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    As tensions heat up over Russia and Ukraine, CBS News chief foreign affairs correspondent and Face the Nation moderator Margaret Brennan tells Mediaite that this may not be a “1941” moment, but the risk of conflict is very high. In her interview with editor-in-chief Aidan McLaughlin for Mediaite’s The Interview podcast, Brennan analyzed the current state of international affairs, noting that conflict doesn’t necessarily mean today what it used to. McLaughlin asked Brennan — who interviewed Secretary of State Antony Blinken about Ukraine-Russia on Face the Nation last Sunday — whether people should be “very worried about the possibility of conflict” between Russia and Ukraine, and how Brennan would assess the “threat level.” “The risk of military conflict is very high,” Brennan answered. “I think one thing the public needs to understand is that the tanks aren’t going to roll first. You are probably going to see a cyber attack, you’re probably going to see some destabilization. You are going to see a conflict that may appear small, or a small bite.” “How people react — how countries react to...
    (CNN)On Monday, the British government moved to make hymenoplasty, or "virginity repair" surgery -- with or without consent -- illegal. The move, a further amendment to the Health and Care Bill, comes hot on the heels of another change to the bill introduced in November 2021 and intended to make "virginity testing" in England and Wales a criminal offense. Both virginity testing and virginity surgery are prevalent in conservative cultures, and were described by Dr. Edward Morris, president of the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, as being "inextricably linked forms of violence against women and girls." Given the harms described by victims of both practices, these UK legislative changes are welcome, but if anything, they should be seen as a beginning and not an end. It is not just testing and repair that is harmful. The very concept of "virginity" is. And it's one societal construct that continues to have extraordinary power in so-called conservative and liberal cultures alike. While not universally the case, in a gender-binary, heteronormative world in which a girl's value is intrinsically less than...
    A SHORT stroll may seem like a "walk in the park" to some, but exhausting for others. If you’re over the age of 60, feeling tired after light exercise or even socialising could signal an early grave. 1Scientists studied more than 2,900 adults over 60 and found a key indicator of an early deathCredit: Alamy Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh say that if you feel particularly tired after a walk or light housework, you may be at an increased risk of dying over the next three years. More than 2,900 older adults over the age of 60 participated in a study - the first to make such conclusions.  The participants rated how tired they typically felt following various activities on a scale of one to five. Activities also included gardening, watching TV, socialising with friends and weight-based exercise.  Each adult was given a “fatigability” score between 0 (low) and 50 (high) to indicate how fatigued they felt after exercise. According to findings published in the Journal of Gerontology, those with the highest scores were more likely to die in...
    Farmer Oluranti Adeboye, 62, harvests cocoa at Sofolu village in Ogun State, southwestern Nigeria, on June 5, 2018.Pius Utomi Ekpei | AFP | Getty Images The cocoa industry faces urgent challenges. Its long-term sustainability is threatened by numerous factors, including, intolerably, the risk of child labor on cocoa farms. This problem won't be solved unless we address the underlying factors that contribute to it. As we know from our work in this area, there is no quick fix, but we are optimistic about a new approach. To start, we acknowledge that this challenge has proven far more complex and deeply rooted than any of us initially realized. Private sector, local governments and nongovernmental organizations in West Africa have worked to address child labor risks by monitoring farms, educating communities and building schools to offer alternatives to families. These efforts have been successful in providing much-needed relief to thousands of children and families, but a close assessment reveals they have fallen short of bringing about the extent of systemic change that was intended. The persistence of child labor risk in the...
    IF you like loading your crisps with guacamole, or a cheeky piece of dark chocolate after dinner, you’ll be glad to hear it could help fight cancer. Scientists have found evidence that magnesium-rich foods are essential for the immune system, including battling cancer cells. 1Guacamole is made with avocado - a healthy fruit with high magnesiumCredit: Shutterstock Magnesium is a mineral that humans need in order to stay healthy. Without it, you would soon become tired and weak. A lack of the mineral could also be indicated by insomnia, PMS or restless legs. But long term, a deficiency can put you at risk of weaker bones and chronic diseases like heart disease. It’s found in foods that you may throw into your dinner, including spinach, wholemeal bread, rice, potatoes, salmon and legumes including black beans, lentils and kidney beans.  But you can get a daily dose with snacks including: Guacamole dip (avocados) Nuts (especially peanuts, almonds and cashews) Dark chocolate A banana  Peanut butter on bread or with fruit Greek yoghurt Researchers from the University of Basel, Switzerland, say that...
    Older people who undergo cataract surgery are 30 per cent less likely to develop dementia, research suggests. University of Washington scientists made the conclusion after tracking more than 3,000 over-65s.  None of the participants, who were tracked for almost a decade, had the memory-robbing disorder when the study began. The findings, published in the JAMA Internal Medicine, did not determine how the common surgery slashed the dementia risk. But the researchers claim that it could be down to cataracts blocking key cells from receiving 'blue light'.  Blue light may reactivate cells in the retina that are associated with cognition and regulate sleep, the experts said. Lead researcher Dr Cecilia Lee said: 'This kind of evidence is as good as it gets in epidemiology.  'This is really exciting because no other medical intervention has shown such a strong association with lessening dementia risk in older individuals.' The academics said the findings highlight the need for further research on how the connection between the eyes and brain affects dementia. Cataracts are cloudy patches on the lens of the eye, which usually develop as...
