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    Parents of fourth and fifth graders in a Beaverton, Oregon, elementary school are outraged about the creation of a Queer Student Alliance (QSA) club they say their children were asked to join without their consent. At a January 18 virtual school board meeting, parents of children aged 9-11 years who attend Raleigh Hills Elementary School expressed concern about the appropriateness of the club, reported Reduxx the following day. Parent Bambi addressed the school board (video begins at 56:18) regarding her experience with the school principal’s alleged dismissal of her concerns: So, I’m a parent of a fourth grader who had some fifth grade students come into her classroom and do a presentation on an LGBTQ club. My daughter was asked to sign up and she did because everybody was doing it and she thought that that’s what she should do. I then became aware of email conversations back and forth between the principal and other school officials dating back to November of last year. The emails showed this club being planned out and how to go around needing parents’...
    New CDC guidance on the effectiveness of masking just gave schools the green light to go mask optional, a group of infectious disease medical professionals penned in a Washington Post op-ed Tuesday. According to the doctors – Tufts Medical Center epidemiologist Shira Doron, Harvard Medical School professor Westyn Branch-Elliman, and Boston Medical Center infectious disease management director Elissa Perkins -- respirators like N95 masks were found to be more protective than surgical or cloth masks. Since these high-quality masks are highly effective at protecting the wearer, it makes the old COVID-19 mantra "my mask protects you" "obsolete." "As a result, schools can finally safely make masks optional for students and staff," they stated. DAILY BEAST COLUMNIST LIKENS BARI WEISS' COVID FATIGUE TO AMERICAN ‘CRUELTY,' WHITE SUPREMACY The doctors admitted that it’s time for the U.S. to finally advance forward in the pandemic with a mindset of personal protection, while taking advantage of the many tools that have been developed since 2020. FILE PHOTO: A workers inspects an N95 respirator during manufacturing at Protective Health Gear (PHG) in Paterson, New...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- This is a pins-and-needles time for college applicants waiting for letters of acceptance.For many, it's a sight-unseen choice because they can't visit every school. A Bay Area company, Vidsig, is using video chats to connect high school and college students for insight about campus life.Video chats have opened all sorts of new ways to communicate. The newest, called Vidsig, is helping college-bound students."It chokes me up sometimes, to be honest with you, to have high school students say, 'oh, my gosh, this totally changed the direction of my life,'" said Jonathan Yarnold, CEO of Vidsig.RELATED: UC system officially drops SAT, ACT scores from use in admissions and scholarshipsReese Williams is a senior at Walnut Creek's Las Lomas High School. She has applied to a dozen colleges but has visited only a couple in California due to time and expense. So she has done a dozen Vidsig video chats with students attending schools where she has applied."They give me answers that I can't find online on, you know, a college's website or simply through other reviews online,"...
    Oakland students held a virtual protest over Zoom Friday and are refusing to come back to school until the district meets all of their demands for COVID safety — something the district said it’s already completed or is in the process of completing. But teachers disagree and say they’ve been asking the district for more safety measures for months. About 300 people logged onto the Zoom protest late Friday morning, where a few dozen students and teachers spoke about the challenges and risks they are still facing as a result of the pandemic and what they hope the schools and the district will do to improve. Since Tuesday, students across the district have been boycotting classes by refusing to come to school and will continue until the district moves in-person learning to online and provides PCR and rapid testing twice a week, KN95 and N95 masks for every student and more outdoor eating spaces. Teachers at Bridges Academy, United for Success Academy and Acorn Woodland Elementary staged a “sickout” on Tuesday in solidarity with the students, forcing the district to...
    Share this: New York City’s Public School Athletic League calls itself the largest sports league in the world, a city-run organization that provides opportunities for some 45,000 high school students to compete in soccer, bowling, cheerleading, table tennis, and more than a dozen other sports. But when it comes to middle school, there are few chances for students to face off against other schools. The education department does not support a competitive league for students in grades six through eight. A Manhattan gym teacher and local nonprofit have filled in that gap. John DeMatteo, who teaches at Manhattan Academy of Technology in Lower Manhattan, and the nonprofit Manhattan Youth Recreation and Resources, have spent years quietly building the Middle School Athletic League, or MSAL. It now includes about 125 schools, giving students the chance to wear a team jersey and travel the city to play against their peers.
              by Kendall Tietz   A teacher training at a Texas middle school reportedly instructed teachers to not tell parents if a student tells them they identify as transgender or non-binary, according to documents reviewed by the Daily Caller News Foundation. “DO NOT contact their parents and out them to their families,” a teacher professional development training at Walsh Middle School (WMS) in Round Rock Independent School District (RRISD), told teachers, according to documents. The training also provided teachers with advice if they “misgender someone,” advising them to “correct students” if they use the wrong pronouns, the documents show. “Apologizing profusely can draw unnecessary attention to or cause embarrassment for someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns,” a training document said. Practice using “‘they’ to refer to a single person, or try to refer to people with names only.” Teachers are encouraged to change sentences to use gender neutral pronouns “whenever possible.” “How long can you go in a conversation without using or needing to use a gendered pronoun? Can you notice when other people use gendered pronouns? How do...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Some Chicago Public Schools students plan to walk out of classes on Friday, protesting the decision to resume in-person learning after the district reached a COVID-19 safety agreement with the Chicago Teachers Union. Students organizing the walkout said they were not asked to contribute to discussions about their academic and personal needs in order to feel safe going back to in-person classes during the Omicron surge of the pandemic. READ MORE: Off-Duty Chicago Police Officer Kyjuan Tate Charged With Shooting Three People At Bowling Alley In Blue IslandThe Chicago Public Schools Radical Youth Alliance, or Chi-Rads, organized the walkout, which will begin at 12:30 p.m., and include a 1:30 p.m. press conference at CPS headquarters. “Young people have never been included meaningfully in any conversation around safety during the pandemic,” organizers said in a news release announcing the walkout. “District leaders, administrators, elected officials consistently make decisions about our safety, assuming they know what we need when they do not. Adultism ran rampant in CPS before the pandemic and has only gotten worse, imposing a major divide...
