States, according to a new report. The last county to record a positive case was the nation’s smallest: Kalawao County, a remote island enclave in Hawaii established in the 1860s for people with leprosy, the Wall Street Journal reported. Kalawao's first case was recorded on December 10 after one resident received a positive COVID result after returning back to the county from a trip to Honolulu.  Five leprosy patients, who are all elderly and considered high risk, still live in Kalawao.  However, the county has so far managed to avoid further spread, with the person who tested positive immediately alerting authorities and quarantining themselves. The discovery in Kalawao came just under 11 months after the first case of COVID-19 was recorded in Snohomish County, Washington, on January 20, 2020. Since then, the virus has continued to ravage its way across the country, infecting more than 24 million Americans, and killing more than 400,000. As reported by WSJ, data released by Johns Hopkins indicated that COVID-19 has now reached every county...
    How swiftly a person's immune system responds following infection with the coronavirus plays a crucial role in determining disease severity, a study shows. Cambridge researchers studied 207 people who tested positive for Covid-19 over a three-month period and found those with no symptoms or mild cases mounted a robust immune response soon after getting infected. But the people with severe cases who required hospitalisation had an impaired immune response, which led to a delayed and weakened attempt to fight the virus.  This undercooked response to the infection is characterised by inflammation of several organs, which occurs immediately after a person catches the coronavirus.   Scientists say abnormalities in immune cells may be behind the slack response to viral infection as well as the body's inflammatory response, and may contribute to severe disease and also 'long Covid'. Scroll down for video   How swiftly a person's immune system responds following infection with the coronavirus plays a crucial role in determining disease severity, a study shows (file) Dr Paul Lyons, senior co-author of the study from the Cambridge Institute of Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious...
    This year, Business with workers registered in the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) could see increased premiums that they must cover before the Institute. This when considering the Covid-19 disease an occupational hazard, as established by the IMSS Technical Council, in a resolution that was published on January 8 of this year in the Official Journal of the Federation. This opinion establishes that the Covid-19 is recognized as a work hazard, although within it it is not indicated what the worker’s activities will be. That is, it would not only apply to personnel working in hospitals or similar tasks, but it is left open in a general way for companies in the country. For some specialists, the implications fall on the fact that the Mexican Institute of Social Security can increase its income through the collection of work risk premiums, at the expense of companies registered as of this year 2021. « The Directorate of Economic and Social Benefits is authorized to implement the proactive judgment strategy as a work risk of the workers of affiliated companies who died or...
    Scientists have identified the brain cells that are most vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease for the first time, in what's being referred to as the 'holy grail' of dementia studies.  The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease. The researchers hope the findings could be used to develop a new and much more targeted approach to developing therapies to slow or prevent the spread of Alzheimer's disease.   The brain cells lie in a region known as the entorhinal cortex, which controls memory, navigation and time perception, and are the first to be killed off by the disease HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE DEMENTIA? The charity Alzheimer's Research UK has described dementia as the greatest health challenge of our time. Somebody is diagnosed with it every three seconds. It is the biggest killer in some wealthier countries - and is completely untreatable. Memory loss is the most common feature. Other symptoms can include changes to behaviour, mood and personality. It can...
    Children who get diagnosed with depression between the ages of five and 19 are six times more likely to die by the time they're 31, according to a study. Researchers in Sweden followed 1.4million people to test whether there was a link between childhood or teenage depression and worse health in adulthood. While they found a 14-fold increase in the risk of death by self-harm, which may be expected to link with depression, they also saw that people who suffered with mental health disorder in their youth were more likely to be diagnosed with dozens of serious illnessses. These included type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart diseases, epilepsy, sleep disorders, liver disease and kidney disease.  Depression is one of the most common mental health problems and is found increasingly often among children and teenagers, studies have found.  The study, led by Stockholm's Karolinska Institutet, said that around 2.8 per cent of eight to 13-year-olds get the condition, along with 5.6 per cent of 14 to 18-year-olds.  The researchers behind it said it was the largest study to date to look at links between...
