Monday, Jan 24, 2022 - 23:52:53
1000 results - (0.021 seconds)

more likely:

latest news at page 1:
    From angry handbags to washing machines in distress, humans see faces in all sorts of inanimate objects – a peculiar phenomenon known as 'face pareidolia'.  Now, researchers in Maryland have found that these faces are more likely to perceived as young and male than old and female.  The academics tested nearly 4,000 volunteers with photos to stimulate pareidolia, including images of an 'alarmed' teapot, a 'relaxed' potato and a 'disgusted' green apple on a branch. Participants perceived illusory faces as having a specific emotional expression, age and gender, but they were mostly perceived as young and male by both men and women.   Researchers weren't sure why this was, although it's possible humans are more prone to seeing men because we were more exposed to male faces during our earliest stages of development.  One of the most famous examples of face pareidolia is seeing a man's face – rather than a woman's face – on the surface of the moon.   The academics tested nearly 4,000 volunteers with photos to stimulate pareidolia, including of an 'alarmed' teapot, a 'relaxed' potato and a 'disgusted' green...
    Telemedicine, which gained wider popularity during the COVID-19 pandemic and is likely to become a permanent fixture of the health care system, has become especially popular in two patient groups: Black patients and women, according to a new study out of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Given the digital divide, we expected to see differences and the use of virtual care among these populations,” said Dr. Gezzer Ortega of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Center for Surgery and Public Health, who authored the study, of the Black patients in particular. “But it was a pleasant surprise when we noticed that there was over-utilization within these groups.” Ortega’s study broke its data into two phases: March 24, 2020 to June 23, 2020, during the stay-at-home advisory in the state, and the rest of the year. The goal was to compare patient appointments for different groups during that time, and determine the breakdown of in-person, video and audio appointments for new patient consultation within the hospital’s Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery. Ortega said the research team chose to focus on surgeries because...
    For many adults, the childlike ability to be spooked in a haunted house is no more than a fond memory.  But according to a new scientific study, the trick to being scared by this classic theme park attraction is visiting with friends. Researchers have found that adult visitors to haunted houses are more likely to experience fear responses including dilated pupils, sweating and rapid heartbeats when attending in a group.  It's thought that among a group, fear may spread like wildfire to a threat, like a herd of wildebeests being preyed upon by a lion in the wild.  The visitors were tested to their limits at 17th Door Haunted House, an extreme attraction that tests 'fight-or-flight' responses in Fullerton, California.  Haunted house visitors are more likely to experience dilated pupils, sweating, and a rapid heartbeat when attending in a group, the study reveals. Pictured are visitors at The 17th Door, a haunted house in California  THE FIGHT-OR-FLIGHT RESPONSE Fight-or-flight is evolution's way of preparing the body to defend itself or flee from a real or perceived threat, like a lion in the tall...
    Men who smoked before hitting puberty are more likely to have fat granddaughters or even great-granddaughters, a study suggests. University of Bristol researchers previously linked fathers who started smoking at a young age with having overweight children. And now they believe they've found the first sign the negative effects of cigarette use can span across four generations. Experts reviewed data records from 14,000 pregnant women who signed up to the Children of the Nineties study, set up to closely monitor the health of their children and grandchildren. These were lined to records on whether their grandfathers or great-grandfathers had began smoking before the age of 13 or in their teens.  Academics uncovered a link with increased body fat in granddaughters and great-granddaughters, but not in their male counterparts. Girls whose maternal grandfather's father smoked as a child carried, on average, 11.8lbs (5.35kg) more fat when they turned 17 than if their relatives picked up the habit later in their teens. They were 13.4lbs (6.1kg) heavier when they were 24, on average.  And if their paternal grandfathers were smokers from young...
    Russian President Vladimir Putin’s team acknowledged the increasing likelihood of additional conflict in Ukraine, portraying it as a “civil war” even as Russian naval forces announced new military drills. "All these statements may bring about a destabilization because some hotheads in the Ukrainian leadership may develop the delusion that they can try to restart the civil war in their country or try to handle the problem of the southeast using force," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Thursday in response to a question about President Joe Biden’s Wednesday press conference. “We feel certain fears on this score.” Peskov pitched that remark at Biden’s promise to impose economic sanctions in response to a feared Russian invasion of Ukraine, but the statement dovetails with U.S. warnings that Russia might orchestrate a false flag incident within Ukraine. Putin has long portrayed the war in Ukraine as a civil war, although he admitted in a 2015 documentary that he ordered Russian special forces to seize Crimea “under the guise of reinforcing security for our military facilities” on the peninsula, and that 2014 annexation expanded into...
