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    DAVIS, Calif. -- A high schooler from Davis, Calif. has joined an elite club of students with a perfect SAT score.Apurva Mishra, 17, a senior at Davis Senior High School answered every single question correctly on this year's test.RELATED: UC system officially drops SAT, ACT scores from use in admissions and scholarshipsMishra said he prepared whenever he had free time, but that has been hard to come by. He is also vice-captain of the robotics team, student body president, and recently took up a job as a software engineering intern.RELATED: Calif. to give subsidies to students who volunteer with Californians for All College CorpsMishra admitted there was one section of the exam that gave him more trouble than the others."The first section for sure. The reading sections," said Mishra. "They're reading these long passages and then they ask you at some point in time, what was the meaning of the intro paragraph or what did the author want to convey in that section? And you're like I don't know."Mishra applied to about a dozen colleges. He expects to start hearing...
    Fairfax County Public Schools included “military kid” as a privileged category during a bingo-style exercise instructing children to identify their privilege. Set up as a kind of bingo card with a free space in the middle, the exercise asked students to identify different categories of privilege based on race, gender, family dynamics, and socioeconomic status. Assistant Superintendent Douglas Tyson told parents who complained about the exercise that it came from “an approved FCPS English Curriculum lesson that is centered around students selecting a ‘choice’ test and examining in detail the author’s perspective on a wide-range of issues,” the Daily Wire reported. Besides the “military kid” square, tiles on the bingo card, which was titled “Identifying Your Privilege,” included “having your own bedroom,” “feel represented in the media,” and “involved in extracurricular activities." YELLOW RIBBONS SYMBOLIZING SUPPORT FOR THE TROOPS REMOVED FROM TOWN SQUARE Fairfax County, a suburb of Washington, D.C, has a heavy presence of military families, increasing the likelihood that at least some students in the class came from military families. “Students are...
    No charges will be brought against a North Jersey teacher accused by an Olympian of ripping a student's hijab off last year, authorities announced. The student's mom was backed by former Olympian Ibtihaj Muhammad in accusing second-grade teacher Tamar Herman of “forcibly removing" the head covering from the Seth Boyden Elementary School student on Oct. 6. Herman later issued a statement through her attorney saying she was just trying to fix the girl's hood. The Essex County Prosecutor's Office announced on Jan. 19 that there was "insufficient evidence to sustain a criminal prosecution in this case." "While we understand that many may find the incident troubling, as prosecutors we have a legal and moral obligation to only bring charges in cases where we believe we can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a crime has been committed. For those reasons, we will not move forward with this case." Click here for Herman's side and here for Muhammad's side.
    GALLOWAY, N.J. (CBS) — A New Jersey university is in the process of creating a maple syrup operation in the region. Students at Stockton University in Galloway are not tapping sap from 400 red maple trees on the campus. A two-mile web of blue tubing is connecting the trees to a collection tank. READ MORE: At Least 1 Dead In Camden County Crash Involving Fire TruckThe sap will be turned into maple syrup. READ MORE: WATCH LIVE: Delaware County Medical Reserve Corps Assisting Local Hospitals With COVID-19 PandemicThis year’s operation has quadrupled in size. MORE NEWS: Philadelphia's Health Department No Longer Recommending Pauses To In-Person Learning For City SchoolsA second $500,000 federal grant is making it possible for private property owners to participate.
    (CBS4) — Police responded to the report of gunshots in a neighborhood near the Manual High/Middle School campus in Denver Tuesday afternoon, CBS4 confirmed from a letter the school sent to the parents of students. Manual High School (credit: CBS) According to the school, “We immediately brought all of the students inside, placed the school on a secured perimeter and called 911. All students and staff are safe.” Denver Public Schools responded to us Wednesday and confirmed the high school had an additional security presence on campus during. For the school, a secured perimeter includes locking exterior school doors and bringing students and staff inside the building. Business inside the building continues as normal, but everyone must stay inside the building. The secured perimeter remains in place until law enforcement lets the school know the area is safe. “We know that this situation can be upsetting for students and families,” wrote Principal Joe Glover. “We assured our students that it is out of an abundance of caution, and we are all safe. Our mental health supports are available to process...
