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    BOSTON (CBS) – David Ferguson is speaking out passionately on behalf of his son DJ. He says the 31-year-old is fighting for his life at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and in desperate need of a heart transplant. “My son has gone to the edge of death to stick to his guns and he’s been pushed to the limit,” Ferguson said. The family says he was at the front of the line to receive a transplant but because he has not received the COVID-19 vaccination he is no longer eligible according to hospital policy. And Ferguson says his son refuses to get the shot. READ MORE: Has The Delta Variant Disappeared? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your COVID-19 Questions“It’s kind of against his basic principles, he doesn’t believe in it. It’s a policy they are enforcing and so because he won’t get the shot, they took him off the list of a heart transplant,” Ferguson said. Brigham and Women’s released a statement saying, “And like many other transplant programs in the United States – the COVID-19 vaccine is one...
    Youm7 TV became the world’s first surgeon, Dr. Bartley has an exclusive interview with Griffith.. Dr. During a meeting with Bartley Griffiths, The Seventh Day, Rami Nawar produced and presented by Hisham Abdel Tawaf: I am a professor of surgery at the College of Medicine in Maryland and I have been practicing in this profession for 40 years. Has performed heart and lung diseases, and many organ transplants and transplants. This is the first operation to transplant a genetically modified pig’s heart into a human. ”There are many cases that require organ transplant surgery, but they are not enough donors. He revealed the details of the world’s first surgery to fit a chainsaw heart into the human body: “This patient would have died if this operation had not been performed. We should consider this as an animal heart transplant surgery. He agreed. “. And the World Physician added: “Patient David Bennett underwent a swine heart transplant on January 7, and in mid-December we started talking about being ready with him and could not get the human heart back...
    The Muslim doctor behind the world's first-ever pig heart transplant said he faced pushback from his family because he used an organ from an animal that was 'forbidden in the home.' 'I got quite a backlash from my family,' Dr. Muhammad Mohiuddin, director of cardiac xenotransplantation at the University of Maryland Medical Center, told Vice.  '"Why are you using this animal?" My father used to always ask me, "Can you at least try using another animal?"' Mohiuddin, Dr. Bartley P. Griffith - the director of the center’s cardiac transplant program - and a team of surgeons implanted a genetically modified pig heart into the body of David Bennett on January 7. The patient is currently in recovery. Bennett, 57, had suffered from terminal heart failure and an uncontrollable irregular heartbeat. Due to his condition, he was ineligible for a human heart or pump. He also did not follow his doctors' orders, missed appointments and stopped taking drugs he was prescribed.  While many are applauding the surgery, calling it a 'historic breakthrough' that some hope could eventually help alleviate shortages of donor organs, Mohiuddin's family has expressed...
    HERE'S a look inside the rise of animal-to-human transplants as a pig kidney was given to a brain-dead man and an ex-convict received a hog heart. Back in September 2021, Dr. Jayme Locke and his surgical team operated sewed the first pig kidney into a 57-year-old brain-dead man. 5Surgical team members show the pig heart that was transplanted into David BennettCredit: AP 5Jim Parsons, 57, was successfully received pig kidneys last yearCredit: The Mega Agency For the first time in history, James Parsons had received kidneys, from a genetically modified pig, implanted into his abdomen. The Alabama dad and registered organ donor was declared brain-dead after a dirt bike accident, NBC News reports. The successful transplant surgery was announced by University of Alabama at Birmingham surgeons on Thursday. The New York Times shared the news after the surgery was reported in The American Journal of Transplantation. Pig kidneys were placed into Parsons' abdomen, where they began working and making urine after 23minutes, and for three days, the surgeons explained. Following the surgery, which removed Parsons' kidneys, the pig organs were...
    A man who made history as the world's first pig-heart transplant recipient was convicted of stabbing a man in the 1980s, making him undeserving of the transplant, the victim's family tells the Washington Post. David Bennett Sr., 57, received a genetically modified pig-heart to replace his own after he was diagnosed with terminal heart disease. Thirty-four years earlier, Bennett Sr. stabbed Edward Schumaker multiple times, leaving him paralyzed from the waist down, The Post says. "He gets a second chance with a new heart — but I wish, in my opinion, it had gone to a deserving recipient,” Leslie Shumaker Downey, the sister of Edward told the Washington Post. When he was 23 years old, Bennett Sr., attacked Shumaker during a round of pool after his wife at the time sat on Schumaker's lap. Court testimony shows that Bennett Sr., stabbed Shumaker seven times and then fled, triggering a high-speed chase by police that ended with his arrest. He was later convicted by a jury of battery and carrying a concealed weapon, Bennett Sr. was also ordered to pay $29,824 in restitution and sentenced to 10 years in prison. He was...
