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    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – The Walnut Valley Water District issued water restrictions Tuesday in response to the state’s ongoing drought situation. The WVWD Board of Directors declared a level 2 water shortage, which calls for a 20% drop in water use. The Walnut Valley Water District has about 100,000 customers in parts of Diamond Bar, Walnut, the City of Industry, Pomona, West Covina and an unincorporated area of Rowland Heights. Under the restrictions, residents are limited to watering their lawns only three days per week. There is also no watering between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Home car washes are also banned. There is no watering during rainfall, or 48 hours after rainfall. There is also no washing of hard surfaces such as sidewalks, driveways and buildings. For a full list of restrictions, click here. Similar water conservation measures have been issued in cities including Glendale, Pasadena and Simi Valley. Although a recent slew of storms dumped heavy rain and snow that helped pull California out of the most severe drought category, the state still remains in...
    DAVIS, Calif. -- A high schooler from Davis, Calif. has joined an elite club of students with a perfect SAT score.Apurva Mishra, 17, a senior at Davis Senior High School answered every single question correctly on this year's test.RELATED: UC system officially drops SAT, ACT scores from use in admissions and scholarshipsMishra said he prepared whenever he had free time, but that has been hard to come by. He is also vice-captain of the robotics team, student body president, and recently took up a job as a software engineering intern.RELATED: Calif. to give subsidies to students who volunteer with Californians for All College CorpsMishra admitted there was one section of the exam that gave him more trouble than the others."The first section for sure. The reading sections," said Mishra. "They're reading these long passages and then they ask you at some point in time, what was the meaning of the intro paragraph or what did the author want to convey in that section? And you're like I don't know."Mishra applied to about a dozen colleges. He expects to start hearing...
    By Peter Valdes-Dapena | CNN Business With the trucking industry facing a shortage of qualified drivers, the US government is setting up an apprenticeship program for young truckers. The new program will allow people as young as 18 to drive big interstate semi trucks. The new program is coming on-line as the industry complains of driver shortages, which have gotten worse during the coronavirus pandemic. Last October, the head of the American Trucking Associations said the industry needed about 80,000 more drivers. Safety advocates, however, are objecting to the program, saying it puts potentially dangerous, inexperienced drivers at the controls of some of the biggest, heaviest vehicles on road. Currently, 49 states and the Washington DC give commercial driver licenses to people under 21, Nick Geale, ATA vice president of workforce policy pointed out in a statement. These younger drivers can drive semis throughout large states like California and Texas, he noted, they just can’t cross state lines. This new program will just take some of those drivers and train them so they can cross state lines in their rigs....
    The state Department of Justice is opening a civil-rights investigation into the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office and its management of South Bay jails, as well as other allegations of neglect and misconduct, with the aim of compelling systemic changes, California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced Wednesday. Bonta said that his office has started what is known as a pattern or practice investigation, “to identify and, as appropriate, compel the correction of systemic violations of the constitutional rights of the community at large by a law enforcement agency.” The investigation comes after the Board of Supervisors, led by board members Joe Simitian and Otto Lee, spearheaded a referral last fall calling for multiple external authorities to launch independent investigations into the Sheriff Laurie Smith’s management of the county jails and corruption allegations related to her practices in issuing concealed-gun permits. “It is clear that there is a lack of trust in Santa Clara County as a result of deeply concerning allegations around county jail facilities and other misconduct. These concerns have been repeatedly voiced by elected leaders, editorial boards, community...
    US President Joe Biden (C) and First Lady Jill Biden (R) tour a neighborhood destroyed by the Marshall Fire alongside Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle (L) in Louisville, Colorado, January 7, 2022.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images The Biden administration this week unveiled a 10-year plan to spend billions of dollars to combat destructive wildfires on millions of additional acres of land and make forests more resilient to future blazes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said in a statement on Tuesday that its plan, called the "wildfire crisis strategy," targets dozens of areas in eleven Western states. The plan includes treatments such as thinning overgrown trees, pruning forests and conducting prescribed burns to minimize dead vegetation. The administration's plan quadruples the government's fuels and forest health treatments. It comes after a year during which California experienced the second-largest fire in state history and Colorado endured its most destructive fire ever that ignited unusually late in the season.  "We're not going to stop fires," U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said at a press briefing in Arizona on Tuesday. "But what we can...