    (CBS4) — Police responded to the report of gunshots in a neighborhood near the Manual High/Middle School campus in Denver Tuesday afternoon, CBS4 confirmed from a letter the school sent to the parents of students. Manual High School (credit: CBS) According to the school, “We immediately brought all of the students inside, placed the school on a secured perimeter and called 911. All students and staff are safe.” Denver Public Schools responded to us Wednesday and confirmed the high school had an additional security presence on campus during. For the school, a secured perimeter includes locking exterior school doors and bringing students and staff inside the building. Business inside the building continues as normal, but everyone must stay inside the building. The secured perimeter remains in place until law enforcement lets the school know the area is safe. “We know that this situation can be upsetting for students and families,” wrote Principal Joe Glover. “We assured our students that it is out of an abundance of caution, and we are all safe. Our mental health supports are available to process...
    The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear the case of a Christian high school football coach who was let go from his job for praying on the field after games. Former coach Joe Kennedy's legal fight with the Bremerton, Washington, School District began in 2015, and the case eventually reached the Supreme Court in 2019, when justices declined to take it and said the case was for lower courts to decide. Kennedy, who coached football for eight years, told the Washington Examiner he began having solitary postgame prayers at the 50-yard line after each game as students gradually began joining him. "A couple of the kids came up to me and they said, 'Hey, coach, what are you doing up there?' And I said, 'I'm just giving thanks to God for what you guys just did out there on the football field.' They asked if they could join. 'Of course,' I said. 'this is America, of course, you could join,'" Kennedy said. When school officials learned about Kennedy's prayers, they sought to compromise by offering him time to pray...
    Staffing shortages have forced more school closures around the country in recent days, and the locations of some of those schools should give pause to the flood of hot-takers wanting to blame it on teachers unions and Democratic lawmakers any time a school closes or goes remote.  Six elementary schools in Wichita, Kansas, were closing on Tuesday due to coronavirus-related absences. Three of the schools were public, three were private, and two of the private Catholic schools were planning to be closed Wednesday as well. A Wichita high school had to close last Friday. About 10% of students and 8.5% of staff in the district were in quarantine. Wichita isn’t unique in Kansas: Schools in Olathe, Kansas City, Eudora, Desoto, Manhattan-Ogden, Bonner Springs, and El Dorado have also had recent closures because of high COVID-19 rates. In Alabama, one in four students were on remote learning last week, and many schools in the state remained remote in the days following Martin Luther King Day. Elmore County, Alabama, was returning to in-person school on Tuesday, but anticipated school bus delays “due to a shortage of drivers and...
    PORTSMOUTH — During the South Central Ohio Educational Service Center’s annual Artist-in-Residency program, local artist Klaire Smith collaborated with students in Mrs. Kelly Emmons’ Wheelersburg High School art classes to create original works of art for display at the Portsmouth Public Library. The exhibit titled “Love and Light Panes” will be on exhibit until March 21, 2022 during regular library hours. Smith began her residency on September 27, 2021 and was with the students daily for two full weeks. Students continued to work on their own until they completed their artwork which is now on display on the main floor of the library. The students’ designs are intended to celebrate the complexity and beauty of the traditional stained glass windows located in the library’s domed ceiling. Students were challenged to create depth and texture using layers of tissue paper applied to canvas while creating designs that were captivating, original, and utilized symmetry. The title “Love and Light Panes” makes reference to the library’s stained glass and the community’s love of our public library. “Many of the students’ designs include a...
    DETROIT (AP) — A Michigan professor who was suspended after making a profanity-filled video for his students is threatening to file a lawsuit if Ferris State University doesn’t quickly lift the sanction. An attorney for Barry Mehler warned the school in a letter Tuesday, saying the history teacher is protected by the First Amendment and a contract between Ferris State and its faculty. READ MORE: University Of Michigan Reaches $490M Settlement Over Dr. Anderson Sexual Abuse Case“The university should be celebrating and defending Dr. Mehler, not summarily disciplining him,” attorney Matthew Hoffer wrote. “Dr. Mehler has been inundated with letters of support from current students, former students, and university faculty as well as students, educators, and law professors from around the world,” Hoffer said. Mehler’s 14-minute YouTube video at the start of a new term was peppered with profanities and unusual remarks about grades, plagiarism, and classroom attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. He included commentary about an old Camel cigarette TV ad — “turning death into profit” — and a clip from the HBO series “Deadwood.” Ferris State President David...