    (CNN)The news last week that David Bennett, a 57-year-old Maryland man, nearing death, had undergone cardiac transplant surgery with a genetically modified pig heart sent shock waves through the medical community and was hailed as a breakthrough in bioengineering, potentially ushering in a new era in solid organ transplantation. While our experience with this technology is still developing and much more research needs to be done, the operation and bravura science that made it possible provide a breathtaking glimpse into a future where patients will potentially spend days rather than months or years on a transplant list.This year, the tens of thousands of Americans hoping for a transplant will anxiously await the call telling them an organ has been found. Some of the patients, sick with congestive heart failure, will wait for a heart. Those with end-stage renal disease who are being sustained with dialysis, will wait for a kidney. Others with liver disease, or failing lungs will also wait their turn. There are currently more than 100,000 people who are on the waiting list for an organ transplant, according...
    Leslie Downey (pictured), whose brother was left paralyzed by David Bennett,  said the ex-con did not deserve the innovative medical treatment and wishes the pig heart could have been given to someone else in need The sister of a man left paralyzed by the world's first person to successfully have  a heart transplant using a pig's heart slammed the now-famous ex-con as 'not a worthy recipient.'  David Bennett, 57, who received the groundbreaking heart transplant last week, was convicted for attacking Edward Shumaker, then 22, while he played pool at a Maryland bar in April 1988 after he caught his then-wife Norma Jean Bennett sitting in Shumaker's lap while the pair were talking and drinking. Shumaker was paralyzed after being stabbed seven times in the back, abdomen and chest. He survived for 19 years before suffering a stroke in 2005 and dying two years later at age 40.  His sister, Leslie Shumaker Downey, bemoaned the praise being heaped on a man who robbed her younger brother of a healthy life in an interview with the BBC, which aired Saturday. Downey...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — A Maryland hospital is defending its decision to transplant a pig’s heart into a dying man following reports that the patient had a criminal past, saying his eligibility was “based solely on his medical records.” David Bennett, 57, is still recovering from last week’s highly experimental transplant, a medical first and a step in the quest to one day ease shortages of human organs by using animals. While the new heart is functioning, it’s too soon to know how Bennett will fare. READ MORE: Feds File Charges Against Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn MosbyOn Thursday, The Washington Post reported that 34 years ago Bennett was charged with a stabbing that left a young man paralyzed. The state’s Division of Corrections told the newspaper that Bennett was released from prison in 1994 after serving six years of a 10-year prison sentence. In a statement Thursday, the University of Maryland Medical Center said doctors are obligated to provide the best care for every patient regardless of their background. READ MORE: Baltimore City Schools Struggle With Staffing Shortages“This patient came to...
    A Maryland hospital is defending its decision to transplant a pig’s heart into a dying man following reports that the patient had a criminal past, saying his eligibility was “based solely on his medical records.” David Bennett, 57, is still recovering from last week’s highly experimental transplant, a medical first and a step in the quest to one day ease shortages of human organs by using animals. While the new heart is functioning, it’s too soon to know how Bennett will fare. On Thursday, The Washington Post reported that 34 years ago Bennett was charged with a stabbing that left a young man paralyzed. The state’s Division of Corrections told the newspaper that Bennett was released from prison in 1994 after serving six years of a 10-year prison sentence. In a statement Thursday, the University of Maryland Medical Center said doctors are obligated to provide the best care for every patient regardless of their background. “This patient came to us in dire need and a decision was made about his transplant eligibility based solely on his medical records,” the hospital...
    The dying handyman who because the first patient in the world to get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig stabbed a man he met in a bar seven times more than three decades ago, leaving him paralyzed and wheelchair-bound. David Bennett, 57, served time in prison for attacking Edward Shumaker, then 22, while he played pool at a Maryland bar in April 1988 after he allegedly caught his then-wife Norma Jean Bennett sitting in Shumaker's lap while the pair were talking and drinking. Shumaker suffered blows to his back, abdomen and chest. He remained paralyzed for 19 years before suffering a stroke in 2005 and dying two years later, aged 40. Bennett, 23 at the time of the attack, was convicted of battery and carrying a concealed weapon, and was sentenced to ten years in prison, but did not serve the entire sentence. His exact time behind bars remains undisclosed. Last Friday, the former convict, who suffered from terminal heart failure and an uncontrollable irregular heartbeat, underwent a groundbreaking transplant that saved his life. 'The new heart is still a...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The first transplant recipient of a genetically modified pig heart continues to recover at The University of Maryland Medical Center. The groundbreaking surgery happened last Friday. As David Bennett continues to improve, his son, David Bennett Jr., said on Tuesday that Bennett was taken off the ECMO machine, an advanced form of life support that pumps and oxygenates blood. READ MORE: Lexington Market Lands Taharka Brothers Ice Cream And Ovenbird Bakery“Overall, he’s a lot better looking,” Bennett Jr. said. “His vitals are a lot better now than they’ve been in the past.” Bennett, 57, is a Maryland native that was diagnosed with terminal heart disease. When he was deemed ineligible for a human heart transplant, Bennett was presented with an alternative option: a pig heart transplant. “For me, it seemed like a win-win,” Bennett Jr. said. “First of all, his prognosis-I didn’t think that he was going to be able to make it out of the hospital given the severity of his heart failure. So, the potential to give him more life and the quality of life...