    Students in the Oakland Unified School District in California are demanding that better coronavirus safety measures are put in place, or else they will go on "strike" and skip school until their demands are met. The group of students issued a "District Wide Petition" earlier this week demanding that the OUSD either switch to remote learning, or distribute KN-95 or N-95 masks for all students, two weekly PCR and rapid tests for every person on campus, and "More outdoor spaces to eat safely when it rains." Over 1,200 students signed the petition, which gives the school until Jan. 17 to meet their demands, or else the students will "strike" and not go to school beginning on Jan. 18 until their demands are met. The students will then protest outside the district office building beginning on Jan. 21.  CHICAGO TEACHERS UNION CONCEDES TO MAYOR LIGHTFOOT'S COVID-19 SAFETY PROPOSAL: 'A ONE-WOMAN KAMIKAZE' A sanitizing station sits in Catherine Fletcher's first grade classroom during the first day of partial in-person instruction at Garfield Elementary School in Oakland, Calif. (Jessica Christian/The San Francisco...
    A Mississippi middle school has offered body-slimming shapewear to female students this month, leading to furious backlash.  Southaven Middle School in northern Mississippi sent a letter home to parents of teen and tween girls, educating on the issue of negative body image. It concluded with an offer from the school's counselors to provide shapewear — a foundation garment that's used alter a person's body shape — to any of the students, aged 10 to 14, whose parents agreed to it. The shocking letter was shared on social media by mom Ashley Heun, who said that she was 'beyond p***ed.'   Southaven Middle School in northern Mississippi sent this letter about body image to parents of girls at the school, who are aged 10 to 14 Mom Ashley Heun shared the letter online, slamming it for perpetuating the problem of negative body image 'This is what was sent home with my 8th-grade daughter,' Heun, whose daughter Caroline attends the school, wrote on Facebook. It concluded by offering literature on body image as well as bras and shapewear for the top and bottom, asking parents...
    (CNN)Sixteen top US universities, including Duke, Vanderbilt and Northwestern, are being sued by five former students claiming those schools may be involved in antitrust violations in the way those institutions worked together in determining financial aid awards for students, according to the lawsuit filed in a US District Court in Illinois. The complaint, which was filed Sunday, alleges that these private national universities have "participated in a price-fixing cartel that is designed to reduce or eliminate financial aid as a locus of competition, and that in fact has artificially inflated the net price of attendance for students receiving financial aid." The suit is asking for class-action status to cover any US citizen or permanent resident who paid tuition, room, or board at these institutions within varying timeframes from 2003 to the present. The plaintiffs want a permanent injunction against this alleged conspiracy, and that they are also seeking restitution and damages to be determined in court.Read MoreBiden extends pause on student loan repayment through May 1 The suit centers around the application of Section 568 of the Improving America's Schools...
    Having regular exercise while studying can help boost pupils' exam grades in both French maths, according to researchers, who say it develops their cognitive skills.  To understand the influence fitness has on learning, experts from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, tested education and activity levels of 193 pupils aged 8 to 12. By combining data on fitness, and exam results, they found a link between better cardiorespiratory fitness and higher marks in mathematics and French grammar. However, the team say the link was indirect, with physical fitness improving executive functions and cognitive flexibility, which in turn helps with subjects that rely on specific and structured answers, such as mathematics.  The researchers say schools and administrators should consider the importance of exercise and movement when planning timetables and allocating budgets.  Having regular exercise while studying can help boost pupils' exam grades in both French maths, according to researchers, who say it develops their cognitive skills. Stock image HOW THE TESTING WORKED The investigators teamed up with eight schools in Geneva to conduct cognitive and physical tests on 193 pupils aged 8 to...
    Jesse Sharkey is a name you need to know. He is as a self-declared champion of the working class, and a prominent socialist activist. Shockingly (or not so much) he is also the proud owner of a $1.4 million dollar property in Chicago, where he lives with his wife, socialist author Julie Fain. Fain also just happens to be the daughter of wealthy capitalist Richard Fain, who up until mere days ago was the CEO of the Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines group. These are all interesting qualities for a socialist, but perhaps the most important quality, in this context, is that Sharkey is the current President of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and the lead cheerleader for unnecessarily shutting out Chicago's 350,000 public school students, even as parents and the Mayor of Chicago beg them to return to school. Chicago Public Schools (CPS) cancelled classes for the third-straight day on Friday, as the vast majority of staff refuses to report to work. Happy New Year!  Jesse Sharkey (above) is a name you need to know. He is as a self-declared...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – Aspiring lawmakers, judges and lobbyists filled the halls of the state capital as YMCA’s Youth in Government session got underway Friday. It’s the 75th year young people have taken over the capital and practice open government without the confines of partisanship. READ MORE: Amber Alert Issued For Missing Baby In CarjackingThe weekend before Minnesota State lawmakers head into session, about one thousand young people are warming up their seats. “They are taking the roles as legislators, lawyers, judges, lobbyists, media officials,” said Orville Lindquist, who works with the YMCA. It’s here these young people talk about real issues, issues impacting their lives. From housing to immigration, police and race there is no topic untouched. “This year I am really working on natural resources and a clean Minnesota that’s been my biggest platform, is kind of moving forward towards and effective means of a natural resource that we can use as a state to kind of get closer to a net zero Minnesota,” said Wesley Ross, this year’s governor. READ MORE: Sheriff Hutchinson Says He'll 'Let The Citizens...