    Utilizing officer’s body-camera footage, in-car video footage and audio recordings, Pasadena Police Department officials have released a new overview of last November’s shootout with a man who killed a local senior, setting off a crime spree that ended in a fatal shootout with police. The recently released briefing provides a deeper look at the harrowing 15-minute incident that spanned a two-block area. The investigation of the deadly incident resulted in four different crime scenes and tied up a shocked neighborhood for hours. Police say the suspect, 24-year-old Devin Edward Hall, a military veteran and a resident of Inglewood, carjacked a driver and took a woman hostage on Tuesday, Nov. 23. The incident began after Pasadena Police Department received several calls to 9-1-1 regarding a shooting that had just occurred in the area of Sunnyslope Avenue and Orange Grove Boulevard. PPD’s investigation into the incident is ongoing, and it is expected that additional details could be revealed as the investigation continues, department leaders said. California law, however, requires that law enforcement agencies make available, within 45 days, video and audio recordings of...
    NEW YORK (AP) — A new study in two states that compares coronavirus protection from prior infection and vaccination concludes getting the shots is still the safest way to prevent COVID-19. The study examined infections in New York and California last summer and fall and found people who were both vaccinated and had survived a prior bout of COVID-19 had the most protection. But unvaccinated people with a prior infection were a close second. By fall, when the more contagious delta variant had taken over but boosters weren’t yet widespread, those people had lower diagnoses than vaccinated people who had no past infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which released the study Wednesday, noted several caveats to the research. And some outside experts were cautious of the findings and wary of how they might be interpreted. “The bottom line message is that from symptomatic COVID infection you do generate some immunity,” said immunologist E. John Wherry of the University of Pennsylvania. “But it’s still much safer to get your immunity from vaccination than from infection.” Vaccination has long...
    In a stunning sign of the heavy burden California’s hospitals are facing this winter, the state’s total number of hospitalizations for all reasons is approaching the peak of last winter’s COVID-19 surge, even as there are some signs that the rise in coronavirus-positive patients may be starting to ebb. Late last week, California averaged 52,000 people daily in its hospitals for all reasons. The count includes patients who were admitted not only for coronavirus-related reasons, but for other reasons as well, such as car collisions and cancer. That number is higher than the summer Delta surge, which topped out at 50,000 hospitalizations, according to state Department of Public Health data reviewed by The Times. California’s pandemic record of 55,000 people hospitalized daily for all reasons was reached last winter and averaged over a seven-day period. Coronavirus-positive patients continue to account for a wide margin of the overall census. As of Tuesday, 15,179 such patients were hospitalized statewide, the highest since Jan. 29, 2020, state data show. The number of coronavirus-positive patients in California’s intensive...
    SANTA ANA  — Charges have been filed against a man who allegedly punched two medical assistants at a COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Southern California and groped a nurse providing him medical care, prosecutors said. Charges of misdemeanor battery and resisting arrested were filed against Thomas Apollo, 44, of Poway, the Orange County District Attorney’s Office said in a statement Tuesday. Apollo faces arraignment on March 30. No attorney was listed for him on the court’s website. According to prosecutors, Apollo was asked to leave the Families Together clinic in Tustin on Dec. 30 after he refused to wear a mask. He allegedly called the clinic workers “murderers” and directed expletives at workers who asked him to put on a mask or go outside. Prosecutors said Apollo punched one assistant five times, hit another twice and then was pinned down by bystanders until police arrived. Related Articles N95 masks to be distributed free to public Forty Santa Clara County firefighters want exemptions from COVID booster mandate Think COVID is becoming like the flu? Here’s how...
    Joseph Baena is opening up about his famous father Arnold Schwarzenegger. The actor and realtor recently appeared on the "Unwaxed" podcast hosted by sisters Sophia and Sistine Stallone, daughters of Sylvester Stallone. "… My relationship with my dad, it took a little while for me and him to get really close and just [feel] like I can joke around with him and talk about anything," said the 24-year-old. Baena was born in 1997 to the Hollywood star’s former housekeeper Mildred Patricia Baena. ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER'S SON JOSEPH BAENA ANNOUNCES NEW MOVIE PROJECT IN HAWAII Joseph Baena is the son of actor/former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and his former housekeeper Mildred Patricia Baena. (Getty Images) "I grew up with my mom, and I was always nervous, and I didn’t want him to think bad of me and be like, ‘What the heck is this guy doing? He’s just partying all the time,’" Baena explained. "Now it’s like awesome. I’m so close to my dad, and we talk about everything." Baena also shared a surprising, fun side to the former California governor....