    NHS surgeons could be performing PIG HEART transplants in the next decade, an expert said. This comes after the medical breakthrough where a 57-year-old man in the US had a pig heart transplanted into his body. 2Members of the surgical team show the pig heart that was transplanted into David Bennett on January 7, 2022 2A pig heart was transplanted into the 57-year-old man at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland The surgery, as well as using other pig organs in the human body, is now "on the straight line" with experts hopeful that it will become mainstream within a decade. Prof Gabriel Oniscu, ESOT President-Elect of the European Society of Organ Transplantation, told the Telegraph: "The unwritten joke in the field of transplantation was that xenotransplantation has always been around the corner, but it has remained around the corner. "Now I think it is not around the corner anymore, it’s on the straight line. “In the past, we’ve always said it will be five to 10 years [until transplantation is a reality as a...
    Stricken by terminal heart disease, David Bennett had only one chance left. He had been bedridden in hospital for months with an irregular heartbeat and was connected to a heart-lung machine keeping him alive. He was deemed too ill for a human transplant — but there was another option, and the 57-year-old grabbed it. ‘I know it’s a shot in the dark but it’s my last choice,’ he said after making the decision. Dr. Bartley Griffith takes a selfie photo with patient David Bennett in Baltimore in January 2022. Mr Bennett has had a genetically modified pig's heart transplanted into his body as he was deemed as too ill to have a human organ Last Friday, the handyman from Baltimore, Maryland, made history as the first person to successfully receive a genetically modified pig’s heart. Delighted doctors say the patient is doing well The genetically modified pig was specifically bred so it could be used as an organ donor  Last Friday, the handyman from Baltimore, Maryland, made history as the first person to successfully receive a genetically modified pig’s heart....
    The man who received the first pig heart transplant continued to recover Tuesday, four days after the experimental surgery. Since the transplant, David Bennett had been connected to a heart-lung machine to support his new heart. He was taken off the machine Tuesday, according to Deborah Kotz, a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “It’s still day to day and will be for the next few weeks,” Kotz said in an email. Bennett, 57, received the highly experimental transplant last Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Doctors gave him the genetically modified pig heart as a last-ditch effort to save his life. Bennett’s condition — heart failure and an irregular heartbeat — made him ineligible for a human heart transplant or a heart pump, doctors said. Because of the shortage of human organs donated for transplant, scientists have been trying to figure out how to use animal organs instead. The heart came from a pig that had been genetically modified to make its organs less likely to be rejected by the human body. The Food...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — The man who received the first pig heart transplant continued to recover Tuesday, four days after the experimental surgery. Since the transplant, David Bennett had been connected to a heart-lung machine to support his new heart. He was taken off the machine Tuesday, according to Deborah Kotz, a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland School of Medicine. READ MORE: Medical Helicopter Traveling From Maryland To Philadelphia Crash Lands; All 4 Occupants, Including Infant, Suffer Minor Injuries, Authorities Say“It’s still day to day and will be for the next few weeks,” Kotz said in an email. Bennett, 57, received the highly experimental transplant last Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Doctors gave him the genetically modified pig heart as a last-ditch effort to save his life. READ MORE: 23-Year-Old Towson University Student Shot, KilledBennett’s condition–heart failure and an irregular heartbeat–made him ineligible for a human heart transplant or a heart pump, doctors said. Because of the shortage of human organs donated for transplant, scientists have been trying to figure out how to use animal organs instead....
    David Bennett had two options: Die or get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig. The 57-year-old Maryland resident opted for the latter and is doing well days after the procedure. The transplant was performed by surgeons with the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The patient, David Bennett, is being monitored over the next days and weeks to make sure the transplant continues to be a success. He was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at UMMC as well as at several other leading transplant centers after a review of his medical records. "It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," said Bennett, a day before the surgery.  "I look forward to getting out of bed after I recover."The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision.  Click here for more details on the story from UMD Medical Center.