    MEN who experience more stress are at an increased risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes at younger ages, experts have warned. Many things in our lives can cause stress, including our jobs and our home lives, but experts say stress in men during childhood and young adulthood are the biggest contributors for risk. 1Men who experience stress and anxiety are more prone to heart disease and type 2 diabetesCredit: Getty - Contributor Writing in the Journal of the American Heart Association, experts said people who are prone to anxiety and worry should pay more attention to their cardiometabolic health. The study looked at over a thousand men who had an average age of 53-years-old. They completed tests on neuroticism on a scale of 0–9 and a worry assessment tool asked how often they worried about each of 20 items, with 0 meaning never and 4 meaning all the time. Lead author of the study, Lewina Lee, a clinical psychologist said neuroticism is a personality trait characterised by a tendency to interpret situations as threatening, stressful and/or overwhelming. She...
    Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich sees alleged abuses by the House Select Committee and the Department of Justice investigating the January 6, 2021 riot at the U.S. Capitol as having consequences. During an appearance on FNC’s “Sunday Morning Futures,” Gingrich suggested those who he said were misusing and abusing the process could “face a real risk of jail” for the laws they had broken during the so-called investigation. “Well, you have, both with Attorney General Garland and with this select committee on January 6, people who have run amok,” he said. “They are breaking the rules. They are going after people in a way which is reminiscent of the British monarchy using closed-door systems that we outlawed deliberately because we’d seen it. We knew what it was like. And they’re running over people’s civil liberties. And what they need to understand is, on January 4 next year, you’re going to have a Republican majority in the House and a Republican majority in the Senate.” “And all these people who’ve been so tough and so mean and so nasty are going...
    Newt Gingrich says that January 6 committee members “face a real risk of jail” should Republicans take over the House after the 2022 election. Appearing on Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Baritromo, Gingrich expanded on an op-ed he wrote for Newsweek earlier this week titled “The Wolves Will Become Sheep,” in which he argued that January 6 committee members will have the tables turned on them if the GOP should gain control of Congress. “You have — both with Attorney General [Merrick] Garland and with this select committee on January 6, people who have run amok,” Gingrich argued. He added, “What they need to understand is on January 4 next year, you’re going to have a Republican majority in the House and a Republican majority in the Senate. And all these people who have been so tough, and so mean, and so nasty are going to be delivered subpoenas for every document, every conversation, every tweet, every e-mail.” Gingrich went on to blast Garland and the Jan. 6 committee as a “lynch mob.” He warned that Republicans may look...
    (CNN)When the remnants of Hurricane Ida flooded Francisco Carrillo's basement apartment in Queens, New York, last year, his subsequent displacement was a wake-up call. He knew the climate crisis was real, but it was the first time he'd ever endured its nearly deadly consequences.As the floodwater rose rapidly, Carrillo grabbed what few, precious belongings he could carry and escaped with his life. When he returned, he was overwhelmed with the stench of festering mold and water damage. The last 7 years have been the warmest on record as planet approaches critical threshold"If we don't change the way that we think, it's going to be worse," Carillo, who is still living in a temporary shelter more than three months after Ida struck, told CNN last month. "And I think all of this is our responsibility, but we can still be the difference."Despite year after year of climate change-fueled disasters, the world is no closer to capping fossil fuel emissions, which would halt the increasing severity of natural disasters. Instead, emissions continue to rise amid pledges and promises to (eventually) rein them...
    poses a much greater risk for myocarditis.Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) is criticizing the COVID-19 vaccine while failing to mention key details that change the scope of his assessment. On Friday, January 22, the Kentucky senator appeared on Fox News with Laura Ingraham where he referenced the findings of a study that suggests the vaccine increases the risk of myocarditis – heart muscle inflammation – in adolescent males. However, what the lawmaker failed to also mention is that adverse effects could be far worse if an individual contracts the virus. This part of the discussion began when Ingraham mentioned a proposal in the state of California that would grant children 12 and older the right to get vaccinated for COVID-19 without parental consent. “Senator, we know they’ve wanted to put a wedge between children and their parents for a long time on a lot of issues, but this kind of takes the cake,” Ingraham said. Paul chimed in with a response that appears to have taken Ingraham's remarks out of context. “I believe it’s medical malpractice to force vaccines on...
    Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) appeared with Laura Ingraham on Fox News Friday night and correctly noted that studies indicate the Covid-19 vaccine increases the risk of myocarditis – an inflammation of the heart muscle – in adolescent males. What he did not mention is that studies also indicate that contracting Covid-19 raises that risk even more. Last week, Joe Rogan did the same thing on his podcast last week. However, in that case, his guest informed him of the data indicating that there is a higher risk of developing myocarditis from Covid than the Covid vaccine. Ingraham noted a proposal in California that would allow children 12 and older to receive the vaccine without parental consent. “Senator, we know they’ve wanted to put a wedge between children and their parents for a long time on a lot of issues, but this kind of takes the cake,” she said. “I believe it’s medical malpractice to force vaccines on children, particularly adolescent males,” said Paul, reacting to a policy Ingraham did not mention. “We now have the scientific evidence that shows the...
    Receiving a COVID-19 booster shot can reduce a person's risk of being hospitalized with the Omicron variant by 90 percent, a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds. The study, published by the agency Friday, further highlights the need for boosters, and their importance during this recent Omicron Covid wave. The Omicron variant, first discovered by South African health officials in late November, has displayed an ability to evade vaccine protection and many available Covid treatments. Data from the CDC strengthens the case that the additional shots are necessary to control the Omicron variant and limit the harm it can cause. The agency reports that the variant now makes up around 99.5 percent of Covid cases in the U.S. A CDC research team found that people who have received their Covid booster shot are 90% less likely to require hospitalization when infected with the Omicron variant than their unvaccinated peers. Pictured: Health care workers treat a Covid patient in a Hartford, Connecticut, hospital on January 18  The researchers also found that those who have received...