    A Los Angeles area charter school barred a group of unvaccinated students from attending class Tuesday and cordoned off the area where the students were with tape barriers, videos of the incident showed. New West Charter School in Los Angeles confirmed Tuesday that management had implemented a vaccine and negative-test mandate for students and that a group of unvaccinated students had staged “a sit-in” on campus and refused to leave the school. LOS ANGELES PUBLIC SCHOOLS DELAY STUDENT VACCINE MANDATE AFTER MASS NONCOMPLIANCE Video of the incident circulated on social media Tuesday, showing tape barriers being put up around the students who were sitting on the pavement outside the school building. Local police can also be seen. Unvax students at New West Charter LA segregated behind barriers & not allowed to attend class. They asked for chairs, were denied & are sitting on the pavement, not allowed to even use restroom. LAPD is on site but not intervening. Litigation from Let Them Choose already pending pic.twitter.com/hgCI97HYv1— LET THEM BREATHE (@letthem_breathe) January 18, 2022 New...
    George Mason University’s Arlington campus at night. The university celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/ George Mason University Gregory Washington is the eighth president of George Mason University. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/George Mason University The Center for the Arts and the Johnson Center sit by a pond on George Mason’s Fairfax Campus. Courtesy Evan Cantwell/Creative Services This aerial photograph shows the newly built George Mason College’s Fairfax campus, circa 1965. Courtesy George Mason University (1/4) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. When people think of universities in the D.C. area, big names such as Georgetown and George Washington University might come to mind. But there’s another George in the area, and it’s celebrating a big milestone this year. George Mason University, Virginia’s largest public research university, turns 50 in 2022 and is celebrating an impressive array of stats it has racked up over the half-century, including: An enrollment of 39,000 students, representing 130 countries. More than $200 million in George Mason-sponsored research in...
    The Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR)  announced a new program aimed at encouraging high school students to explore careers in conservation: The Georgia DNR Career Academy, a week-long, overnight summer camp, will be held July 17-23, 2022, at Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center in Mansfield and Georgia 4-H at Camp Jekyll on Jekyll Island. High school students will have the opportunity to learn about DNR career paths, and visit wildlife management areas, hatcheries, state parks, and the coast, said Lindsey Brown, the Career Academy’s director. “Throughout the week, students will get hands-on experience as they learn from DNR game wardens, wildlife, fisheries and marine technicians, park rangers, and support staff,” Brown said. “They’ll have the opportunity to go behind the scenes with DNR staff and see what it takes to conserve Georgia’s natural resources.” The Career Academy’s activities will include trail blazing and hiking, land navigation, state park hospitality, hunting incident investigation, fishery management, urban wildlife and deer aging, and other programs.  Throughout the week, students will interact with full-time DNR...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. READ MORE: US Plans $50B Wildfire Fight Where Forests Meet NeighborhoodsIn exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part in the program in 2022, including UC Berkeley and UCLA, along with 16 of the 23 California State University schools and more than two dozen community and private colleges. The $146...
    Students at a Westchester high school captured an unexpected visitor on camera making the rounds on campus in the middle of the night As part of an ongoing wildlife research project, Bronxville High School students who set up motion-activated cameras at Scout Field captured a red fox that was taking a stroll around the field. Under the guidance of Bronx River Research teacher Stephen Kovari, the students set up the camera traps onto trees away from trails and in the immediate vicinity of the baseball field to gather data and study the activity patterns of different species. Their most recent discovery was the red fox, who was briefly caught on one of the cameras before making his way into a nearby area without incident. “Trail cameras are an increasingly popular tool used by wildlife biologists and ecologists as a non-invasive method of monitoring otherwise elusive and difficult to detect species,” Kovari said. “Camera traps take pictures, but these photos aren’t just images - they’re data. This ecological data helps us understand what species we share our spaces with, but...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) – Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. A student with Powell Hall in the background on the campus of UCLA on Jan. 7, 2022, in Los Angeles. (Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images) READ MORE: LA Musician Marty Roberts Of ‘Marty & Elayne’ Lounge Band Dies At 89The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part...
    CASES of deadly meningitis B have reached pre-coronavirus pandemic levels, new data has revealed. Rates are particularly high in university students, are rising sharply and are now higher than they have been since 2018. 1Meningitis can be deadly and experts have warned that there has been a sharp increase in casesCredit: Getty - Contributor Meningitis B can be fatal in less than 24 hours if the bacteria enters the bloodstream to cause sepsis. The bacteria that causes meningitis B lives in the nose and throat and can be spread by close contact from coughing, sneezing or kissing - so it's particularly prevalent among uni students who live in close proximity to each other. Signs of the virus can often to appear like a hangover, which is why some university students struggle to recognise when they are unwell - as many tend to participate in events held specifically for students, which in most cases, involve alcohol. A report from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) revealed that between September and November 2021 cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) increased with group...