    David Bennett faced two options: Die or get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig. The 57-year-old Maryland resident opted for the latter and is doing well days after the procedure. The transplant was performed by surgeons with the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The patient, David Bennett, is being monitored over the next days and weeks to make sure the transplant continues to be a success.  He was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at UMMC as well as at several other leading transplant centers after a review of his medical records. "It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," said Bennett, a day before the surgery.  "I look forward to getting out of bed after I recover." The US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision.  "This was a breakthrough surgery and brings us one step closer to solving the organ shortage...
    David Bennett had two options: Die or get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig. The 57-year-old Maryland resident opted for the latter and is doing well days after the procedure. The transplant was performed by surgeons with the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The patient, David Bennett, is being monitored over the next days and weeks to make sure the transplant continues to be a success. He was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at UMMC as well as at several other leading transplant centers after a review of his medical records. "It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," said Bennett, a day before the surgery.  "I look forward to getting out of bed after I recover."The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision.  Click here for more details on the story from UMD Medical Center.
    Surgeons in Maryland made history by successfully transplanting a genetically modified pig heart into a 57-year-old patient with terminal heart disease -- and he's doing well days later (scroll down for photos). The transplant was performed by surgeons with the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The patient, David Bennett, is being monitored over the next days and weeks to make sure the transplant continues to be a success. He was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at UMMC as well as at several other leading transplant centers after a review of his medical records."It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," said Bennett, a day before the surgery.  "I look forward to getting out of bed after I recover."The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision.  Click here for more details on the story from UMD Medical Center.
    Surgeons in Maryland made history by successfully transplanting a genetically modified pig heart into a 57-year-old patient with terminal heart disease -- and he's doing well days later. The transplant was performed by surgeons with the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The patient, David Bennett, is being monitored over the next days and weeks to make sure the transplant continues to be a success. It was determined he was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at UMMC as well as at several other leading transplant centers after a review of his medical records."It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," said Bennett, a day before the surgery.  "I look forward to getting out of bed after I recover."The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on New Year's Eve through its compassionate use provision.  Click here for more details on the story from UMD Medical Center.
    HUMAN-animal hybrids could be used to grow lifesaving organs and replacement limbs in a landmark breakthrough for medical science - but some fear it may be mankind "playing God". History has been made as it emerged David Bennett, 57, from Maryland in the US, underwent a first-of-its-kind surgery to have a genetically-modified pig heart implanted in his chest. 4David Bennett, right, was implanted with a pig's heartCredit: PA 4'Baby Fae' received a baboon heart transplant because a human organ couldn't be foundCredit: Corbis - Getty 4In 1997, scientists grew a human ear on a mouse's backCredit: JOSEPH P. VACANTI/MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL Bennett had terminal heart disease, and underwent the bizarre-sounding procedure as a last hope - and he is now doing well three days after the operation. And in the past scientists have used the techniques to spliced human and monkey embryos together, transplant fetal organs into rats, and even grown human ears on mice. So-called "chimera" embryos and use of animal parts, known as xenotransplants, have been very controversial - with some feeling that scientists have...
    Some hearts are made of gold, but one man’s is now made entirely of a pig after he has undergone the world’s first successful heart transplant from a genetically modified pig to save his life, according to a recent New York Times report.  "It’s working and it looks normal. We are thrilled, but we don’t know what tomorrow will bring us. This has never been done before," said Dr. Bartley Griffith, the director of the cardiac transplant program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where he performed the eight-hour operation  RED CROSS DECLARES FIRST-EVER NATIONAL BLOOD CRISIS  Members of the surgical team perform the transplant of a pig heart into patient David Bennett in Baltimore on Friday, Jan. 7, 2022. On Monday, Jan. 10, 2022, the hospital said that he's doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery.  (Mark Teske/University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP) David Bennett Sr., who was so sick that he couldn’t even qualify for a human heart transplant, still remained connected to a heart-lung bypass machine as of Monday, but the...
    HISTORY was made in January of 2022, when a man received the world's first-ever pig heart transplant. The 57-year-old patient survived the surgery and is currently breathing on his own, without a ventilator. 2A man received a heart transplant from a pig Who received the world's first pig heart transplant? On Friday, January 7, 2022, Dave Bennett became the first human patient to receive an organ from a gene-edited pig. The surgery took place at the University of Maryland Medical Center, and took upwards of nine hours to complete. A one-year-old, 240-pound pig who was specifically bred for the purpose of the transplant, provided a working heart for Bennett. "This is nothing short of a miracle," said Bennett's son, David. "That’s what my dad needed, and that’s what I feel like he got." Although Bennett remains on an ECMO machine to help pump blood through his body, he is breathing on his own and doctors plan to slowly wean him off of the machine. "This is a truly remarkable breakthrough," said Robert Montgomery,...