    A new Arizona school choice program will fund school tuition for eligible students whose public schools close amid a spike in COVID-19 Omicron variant cases, according to a press release from Republican Gov. Doug Ducey. The Open for Learning Recovery Benefit program gives parents a maximum of $7,000 to pay for child care, transportation to education centers, online tutoring and school tuition to help cater to students who fail to perform in virtual learning environments, according to the press release. Eligible parents can opt into the program “if a school closes for even one day.” “In Arizona, we’re going to ensure continued access to in-person learning,” Ducey said. “Everyone agrees that schools should stay open and kids need to be in the classroom. With this announcement, we are making sure parents and families have options if a school closes its doors.” We’re making sure in-person learning remains an option for all Arizona families and students. That’s why we’re taking preemptive action and launching the Open for Learning Recovery Benefit. 1/ — Doug Ducey (@dougducey) January 4, 2022 The program...
    A Belgian plastic surgeon has been jailed after telling students that women 'don't want to open their legs anymore' in a university lecture. Jeff Hoeyberghs, 60, was given a ten-month prison sentence, half of which is suspended, after the extraordinary 2019 rant in which he said women exist to 'satisfy men sexually and perform household chores'. The TV surgeon, who is qualified in the UK, had been invited to speak by the University of Ghent and the Catholic Flemish Students' Union, with his comments prompting a barrage of complaints. Plastic surgeon Jeff Hoeyberghs has been jailed after telling students that women 'don't want to open their legs anymore' in a university lecture Judges said the sentence plus an €8,000 fine were merited because he incited discrimination, hatred and violence against women and refused to back down. He has maintained he was speaking the 'truth' and claimed his freedom of speech is being denied. In the two-hour lecture to the postgraduate students, Hoeyberghs said: 'Women want the privileges of male protection and money, but they do not want to open their legs anymore. RELATED ARTICLES...
    (CNN)While a seventh grade boy taught an eighth grade boy how to start a knitting row, a seventh grade girl put the finishing touches on her knit bunny and a diverse group of middle schoolers streamed into a classroom in Washington, D.C., for knitting club. As the pandemic drags on, the club -- founded by Sheridan School teachers Christine Heiler and Laura Nakatani -- has increasingly drawn students who find they benefit from starting their day with a meditative activity alongside calm, warm adults. As the Sheridan School counselor, I recognize that creative interventions such as knitting club can help bolster students' well-being at this challenging time. Anxiety and depression symptoms among children have doubled, and the US Surgeon General and the American Academy of Pediatrics have called the current state of children's mental health a crisis. Communities are experiencing a shortage of pediatric mental health care providers, and few schools have adequate resources to meet kids' growing needs.'My stomach worries so much it hurts'Our children need help, but they are not often getting it. The American School Counselor Association...
    A Johns Hopkins University medical professor slammed America's Ivy League universities on Tuesday for their 'anti-scientific and cruel' COVID policies. Writing for former New York Times editor Bari Weiss' Common Sense substack, Dr. Marty Markay said the policies schools such as Georgetown, Cornell, Princeton, UMass Amherst and Emerson have in place are creating an undue harm on the mental health of college students - who tend not to get severely sick from COVID. Over the last six months, Markay wrote, the risk of a person 15 to 24 dying of COVID was 0.001 percent - and all or nearly all of those deaths were among unvaccinated people with a comorbidity. But colleges in the United States are now requiring students to be vaccinated against the virus, as they also impose 10-day isolation periods for infected students, outdoor mask mandates and weekly testing - even as they charge thousands of dollars for tuition. Some are also mandating students receive a booster shot against COVID, despite the risk of myocarditis.  These policies, Markay said, are creating an undue harm on college students...
    I teach college, and recently had an overwhelming sense of sadness. It was the last class of the semester. When I said goodbye to my students, I sat alone in my office with the door closed. I took a deep breath and sighed, mentally worn out and emotionally uncertain. Can we ever be the same? After 15 weeks of classes, I am unsure if we can. I have been teaching college for more than 20 years and have had every kind of student in my classes. For the most part, every class has had its unique level of engagement. But always engagement of some degree — college students who are ready to stretch toward their dreams, willing to challenge, to question, to absorb themselves in healthy, vigorous debate and the pursuit of creative work. This semester, however, has been markedly different. Was it me? Have I not been trying hard enough? The pandemic has forced me to rethink my teaching. My interaction with students through Zoom and email has forced me to find new and sometimes, admittedly exciting ways...