    CRYPTOCURRENCY XRP has continued its months-long nosedive this week, hitting its lowest price since July. The eighth biggest coin has struggled since early September, losing more than half its value as dozens of cryptocurrencies have floundered. ???? Read our cryptocurrency live blog for the latest Bitcoin updates 1We explain how XRP and the Ripple network operateCredit: Alamy Before investing in any cryptocurrency, you should be aware of all the risks involved. Cryptocurrencies are highly volatile, which means your investments can go up or down quickly, often losing substantial value in short periods of time. This means you should never invest anything you can't afford to lose. Investing in cryptocurrencies or stocks and shares is not a guaranteed way to make money. (Ad) An easier way to buy crypto with eToroJoin the 25 million users who trust their investments with eToro. You can start investing from as little as $10.  Choose from a selection of crypto assets including Bitcoin, Ethereum and Dogecoin. You can practice risk-free, with a virtual investment account.  Own crypto with eToro  Cryptocurrency investing within the EU...
    LONG Covid has baffled scientists more than the virus itself. Millions of people are grappling with long-term effects of Covid illness, sometimes with no answers for how to relive their symptoms. 1Long Covid plagues sufferers with fatigue In the UK, an estimated 1.3 million people - one in 50 - are likely to be suffering from long Covid. The figures from the Office for National Statistics, collected in the month to December 6, suggests rates of long Covid are the highest they have ever been. Some 809,000 people said long Covid adversely affected their day-to-day activities.  Fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom (51 per cent), followed by loss of smell (37 per cent) shortness of breath (36 per cent) and difficulty concentrating (28 per cent). Now, scientists led by the Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington, say they have been able to pinpoint four key factors that may help predict who will end up with the condition. These can be identified at the original point of Covid diagnosis. They are: Type 2 diabetes High viral load Reactivation of...
    FOR Britain, the Covid war is over. Hospital admissions, infections and deaths are down. The virus is weakening. Vaccinations are working. 2Our version of the classic anti-war shot with Boris Johnson and Sajid Javid Boris Johnson has declared a ceasefire, giving our shell-shocked economy and blighted high streets a chance of survival after two years of lockdown misery. Working from home is no longer encouraged. We can resume hugging and holidays, visiting GPs, showing our faces and living life as it used to be. And embrace this return to normality we must. Your after-work pub will welcome your hard-earned cash. The sandwich shop where you buy your lunch will be delighted to once again prepare your “usual”.  Most read in NewsLET IT SNOW Track winter storm Jasper as Arctic blast dumps MORE snow on East CoastFLIGHT CHAOS Police kill armed man at airport as incident causes closuresBACK FOR MORE What to know about the voting rights billTEEN HORROR 3 teens found dead in double murder-suicide' with 'signs of trauma' at scene Yet like Japanese soldiers still fighting after hostilities ended, public...
    Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, said Wednesday that he expects the Food and Drug Administration to approve the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children under the age of five as early as next month. Fauci told Blue Star Families, a non-profit group that supports the families of U.S. service members, that he expects authorization for the shots to be extended soon. Pfizer is currently trialing its Covid vaccine in children as young as six months old, and reportedly plans to submit its application for approval soon. The Pfizer vaccine is the only jab minors in the U.S. are eligible for, with children as young as five allowed to receive the shot.  The U.S. is already a part of a small list of countries that jabs children under the age of 12. Approving the vaccines for children as young as six months old would make U.S. kids the youngest in the world to receive the shots. Dr Anthony Fauci (pictured), said Wednesday that he expects Covid vaccines to become available for children younger than age five as soon as...
    It's known as the best medicine, but laughter really can help our health - as long as we're laughing with friends, a new study suggests.  Sharing a laugh with a good mate reduces the risk of cognitive or physical disability by over 30 per cent for people aged 65 and over, researchers have found.  This was in comparison to people of the same age who laughed alone, such as when they were watching TV with no-one for company.  While the reason for the findings remains unclear, researchers suggest that laughing with friends may improve our immune functions, which in turn can reduce the risk of disability.    Laughter is the best medicine: Sharing a joke with friends reduces the risk of disability by over 30 per cent, according to the study (stock image) WHAT IS FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY?  Functional disability has been defined as acquired difficulty in performing basic everyday tasks or more complex tasks needed for independent living, either due to cognitive or physical impairment. Disabilities in old age are common occurrences affecting the functionality and thus compromising the ability to carry out the...
    Binge-watching TV can significantly raise your risk of suffering blood clots, a major review suggests. British researchers found the risk was about a third higher in adults who spent four or more hours in front of the TV a day, compared to people who watched for two-and-a-half or less. They are now urging people to take half-hour breaks between boxsets to 'stand and stretch' and cut down on snacks.  Bristol University experts also urged Netflix addicts to think about using a stationary bike.  Scientists have known for years that prolonged sitting can raises the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which kills thousands of people every year.  Long periods of inactivity lets blood to pool in the extremities, which can then lead to clots. It is for this same reason airplane travellers are advised to move frequently on long-haul flights.  But the new study found that even physically active people were still at more risk of blood clots.  Researchers also warned people who binge on TV tend to eat junk food, which can lead to other conditions such as obesity and...