    Trench fever - the disease that plagued First World War soldiers - has started cropping up amongst the urban, homeless population in Canada, according to a new study.  The Canadian Medical Association Journal study, which was published Monday, revealed four people living in Manitoba, who had experienced homelessness, were eventually diagnosed with trench fever, which killed millions of soldiers during the First World War.   The disease, caused by the bacteria Bartonella quintana is transmitted from person-toperso through body lice. Symptoms include relapsing fevers, muscle aches, headaches, rashes, and pain in the shins, CTV News reported.  Trench fever, first identified in 1915 amongst British soldiers, was found in four homeless men living in Winnipeg, Manitoba. First World War British soldiers are pictured near German lines RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Nurse in Pfizer vaccine trial who worried she had COVID-19... Hundreds of black vultures invade Pennsylvania town where... Share this article Share The cases discussed in the study were the first four cases of trench fever reported in Canada in more than 20...
    Evie Junior has been living with the pain and limitations of sickle cell disease for almost all of his 27 years. He’s been hospitalized too many times to count with infections, exhaustion and excruciating pain, spawned by the incurable illness embedded in his genes. “You try and adjust to the demands of the disease, but it’s never clear when the attacks are going to occur,” Junior explained. “You start to make progress on something, then you get sick and it takes you out, and you have to start over at square one. “It’s one step forward and three steps back all the time.” But the Anaheim man has good reason to feel thankful this holiday season: An experimental gene therapy being tested on him shows promise in disarming the debilitating disease. Junior’s doctors at the UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center say the genetically modified stem cell infusion that he received last summer seems on track to correct the genetic error responsible for his sickle cell disorder. “If we can get enough of the stem cells to pick up our...
    Bill Gates has criticized White House coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas as a 'pseudo-expert' and labeled him 'off-the-rails'. The Microsoft billionaire's remarks about Atlas joined an increasing chorus from public health experts that sounded in recent weeks.  'We now have a pseudo-expert advising the president,' Gates said during Yahoo Finance's All Market Summit: Road to Recovery on Monday.  The outlet said that after the initial interview on October 15, Gates confirmed he was speaking about Atlas and added that the Stanford professor is 'off-the-rails.'  While speaking during Yahoo Finance's All Market Summit: Road to Recovery, Bill Gates (pictured) called Dr. Scott Atlas a 'pseudo-expert' News reports have indicated that Scott Atlas, a neuroradiologist who has gained favor with the President, has promoted the controversial herd theory in the White House.  The notion has been blasted by several other experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, who was previously the face of the White House's task force and called it 'scientifically and ethically problematic.' Fauci, in an interview on 60 Minutes, said: 'If you just let things rip and let the infection go...
    Diet drinks are just as bad for your heart as the full-sugar versions, a study has found. French researchers tracked more than 104,000 people over ten years, looking at how many sugary or sugar-free soft drinks they consumed. They found the consumers of both sugary and artificially sweetened drinks are up to  20 per cent more likely to suffer heart disease, stroke or heart attacks than those who avoid soft drinks.  Scroll down video   Researchers found the consumers of both sugary and artificially sweetened drinks are up to 20 per cent more likely to suffer heart disease, stroke or heart attacks than those who avoid soft drinks The scientists, at Sorbonne University in Paris, split people into three groups based on their consumption of sweetened beverages.  These categories were labelled as non-consumers, low consumers and high consumers and drinks split into either artificially sweetened or sugary.  A sugar content equalling or exceeding five per cent meant it was considered sugary whereas a sub-five percentage and the presence of 'non-nutritive sweeteners' was enough to be classified as an artificially-sweetened beverage.   The...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump's election endgame argument, far from bristling with new solutions to a pandemic that has killed 220,000 Americans, on Monday devolved into a campaign of insults against Dr. Anthony Fauci -- for telling the truth about the disease.Trump ridiculed Fauci as a "disaster" and an "idiot" who has been around for "500 years" -- trashing one of the nation's best hopes of easing the pandemic along with his recommendations to quell an alarming Covid-19 surge.His personal warfare against Fauci on a frenzied day on the campaign trail, while indecent and questionable from a strategic political perspective, revealed how the US government effort to beat the pandemic has been suppressed in the service of Trump's reelection."Tony Fauci has been the most clear, consistent proponent of the measures the United States needs to protect itself from a deadly disease," William Haseltine, a renowned public health expert and former professor at Harvard Medical School, told CNN's Erin Burnett on Monday."What Donald Trump is doing is attacking the fire department when the house in burning down. This is a very serious time."Read...