              by Logan Washburn   After a Chinese student at Purdue University spoke out against the Chinese Communist Party, fellow Chinese students at the American school allegedly threatened to report him to China for espionage. Zhihao Kong told ProPublica that after he posted a letter condemning the Tiananmen Square Massacre, China’s Ministry of State Security began threatening him and his family. “His family back home, in this case China, was visited and threatened by agents of that nation’s secret police,” President Mitch Daniels said in an email published by the Purdue Exponent. Daniels explained that Ministry of State Security officers ordered Kong’s family to stop him from speaking against the regime. If Kong refused, his family said they knew they would get “in trouble,” according to ProPublica. These threats didn’t only come from the Chinese government. After Kong criticized the Chinese Communist Party, his American peers allegedly began harassing him as well. “One of our students, after speaking out on behalf of freedom and others martyred for advocating for it, was harassed and threatened by other students from his home country,” Daniels said in a...
              by Alexa Schwerha   Even at religiously affiliated institutions, pro-life students fight to have their voices heard peacefully. Below are five times in 2021 that pro-life advocates overcame adversity on college campuses. 1. VIDEO: ‘I love sacrificing children’: Pro-life rally turns into megaphone battle At the University of North Texas, a pro-life vigil held by the Young Conservatives of Texas chapter was interrupted by a pro-choice mob. The protestors brought whistles, megaphones, and instruments to drown out the pro-life students. Phrases shouted by the leftists include vulgarity such as “I love sacrificing children”, and “F**k your God”. Campus Reform obtained a video of the incident. 2. WATCH: Students destroy pro-life memorial at Pepperdine University A pro-life display arranged by the Pepperdine College Republicans was vandalized by pro-choice students at the Christian university. 620 crosses were placed on the Freedom Wall to honor the 62 million lives lost to abortion since 1973. Protestors disrupted the display by tearing down the crosses, hanging them upside down, and covering the board with pro-choice slogans such as “My Body, My Choice”, and “No uterus, No Opinion.” Other...
    CBS News’ Jan Crawford on Sunday said she believed that closing schools for fear of Covid-19 had a “crushing” impact on American students. “My kids hear me rant about this every day,” Crawford said in a Face the Nation segment about underreported stories. “So I may as well tell you guys. It’s the crushing impact that our Covid policies have had on young kids and children, by far the least serious risk for serious illness.” Citing Surgeon General Vivek Murthy’s assessment that there was an emerging “epidemic” of “mental health challenges” among young people who had lived through Covid-19 lockdowns, Crawford argued that the cost of closing schools had outweighed the benefits. “Even teenagers, I mean, a healthy teenager has a one-in-a-million chance of getting … and dying from Covid, which is way lower than dying in a car wreck on a road trip,” Crawford said. “But they have suffered and sacrificed the most, especially kids in underrepresented and at-risk communities. And now we have the surgeon general saying there’s a mental health crisis among our kids. The risk of...
    A group of Rhode Island teens came together to build a shelter for a handicapped five-year-old boy - after they noticed that he would often get wet while waiting for the school bus. Ryder Killam, from Bradford, Rhode Island, went to the bus stop early every day because he feared he might miss the school bus due to his disabilities.  He often waited more than 15 minutes for the bus to arrive, and sometimes he was hit with inclimate weather. But when a few local students heard about his problem, they teamed up and constructed a shack at the bottom of his driveway - and he can now wait for the bus with shelter over his head on days when it was raining or snowing.  Giving: A group of Rhode Island teens came together to build a shelter for a handicapped five-year-old boy after they noticed that he would often get wet while waiting for the school bus Ryder Killam, from Bradford, was born with spina bifida and can't walk. He often waited 15 minutes for the bus to arrive -...
    Lawyers representing women who accused James Franco of sexual misconduct criticized his decision to defend himself in a podcast, saying he showed a lack of remorse and downplayed the harm done to the women. Franco, 43, admitted in the podcast, which aired on SiriusXM on Thursday, that he slept with students at his acting school and 'cheated on everyone' he dated during a 20-year battle with 'sex addiction.' His interview marked the first time he had addressed the allegations since being accused in January 2018 of sexual misconduct by five women - four of his ex-students and one who said he was her mentor. A suit was filed by two of the women - Sarah Tither-Kaplan and Toni Gaal - against Franco in October 2020. In June this year it was announced that a $2.2 million settlement had been reached.  Lawyers for the accusers were angered by Franco's interview for The Jess Cagle Podcast. 'In addition to being blind about power dynamics, Franco is completely insensitive to, and still apparently does not care about, the immense pain and suffering he put...
    Angry students and parents are demanding their California school district take action after eight high schoolers allegedly posted a photo on social media of themselves topless sporting painted swastikas on their chests.   Wheatland Union High School, where the group reportedly attends, has launched an investigation into the photo and other inappropriate social media posts made by students. 'I want to make very clear that our district seeks to educate our students in an environment of respect for each other, for our community and humankind,' Superintendent Nicole Newman wrote in a press release, noting she cannot comment on the photograph due to the ongoing investigation.   'The District prohibits any discrimination, harassment, intimidation or bullying of any student or staff member,' she added. Despite the district's response, some parents claim their children are still upset about the incident and allege that school leaders have failed to address issues of racism in the past. DailyMail.com muzzed the students' faces in the photo because they are minors.  Angry students and parents are calling for action after eight Wheatland Union High School students allegedly posted...