    Kaelyn Hughes, 21, has wanted to teach since she was in third grade. For her, school has always been a place of solace — and she wants to share what education has meant to her with other children. “I would like to show to other Black girls that you can do this — you can go to college. I came from a low-income area, and I didn’t think I would go to college. I didn’t think I would go far,” she said. “But you use education to help you get somewhere better.” The UC Merced senior spends time in elementary school classrooms working with students struggling with math or English as a volunteer — service that would otherwise be a luxury she could not afford. But through her participation in the state’s pilot Civic Action Fellowship program, she has been paid a stipend for tuition and basic needs, such as rent, allowing her to pursue service instead of another job to make ends meet. The Civic Action pilot is a model for an initiative at 45 state community colleges...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including UCLA and UC Berkeley, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies.The program called "Californians For All College Corps" will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state's public university and community college systems. Last year, we announced historic investments to help provide students with a debt-free path to college through service. Today, 45 colleges were selected for the first round of funding. We are working to make college more affordable for more Californians. pic.twitter.com/bY82bhW70r— Office of the Governor of California (@CAgovernor) January 18, 2022In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work.Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take...
    At the start of this new semester, we face a sobering reality. As law and political science professors, we’re in new territory: instructing our students about the foundations of constitutional law when neither they nor we have faith that the current Supreme Court will respect precedent and approach the law as the institution once had. It is now clear that the court, with six conservatives — three appointed by Donald Trump — has a different attitude toward interpreting the Constitution and preserving fundamental rights. Students see a court about to overrule or gut Roe v. Wade, a half-century-old precedent, for no reason other than that the conservatives have the votes to do so. They see a majority of the justices eager to advance Republican ideology in blocking vaccine or testing requirements for large businesses. Today’s students aren’t alone in losing faith in the Supreme Court. A recent Gallup Poll showed the institution at its lowest level of public confidence in decades: Only 40% of Americans approve of the job it is doing and 53% disapprove. There is every reason to...
    This is particularly the case in the country facing the number of people who are forced to isolate themselves due to the outbreak of the omigron variant of Govit-19. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Wednesday that holders of a student or work holiday visa who have not entered the country will benefit from a reduction of about A $ 600 or 80 380 in their visa fee if they travel to Australia. The next 8 or 12 weeks respectively. The $ 55 million (35 35 million) move is aimed at attracting workers to a country where many economic sectors, such as agriculture or catering, are facing labor shortages. The 150,000 students and 23,500 “backpackers” who already have visas will take the move to Australia, whose borders have long been closed. “We want to thank the students for coming back and continuing to choose Australia, but we also want them to come here and meet this severe labor shortage,” Morrison told a news conference. He specifically cited those trained in health and geriatrics. The Prime Minister also encouraged tourists...
                 The Star News Network has identified a “woke” fifth grade teacher, whose classroom is centered around left-wing propaganda. Allyson L. Ryoppy teaches 10 and 11-year-olds at Halle Hewetson Elementary School in Las Vegas, Nevada, part of the Clarke County School District. Her TikTok account, called “therainbowteacher” has more than 247,000 followers. Ryoppy does not reveal her real name on the account, but through investigative work, The Star was able to identify her. The Star sent multiple requests to Ryoppy, asking is sher would confirm that the account belonged to her. All of those requests went unreturned. Neither the Clark County School District or Halle Hewetson Elementary responded directly to a comment request, but after multiple inquiries, The Star received a phone call from Halle Hewetson Principal Mark Connors. Connors confirmed that Ryoppy teaches at the school, but said he was unaware of her TikTok account, and that if he was, he could not confirm that it belonged to Ryoppy. He cited privacy laws as an explanation. Christopher Rufo is a fellow at The Manhattan Institute, and one of America’s foremost critics of politicized schools....
              by Mckenna Dallmeyer ’22   Wealthy individuals in America often provide scholarships for college students. However, some of these scholarships are only for members of specified races. Campus Reform has compiled a list of the colleges that have received funding for college scholarships based on race. Meharry Medical College In September 2020, former New York City Mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg announced that Meharry Medical College would receive $34 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies because “America urgently needs more Black doctors.” The scholarship will fund scholarships for minority medical students with financial need. Meharry School of Medicine students demonstrating financial need could be eligible for scholarships of up to $100,000 over four years under the gift. The grant also covers financial counseling for students and resources to track the program’s success. The college’s largest-ever individual gift is part of Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Greenwood Initiative, which intends to “accelerate the pace of wealth accumulation for Black individuals and families and address decades of underinvestment in Black communities.” “More black doctors will mean more black lives saved,” Bloomberg said in his announcement. Middlebury College Middlebury alumni Ted and Kathy O’Connor...