    CNN’s John Berman marveled at the wonders of modern medicine while reacting to the news that a man received a heart that came from a pig in a successful transplant. On Tuesday, Berman used part of New Day to focus on the story of David Bennett, a Maryland man with terminal heart disease who underwent an experimental procedure to receive the heart of a genetically modified pig. CNN’s reporting states that Bennett was ineligible for a conventional heart transplant or an artificial heart pump after his medical records showed he was too sick to qualify, but he decided to take a chance on the surgery, and the FDA granted emergency authorization to make it happen. While Bennett’s long-term prognosis isn’t clear, his body’s immune system hasn’t rejected the transplant yet, and the heart appears to be working. As Berman spoke about all of this with Dr. Jonathan Reiner, he hailed it as a miracle of science as he exclaimed “When I read the headline ‘A pig art in a human being,’ I’m like, nothing else matters. This is everything that...
    BALTIMORE, Maryland -- In a medical first, doctors transplanted a pig heart into a patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said Monday that he's doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery.While it's too soon to know if the operation really will work, it marks a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center say the transplant showed that a heart from a genetically modified animal can function in the human body without immediate rejection.The patient, David Bennett, a 57-year-old Maryland handyman, knew there was no guarantee the experiment would work but he was dying, ineligible for a human heart transplant and had no other option, his son told The Associated Press."It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," Bennett said a day before the surgery, according to a statement provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine.On Monday, Bennett...
    3 hours before The film was released, University of Maryland School of Medicine Comment on the photo, Surgeon Bartley Griffiths took a photo of David Bennett earlier this month Doctors in the United States have announced the success of the first operation to transplant a genetically modified pig heart into the human body. Doctors say David Bennett, who underwent surgery three days after the seven-hour operation, is fine. The operation was seen as Bennett’s last hope of saving his life, although it is not yet clear what his chances of survival will be in the long run. The day before the surgery, Bennett, 57, said, “I’m going to die or I have to have this surgery, which is my last wish.” Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center have obtained a special exemption from U.S. medical authorities to perform surgery on the grounds that Bennett may have died. According to the medical team that performed the procedure, this is the culmination of many years of research and could change lives around the world. “This will bring the world of...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — For the first time in history, doctors with the University of Maryland School of Medicine successfully transplanted a pig heart into a patient. The experimental surgery, which has no guarantee to work, was the only option for David Bennett, 57, who was diagnosed with terminal heart disease. The patient was ineligible for a human heart transplant. He also didn’t qualify for an artificial heart pump due to his life-threatening arrhythmia. READ MORE: Former Baltimore County Police Chief Cornelius “Neil” Behan Dies At 97Before the procedure, Bennett survived for weeks off of a heart-lung bypass machine, which left him bedridden. “He said I don’t want to die and he said if I do, maybe you’ll learn something to help others,” said Dr. Bartley Griffith, a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland. The surgery was performed on Friday, which took about 7 hours. Three days later, doctors confirm Bennett is doing well. “We seem to be past what we consider the hyper-acute rejection phase that we would have normally seen in an animal organ that wasn’t specially...
    By Carla K. Johnson | Associated Press In a medical first, doctors transplanted a pig heart into a patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said Monday that he’s doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery. While it’s too soon to know if the operation really will work, it marks a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center say the transplant showed that a heart from a genetically modified animal can function in the human body without immediate rejection. The patient, David Bennett, a 57-year-old Maryland handyman, knew there was no guarantee the experiment would work but he was dying, ineligible for a human heart transplant and had no other option, his son told The Associated Press. “It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Bennett said a day before the surgery, according to a statement provided by the University...
    THE first human patient to receive a pig heart transplant called the one-of-a-kind medical procedure a "shot in the dark" that could save his life. A pig heart was transplanted into 57-year-old David Bennett on Friday at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. 3Dr. Bartley Griffith, left, took a selfie with patient David BennettCredit: AP The experimental surgery — which took seven hours to complete — led doctors at the medical center to confirm the procedure showed that a heart from a genetically modified animal can work in the human body without being rejected immediately. Bennett said in a statement, obtained by The Associated Press a day before the surgery: "It was either die or do this transplant. "I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice." His son David Bennett Jr. told the news outlet his dad was ineligible for a human heart transplant and this was his only option for a chance at living — despite it not being guaranteed to help. On Monday, three days post-operation,...
    The first-ever successful transplant of a porcine heart into a human’s chest cavity took place last week in a Maryland hospital. Three days after the grueling seven-hour operation, the patient, David Bennett Sr., is reportedly as happy as a pig in mud. “It’s working and it looks normal,” Dr. Bartley Griffith, who performed the operation, told The New York Times. “We are thrilled, but we don’t know what tomorrow will bring us. This has never been done before.” The highly experimental operation took place as part of a last-ditch effort to save Bennett’s life. The 57-year-old, diagnosed with a life-threatening heart disease, was at a point where his condition had rendered him ineligible for a human heart transplant. His heart arrhythmia had left him hospitalized in the weeks before the procedure. Only a heart-lung bypass machine was keeping him alive. “It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Bennett said in a statement issued a day before the surgery. On Monday, the handyman...