    Share this: At one school in the Bronx, students will eat in their classrooms because there isn’t enough staff to supervise the lunchroom — almost 20% of employees are either sick with COVID-19, or showing symptoms and trying to get tested, according to an assistant principal there. In at least three schools in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, administrators decided to pivot to remote learning after a dozen people at each of their campuses tested positive, giving students the option to come into the building to log in to their classes if they can’t stay home. And one elementary school in Queens told entire classes to stay home, despite city guidance that only close contacts have to quarantine, because it was taking too long to report and confirm positive cases through the official channels.
    Roughly 6-in-10 parents are concerned about the current quality of American education, according to a survey conducted by an education advocacy group. An overwhelming number of parents believe they should be able to determine what their kids are taught in the classroom, according to a Free to Learn (FTL) poll. Concerns over COVID-19 mitigation measures, Critical Race Theory (CRT), gender ideology and virtual learning have been on the rise since the start of the pandemic. CRT holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches people to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue “antiracism” through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies. Over 50% of parents said virtual learning negatively impacted their children’s academic performance, while 60% said it negatively impacted their mental health, according to the survey. More than half of parents said they have become more involved in their child’s curriculum because of virtual learning. ???? NEW: Our organization has released a new poll showing students and parents are disheartened from virtual learning and deeply concerned with...
    Oregon’s new social science standards are now integrated with “ethnic studies” and require kindergartners to become indoctrinated in identity politics, including developing “an understanding” of their own “gender.” The state’s 2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies now includes a Civics and Government standard for five-year-olds that requires them to: K.3 *Develop an understanding of one’s own identity groups including, but not limited to, race, gender, family, ethnicity, culture, religion, and ability. The left’s continued focus on “historically marginalized” identity groups continues in Oregon’s Geography standards. Kindergartners are now required to: K.11 * Examine culturally significant traditions, celebrations, days, and places including those from cultures that are currently and historically marginalized. To develop their “Historical Thinking (Skills),” Oregon kindergartners are also now required to: K.17 * Make connections identifying similarities and differences including race, ethnicity, culture, disability, and gender between self and others. Democrat Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed a sex ed bill into law that requires kindergartners to learn to define gender identity. https://t.co/8KRdLSM5H4 — Breitbart News (@BreitbartNews) August 29, 2021 As noted by the Oregon Department of Education,...
    When U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy issued a public health advisory this month on protecting youth mental health, he brought attention to the widespread challenges facing today’s young people. But he also emphasized that these challenges are surmountable — and often preventable. One of his recommendations, as part of what he calls a “whole-of-society” effort to mitigate the pandemic’s corrosive effects on mental health, is to support students’ mental health in schools. What kind of support systems do students have there? What can parents rely on school counselors to handle, and when does an issue become something that requires extra assistance? Debra Duardo, the superintendent of schools for Los Angeles County; Loretta Whitson, executive director of the California Assn. of School Counselors; and staff from the Santa Ana Unified School District explain. How does it all work? Schools have a combination of counselors, social workers, psychologists and nurses who work together as a mental health team on campus, Duardo said. The team’s No. 1 priority is making sure students can learn. This includes identifying and removing (or at...
    Paying the bill on a first date might be derided as old-fashioned or even sexist. However, 85 per cent of young men still picked up the tab on initial romantic rendezvous, a study found.  And what’s more, most of their dates expected them to do so.  Paying the bill on a first date might be derided as old-fashioned or even sexist. However, 85 per cent of young men still picked up the tab on initial romantic rendezvous, a study found Researchers at the University of North Carolina quizzed 552 male and female college students in their teens and 20s. The results, in the journal Psychological Reports, found a ‘strictly gendered pattern’ with ‘very little shift from the convention’ RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next US student takes to TikTok for advice on moving to... 'It was totally about the money': British model Marilyn... Share this article Share Researchers at the University of North Carolina quizzed 552 male and female college students in their teens and 20s. The results, in the journal Psychological Reports,...
    Drug and alcohol use among US teenagers recorded its biggest drop on record this year, when many children were forced to learn remotely, according to a new national survey published on Wednesday. The National Institute on Drug Abuse survey, which has been conducted annually since 1975, found that self-reported overall illicit substance use plunged faster this year than any other on record. 'We have never seen such dramatic decreases in drug use among teens in just a one-year period,' said NIDA Director said Nora Volkow.  'These data are unprecedented and highlight one unexpected potential consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic, which caused seismic shifts in the day-to-day lives of adolescents.' The survey was conducted between February and June, when many schools were still closed for in-person learning, and some experts speculate that the closures limited teens' access to drugs outside of the home. Drug and alcohol use among US teenagers recorded its biggest drop on record this year, when many children were forced to learn remotely A student is seen learning remotely in March 2020. The survey was conducted between February and June of...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — Christmas shopping is rarely easy, but it’s even harder for low-income families surrounded by violence. Morning Insider Marissa Parra got a behind-the-scenes look at one Englewood school that is stepping up to meet family needs. READ MORE: 4 People, Including Firefighter, In Critical Condition After Apartment Building Fire In Belmont CentralAndreanita Anderson is not shopping for herself, she’s stocking up for her children. “My son, he’s tough on clothes, and he don’t have pajamas at the moment,” she said. “He’s gonna love this.” She was referring to the Montessori School of Englewood’s pajama drive. A lot has changed since their first one last December “It became more than just a pajama drive after a while, because there was a larger need for our students,” said the school’s family coordinator, Jonathan Howell. READ MORE: Northwestern Medicine Launches Nation's First Urology Clinic Targeted Toward Needs Of Gay And Bisexual MenWhen students were food insecure during the pandemic, Howell rallied thousands of meals. Now, for families who may have trouble staying warm during winter break, he’s rallied up supplies, using...