    A Los Angeles County deputy district attorney slammed progressive criminal justice policies as well as their architects, including his own boss, George Gascón, in the wake of a brutal stabbing that left a father grieving his daughter, a California grad student.  "We are not focused on victims, we are not focused on public safety, and in Los Angeles County you know, my boss, George Gascón, has a soft spot for criminals," John McKinney told "America’s Newsroom" co-hosts Dana Perino and Bill Hemmer.  McKinney went on to say the Gascón is on a mission to raise his "stature" nationally as a criminal reformer and is doing so by "leading in favor of criminals" rather than victims.  PROGRESSIVE PROSECUTORS BLASTED AS HOMICIDE NUMBERS CLIMB IN LOS ANGELES, OTHER LEFT-WING CITIES "He has created an environment where crime thrives here in Los Angeles County by explicitly telling the criminal community you can commit crimes, certain crimes I will not prosecute you at all," said McKinney.  Los Angeles County District Attorney George Gascón discusses community violence reduction efforts in Los Angeles on Wednesday,...
    A Woodland woman who had gone missing was found dead in her crashed car, the wreckage apparently having gone unnoticed for days. The family of Damaris Gonzalez, 20, last heard from her on Saturday. When they had not been able to contact her by Monday, they reported her disappearance to Woodland police. Around 5 a.m. Tuesday, her car was discovered in a brushy gully off Interstate 80 at the west edge of Sacramento. Gonzalez, its only occupant, was dead, the California Highway Patrol said. A CHP officer told Sacramento TV station KOVR that the wreck was thought to have happened about three days earlier. The car had apparently gone off westbound I-80 or the connector ramp from El Camino Avenue. It hit a tree and came to rest in heavy brush next to the Natomas Self Storage lot. The case is similar to the 2004 disappearance of Sean Patrick Sullivan, a 21-year-old college student from Roseville who went missing after a night out with friends. Eight days later, he was found dead in his wrecked car off an Interstate 80...
    While California continues to see disturbing rises in COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths, there are some early signs the unprecedented Omicron wave is slowing. The shift is uneven across the state, but the numbers suggest California could be reaching a crest in the latest surge. States on the East Coast that were hit earlier by the Omicron wave have already started to see a sustained decline in infections. California has recorded more than 7 million coronavirus cases as of this week. The tally, recorded in the state’s databases late Monday, comes one week after it recorded its 6 millionth coronavirus case. World & Nation This is how the COVID-19 health emergency could be over this year, WHO says A leading World Health Organization official says the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic — including deaths, hospitalizations and lockdowns — could be over this year if huge inequities in vaccinations and medicines are addressed quickly. Here are what the numbers show:Cases still high but leveling The exponential growth in California’s case rate appears to be leveling off, although it...
    LEEDS — Two California men were jailed in Alabama after police said they found almost 1,000 pounds of marijuana worth nearly $3 million hidden in a camper just off Interstate 20. An officer saw a camper running off the road while exiting the highway Tuesday morning, news outlets reported. The officer stopped the vehicle outside a store and the men agreed to a search, police said. Officers found 953 pounds of marijuana wrapped in plastic hidden throughout the camper, authorities said. Related Articles Humming in California court backfires on defendant who didn’t want to hear fentanyl warning Opinion: Build Back Better’s Medicare drug-payment cap worth saving Three dead after possible overdose in California apartment California law enforcement agencies, families call for tougher penalties against fentanyl dealers Naloxone to be handed out free in San Joaquin County amid rise in fentanyl deaths “There actually wasn’t a square inch of storage space in the vehicle, whether it be the undercarriage or inside the vehicle, that wasn’t stuffed with marijuana,” Police Chief...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. READ MORE: US Plans $50B Wildfire Fight Where Forests Meet NeighborhoodsIn exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part in the program in 2022, including UC Berkeley and UCLA, along with 16 of the 23 California State University schools and more than two dozen community and private colleges. The $146...
    By Cheri Mossburg | CNN Divers from the Fresno County, California, Sheriff’s Office embarked on a “dangerous dive operation” this week and recovered the body of Missy Hernandez, who was last seen more than a month ago, authorities announced Tuesday. The recovery came just days after Hernandez’s boyfriend, Ramon Jimenez, was charged with murder. Hernandez’s body was recovered Sunday from the California Aqueduct, Sheriff Margaret Mims said at a news conference. Her body was discovered weighed down beneath the surface, said Mims, who did not provide additional details. The delicate dive operation took about three hours, as divers searched in the cold waters. Each diver could only go beneath the surface for about 30 minutes at a time and could not touch the bottom of the aqueduct as the disruption of silt on the bottom obscured visibility, Mims explained. Jimenez, 41, was charged last week in connection with Hernandez’s death. Authorities said Thursday that he was being held in the Fresno County Jail on charges of murder and domestic violence. He was already in custody since he had been...