    A MARKER in your eye could reveal if you’re at risk of an early death, scientists say. Their discovery means they could predict who may die within a decade before any obvious signs of ill health. 1Scientists say they can predict if someone is likely to die in the next ten years by looking at their eye healthCredit: Alamy Researchers say the retina, tissue which sits at the back of the eye, can give clues about a person’s health. Damage to the nerves and blood vessels in the retina may be an early warning sign of disease. Already it is known that factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and poor diet are implicated in eye disorders, such as macular degeneration. The new research suggests if the retina is ageing faster than the person themselves, it may forewarn an early death. Scientists from China and Australia called this the “retinal age gap”. They tested their “eye-opening” theory on thousands of Brits. Those with the largest retinal age gaps of 10 years were up to 67 per cent more...
    A BLOOD test predicts the patients most likely to die from Covid. It identifies 14 proteins in the blood linked to survival, scientists say. 1A blood test predicts the patients most likely to die from Covid Artificial Intelligence uses plasma levels to work out mortality risk with almost 100 per cent accuracy weeks before. The test may also prove useful in measuring the efficacy of Covid-19 treatments developed in the future by showing their impact on individual patients. The researchers analysed levels of 321 proteins in blood samples taken at 349 time points from 50 individuals being treated in Germany and Austria. A machine learning method was used to find links between the measured proteins and patient survival. Prof Florian Kurth, of Charite University Hospital, Berlin, said: “Covid-19 is exceptionally diverse, ranging from asymptomatic to very serious ­disease and death. “It is difficult to estimate the individual risk.” The average time from admission to death in the study was 28 days. Most read in The US SunPOOR GIRL Khloe Kardashian slammed for posting 'extremely filtered' photo of niece ChicagoMASON SPILLS?...
    Eye scans could in the future be used to calculate your risk of dying, researchers have suggested.  Academics claim the retina acts as a 'window' in allowing doctors to take a deeper look at someone's health.  And Australian scientists have now linked a bigger 'retinal age gap' to a heightened risk of death.  The gap is the difference between someone's chronological age and the estimated biological age of their retina.  The latter can be calculated by an AI programme that analyses images taken of the fundus, the internal back surface of the eye. Some high street opticians offer these scans.  People with gaps of a decade were up to 67 per cent more likely to die, according to Australian experts who tracked volunteers for 11 years.   Academics calculated there was a 2 per cent increased risk of death for every year of gap.  Experts analysed retina scans taken from 36,000 Britons, they found those with retinas older than their biological age were at increased risk of death. Each one year gap between a person's retina age and their biological age...
    Children are extremely unlikely to die from COVID-19, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveals. The agency's data shows that around 8.3 million children have contracted Covid and 841 have died since the pandemic began in March 2020. This means that children make up around 12 percent of cases and less than 0.1 percent of deaths in the U.S. The Census estimates that 22 percent of Americans are under the age of 18. Children under the age of five are especially unlikely to die, with 259 deaths being reported among the population that makes up six percent of Americans. It has long been known children do not suffer from Covid as badly as adults do. Previous studies have found that around half of cases among children are asymptomatic. Data from the CDC shows that children make up less than 0.1% of COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. since the pandemic first began in March 2020. Pictured: A young girl in Boston, Massachusetts, is tested for Covid on January 13 The CDC reports age mortality data on a...
    By Carla K. Johnson | Associated Press The fast-moving omicron variant may cause less severe disease on average, but COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. are climbing and modelers forecast 50,000 to 300,000 more Americans could die by the time the wave subsides in mid-March. The seven-day rolling average for daily new COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. has been trending upward since mid-November, reaching nearly 1,700 on Jan. 17 — still below the peak of 3,300 in January 2021. COVID-19 deaths among nursing home residents started rising slightly two weeks ago, although still at a rate 10 times less than last year before most residents were vaccinated. Despite signs omicron causes milder disease on average, the unprecedented level of infection spreading through the country, with cases still soaring in many states, means many vulnerable people will become severely sick. If the higher end of projections comes to pass, that would push total U.S. deaths from COVID-19 over 1 million by early spring. “A lot of people are still going to die because of how transmissible omicron has been,” said University of...
    In the wake of the pandemic, millions are reporting trouble sleeping. For the past three days we’ve shared advice from consultant neurologist and sleep specialist Professor Guy Leschziner. Insomnia is generally not a threat to physical health.  But the same can’t be said of sleep apnoea. In the final part of our series, Professor Leschziner focuses on identifying and managing the condition...  Feeling tired all the time is a common problem — and the list of possible causes is endless: an underactive thyroid gland, diabetes, depression, cancer, shift work, anaemia, carbon monoxide poisoning... the list goes on. One possible — if under-considered — explanation is sleep apnoea. As you sleep, it’s natural for the muscles in the walls of our throat to slacken a little. However, in some people this slackening causes the airway to collapse and obstruct, leading you to snore loudly, repeatedly stop breathing, and then gasp awake or almost awake many times a night. You will probably not realise you’re doing it — although your partner might — and the danger is that these multiple little awakenings...