                 Earlier this year, Floyd County School System officials invited a group of speakers to enter a school and ask students personal questions about their sexual preferences and whether they or their families harbored racist attitudes. Amy Bergstrom, whose daughter attends Coosa High School in Rome, said the incident occurred in May. “My daughter, who was then 13, called me, and said ‘I need you to know that this happened today.’ The school had brought in a group of individuals from One Community United to discuss anything ranging from the George Floyd event and police brutality to racism to LGBTQ. It took place during ELA classes for all grades from eighth until twelfth,” Bergstrom told The Georgia Star News this week. “Children were not given the option to opt out. My daughter’s teacher stood in front of the door and didn’t let her leave. They [the speakers] put them in circles. They told them the circles were a safe space and told them to put their heads down on the desk. They asked ‘Are you queer? Are you trans?...
    Cornell sophomore Vlad Asriev said in an interview with WSYR-TV, that the university probably should have acted much sooner to curb the spread of the pandemic among the students. "It is obviously extremely dispiriting to have to take these steps," concluded Pollack. "However, since the start of the pandemic, our commitment has been to follow the science and do all we can to protect the health of our faculty, staff, and students."Here's a local news report about the Cornell omicron shutdown: Cornell Code Red www.youtube.com
    Cornell University has gone into 'red alert' territory and moved student finals online after a spike in COVID-19 cases that officials suspect has been caused by the highly-contagious Omicron variant. Libraries have been shut, athletic competitions are cancelled and upcoming events have been scrapped after 214 new cases were confirmed Monday and another 227 tests came back positive Sunday. Cases at the Ithaca, New York campus - where 97 percent of staff and students are vaccinated, the university says - began snowballing last week. There were 12 cases December 6 and another 27 on December 7; the following day, the figure more than doubled to 58 cases, according to university data. The school's COVID-19 testing lab found evidence of the Omicron variant in a 'significant number' of Monday's positive student samples, Cornell President Martha E. Pollack said in a statement. COVID-19 cases at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York began snowballing  in the past week. There were 12 cases December 6 and another 27 on December 7; the following day, the figure more than doubled to 58 cases   She said that although...
    Black Lives Matter (BLM) activists told students that they live in a “misogynistic, masculine society” that claims “women should stay at home” to cook and clean and that as black women, they are “overlooked a lot” and encounter people who want to harm them because of who they are, according to a video obtained and reviewed by the Daily Caller News Foundation. Four female activists with Indy10 Black Lives Matter gave a talk to over 150 participants during the spring of 2020, where they told students that black people often don’t have the same opportunities as their white counterparts, according to a video of the lecture. “I’ve really had to learn to retain my anger,” Derray said. “You know, when you really start to learn about white supremacy and capitalism and how it really harms black and brown people.” Black Lives Matter (BLM) activists told students that they live in a “misogynistic, masculine society” that claims “women should stay at home” to cook and clean and that as black women, they are “overlooked a lot” and encounter...
    Woke school districts are facing backlash for screening their teacher applicants about their political beliefs because they favor left-wing ideology on race and gender.  The controversial hiring practice, which is being use in more than 500 districts across the US, asks applicants how they would incorporate race and gender into their daily lessons and about what they have done to combat racism in their personal and professional lives.  A recent report from Ed Week detailed how US school districts are screening teachers' racial biases during the hiring process through these 'cultural competency' questions.  Although the method is primarily used to promote inclusion and diversity, some districts, like the Shaw Elementary School, in Boston, have gone beyond the norm and asked questions like, 'What have you done personally or professionally to be more anti-racist?'  Samuel Goldman, a writer for The Week, criticized the relevance of these types of questions for a teaching position and said, 'They're making progressive political views a requirement for the job.'  About 500 school districts in the US use Nimble, a teaching-hiring software, to help them sort out...
    WESTBURY, Long Island (WABC) -- The holiday season was made brighter for the families of 50 children on Long Island thanks to Nassau County police officers.The "Shop with A Cop" event held Thursday in Westbury paired students from the Westbury School District with police officers to shop for holiday gifts for their families.The NCPD's Leo the Lion and police officers dressed as superheroes helped kick off the event.The Nassau County Police Department Foundation donated $150 per student for the shopping spree."I'm buying things for my family because they have done a lot of things for me and now I have to do something for them," student Ingrid Escamilla. "I never did that before, so it feels special to me, and I'm proud because I am buying them gifts."Many of them, whose parents are just working hard to put food on the table, much less have time, or money for holiday toys. And so 11-year-old Genesis made her doll selection very carefully."A doll that I can play with, cause I don't have siblings..I"m all alone," she said. "And on Saturday, when...