              by Mary Stroka   Several career-focused educational grants and funding opportunities were announced last week for Iowa institutions. Gov. Kim Reynolds announced funding initiatives in her 2022 Condition of the State Address, including the first-in-the nation Teacher and Paraeducator Registered Apprenticeship Grant Program. Through the program, current high school students can earn paraeducator certificates and associates degrees, and paraeducators can earn their bachelor’s degree while learning and working in the classroom. The program starts in the 2022-2023 school year. Iowa will spend $9 million in American Rescue Plan Act Elementary and Secondary School Education Relief funding on the program. School districts must partner with local community colleges or four-year colleges to provide the required education and training. The Iowa Department of Education and Iowa Workforce Development will provide up to $40,500 over three years per high school student who completes either the paraeducator certificate or the associate’s degree model. The DOE will provide up to $47,000 over two years for every paraeducator who completes the bachelor’s degree. Specifically, that funding will support tuition and fees up to $7,000 for up to...
    Share this: NEW ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OFFER SCHOLARSHIPS:  Brooklyn College’s Murray Koppelman School of Business is working with Aon plc and The Spencer Educational Foundation to develop a series of cutting-edge risk management courses and programs at the undergraduate level to better prepare students for a career in risk management, insurance, finance, and other professions. Aon, a leading global professional services firm, will provide full-course tuition awards for up to 25 students enrolled in these courses with GPAs of 3.00 or higher. As part of Brooklyn College’s and Aon’s commitment to diversity, at least 50 percent of the students receiving the tuition awards will come from traditionally underrepresented and diverse backgrounds. ✰✰✰
    HAYWARD (KPIX) — After a week of remote learning due to COVID concerns, the Hayward Unified School District resumed in-person instruction on Tuesday. “We just didn’t feel like we had sufficient staff to maintain a safe learning environment in our schools last week,” said district spokesperson Dionicia Ramos. “We did not transition to virtual learning because of student exposure – we still feel the risk of transmission in school is actually fairly low. It was really the issue of staffing shortages and testing shortages.” READ MORE: Enrollment Up At Hayward Trucking School As Driver Shortage Fuels Better PayRamos explained on the Friday before last week, they had 81 uncovered classrooms with 365 staff members out. As the district headed into this new week, she says they were in a much better position. “As of yesterday at 5:00, the outlook for today was that we would only have 33 uncovered classes. That’s a much more manageable number,” Ramos said. She says the district has implemented new safety measures which should help keep the schools safe for students and staff. “We are...
    By Jocelyn Gecker | Associated Press Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Tuesday that 45 colleges and universities in California, including some of the most prestigious campuses in the state, will be part of a new public service program that will subsidize tuition for students who do community service alongside their studies. The program called “Californians For All College Corps” will start in the fall 2022 semester with 6,500 students who will be deployed to part-time work in areas of pressing need like K-12 education disparities, climate change and food insecurity, Newsom said in a news conference with the leaders of the state’s public university and community college systems. In exchange for 450 hours of service, each student will receive $10,000 toward their education and can get academic credit for their work. Seven of the 10 University of California campuses will take part in the program in 2022, including UC Berkeley and UCLA, along with 16 of the 23 California State University schools and more than two dozen community and private colleges. The $146 million cost was approved as part of last...
    STANFORD — Hundreds of people have signed a petition urging Stanford University to repeal its mandate that all students and staff get a booster shot before the end of the month. Nearly 1,600 people have signed the petition started by Stanford PhD candidate Monte Fischer a week ago asking the school to take back its Dec. 16 decision requiring everyone to get boosters unless they have a medical or religious exemption. Amid the rapid spread of the omicron variant, Stanford announced it would begin the winter quarter with online instruction for the first two weeks. Starting Tuesday, students returned to in-person classes but must provide documentation of a booster shot by Jan. 31, and some students aren’t having it. “We are not anti-booster or anti-vaccination,” Ficher writes. “We are pro-bodily autonomy and support the rights of Stanford students to evaluate the data and make their own medical choices.” Stanford did not return requests for comment. According to university data, at least 95% of all students, faculty and post-doctorate workers are vaccinated, while the other 5% have noted specific religious or...