    (CNN)A 57-year-old Maryland man is doing well three days after receiving a genetically modified pig heart in a first-of-its-kind transplant surgery, University of Maryland Medicine said in a news release Monday.David Bennett had terminal heart disease, and the pig heart was "the only currently available option," according to the release. Bennett was deemed ineligible for a conventional heart transplant or an artificial heart pump after reviews of his medical records."It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it's a shot in the dark, but it's my last choice," Bennett said before the surgery, according to the release.The US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization for the surgery on December 31. US surgeons successfully test pig kidney transplant in human patientThree genes that are responsible for rejection of pig organs by human immune systems were removed from the donor pig, and one gene was taken out to prevent excessive pig heart tissue growth. Six human genes responsible for immune acceptance were inserted. Read MoreBennett's doctors will need to monitor him for days to weeks...
    A Maryland man now has a pig to thank for his second chance at life. In a medical first, surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center transplanted a pig heart into a human patient, reporting three days later that he is doing well, the University of Maryland School of Medicine announced in a press release Monday. The patient, 57-year-old David Bennett, will be monitored over the coming weeks to see if the transplant provides "lifesaving benefits," according to the statement. The highly experimental surgery was the patient's last chance to live, as he suffered from terminal heart disease and did not qualify for a human heart transplant. AUSTRALIANS WAITING FOR ORGAN TRANSPLANTS WILL BE DENIED LIFESAVING PROCEDURES UNTIL FULLY VACCINATED: REPORT "It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Bennett said ahead of his surgery in a press release. Surgeons received the green light to proceed after the Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization...
    In a medical first, doctors transplanted a pig heart into a patient in a last-ditch effort to save his life and a Maryland hospital said Monday that he’s doing well three days after the highly experimental surgery. While it’s too soon to know if the operation really will work, it marks a step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center say the transplant showed that a heart from a genetically modified animal can function in the human body without immediate rejection. The patient, David Bennett, 57, knew there was no guarantee the experiment would work but he was dying, ineligible for a human heart transplant and had no other option, his son told The Associated Press. “It was either die or do this transplant. I want to live. I know it’s a shot in the dark, but it’s my last choice,” Bennett said a day before the surgery, according to a statement provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine. There’s a huge shortage of...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — US doctors transplant a pig heart into a patient in an experimental, last-ditch effort to save his life. According to the New York Times, the operation was performed in Baltimore at the University of Maryland School of Medicine on Friday.    
    A mother has penned an emotional letter to the organ donor who gave her 'the best gift ever' of a heart transplant just days before Christmas 2020 - to enable her to enjoy her first festivities with her new baby this year. Nicolette Somers, 30, from Detroit, Michigan, was diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) - a rare form of congestive heart failure associated with pregnancy - in October 2020, three months after her son Beckett, now one, was born. Although doctors initially hoped they'd be able to treat Nicolette for the condition, she was eventually told she would need a heart transplant - or she would risk missing her newborn son grow up. She was told the wait for a new heart could take up to 11 months - but received a call nine days later to say there was a donor heart ready for her and underwent the life-saving transplant on December 20 2020, before spending the next three weeks in recovery. The mother-of-one missed her son's first Christmas while in hospital but says that videos of him opening his...
    MILLER PLACE, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) — A Long Island dad is home for the holiday after spending last Christmas battling heart failure. Now, following a transplant, he’s not taking anything for granted, CBS2’s Dave Carlin reported Thursday. READ MORE: 14-Year-Old California Boy On The Mend After Having Extremely Rare Heart And Liver Transplant“So, we always love being out with my kids, playing with them outside,” Christopher Frey said. Frey, 39, is a married father of two sons, ages 2 and 3. He said what makes him younger than his kids is coming up on the year anniversary of getting his new heart and his second life. (Photo: Frey family) During a tough transplant journey, he said he told himself, “No matter what, I’m going to get through this. I have a family I have to go home to. I have boys to raise.” He said it was Thanksgiving Day 2020 when he felt weak. He knew to get it checked because his heart problems dated back to his childhood. At Mount Sinai Hospital, he was told his heart was...