    (CNN)The conservative Supreme Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts has long wanted to diminish racial remedies in American life and may now be headed toward a far-reaching decision on university affirmative action. The court is likely to decide in upcoming weeks whether to hear a challenge to Harvard's admission practices, which critics claim unlawfully consider students' race, benefitting Blacks and Hispanics, but disadvantaging Asian American applicants. The Department of Justice late Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to reject the case against Harvard. The filing from the office of US Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar emphasized that lower US courts had extensively reviewed Harvard's racial admissions practices and found them sufficiently limited to meet Supreme Court precedent as they furthered the school's interest in campus diversity. Admissions practices that take account of students' race, first upheld in a 1978 Supreme Court decision and reaffirmed in 2003, have boosted the admission of Black and Latino students for decades. Proponents argue such diversity enhances campus life and the educational mission. The policies have remained controversial over the years, however, and the high court...
              moreby Debra Heine   At least two parents have accused a prep school in South Los Angeles of vaccinating their children without their permission after bribing them with pizza, according to NBC Los Angeles. One distressed mother claimed that her 13-year-old son was told not to tell his parents after he was given a Pfizer COVID-19 injection at Barack Obama Global Prep Academy. Maribel Duarte told NBC LA on Monday that her son recently came home from school with a vaccine card after he had accepted the jab. The boy told his mom that he agreed to get the shot after he was offered pizza. Duarte said that the woman who administered the shot and signed the form told her son not to tell his parents because she didn’t want to get in trouble. “It hurt to know he got a shot without my permission, without knowing and without signing any papers for him to get the shot,” Duarte said. The mother explained that she isn’t anti-vaccine, and is vaccinated herself, but is wary of her son getting vaccinated because he...
    Nearly 500 Los Angeles school district employees have lost their jobs for failing to meet the COVID-19 vaccination requirement, officials announced on Tuesday. The number represents less than 1% of about 73,000 employees, a compliance rate the school system characterizes as a success. The total of terminated employees is much smaller than feared. Seven of the dismissed employees held teaching credentials, although officials did not indicate whether any of them were classroom teachers. “We care deeply about all of our employees,” interim Supt. Megan K. Reilly said. “Parting ways with individuals who choose not to be vaccinated is an extremely difficult, but necessary decision to ensure the safety of all in our school communities. We wish everyone the best in their future endeavors and encourage everyone to get vaccinated.” On Oct. 18, when the mandate took effect, 2,214 district employees either had not applied for or had not received an exemption. At that time, about 1,500 others had received an exemption — 175 for a serious medical condition or disability, and 1,325 for a “sincerely held religious belief.” Workers...
    A Virginia Department of Education administrator sent educators, including school nurses, a resource guide for effectively implementing “social-emotional learning,” an education style that is linked to critical race theory. Sarah Bazemore, the school counseling specialist and student assistance systems coordinator at the Virginia Department of Education, sent the “social-emotional learning” (SEL) resource guide on Dec. 8 to educators statewide. The beginning portion of the resource guide asks teachers to rank their ability to implement SEL and find ways to improve. Included in the guide are video links to “Teaching In Support Of Black Lives,” and enacting “restorative circle[s],” which call for students to engage in restorative justice practices, in the fourth grade. The guide also links to the New York Times’ “Nice White Parents” podcast. One of the SEL resources calls for “student-centered discipline” and tells teachers and administrators to refrain from using “punitive measures” when students misbehave. “Teachers should not attempt to over manage their students, nor should they use punitive measures to get students to behave,” the guide reads. Educators were encouraged to give students an index card...
    Share this: Sãmara Cotto was scrolling on Snapchat when a news headline stopped her in her tracks. Earlier that week, a secretary at her Downtown Brooklyn school spotted a gun and a wad of cash in a student’s backpack while the teen signed in late, before ever making it to class. Scanners popped up at the building in the following days, uncovering 21 banned items such as tasers, pepper spray, and brass knuckles. A headline blared: “School of glock.” Cotto felt coverage of the incident at the Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice missed a larger point — that students said they felt the need to protect themselves with these items on the way to and from school. The piece made Cotto feel stereotyped as a student of her majority Black and Latino school, she wrote in a response on Snapchat that she typed over an image of the story.
              moreby Kerry McDonald   Teachers across the country are feeling burned out and depleted, particularly as school coronavirus policies and staffing shortages make their jobs more difficult. According to a survey by the RAND Corporation, almost one-quarter of teachers planned to leave the profession in 2021, and teachers experienced higher rates of work-related stress and depression than other adults. A recent letter from teachers and staff at a small Vermont public elementary school to their superintendent and school board members echoes the feelings of many public school personnel. “Everybody is stepping up to try to do what is asked of them; everybody is feeling inadequate, exhausted, and defeated much of the time,” wrote educators at the Ottauquechee School in Hartford. “Colleagues are questioning whether changing professions is in their best interest.” Rather than abandoning their passion for teaching, some educators are discovering that they can do what they love and avoid the bureaucracy and stress of a conventional classroom by starting their own microschools. Microschools are modern twists on the quaint, one-room schoolhouse model, where small, multi-age groups of students learn together in...
    A video was posted on Tik Tok depicting Oxford High School students escaping through a window as someone attempted to enter the classroom amid a school shooting. In a video posted by Tik Tok user, @shwifty766, a male’s voice is heard stating, “It’s safe to come out,” as students hide in their locked classroom with the lights off. Another inside the classroom, who appears to be the teacher, replies to the person at the door, saying, “We’re not willing to take that risk right now.” WATCH: @shwifty766All prayers out for Oxford high school and to all my classmates #prayers #prayersneeded #oxfordhighschool #fyp #fypシ #capcut♬ original sound – ItsShwifty The voice at the door continues to persuade the students, saying, “Come open the door … bro.” The students remark on his use of the word “bro,” with some alarmed students saying that it’s a “red flag,” suggesting that the voice at the door belonged to the shooter. The students begin exiting the classroom outside through a window and running toward another section of the school, where they are met by...