    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials approved the first treatment for Ebola on Wednesday.  Regulators greenlit a trio of antibody drugs developed by Regeneron to treat the hemorrhagic fever virus that has killed tens of thousands of people in West Africa, and is up to 90 percent fatal.  Regeneron is making another antibody to treat the newest viral threat to humanity, COVID-19, but the two treatments are entirely unrelated.  Ebola patients treated with Regeneron's antibody 'cocktail' in trials were one third less likely to die than were people who did not get the drug.   Although a vaccine against Ebola was approved in December of last year and was declared officially 'over' in June, has been little doctors could do to improve survival odds for someone who does catch the devastating virus.  'It's still pretty terrifying' said former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) associate commissioner Peter Pitts of Ebola.  'If there is an approved treatment for it, that's as close to a miracle as you get.'  He reiterated that the approval for a Regeneron antibody cocktail for treating Ebola was entirely...
    ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images Coronavirus has killed over 1 million people globally. Many died alone, due to strict COVID-19 hospital rules. The president casually drove by his supporters while infected with the very disease that killed more than 210,000 Americans across the country. Insider spoke with a man who lost his father in April to coronavirus who couldn't be there with him for his final moments. He said it's "It's painful to watch" the president downplay the disease. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.   John Pijanowski's dad is not going to be at Thanksgiving dinner this year. In April, 51-year-old Pjanowski lost his 87-year-old father Don to a sudden, fatal case of coronavirus that "literally hit him like a lightning bolt." The grief is hardly over for Pijanowski. Just a few days ago, President Donald Trump casually drove by his supporters while infected with the very disease that killed John's father. "It's painful to watch," Pijanowski said of the president's action.  "There are these stages of grief, and I think anger is the hardest one...
    (CNN) — The novel coronavirus may have infected about one in 10 people globally, meaning the majority of the world remains vulnerable to Covid-19, a World Health Organization official has said. “Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus,” Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the WHO’s Health Emergencies Programme, said at a WHO executive board meeting Monday. “This varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies between different groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk,” Ryan added. There are more than 35.5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases globally, according to the widely-used Johns Hopkins University dashboard, but WHO and other experts say that is almost certainly an enormous undercount. Over the summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said cases in the US had likely been undercounted by at least 90%. With a global population of about 7.7 billion people, Ryan’s estimate would mean about 770 million have been infected — but most...
    (CNN)The novel coronavirus may have infected about one in 10 people globally, meaning the majority of the world remains vulnerable to Covid-19, a World Health Organization official has said. "Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus," Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the WHO's Health Emergencies Programme, said at a WHO executive board meeting Monday."This varies depending on country, it varies from urban to rural, it varies between different groups. But what it does mean is that the vast majority of the world remains at risk," Ryan added. Months into a pandemic, Fauci says the US is still lagging in Covid-19 testingThere are more than 35.5 million confirmed Covid-19 cases globally, according to the widely-used Johns Hopkins University dashboard, but WHO and other experts say that is almost certainly an enormous undercount. Over the summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said cases in the US had likely been undercounted by at least 90%. With a global population of about 7.7 billion people, Ryan's estimate would...
    Love him or loathe him, President Donald Trump is arguably the most famous person on the planet right now — which makes him, by default, the biggest celebrity to test positive for COVID-19 to date. Wife Melania Trump has a confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, too, and so the First Couple has now officially joined over 34 million people worldwide to receive such a diagnosis thus far, including more than one million who died as a result of the virus. The overall total includes in excess of 71,000 Coloradans who've had COVID-19 during the pandemic's first six months plus; because of medical privacy laws, most of them have never been publicly identified. Some have, though; here's a look at some of the most notable individuals from our state to have contracted the disease:The Athletes Related Stories Jared Polis's Mom on Trump Racism and New Hate Groups Film COVID-19: Greek House Sh*t Show as Outbreaks Set New Record Previewing Colorado's New COVID-19 Notification Phone App Sports standouts are the biggest stars in Colorado, and two of the most prominent —...
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