    Oklahoma is calling on state employees to step in as substitute teachers as the Sooner State grappes with a shortage of educators in the classroom. Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) signed an executive order on Tuesday that allows state agencies to substitute teach without being deprived of employment, pay or benefits. The governor said it is the responsibility of the state to ensure that students can receive an in-person education. “I appreciate schools and teachers that are doing everything they can to provide in-person learning for their students, as well as the business community for stepping up,” Stitt said in a statement. The order will remain in effect for 120 days. A number of teachers, staff and students in Oklahoma have tested positive for COVID-19 in recent weeks, forcing school districts to shutter operations or transition to virtual learning, according to KFOR. State employees already appear to be stepping in as substitute teachers amid the educator shortage. The Moore Police Department posted photos on Facebook on Tuesday of on-duty officers teaching sixth-grade students in classrooms. The officers are wearing their police...
    MIAMI GARDENS (CBSMiami) – A first-of-its-kind program at FMU Tuesday. For many it will give them the keys to a wide range of jobs in construction. In Ann McNeill’s class, the entry into learning began with a question, “How much money do you want?” READ MORE: Hate Ends Now: The Holocaust Cattle Car ExperienceMcNeill is one of the instructors of the program, she’s also a general contractor, CEO of MCO Construction and Services, she also runs a number of other businesses. “I’ve never been asked that question before let me tonight think about the answer to that question,” she recalled of the first time she had to think about how much money she wanted. It’s not how much you want to make, it’s how much money you want in a set time frame. That’s just part of a lesson in planning for success. It also takes commitment, and this is how knowledge in construction can help with upward mobility. “I’m 32 years old, I work for the United States Postal Service,” Antynia Bennett said. Bennett used to be a local...
    ST. PAUL, Minn. (WCCO) — A student walkout occurred Tuesday in St. Paul, with students across the district demanding better COVID-19 precautions to stay in school. Some of the St. Paul students in the group Minnesota Teen Activists, which organized the walkout, met Tuesday morning to announce their demands for the district, which include more KN95 or N95 masks in schools, tests for staff and students on campus and a better outline for transitioning to distance learning. READ MORE: Free COVID-19 Test Rollout Begins Early Online (CBS News)Last week, the district said all St. Paul schools will remain open for in-person learning, as several other districts shifted online. The district says it’s handling the virus on a building-by-building basis. Jerome Treadwall is one of the leaders of the walkout. He shared his experience of the setbacks students are facing since returning to the classroom after winter break. READ MORE: COVID In Minnesota: 11,000 Deaths Tallied In MN, Positivity Rate Climbs To 22.2%“For example, at Washington High School, the first concern is that last week 1,000 students were not able to...
    COMMERCE CITY, Colo. (CBS4)– Some students in the Adams 14 School District returned to class on Tuesday after a week of remote learning. The district said so many teachers called in sick, nine schools held virtual classes on Tuesday. (credit: CBS) The district went remote last week because of the number of COVID-19 cases in Adams County. Families are expected to get an update on remote or in-person status Tuesday evening.
    ALLENDALE, Mich. (AP) — Grand Valley State University is expanding its free tuition to all low-income families in Michigan. The program, called the Grand Valley Pledge, will no longer be limited only to students from six counties. READ MORE: Whitmer Urges Michigan Residents To Claim Free COVID-19 Tests From Federal Government“We never want finances to be a barrier that stops students from moving forward… Talented students with a passion for learning belong at GVSU,” President Philomena Mantella said Tuesday. New students from families with income under $50,000 can qualify. READ MORE: Father, Twin 6-Year-Olds Die In Crash In Bay CountyAbout 400 students who qualified were enrolled during the fall term, GVSU said. The University of Michigan has a similar program for in-state students from families that make $65,000 or less. MORE NEWS: AG Nessel Expands On Why Feds Should Probe Fake GOP Electors© 2021 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Related
    DETROIT (AP) — A Michigan professor who was suspended after making a profanity-filled video for his students is threatening to file a lawsuit if Ferris State University doesn’t quickly lift the sanction. An attorney for Barry Mehler warned the school in a letter Tuesday, saying the history teacher is protected by the First Amendment and a contract between Ferris State and its faculty. “The university should be celebrating and defending Dr. Mehler, not summarily disciplining him,” attorney Matthew Hoffer wrote. “Dr. Mehler has been inundated with letters of support from current students, former students, and university faculty as well as students, educators, and law professors from around the world,” Hoffer said. Mehler’s 14-minute YouTube video at the start of a new term was peppered with profanities and unusual remarks about grades, plagiarism and classroom attendance during the COVID-19 pandemic. He included commentary about an old Camel cigarette TV ad — “turning death into profit” — and a clip from the HBO series “Deadwood.” Ferris State President David Eisler said he was “shocked and appalled” by the video, which has been...