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Two more House Democrats announced Tuesday they won’t seek reelection in November, bringing the party’s total retirements to 28 ahead of what is expected to be a difficult midterm election year. Reps. Jim Langevin of Rhode Island and Jerry McNerney of California both said in separate announcements that they will not run for another term. Neither gave a specific reason or disclosed any firm plans for the future. The 57-year-old Langevin, chair of the House Armed Services subcommittee handling cyber issues, has represented a district covering western Rhode Island since 2001. He is the first quadriplegic to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. “I have not come to this decision lightly, but it’s time — time for me to chart a new course which I hope will keep me closer to home and allow me to spend more time with family and friends,” Langevin said in a video. The 70-year-old McNerney, who represents a district in California’s Central Valley that includes Stockton, has served eight terms in the House, beginning in 2007. “I will keep working...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) – Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. A student with Powell Hall in the background on the campus of UCLA on Jan. 7, 2022, in Los Angeles. (Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images) READ MORE: LA Musician Marty Roberts Of ‘Marty & Elayne’ Lounge Band Dies At 89The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part...
    Q: I frequently drove Interstate 5 to Southern California and have a solution for those who use it. By driving most of the way on Highway 101 — cutting over on the improved Highway 46, with Lost Hills as a refueling stop — I avoid the northern section of Interstate 5 and all of Highway 152. The drive is far safer and more pleasant. That leaves about 60 miles of two-lane I-5. Google Maps claims it is 28 miles and 25 minutes longer for this route between San Jose and Los Angeles, but with my higher speed on 46, I find it adds only 10 minutes. Rich Davis, San Jose A: Rich knows both routes well. He estimates he has driven about 250,000 miles between San Jose and Southern California on I-5 or the 101-46 route over 10 years. Q: I believe a big part of the problem on I-5 (and in California in general) is signage. Throughout California, signage says “Slower Traffic Keep Right.” The problem is that it requires people to determine if they are “slower” traffic. In...
    The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Daniel Donner, and Carolyn Fiddler, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Leading Off ● CA-09, CA-13: Democratic Rep. Jerry McNerney, who got to Congress in 2006 by unseating a longtime Republican incumbent, announced Tuesday that he would not seek another term in California's redrawn 9th District, a new seat that shares the same number as his current constituency. Minutes later, fellow Democratic Rep. Josh Harder declared that he'd run to succeed McNerney rather than continue with his previously announced campaign for the revamped 13th District just to the south, a move that will set off an open seat race for the latter district. Harder's move is a bit surprising. His old district, numbered the 10th, was chopped up during redistricting, leaving him representing just 31% of the new 13th, located in the mid-Central Valley. But an even smaller share of his current constituents—just 27%—wound up in the new 9th, which is based around the city of...
    Gov. Gavin Newsom’s pitch for $4.2 billion of state funding for high-speed rail is a big lie. “Let’s get the job done. Let’s finish the Central Valley component,” Newsom said during a Bay Area visit last week to push his budget plan. “The voters set aside the money for this purpose, I want to get those dollars out from Prop 1A and finish that job. Doing it in a fast and judicious way.” Let’s be clear: That’s not what Californians approved back in 2008. If Newsom really believes his claim about voters’ desires, then he should ask them. Let’s put high-speed rail back on the ballot with realistic independent cost estimates, timelines and environmental analyses and see what California voters really think. Newsom knows that would be a losing venture. In 2008, when voters approved nearly $10 billion of state bond funding, they were promised bullet trains traveling at more than 200 mph from San Diego to San Francisco and Sacramento at a cost of $45 billion. By last year, the cost estimate had jumped to $83 billion and perhaps as...
    Kaelyn Hughes, 21, has wanted to teach since she was in third grade. For her, school has always been a place of solace — and she wants to share what education has meant to her with other children. “I would like to show to other Black girls that you can do this — you can go to college. I came from a low-income area, and I didn’t think I would go to college. I didn’t think I would go far,” she said. “But you use education to help you get somewhere better.” The UC Merced senior spends time in elementary school classrooms working with students struggling with math or English as a volunteer — service that would otherwise be a luxury she could not afford. But through her participation in the state’s pilot Civic Action Fellowship program, she has been paid a stipend for tuition and basic needs, such as rent, allowing her to pursue service instead of another job to make ends meet. The Civic Action pilot is a model for an initiative at 45 state community colleges...
    Listen to this episode of The Times: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Google Podcasts This past December brought record-high amounts of snow to the Sierra Nevada, California’s main mountain range. The state, of course, has suffered for years from bad, bad drought, so we should all be happy that the dry days are over with all this snow, right? In fact, those who monitor such things are saying we should be saving water more than ever. Because there’s a real possibility that one day, blizzards in the West might be gone. Today, our Masters of Disasters reconvene to talk about this possible future. Host: Gustavo Arellano Guests: L.A. Times wildfire reporter Alex Wigglesworth, L.A. Times earthquake reporter Ron Lin, and L.A. Times water reporter Ian James. More reading: A ‘no snow’ California could come sooner than you think California is suddenly snow-capped and very wet. But how long will the water rush last? Editorial: Welcome the bout of winter storms, just don’t call...