    (CNN)Most college students can't wait for their 21st birthdays. But Lakshmi Parvathinathan is terrified. It's the moment when everything she's worked for could slip away. "All my friends excitedly talk about turning 21 -- hitting the bars, all of that...but it's just something that I dread," she says.The day she turns 21, Parvathinathan will no longer be protected by the work visa that allowed her parents to immigrate to the United States from India. And she may face deportation.It's known as "aging out," and experts estimate that about 200,000 people like Parvathinathan are living in a similar limbo. Brought legally to the United States as children, many are scrambling to find ways to stay in the country they love. Some are forced to leave the US when they run out of options. Read MoreThey've dubbed themselves "documented Dreamers," and they say their plight shows how broken the US immigration system is. Even those who immigrate legally find themselves facing roadblocks that are impossible to surmount, Dip Patel says. The 25-year-old pharmacist is the founder of Improve the Dream, a group...
    A Canadian school has cancelled an event with ISIS survivor Nadia Murad, saying her visit would be offensive to Muslims and foster 'Islamophobia'. Murad was scheduled to sit down with students from the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) - the largest school Board in Canada with nearly 600 schools - to discuss her book The Last Girl: My Story Of Captivity in February 2022.  Murad's graphic exposé detailed how she escaped the Islamic State, where she was ripped from her home and sold into sexual slavery aged just 14 years old, according to The Telegraph.  She uses the book to talk about how she was raped and tortured before finding her way to a refugee camp in Durhok, in northern Iraq, and then to Germany where she now lives.  Nadia Murad (pictured) wrote an exposé detailing how she escaped the Islamic State and was slated to discuss it at a book club event for the Toronto District School Board (TDSB). However, the event was cancelled because Superintendent Helen Fisher (right) said said it would offend Muslim students and 'promote Islamophobia'...
    University of Florida students who said they supported changing the name Black Friday because of possible racial connotations - with one even saying it 'sounded offensive' - changed their minds after they were told it has nothing to do with race.   Students at the Gainesville campus were asked by a student reporter with Campus Reform whether they supported renaming Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving that is seen as a commercially driven day of consumerism. Their responses were recorded on video.  Black Friday was named in honor of retailers earning a profit and going 'into the black' on the day after Thanksgiving after a year of loss and being 'in the red.'  Ophelie Jacobson asks students if they will be participating in Black Friday. Most students said they would not, noting its deep-rooted connections to capitalism and consumerism.  Jacobson went out to see if students were willing to change the name and how far they would take cancel culture.   The survey by Campus Reform was formed in response to the Chicago Tribune's article questioning whether 'Black Friday should be renamed so...
    The police chief of Aurora implored parents to 'take guns away from their kids' after three 16-year-olds were charged for attempted murder following a firefight that injured three students in a school parking lot - the second drive-by in a school zone there within a week.  One of the shooters was apprehended hours after the Friday shooting at Hinkley High School in Colorado after he sought medical attention for injuries sustained in the shoot out. Two other teens - a 17-year-old girl and a 16-year-old boy - were hospitalized following the incident.  On Sunday, two more 16-year-olds were arrested, one in Aurora and the other from the nearby town of Parker.  All three suspects are being held on charges of first-degree attempted murder.  A motive has not been revealed in the case, and Aurora Police Department is still searching for an unspecified number of additional people involved in the attack, and are offering $2,000 for tips leading to their arrests.  Earlier last week, six teens aged 14 to 18 were struck by bullets shot by 'multiple gunmen' at Nome Park,...
    Crime has become front and center for people who live in San Francisco, California, and now people are taking their safety into their own hands by enrolling in self-defense courses and installing high-tech security systems in their homes. According to an August, 2021, report published on the Safewise home security website, San Francisco comes in 6th in the Top 10 most dangerous cities in America, with two other California cities making the list — Stockton came in 9th and Bakersfield 10th. The San Francisco Chronicle reported on the development: With San Francisco mired in an intensifying debate over crime and public safety, the lessons taught by instructors like Chow are in greater demand. Several operators of self-defense schools and people who sell security equipment said they are seeing an uptick in business. San Francisco — which has long struggled with a high rate of theft crimes — has not experienced major increases in violent crime this year, according to police figures, but more burglaries, robberies and other crimes are being captured on videos that spread virally on social media, and...
    Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, is yet to fire Allyn Walker, a professor who defended pedophiles and said they shouldn't be ostracized, instead placing them on administrative leave temporarily  The refusal of a Virginia university to fire a transgender assistant professor who defended pedophiles and said they should be given child sex dolls has outraged students, alumni, politicians and the school's LGBTQ board, who say it is proof of a double standard that protects woke staff.   Allyn Walker, 34, is an assistant professor of sociology and criminal justice at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. The non-binary teacher claimed in a recent interview to promote their new book that pedophiles shouldn't be ostracized, that they can't help who they are attracted to and that they should be given child-like sex dolls to satisfy their urges.  Walker, formerly known as Allison, made the comments in an interview to promote their book Long Dark Shadow: Minor Attracted People and their Pursuit of Dignity. They believe pedophiles should be referred to as Minor Attracted People, and that they don't 'choose' who to be attracted to so...