    SHOREHAM, Long Island (WABC) -- A family on Long Island is facing the unthinkable - their infant son needs a heart transplant only two years after their other child needed one.One-year-old Everett Cotter, of Shoreham, is hospitalized at New York Presbyterian Hospital awaiting a heart transplant.In September 2019, his older sister, Ruby Cotter, was in the same hospital ward waiting for her own transplant. She was only two months old at the time."I didn't want to believe that it was a possibility that it could have happened again," Everett's mother, Ashley Cotter, said when she got the news from doctors that Everett has the same heart condition as Ruby - dilated cardiomyopathy.It's a condition in which the heart cannot pump blood effectively because it's enlarged.Brian Cotter, Everett's father, said the family has no history of dilated cardiomyopathy."We're still unsure how it's happened twice," he said.Ruby's heart took four months to arrive and her parents spent every moment in the hospital with her."It could be longer for him," Ashley Cotter said of Everett. "Because he's older and he's bigger and there's...
    A single mom who suffered a heart attack at age 27 and spent two years waiting for a transplant got one just in time for the holidays — and now she gets to spend Christmas with her nine-year-old child.  Victoria Guajardo, now 29, was just 27 when she had a heart attack that left her heart unable to pump, according to KTRK. She spent two years in a hospital over 300 miles away from home, meaning she didn't get to spend much time with her son, Alfredo De la Cruz. But in October, she finally got off the transplant list and is now recovering with a new heart — and her little boy. Victoria Guajardo, now 29, was just 27 years old when she had a heart attack that left her heart unable to pump She spent two years in a hospital over 300 miles away from home, meaning she didn't get to spend much time with her son, Alfredo De la Cruz After two years in the hospital, she finally got a new heart in October and can spend Christmas...
    A local news team is helping an anonymous man give $1 million to deserving residents in Idaho, one of them being the Gast family. In November, Jason celebrated his eight-year anniversary of undergoing a heart transplant, but went to the hospital when he did not feel good for a few days, East Idaho News reported Friday. He was later transported by ambulance to the University of Utah to meet with doctors. Following multiple tests, Jason was placed back on the transplant list because his heart was not working anymore, which meant a long journey for their family. His wife, whose name is Jill, cares for their four children and keeps everyone together without asking for assistance. Meanwhile, the Gast’s received a rent increase and Jason’s health is uncertain. Jill is also employed part-time doing transcription to make extra money. The outlet’s Nate Eaton recently surprised the couple with a check for $2,000 to help with gas, $3,000 for groceries, and said the Secret Santa wanted to pay the family’s rent for the next six months. Inflation will cost families an...
    A New York family is experiencing the unimaginable as they watch an artificial heart keep their one-year-old son alive while he awaits a heart transplant — just two years after their daughter underwent surgeries for the exact same rare heart condition. Brian and Ashley Cotter's daughter Ruby was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy — an enlarged heart condition that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood — in 2019, two months after she was born. She nearly died from the condition, but was kept alive with an artificial heart for three months until she could undergo a heart transplant. Now two-and-a-half, Ruby is thriving — but just a couple of weeks ago, Brian, 37, and Ashley, 31, noticed their son Everett exhibiting some of the same symptoms that had first troubled them in Ruby. Now Everett, who turns one on December 30, is surviving with the help of his own artificial heart as his family anxiously awaits news that he, too, will be the recipient of a donor heart.    Both of Brian and Ashley Cotter's children have had the same rare heart condition - and...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Delilah Edwards’ parents didn’t plan an elaborate Thanksgiving celebration. Just spending the day together is a big deal when your 3-year-old daughter has a new heart. “Before her color was really off. She was very pale…,” Delilah’s mother, Samantha Davidson, told the Chicago Sun-Times. “Now she is very pink. I’ve never seen her cheeks have this much color to them.” Since March, Davidson and her husband Ryan Edwards have traveled every weekend from Moline, Illinois, to see their daughter at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago. Last month, Delilah, who was born with an underdeveloped left side of her heart, underwent 12 hours of transplant surgery. Now Delilah’s parents have been staying at the Ronald McDonald House downtown while they accompany their daughter for multiple checkups each week. On Thursday they celebrated the holiday with 70 other families at Ronald McDonald House, which provides free accommodations for families of children undergoing medical treatment. After nine heart surgeries, some of which didn’t work, doctors told Delilah’s parents a new...