    INDIO –  An employee at a Southern California golf course was found dead in a caged golf court that submerged in a canal, authorities said. Divers pulled the man from the cart Monday afternoon from the canal on the grounds of the Terra Lago golf course in Indio and he was pronounced dead at the scene. His name wasn’t immediately released. The cart, a maintenance vehicle that was caged to protect the driver from golf balls, was on its side in the canal. Related Articles Remains found by hiker in California mountains identified Gabby Petito murder: Moab cops should be disciplined, investigation says Stepmother of missing 7-year-old Harmony Montgomery to face nine new charges Mother, 2 siblings charged in death of missing 6-year-old boy found in abandoned home ‘Shopping cart killer’: Northern California woman had gone missing on vacation “This person was an employee of the Terra Lago golf course. As he was travelling he seems to have some sort accident that led to land him in the Coachella...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including UCLA and UC Berkeley, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies.The program called "Californians For All College Corps" will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state's public university and community college systems. Last year, we announced historic investments to help provide students with a debt-free path to college through service. Today, 45 colleges were selected for the first round of funding. We are working to make college more affordable for more Californians. pic.twitter.com/bY82bhW70r— Office of the Governor of California (@CAgovernor) January 18, 2022In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work.Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take...
    Give Gov. Gavin Newsom credit: Whatever you might think of him on other matters, he got it completely right on Sirhan Sirhan. No. 1, Sirhan committed an unpardonable crime against America that changed our history for the worse. No. 2, although some conspiracy theorists question Sirhan’s guilt, the evidence is overwhelming that he murdered Sen. Robert F. Kennedy by shooting him in the back of the head. No. 3, the convicted killer now says he can’t remember whether he shot Kennedy. That’s very hard to believe since he confessed several times in the past. At any rate, it tarnishes the credibility of any remorse he might express. No. 4, he deserves to die in prison. That last thought is mine. Newsom didn’t quite go there Thursday in announcing his refusal to free Sirhan, rejecting a two-person parole panel’s recommendation that the 77-year-old killer be released after 53 years behind bars. Newsom was clear and unequivocal. Sirhan’s assassination of Kennedy “is among the most notorious crimes in American history,” the governor asserted. “Mr. Sirhan lacks the insight that would prevent him...
    Some San Francisco-area residents have had it with waiting for the city to send crews to fix potholes on the roadways and have taken it upon themselves to make the repairs.  The "PotholeGate Vigilantes" have patched around 130 potholes in Vallejo as of Tuesday and have raised more than $7,000 via a GoFundMe page to purchase asphalt and other repair materials.  "It's gotten to where it's dangerous," David Marsteller, a volunteer with the group, told Fox News. "Every day on our Facebook platforms, we're seeing five or six people posting pictures of tires bent, tires blown out." A pothole in Vallejo, California. A group dubbed the "PotholeGate Vigilantes" has taken it upon themselves to patch potholes across the city. (David Marsteller) The group numbers around 6 to 10 people who met through a community Facebook page where they were asked if they would be willing to pitch in to fix the roads.  Images shared by Marsteller show potholes deep enough to partially place orange cones inside and others that could do serious damage to car tires and rims. In...
    Police were called to step in after a group of conservatives wearing orange shirts that said “RINO hunters,” with crosshairs making a target of the “O,” tried to storm a Republican Party of Orange County meeting in Costa Mesa on Monday night. The group was led by Nick Taurus, a self-proclaimed American Nationalist who last year spearheaded a protest during a town hall for Rep. Katie Porter, D-Irvine, that turned violent. After provocation from Taurus’ group, a Porter supporter threw a punch and was arrested. Taurus, R-Laguna Hills, is now challenging GOP Rep. Young Kim in the CA-40 House race. He’s labeled Kim, who’s been endorsed by the OCGOP as a RINO, a derogatory name used by the far-right for more moderate politicians who they deem “Republican in name only.” The clash reflects a growing schism in the Republican party, pitting those who strive to elect GOP candidates in purple areas like Orange County, and those on the far right, who remain fiercely loyal to former President Donald Trump. The party said on Jan. 12 that because of the coronavirus...
    A man has been taken into custody while police investigate the fatal stabbing of his mother in their shared apartment, Long Beach Police Department officials said. At approximately 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 18, officers were responding to an initial report of a person yelling for help in the area of the 1000 block of Pacific Avenue when they received an updated report from an eye witness that a stabbing occurred and who provided a suspect description. When the first responding officers arrived, a witness pointed out a man in his 20s who matched the description of the suspect and he was taken into custody without incident, a news release said. Officers located a female in her 50s, the suspect’s mother, inside an apartment and Long Beach Fire Department personnel transported her to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead. An initial investigation by homicide detectives suggests the suspect repeatedly stabbed his mother in the upper body during an argument in their apartment. “There were no other individuals inside the apartment at the time of the assault,” the news...