    A majority of Americans says in a stunning new poll that U.S. democracy is at risk of 'extinction.' The assessment comes in a new poll near the anniversary of President Joe Biden's first year and office, just days after the anniversary of the Capitol riot.   About half, or 26 per cent, said U.S. democracy's survival 'is secured for future generations,' according to the poll from Schoen Cooperman Research. Slightly fewer, 23 per cent, said they weren't sure, with 51 per cent saying the democracy was in danger of extinction. The result comes after President Joe Biden spoke about the Capitol riot during a voting rights speech in Atlanta, saying that a year ago a 'dagger was literally held at the throat of American democracy.' A new Schoen Cooperman poll shows a 51 percent majority believe the U.S. democracy is at risk of extinction Only 54 per cent of Americans said President Joe Biden was the legitimate winner of the election in a new poll On Saturday, former President Donald Trump, who launched an unsuccessful election overturn effort last year, once again...
    by Ore Koren, Indiana University The potential for violent extremism in America to erupt into full-fledged conflict across the country is a common topic of discussion nowadays. A recent FBI report highlights an increasing risk of violence against government institutions, private organizations and individuals. The possible perpetrators: primarily “lone wolves,” but potentially also militias and other organized groups such as animal activists, anti-abortionists and white supremacists. Claims that America is at the greatest risk of civil war since, well, the Civil War, recently received additional support from some experts in the field of political science. But civil wars are rare events. Before the 2020 election, I analyzed the risk of a so-called “Second American Civil War” that some speculated might ignite on or around Election Day. I concluded the risk was very low, while also emphasizing the uncertainty of the times. Despite the ugly Capitol riot of Jan. 6, 2021, and anti-racism protests of the past few years, some of which included rioting, violent confrontation, and property destruction, my analysis has held, and I remain unconvinced that...
    OMICRON has triggered a rise in babies being admitted to hospital with Covid – but most only get a fever and a runny nose. Data shows 42 per cent of child Covid patients are now younger than one, up from 31 per cent in waves of earlier variants. 2Sage advisers say Omicron has led to a rise in babies being admitted to hospital with Covid, but most of them aCredit: Getty - Contributor But top doctors on the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) say the tots are not getting sick and most are admitted as a precaution. A Sage report revealed babies younger than one have made up a majority of childhood admissions since December. But there have only been 171 of them, with a study finding just one out of 55 needed intensive care because of a high fever. It is in line with a string of hugely positive studies which found Omicron is milder than other strains in the vaccinated - with the first official UK report revealing the risk of hospitalisation is 50 to 70 per cent lower than...
    Center for American Liberty CEO and civil rights attorney Harmeet Dhillon praised the Supreme Court's decision to block President Biden’s vaccine mandate on large businesses, calling it a "reprieve" for the millions of American workers whose livelihoods were on the line. "This is a very important ruling and it is indeed a reprieve for the millions of Americans who work for employers who do not wish to impose this mandate on their workers," Dhillon, who personally represented a client in the case, told Tucker Carlson. DHILLON PREDICTS SPLIT SCOTUS RULING ON BIDEN VACCINE MANDATES Thursday's decision undercuts Biden's attempt to federalize the private workforce, but not everyone is off the hook, Dhillon said. "If you work for an employer who already is imposing a mandate based on their own initiative or because of the state rule imposing such a mandate, then you’re in a completely different situation," she said. A lone protester stands outside the U.S. Supreme Court as it hears arguments against the Biden administration's nationwide vaccine-or-testing COVID-19 mandates, in Washington, U.S., January 7, 2022. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst) As predicted, the High Court issued a split ruling, voting to overturn...
    During Wednesday’s edition of his podcast, Joe Rogan denied that myocarditis – an inflammation of the heart muscle – is more commonly a side effect in children who have had Covid-19 than it is in children who have had the Covid-19 vaccine. He was immediately fact-checked by his guest Josh Szeps, who said the opposite is actually true. After not believing Szeps, Rogan had his producer look up the information to confirm. Szeps was correct. Here’s their exchange: ROGAN: For young boys in particular, there’s an adverse risk associated with the vaccine. There’s like a two- to fourfold increase in the instances of myocarditis versus hospitalization. SZEPS: You know that there’s an increased risk in myocarditis among that age cohort from getting Covid as well – which exceeds the risk of myocarditis from the vaccine. ROGAN: I don’t think that’s true. It don’t think it’s true. SZEPS: It is. ROGAN: No, no, no. I don’t think it’s true that there’s an increased risk of myocarditis from people catching Covid that are young, versus increased risk of myocarditis from the vaccine....
    New data from New York City shows the much higher risk for hospitalization and death than unvaccinated people faced as the initial Omicron surge swept through the city last month. For the week ending December 25, when Omicron first hit the city, unvaccinated New Yorkers were hospitalized at a rate of 179.84 per 100,000, versus 21.85 for vaccinated. That means the unvaccinated were hospitalized 8.2 times more often on a per capita basis. It is a wider gap than the 6.3 hospitalization risk multiple that unvaccinated New Yorkers have faced on average since vaccinations started.  The latest data from the New York City Department of Health also showed that unvaccinated people were 8.9 times more likely to die in the final full week of December. For the week ending December 25, when Omicron first hit the city, unvaccinated New Yorkers were hospitalized at a rate of 179.84 per 100,000, versus 21.85 for vaccinated Unvaccinated people were 8.9 times more likely to die in the final full week of December. Due to a display error on the NYC website, unvaccinated deaths...