    Christy Teigen isn’t backing down after once again being on the receiving end of backlash for another "out of touch" social media post. The model and entrepreneur, 35, showed off her new eyebrow transformation over the weekend to much dismay and took to her Instagram Stories on Monday to respond to the criticism, using a screenshot of a recent online article to drive her point home. "WHY are peoples so f---ing riled up over any little thing I do? You’re gonna give yourselves a heart attack," Teigen wrote alongside a screenshot of the article, which detailed how the cookbook author had hair taken from the back of her scalp and transplanted to her face in order to create a fuller appearance. "I never wear makeup if I can avoid it so I was so excited for this eyebrow transplant surgery," she wrote of the "crazy" results she seemingly was satisfied with before sharing photos. CHRISSY TEIGEN'S 'SQUID GAME' PARTY BASHED ON SOCIAL MEDIA AS 'TONE DEAF' "A little dark from the pencil but it’s so cool to have eyebrows again,"...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Delilah Edwards, 3, of Moline has been through more than many people face in a lifetime.On Saturday she celebrated her third birthday while helping Lurie Children's Hospital mark its 400th heart transplant.It's been just a few weeks since Delilah received her new heart and now she and her family are all back together again.A daughter running into her father's arms - a moment the Edwards family is not taking for granted.Delilah has undergone 10 surgeries and spent more than half her life in hospitals with a rare heart condition.Before birth she was diagnosed with two congenital heart conditions: hypoplastic left heart syndrome and double outlet right ventricle. Both disorders affect how blood flow to the heart and require treatment as soon as a child is born for survival."We always stay positive but we were always prepared that you know, anything could turn at any moment" said her father Ryan Edwards. "You know , we doctors can only do so much."Well those doctors did in fact save her life. In late October, her parents got the call that...
    Kurtis Blow is lucky to be alive. “Man, I was supposed to be gone this year,” reflects the legendary rapper, using the word “gone” to mean “dead” in his case. “Doctors told me I had six months to a year to live and I better think about getting a heart transplant.” Fortunately, he did more than just think about it and ended up having a heart transplant on Dec. 6, 2020. Knowing what could’ve been, this founding father of hip-hop is now greeting every new day as a second chance at life. “It’s incredible just to be in this position, waking up in the morning,” says Blow, who, in 1979, became the first rapper signed to a major label. “I use to say this on Twitter all the time — ‘Good morning, thank God we all woke up.’ I have been doing that for about 10 years. “Now, when I wake up in the morning, I am living that statement — actually, literally thanking God when I open up my eyes.” Blow is feeling hopeful, and ready to perform for...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — In an amazing medical breakthrough, doctors at NYU have succeeded in using a pig’s kidney for a human recipient. Experts believe this could mean the thousands of people on kidney transplant waiting lists could have a new option someday. “The sad truth is that nearly half of the people who are waiting for a transplant are going to get too sick or die before an organ is available,” said Dr. Robert Montgomery of NYU Langone Health. READ MORE: Miami-Dade Approves COVID-19 Sick Leave For County EmployeesThat’s the driving force behind Dr. Montgomery’s quest to enlarge the pool of organs suitable for transplant – the need will always exceed the demand. Less than one month ago, surgeons at NYU transplanted a kidney from a pig onto the body of a brain-dead recipient whose family consented to the experiment. Within minutes, the kidney worked as a human one would for 54 hours. It produced urine and showed no signs of being rejected. In order to prevent rejection, the kidney came from a herd of pigs that had been genetically...
    GROWING up Cecilia Adamou had to have multiple surgeries in order to keep her fit and well. When she was just ten-years-old she was given a heart transplant and can now see her heartbeat through her chest as the organ had been from a 30-year-old man. 6When she was 10-years-old Cecilia Adamou had to have a heart transplant after heart surgery didn't workCredit: SWNS 6Now 22-years-old Cecelia is encouraging other people to sign up to be an organ donorCredit: SWNS 6Cecelia went viral on TikTok after posting a video of her beating heart onlineCredit: SWNS The 22-year-old went viral after she posted a video online of her heart pushing through her rib cage and uses her platform to talk candidly about organ donation, after undergoing both heart and kidney transplants since she was born with a serious health condition. Cecilia, from Cobham, Surrey, said: "It's always been very special to me, I find it very amazing that I have somebody else's heart inside of me - how incredible is that? "It used to be much more pronounced, when I had...
    PLANTATION (CBSMiami) – After 65 days in the hospital, on Thursday, Heydi Yudex officially beat COVID-19. “She actually walked today [for the first time] with the use of the ECMO machine,” said her husband David Duran. “She was able to be taken off the ventilator.” READ MORE: Fort Lauderdale PD Needs Help Catching Man Caught On Cam Trying To Kidnap WomanDuran was also hospitalized with Yudex at Westside Regional Medical Center, but he recovered much quicker. “I just saw her for two seconds and then I didn’t see her until a month ago,” said Duran. The last two months have been an emotional rollercoaster for the couple, with what has felt like more downs than ups. “When someone finds themselves in a situation alone, full of despair, your mind wanders to dark places” said Duran. “A lot of thanks that I have in my heart for the staff here. They do make it easy to have that hope.” Duran acknowledged each one of them as they passed by. Things only recently turned the corner in the last week. From the...