    Kathy and Ken Dunham, who lost their son Jake in the mass shooting at the Borderline Bar and Grill, show their tattoos from Jake’s last cards during a visit to the memorial at the closed Thousand Oaks club on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 as the one-year anniversary approaches. The couple comes weekly to the memorial to water plants and tidy up and are also part of a peer support group. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) People awaiting word of loved ones from the Borderline Bar & Grill shooting in Thousand Oaks at the Alex Fiore Teen Center in Thousand Oaks, CA. 13 people including a sheriff deputy and the shooter were killed in a mass shooting at the bar overnight. (Photo by David Crane, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG) Kelsey Escobar, 21, of San Diego, who was friend’s with victim Jake Dunham, visits the Borderline Bar & Grill mass shooting memorial in Thousand Oaks with Lynn Sanchez, of Thousand Oaks, earlier this month. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)...
    (CNN)As Covid-19 cases rise again in nursing homes, a few states have begun requiring visitors to present proof that they're not infected before entering facilities, stoking frustration and dismay among family members.Officials in California, New York and Rhode Island say new Covid-19 testing requirements are necessary to protect residents — an enormously vulnerable population — from exposure to the highly contagious Omicron variant. But many family members say they can't secure tests amid enormous demand and scarce supplies, leaving them unable to see loved ones. And being shut out of facilities feels unbearable, like a nightmare recurring without end.Severe staff shortages are complicating the effort to ensure safety while keeping facilities open; these shortages also jeopardize care at long-term care facilities — a concern of many family members. People desperate for Covid tests are turning to resellers onlineAndrea DuBrow's 75-year-old mother, who has severe Alzheimer's disease, has lived for almost four years in a nursing home in Danville, California. When DuBrow wasn't able to see her for months earlier in the pandemic, she said, her mother forgot who she was."This...
    A man wanted in connection with the killing of a woman at a Florida motel earlier this month was captured last week in Southern California, authorities said on Tuesday.  U.S. Marshals and police from Hollywood, Florida, took Davis Zimmerman, 19, into custody in Orange County, California, on Friday, KCAL-TV in Los Angeles reported.  A warrant had been issued for Zimmerman’s arrest on first-degree murder charges, according to WTVJ-TV in Miami.  AMTRAK PASSENGER SHOT DEAD ABOARD TRAIN TO MISSOURI; SUSPECT FLEES, AUTHORITIES SAY  Davis Zimmerman, 19, was awaiting extradition to Florida on Tuesday on murder charges.  (Hollywood Police Department) A woman’s body was found in a motel room in Hollywood, Florida, on Jan. 6. She hasn’t been identified and no details have been released about her suspected murder, KCAL reported.  Davis Zimmerman's alleged victim was found dead at the New Kent Motel in Hollywood, Florida, on Jan. 6.  (Google Maps) CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP He is being held at the Orange County’s Intake Release Center and will soon be extradited to Broward County, Florida, WTVJ...
    SAN RAMON — An Orange County man and woman were arrested this week as suspects in multiple recent jewel thefts in town and around the region, authorities said. In a statement Tuesday, police said an automated license plate reader hit around 3:15 p.m. Monday alerted officers of a vehicle tied to a weekend theft. In that incident, police said a female suspect called a 74-year-old woman over to her vehicle on Sunday before placing costume jewelry on her. When the woman refused the jewelry, the suspect removed a valuable jewelry item from the woman and left the costume jewelry behind. Officers found and stopped the vehicle Monday at Crow Canyon Road and Reedland Circle, and spoke with a 24-year-old man and 21-year-old woman from Fullerton who were inside with their two-year-old child. Soon after, officers arrested the man and woman on suspicion of multiple charges, including grand theft, conspiracy and theft from an elder or dependent adult. The child was released to a family member, police said. After at least one local victim identified the pair in a theft, investigators began working to find possible...
              by Ailan Evans   Federal authorities are investigating Chinese investment in a California-based plane maker after shareholders alleged that the firm’s technology was being transferred to China, The Wall Street Journal reported. The FBI and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS) have launched separate reviews of Chinese investment in small plane manufacturer Icon Aircraft Inc., according to the WSJ, which cited company documents and people familiar with the matter. The authorities are investigating allegations that technology from the company with military applications was transferred to China. The investigation follows a lawsuit filed in June 2021 by a group of minority shareholders, including former Boeing CEO and chairman Phil Condit, who alleged that Pudong Science and Technology Investment Co. (PDSTI), a Chinese firm which owns 47% of Icon’s shares, was exploiting the company for its technology’s military applications to the detriment of the firm’s bottom line. In March 2021, PDSTI transferred an Icon plane to China, and in April 2021, it initiated plans to license Icon’s intellectual property, the WSJ reported. The group of minority shareholders sent a memo to CFIUS in...