    OAKLAND (CBS SF) – The Oakland Unified saw another day of protest Monday as a number of students and teachers skipped school to call for improved COVID safety measures. The day was disrupted for at least one Oakland school Tuesday where there couldn’t be any instruction because either there weren’t enough students or teachers in class. READ MORE: Robbers Shoot 40-Year-Old Man During Incident In San Francisco’s Soma NeighborhoodChopper 5 was overhead during an Oakland car caravan Tuesday morning that was part of the protest. KPIX spoke with a student who had planned to participate in the protest and one of her parents. “I just feel frustrated, because a lot of the kids are coming to school even after they know they have COVID,” said Zolie Sarriugarte, a student at Oakland Tech. She was going to skip school along with hundreds of others, but she decided not to. A hard decision to make, her father Jon Sarriugarte agreed. “I hear her go back and forth, wanting to be in school, wanting to learn, wanting to do her assignments to...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott visited schools throughout the city Tuesday morning as he helped distribute thousands of COVID-19 test kits and face masks. His first stop? Mergenthaler Vocational Technical High School, his alma mater. READ MORE: Five Baltimore Schools Go Virtual TuesdayScott’s visits, which involved distributing 50,000 test kits and 40,000 masks, came the same day that three Baltimore City Public School shifted temporarily to virtual learning. “This is the right thing to do,” Scott said. “This is us helping to supplement, this is us going into what I call critical need to help out.” The mayor also underscored the importance of testing, even for those who don’t feel ill, likely because it’s easy for asymptomatic cases of COVID-19 to go undetected. “Continue to get tested even if you do not have symptoms,” he said. The school visits also come as the school district has launched what’s known as a “test to stay” policy for elementary and middle school students and staff. READ MORE: Man Charged With Arson In Reisterstown Apartment Fire, Authorities SayUnder the policy, those...
    By Nicole Chavez | CNN New Jersey will soon require Asian American history to be taught in public schools. Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation on Tuesday that will make it mandatory for K-12 schools to include Asian American and Pacific Islander history in their curriculums starting on the 2022-2023 school year. The move makes New Jersey the second state in the nation to require the curriculum change, after Illinois. “By teaching students about the history and heritage of our AAPI community, we can ensure that the diversity of our state is reflected in our curriculum and create a more tolerant and knowledgeable future for New Jersey. I am proud to sign these bills into law,” Murphy said in a statement. In addition, another law will establish a Commission for Asian American Heritage within the state’s Department of Education. One of the commission’s goals will be to provide guidance to public and nonpublic schools in the “implementation of historical, cultural and educational programs concerning people of Asian and Asian American descent,” and help develop curriculum guidelines. Make Us Visible NJ, a...
    (CNN)New Jersey will soon require Asian American history to be taught in public schools.Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation on Tuesday that will make it mandatory for K-12 schools to include Asian American and Pacific Islander history in their curriculums starting on the 2022-2023 school year. The move makes New Jersey the second state in the nation to require the curriculum change, after Illinois."By teaching students about the history and heritage of our AAPI community, we can ensure that the diversity of our state is reflected in our curriculum and create a more tolerant and knowledgeable future for New Jersey. I am proud to sign these bills into law," Murphy said in a statement.Most US schools teach little to nothing about Asian American history and it hurts everyone, experts sayIn addition, another law will establish a Commission for Asian American Heritage within the state's Department of Education. One of the commission's goals will be to provide guidance to public and nonpublic schools in the "implementation of historical, cultural and educational programs concerning people of Asian and Asian American descent," and help...
    Welcome to the Glean, MinnPost’s twice-daily roundup of Minnesota news. Students planned walkouts at several St. Paul Public Schools high and middle schools in protest of inadequate COVID-19 safety protocols in the buildings. Gov. Tim Walz called for the state to issue $2 billion in general-obligation bonds to pay for infrastructure in Minnesota. Classes were canceled and students were sent home from Holy Angels high school in Richfield after the school received a bomb threat over the phone. The Rochester man who pled guilty to arson in connection with a fire in a Lake Street pawn shop in which one person died during the unrest following the murder of George Floyd was sentenced to 10 years in prison, below the federal sentencing guidelines. Article continues after advertisement A St. Paul man whose car was stolen with his puppy inside is offering a $5,000 reward for the return of the dog. A Cook, Minnesota teenager has been charged with attempted murder for allegedly shooting her mother after the mother confiscated methamphetamine from her daughter. Louie Anderson has been hospitalized with blood...