    Glandular fever may be the biggest cause of multiple sclerosis, a major study has concluded. Harvard scientists say they have 'compelling evidence' the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – which causes the 'kissing disease'/mononucleosis – is to blame. They tracked the prevalence of MS among 10million soldiers in the US military over the course of two decades. Volunteers regularly had blood tests taken to see if they had EBV.  Almost 1,000 were diagnosed with the crippling condition, which can leave victims struggling to walk and see. Analysis of the patients revealed that those who had EBV were 32 times more likely to get MS. No other infection raised the risk. Professor Alberto Ascherio, study author, said: 'The hypothesis that EBV causes MS has been investigated by our group and others for several years. 'But this is the first study providing compelling evidence of causality. 'This is a big step because it suggests that most MS cases could be prevented by stopping EBV infection.' He added: 'Targeting EBV could lead to the discovery of a cure for MS.' A graphic showing a 3D...
    Some Americans are trying to get COVID-19 on purpose and get the disease 'out of the way,' assuming that their case will be mild - but doctors say this strategy is unwise. While leading experts and modeling studies have suggested that all Americans will be exposed to this variant, seeking out infection is not the recommended way to weather this surge. Young and healthy people are still at risk of 'long Covid' - symptoms lasting weeks or months after their initial diagnosis - explained infectious disease specialist Dr Kitonga Kiminyo. Kiminyo called the 'get Omicron out of the way' strategy 'a very foolish proposition.' While Omicron might be less severe, the number of Covid patients has surged past last winter's record, with over 150,000 people currently hospitalized for the disease. Plus, scientists have not yet determined whether an Omicron infection provides people with immunity against future infections from this and other variants. 'That would be a very foolish proposition,' said Dr Kitonga Kiminyo, discussing the 'get Omicron out of the way' strategy some Americans are employing on WPBF 25 In the...
    Scientists have discovered a gene that more than doubles the risk of becoming severely ill with Covid.  Researchers from the Medical University of Bialystok in Poland found that the gene is the fourth most important factor determining how seriously a person suffers from Covid, after age, weight and gender.  The gene is present in around 14 per cent of the Polish population, compared to 8-9 per cent in Europe as a whole and 27 per cent in India, they say.   Its discovery could help doctors identify those who are most at risk from the disease and prioritise them for vaccinations. Poland and several other countries in central and eastern Europe are battling their latest surges of coronavirus cases and deaths while continuing to record much lower vaccinations rates than in western Europe.  Polish scientists have found a gene that they say more than doubles the risk of becoming severely ill with Covid (stock image) The new study was led by Professor Marcin Moniuszko, a professor at Medical University of Bialystok.  The gene might not be a specific 'Covid gene' as...
    President Joe Biden half-joked that he was “insulted” when a reporter asked him about Stacey Abrams “skipping” his major voting rights speech in Atlanta. The president spoke to reporters as he departed the White House shortly before he and Vice President Kamala Harris were to speak at the Atlanta University Center Consortium on the grounds of Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia in support of the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. In those exchanges, the president mock-bristled at a question about Abrams, who cited a scheduling conflict in declining to attend, and responded to another question about the political “risk” of taking a strong stand on voting rights should the effort fail: Q Good morning, sir. Quick question on voting: Any thoughts on Stacey Abrams skipping your speech today, sir? Are you insulted she is skipping the speech? THE PRESIDENT: I’m insulted you asked the question. (Laughs.) I spoke with Stacey this morning. We have a great relationship. We got our scheduling mixed up. I’m going to be — I talked with her at length...
    London (CNN Business)Many business leaders, politicians and academics are overwhelmingly pessimistic about the threat Covid-19 still poses even as the pandemic enters its third year. They worry that an uneven economic recovery could deepen divisions within societies and between countries.More than 84% of global experts surveyed by the World Economic Forum are worried or concerned about the outlook for the world, according to the forum's Global Risks Report published Tuesday. Just 12% of experts have a positive view, and only 4% reported feeling optimistic."Most respondents ... expect the next three years to be characterized by either consistent volatility and multiple surprises or fractured trajectories that will separate relative winners and losers," WEF said.With only half of the world's population fully vaccinated, WEF said that vaccine inequality is creating a divergent economic recovery "that risks compounding pre-existing social cleavages and geopolitical tensions." Only 11% of the nearly 1,000 experts and leaders who responded to the group's survey expect the global economic recovery to accelerate over the next three years. Developing countries, excluding China, will fall further behind advanced economies, the survey...
    Demonstrators holds a banner with 'Covid slave ticket' written while they protest against the compulsory vaccination campaign against SARSCoV2, Belgium.Thierry Monasse | Getty Images News | Getty Images New research from the organizers of the annual Davos gatherings in the Swiss Alps warns of inequalities stemming from the coronavirus pandemic that could flare domestic and cross-border tensions around the world. This year's Global Risks Report by the World Economic Forum describes a "global divergence" — where poorer nations have much lower Covid-19 vaccination rates and , therefore, face more prolonged economic troubles. "Covid-19 and its economic and societal consequences continue to pose a critical threat to the world. Vaccine inequality and a resultant uneven economic recovery risk compounding social fractures and geopolitical tensions," WEF said in the report published Tuesday. "The resulting global divergence will create tensions — within and across borders — that risk worsening the pandemic's cascading impacts and complicating the coordination needed to tackle common challenges." Aside from the catastrophic death toll, one of the most immediate impacts of the coronavirus pandemic has been the ensuing rise...