    In a wealthy enclave along the Santa Monica Mountains that is a haven for celebrities, residents are now facing more aggressive consequences for wasting water. The Las Virgenes Municipal Water District northwest of Los Angeles hopes to spur water savings by making it easier to fine households that go over their allotted “water budgets” and threatening to vastly limit water flow to customers who repeatedly fail to conserve. The district offers a bold example of how local authorities across drought-stricken California are trying to get people to use less water, voluntarily if possible but with the threat of punishment if they don’t comply. Las Virgenes officials hope their approach will be a wakeup call for residents of the affluent neighborhoods, where most of the water goes toward outdoor use like landscaping and pools. “What we’re trying to do is conserve water now so that we can stretch the limited supplies we have available,” said Dave Pederson, the district’s general manager. California is feeling the effects of climate change; it has had drought conditions for most of the last decade...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Video from cameras worn by deputies who responded to a mass shooting at a Southern California bar in 2018 and recordings of calls for help released Tuesday captured the chaos, horror and confusion of the massacre that left a dozen people dead. Terrified patrons hiding from a gunman still stalking victims reported the shooting in whispers to dispatchers, while others sobbed over the trauma of an event still unfolding. Officers encountered patrons running for their lives and a man bleeding in the parking lot while friends tried to save him. The footage and audio from the Borderline Bar and Grill shooting was released Tuesday by the Ventura County sheriff’s after a court fight by The Associated Press and other news outlets who sought the evidence under public records laws. While the evidence was documented in a more than 400-page report on the shooting released in July, it was the first time the video and call recordings were released. Investigators concluded that Ian David Long, 28, who served as a Marine in Afghanistan, felt college students disdained...
    OROVILLE (CBS13) — Authorities have identified the Oroville man arrested and accused of shooting at a California Highway Patrol Officer following a Chase that ended in Yuba County over the weekend, authorities said Tuesday. Aaron Tobias Quinn, 44, faces one count of attempted murder of a peace officer. READ MORE: Man Arrested In South Sacramento After ShotSpotter ActivationAccording to the California Highway Patrol Oroville, an officer attempted to stop Quinn for speeding in the Oroville area Sunday morning. Quinn allegedly failed to yield and led a chase through several county roads across Butte and Yuba counties. READ MORE: Verizon Delays 5G Rollout Again Amid Safety Concerns At AirportsQuinn reportedly lost control and crashed the vehicle into a power pole along La Porte Road in Yuba County. He then got out of the car and began firing at a CHP officer at the scene, authorities said. The CHP said the officer returned fire and Quinn was seriously injured. Quinn remained in the hospital as of Tuesday and in the CHP’s custody. MORE NEWS: California College Students Will Be Offered $10K For...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- California is beginning to see a slight decline in the 7-day average COVID cases with about a 48 percent decrease in the last week.In San Francisco, the 24th Street testing site in the Mission District is also noticing a shift.RELATED: White House soft-launches COVID-19 test request website"Yesterday we had 359 positives. So, that is a positivity rate of about 34 percent. Which is really high," said Diane Jones, volunteer for Unidos en Salud. "Perhaps we can say we are in a plateau but, it's really too soon to tell."At its highest, the positive rate at the Mission site was 37 percent.Last week it was 34 percent. They are attributing these numbers to everyday interactions and no longer the holidays."Schools reopening, people going back to work and that is being driven not only by holidays it's just life," said Jones.VIDEO: Mixed reaction over how to handle the future as doctors say COVID is here to stayEMBED More News Videos As we grapple with what living alongside COVID will look like in the future, doctors have different takes...
    Rep. Jerry McNerney Democratic Rep. Jerry McNerney, who got to Congress in 2006 by unseating a longtime Republican incumbent, announced Tuesday that he would not seek another term in California's redrawn 9th District, a new seat that shares the same number as his current constituency. Minutes later, fellow Democratic Rep. Josh Harder declared that he’d run to succeed McNerney rather than continue with his previously announced campaign for the revamped 13th District just to the south, a move that will set off an open seat race for the latter district. Harder’s move is a bit surprising. His old district, numbered the 10th, was chopped up during redistricting, leaving him representing just 31% of the new 13th, located in the mid-Central Valley. But an even smaller share of his current constituents—just 27%—wound up in the new 9th, which is based around the city of Stockton. (A 43% plurality of Harder’s existing 10th District wound up in the new 5th, a safely red seat where GOP Rep. Tom McClintock is reportedly seeking another term.) The new 13th also contains Harder’s hometown of...