    Today, the U.S. Department of Education announced that every state education agency (SEA) received approval of their American Rescue Plan Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ARP ESSER) plan before the end of December 2021. As a result, the Department has distributed all $122 billion of ARP ESSER funds to all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. From U.S. Dept of Ed: These funds are critical to helping states and local districts safely keep schools open for in-person learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, including responding to recent challenges arising from the Omicron variant. As of last week, with the help of ARP funds, about 96% of K-12 public schools were open for full-time, in-person instruction. The Department recently issued a new resource to state and local leaders stressing the importance of full-time, safe, in-person learning and how federal funds can be used to achieve that goal. Additionally, last week, the Administration announced the availability of millions of new tests each month to help schools safely remain open and implement screening testing...
    The William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, said it has no benchmarks for returning to in-person classes due to the rise of COVID-19 cases in the Las Vegas area brought on by the omicron variant. Interim Dean Sara Gordon said at a Jan. 6 town hall, a recording of which was obtained by the Washington Examiner, that the institution had no “set metric” for returning to in-person classes. The law school, as with a number of universities nationwide, had returned to spring semester classes exclusively online, citing the winter surge of coronavirus cases, but unlike most institutions, it has no set date to return to classes. Gordon said online classes would be in place for at least two weeks and that the school is “very committed to doing everything we possibly can to maintain in-person instruction as much as possible for the remainder of the academic year.” LAWSUIT CLAIMS 16 MAJOR UNIVERSITIES ‘PARTICIPATED IN A PRICE-FIXING CARTEL’ “The very disappointing reality is that the spring schedule that we...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Today, Governor Newsom is set to announce the 45 California colleges and universities chosen to take part in his "Californians for All" College Corps.In exchange for volunteer service to help the state's response to emergencies and disasters like COVID, the state will subsidize tuition for participating students.The students will get up to $10,000 for 450 hours of service.The governor is set to make the announcement at 11:30 this morning.(Watch in the media player above when it begins.)
    During a Tuesday interview with CBS’s “Mornings,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) claimed that GOP-led state legislatures across the United States are trying to prevent “black people, brown people, college students” and “people who live on tribal reservations” from voting. As she emphasized the importance of passing voting rights legislation, Warren argued that some of those minorities and college students “might vote Democratic,” which is why “Republicans are doing everything they can” to keep them from voting.” “Look, I am not declaring this bill dead because we can’t. It is absolutely too important,” Warren declared. “Understand it this way — voting is foundational,” she continued. “That is the whole premise of our democracy. And before we get to the procedural part, keep this in mind: that state legislatures all across the country controlled by Republicans are doing everything they can to keep people from voting. Who are they trying to keep from voting? Black people, brown people, college students, people who live on tribal reservations, trying to keep those folks from voting because they might vote Democratic. Every single senator who...
    Oakland Unified School District officials said they’ve met “most” of the demands for COVID safety made by students, who are set to boycott classes starting Tuesday morning to push for their goals. As of Tuesday, more than 1,200 students have signed a petition organized by MetWest High School sophomores Ayleen Serrano, Ximena Santana and Benjamin Rendon, who noticed a wave of positive COVID cases at the school since returning from winter break. They’re asking that the district move in-person learning to online instruction and provide PCR and rapid testing twice a week, KN95 and N95 masks for every student in all schools, and more outdoor spaces where students can eat. They’re also planning to stage a protest on Friday outside of the district building downtown and continue until school officials meet all of their demands. In response, district spokesman John Sasaki said in a news release Monday that the district has been meeting “most” of the student demands by distributing 200,000 KN95 masks for students at all schools this week and installing covered, outdoor eating spaces at some of the...
    RICHFIELD, Minn. (WCCO) — Students at a private school in Richfield were sent home Tuesday morning due to an “unforeseen emergency.” “We will provide you more information via email as we have it,” Academy of Holy Angels said in a message to parents. The school told parents any students who ride a bus will return home on a bus. Students who drive were told to drive home, and any children still at school will need to be picked up “as soon as possible.”