    A MUM has shared her disbelief that all three of her children share the same January birthday. Sinead Cottam, has two sons and a daughter and incredibly all three siblings were born on January 11. 5Sinead gets three cakes for her three children who all celebrate their birthday on the same dayCredit: Caters The 31-year-old from Scarborough said people refuse to believe her when she explains that Lewis, 11, Shae, five, and Demi, two defied unbelievable odds to celebrate their birthdays together. Sinead’s oldest son Lewis, soon to be 12, arrived two days after his January 9 due date back in 2010. He enjoyed being an only child – and having his birthday to himself - until Sinead gave birth to his little brother Shae, who arrived four days early also on the 11th January, in 2016. FABULOUS BINGO: GET A £5 FREE BONUS WITH NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED Single mum Sinead went into labour with Shae the day Lewis...
    Novak Djokovic will plead his case in front of a judge today in a last-ditch attempt to stay in Melbourne and contest his 10th Australian Open Title. Lawyers for the Minister of Home Affairs filed their submissions at 10.30pm on Sunday - less than 12 hours before the case will be heard in the Federal Court. The government maintains the decision to tear up Djokovic's visa was correct on the basis he failed to justify his purported medical exemption. Even if Djokovic is successful in his visa battle, lawyers for the government say they could cancel his visa again, leaving him in perpetual limbo just a week before the Open begins. Their submission claims Djokovic is of a 'greater health risk' of spreading the virus than an vaccinated person, and that infecting others would 'burden the health system'.  Novak Djokovic (pictured with Tennis Australia boss Craig Tiley in 2021) is set to learn his fate after a whirlwind trip to try and defend his Australian Open title - which would make him the most successful men's player of all time...
    TWO years ago, we wouldn't have been able to tell you what TikTok was - but these days, we can easily spend HOURS scrolling through the endless number of hilarious videos. Although it's great for teaching us the life hacks we never knew we needed (DIY extension cable wall plug anyone?), it's also seems like a different bonkers beauty trend is going viral every other day. 8This viral TikTok video saw a woman cutting her own lashes with nail scissorsCredit: Tiktok/@tesia84 8She then clamped her fake lashes over themCredit: Tiktok/@tesia84 And let's just say, not all of them are winners. Here Fabulous reveals the beauty trends that experts are begging you to avoid - so have YOU tried any? Cutting your lashes In our books, nothing beats a full set of fluttery fake lashes. FABULOUS BINGO: GET A £5 FREE BONUS WITH NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED But while most people simply attach them to the top of your natural lashes, TikTok account Beauty Trends shared a video earlier this month that left viewers stunned. The viral clip shows the woman...
    (CNN)As the Supreme Court debated federal authority to impose a vaccine requirement on workers, the nine justices could not help but reveal their varying sentiments about the depth of America's Covid-19 pandemic and the value of vaccines. "We know that the best way to prevent spread is for people to get vaccinated," Justice Elena Kagan said, "and to prevent dangerous illness and death is for people to get vaccinated. That is by far the best. The second best is to wear masks." That view was not universally shared. Supreme Court appears poised to block Bidens vaccine and testing rules for businessesJustice Clarence Thomas, a conservative, took a different tack than liberal Kagan regarding the sweeping rule the Occupational Health and Safety Administration seeks to impose. "There's been some talk ... that the vaccinations are efficacious in preventing some degree of infection to others," he said, and observed, "As I remember in the filings ... that younger workers, the 20-year-olds who are unvaccinated are actually safer than the older workers who are vaccinated. So there are obviously some differences."Read MoreRELATED:...
    ALZHEIMER'S is a devastating condition for those who have it and their families. But experts have warned that there is one warning sign that could double your risk of the condition. 1Various studies have shown that there is a link between smell and the development of Dementia and Alzheimer'sCredit: Getty - Contributor Alzheimer's is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. The disease progresses in several stages: preclinical, mild (sometimes called early-stage), moderate, and severe (sometimes called late-stage). A long-term study of almost 3,000 adults aged between 57 and 85 found that those who could not identify at least four out of five common smells were more than twice as likely to develop the disease within five years. The five odours, in order of increasing difficulty, were peppermint, fish, orange, rose and leather. Most people, about 78 per cent, were able to correctly identify at least four out of the five scents but 14 per cent could only name three, five per cent could name two, two per cent could name one and one...
    With every passing year, our understanding of how dementia affects people and how we can treat it gets better and better. Unfortunately, every new year brings us closer to a crisis: According to a new study published Thursday in The Lancet, dementia rates around the world are expected to triple by the year 2050—affecting 153 million people, up from 57 million in 2019. This comprehensive new forecast—which predicted prevalence rates for 195 countries—is an urgent warning for the world to address dementia’s biggest risk factors now rather than later, as well as for countries that will be hit hardest to begin making preparations to provide long term care and treatment options for elderly populations over the next three decades. “Dementia has a large impact on health systems, and service and support for end of life care,” Emma Nichols, public health researcher at the University of Washington and lead author of the new study, told The Daily Beast. “As the number of people with dementia increases, the availability of health services will need to increase to keep pace with anticipated demand.”...
    Thanks to the arrival of the Omicron variant, it’s now accurate to say that COVID-19 is “just the flu” for the vast majority of the population. Before the Omicron variant, an average vaccinated 75-year-old had about a 0.5% chance of dying from COVID-19 if contracted, according to The New York Times. The typical death rate from influenza for the same age cohort, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewed by the NYT, falls in a similar range between 0.6% and 1.3%. About 48 million of the roughly 54 million American residents aged 65 and older are fully vaccinated, the CDC reports. So, for those Americans, risk of dying from COVID-19 was not significantly different from dying of the flu before Omicron came around. Now, evidence continues to pile up that Omicron is less severe — perhaps significantly so — than prior strains of the virus. (RELATED: Omicron Can Be So Mild, Americans Are Struggling To Distinguish It From A Common Cold) One study found that the Omicron variant is 80% less likely to hospitalize...