    Oakland on Tuesday became the latest California city to ban the components for easy-to-assemble and impossible-to-trace “ghost guns,” whose popularity has spiked in recent years, amid a wave of gun violence in the city. The ordinance, which passed unopposed, takes aim at the rapid proliferation of the firearms, which can be ordered online and delivered without a serial number or the buyer undergoing a background check. Vice Mayor Rebecca Kaplan and council members Dan Kalb and Noel Gallo proposed the ordinance. In seeking its passage, Kalb and Gallo called it a key move to strike back against a spate of gun violence across the city. “We don’t pretend that one new law is going to end gun violence in the next month in Oakland or any other city,” said Kalb, ahead of the vote. “But any additional thing we can do that makes it a little bit harder, I think, is worth the effort.” The proposal passed in a bulk vote alongside several other items, and most council members did not comment on it. A second vote, expected on Feb....
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The federal government did a soft launch of its new website where people can order free at-home COVID tests.But some health experts say it's too little, too late.RELATED: White House soft-launches COVID-19 test request website"I think we missed the boat," said Doctor Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease expert at UCSF.Dr. Gandhi says, while she supports people using the tests, they would have been more helpful the government had been issuing them before the omicron surge."If the tests are coming right now, that simply isn't enough time. If we had it before, we could have helped our schools stay open for example," Gandhi said.All the at-home tests sent out will be antigen tests, similar to the ones sold at retail stores.VIDEO: Mixed reaction over how to handle the future as doctors say COVID is here to stayEMBED More News Videos As we grapple with what living alongside COVID will look like in the future, doctors have different takes on what health guidelines should looks like. "Those tests are best used to quote, test out early from isolation....
    By Jocelyn Gecker | Associated Press Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part in the program in 2022, including UC Berkeley and UCLA, along with 16 of the 23 California State University schools and more than two dozen community and private colleges. The $146 million cost was approved as part of last...
    Sunny skies. Balmy temperatures. Walks on the beach. Umbrellas back in the closet. After a soaking wet December that ended fire season, delivered more 15 feet of snow to the Sierra Nevada, and boosted hopes that California’s severe drought might be coming to and end, dry weather is back, in a big way. Like a baseball player stuck in a hitting slump, it hasn’t rained significantly in the Bay Area for 14 days, since Jan. 4. Although reservoirs received a nice boost from big storms in December and late October, they still remain well below normal levels in most parts of the state. Time to start sweating that the state’s two-year drought might turning into a three-year drought? Not yet, say experts. As it turns out, dry spells in the middle of winter are the norm, rather than the exception. The key is how long those dry spells last. In nearly every winter season back to 1950 in the Bay Area, there has been a dry spell in December and January. The average duration is 19 days. “It’s not unusual...
    MARTINEZ (CBS SF/BCN) – The Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors approved an ordinance Tuesday that bans natural gas from being used to power new homes and buildings in unincorporated areas of the county. The ordinance will prohibit the installation of natural gas piping in all new residential buildings and hotels, offices, and retail buildings in unincorporated parts of the county. READ MORE: East Bay Rep. Jerry McNerney Latest Not To Seek Re-Election To Congress In 2022The vote was 4-1, with District 2 Supervisor Candace Andersen saying many of her constituents believe the ordinance is an overreach. “I’m concerned about the state of California’s ability to provide sufficient clean electricity that really could power the entire state, as there seems to be this shift,” Andersen said. “And we saw such a loss of hydroelectric power in the drought, in the wake of wildfires, so I really think it’s a little premature to be jumping this far.” Board members have pointed out there are new state rules mandating solar power for most new development. The county ordinance will affect...
    Two more House Democrats announced Tuesday they would retire from Congress at the end of their terms, bringing the total to 28 amid polls that show President Biden's party in danger of losing its majority. Rep. James Langevin, an 11-term lawmaker from Rhode Island who serves on the coveted House Armed Services Committee, announced his decision in an op-ed Tuesday. He said it was 'time for me to chart a new course, which will allow me to stay closer to home and spend more time with my family and friends. Langevin, a quadriplegic who uses a motorized wheelchair to get around Congress, also reflected on his career. Rep. Jim Langevin, D-R.I., announced he will retire from Congress at the end of his 11th term 'Nearly 40 years ago, a tragic accident left me paralyzed. My dreams of becoming a police officer were crushed, and I was forced to dream new dreams, and relearn how to perform almost every daily task. Yet during my hour of need, Rhode Islanders rallied behind me, and I was inspired to give back to...