    Former President Jimmy Carter has warned democracy is in danger, that there is a risk of 'civil conflict' and urged Americans to 'set aside their differences'.   Writing in an op-ed in the New York Times as part of a series to mark the anniversary of the January 6 insurrection, Mr Carter said that 'our great nation now teeters on the brink of a widening abyss.' He said he had hoped the breach of the Capitol would have 'shocked the nation into addressing the toxic polarization that threatens our democracy' but lamented that it had not.  'Our great nation now teeters on the brink of a widening abyss. Without immediate action, we are at genuine risk of civil conflict and losing our precious democracy. Americans must set aside differences and work together before it is too late,' he wrote.  Last year, the 97-year-old joined fellow former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton in denouncing the Capitol insurrection as Congress was certifying the Joe Biden's win in the 2020 election.   And on Wednesday, Mr Carter set out five steps 'for American...
    COVID-19 during pregnancy surprisingly did not increase the chance of babies' neurodevelopmental delay, although those born during the pandemic were associated with higher neurodevelopmental delays compared to those born prior to the pandemic, according to a recent JAMA Pediatrics study.   Columbia University Irving Medical Center established a prospective cohort study called COVID-19 Mother Baby Outcomes (COMBO) Initiative in the spring of 2020 to study the associations between the exposure of the virus while the baby is still in the mother’s womb with the well-being of the baby.  The researchers studied a cohort of infants who were exposed to COVID-19 during pregnancy and compared them to a control group of similar gestational age at birth, birthday, sex, and mode of delivery who were not exposed to the virus.  Whether or not kids should be required to wear masks has been a polarizing topic thorough the COVID-19 pandemic.  "Infants born to mothers who have viral infections during pregnancy have a higher risk of neurodevelopmental deficits, so we thought we would find some changes in the neurodevelopment of babies whose mothers...
    Teachers’ unions across the country are demanding that schools shut down in favor of virtual learning amid concerns over the low-risk omicron variant of the coronavirus. Virtual learning has proven detrimental to the educations, social development, and mental health of children. The Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) voted 73 percent in favor of not returning to school until their demands are met. “Testing, contact tracing and vaccination efforts by [Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s (D)] administration have been an abject failure,” CTU Vice President Stacy Davis Gates told CNN. “Our mayor … is failing our students. We want a plan that looks like, that sounds like safety.” Even Lightfoot appears to believe the union is overstepping. “We need to keep our kids in schools, which is what we’re going to do in Chicago,” Lightfoot told CNBC on Monday, dismissing the concerns as “saber-rattling by teachers union leadership.” In a Twitter thread announcing their decision, the CTU said in part, “We fight for your children like they are our own, because when we teach, they are.” Thousands of our members are CPS parents. To...
    IT may not just be what you eat, but how you prepare it, that drives your cancer risk. Some experts argue that grilling or roasting food until it is slightly burnt is dangerous and you should instead aim for a “golden” colour. 1Cooking food at lower temperatures is better for you, the Food Standard Agency says Although burnt food is usually an accident - such as a pizza left in for 10 minutes too long - many people prefer the taste of it when it comes to toast, meats and more. When food is cooked at a high temperature, a natural by-product called acrylamide is produced. Acrylamide may be carcinogenic, suggesting burnt toast, burnt chips, or anything else that’s a little on the blackened side may be linked to an increase in cancer. The chemical is more likely to be produced with roasting, grilling, toasting and frying. The Food Standard Agency warns: “Laboratory tests show that acrylamide in the diet causes cancer in animals.  “Scientists agree that acrylamide in food has the potential to cause cancer in humans as well. ...
    A POPULAR food could double men's risk of prostate cancer, a study has warned. Researchers found eating lots of dairy based items might increase the likelihood of developing the disease later in life. 1Men who eat dairy are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer, a study has warnedCredit: Getty - Contributor A paper published in Epidemiological Reviews suggests it could even double the risk for people who take in high amounts of dairy. The researchers wrote: “In these studies, men with the highest dairy intakes had approximately double the risk of total prostate cancer, and up a fourfold increase in the risk of metastatic or fatal prostate cancer relative to low consumers. “It remains unknown which compound in dairy products might be responsible for this association. “However, several recent studies which have been able to investigate nutrients more thoroughly suggest that calcium and perhaps phosphorus may play important roles.” It has been previously thought it is the fat content in milk which is the risk factor. In 2019 US scientists analysed data on 47 studies which looked at the...
    Yale University has banned its students eating outdoors at local restaurants for this upcoming spring semester, despite a leading scientist saying students are the lowest risk group for serious COVID side effects. The Ivy League university - which has 58 percent of students living in on-campus housing - made the announcement in an email Tuesday afternoon.  Students are being told to return to campus between January 14 and February 4 and they have to quarantine until the results of a COVID-19 test, according to the Yale Daily News.  A post on its Facebook page explained: 'Yale announced its plans for the start of spring semester in an afternoon email. Students can return to campus anytime between Jan. 14 and Feb. 4.  'They must quarantine in their residences (except to pick up food and test) until they receive results of an arrival test. Yale instituted a campus-wide quarantine until Feb. 7 or (which may be extended depending on public health conditions).  'Students may not visit New Haven businesses or eat at local restaurants (even outdoors) except for curbside pickup. Dining is grab-and-go...