    Joe Raedle/Getty Images Getting the Covid-19 vaccine is far safer than taking daily Aspirin, according to a report from Australian professor and public health physician Nathan Grills.  Grills, a professor at the University of Melbourne with 20 years of experience working in global health, penned a report stressing that side effects from Covid-19 vaccines such as AstraZeneca have been “greatly exaggerated.” “Around 11 percent of older Australians take daily aspirin to help prevent stroke and heart attack, but statistically, aspirin is two hundred times more dangerous than AstraZeneca – resulting in around one death per 10,000 people,” he wrote. The professor further explained that in comparison to deaths due to aspirin, just two people in Australia have died from the AstraZeneca vaccine, “despite nearly four million doses” received in the country. So why is there still hesitancy surrounding the vaccine, while millions of Australians continue to take aspirin daily? “Perhaps it’s because the media – and anti-vaxxers – are very good at making rare side effects seem very common by focusing all the attention on those effects,” Grills explained. “This trick starts...
    Rich people are more likely to be mean, similar to the character of Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, according to a new study, that found those from poorer backgrounds are more likely to be kind, like Tiny Tim and his family.  Analysing data from 46,000 people across 67 countries, including information on wealth and levels of morality and moral behaviour, helped a team from the University of Agder in Kristiansand, Norway, to make their discovery. This research suggests that the Disney movies, as well as tropes in classic literature, stand up to scrutiny, with lack of wealth linked to higher moral standards.  While the link was relatively slim, it was a significant discovery, according to the researchers, who said poorer people were more likely to donate to charity and help. Rich people are more likely to be mean, similar to the character of Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, according to a new study, that found those from poorer backgrounds are more likely to be kind, like Tiny Tim and his family RESEARCHERS PINPOINT 'GENEROUS'...
    WE'VE gotten used to looking out for a cough, fever and loss of smell or taste. But as Covid has evolved, so has the symptoms it inflicts on its victims. 1A sore throat is seen in more than half of Omicron patients, data suggest New data has revealed what symptoms you can expect with the Omicron variant - the most dominant in the UK. A report from the UK Health and Security Agency detailed how Omicron is different to Delta - the previous dominant Covid strain - based on more than 260,000 patients.  It said a sore throat was more commonly seen in people with Omicron - 53 per cent compared to 34 per cent of those with Delta. The full list of symptoms more likely to be reported by Omicron patients are: A sore throat A fever A cough Diarrhoea Muscle ache or joint pain These symptoms are not “the most common”, rather, the ones that are popping up more often than they used to. The paper said that rashes, nausea or vomiting and fatigue were present...
    Houston Texans general manager Nick Caserio talked about quarterback Deshaun Watson’s status and if he will return to the team next year after sitting out this season due to off-field legal issues. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Director of player personnel Nick Caserio of the New England Patriots walks onto the field prior to a preseason game on Aug. 25, 2017 against the Detroit Lions at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. New England won 30-28. (Nick Cammett/Diamond Images/Getty Images) Caserio, who made an appearance on Sports Radio 610, was asked about the team hiring head coach Brian Flores and if that would give Watson a reason to stay with the team. According to the Houston Chronicle, Caserio said "that more than likely would not be the case." "I think we have to be open-minded and just take the information and process it and ultimately make the decision that we feel makes the most sense for everybody involved, whatever that looks like," Caserio said. I'LL DRINK TO THAT: BENGALS COACH ZAC TAYLOR GIFTS GAME BALL TO LOCAL...
    The new Omicron variant of the novel coronavirus is continuing its march around the planet. It’s now the dominant lineage in the United States, much of South America and Europe, and many Asian countries. The new variant is a nasty one. But some countries have weathered Omicron without registering any significant increase in severe illness or death. Cases go way up. Serious cases don’t. Singapore and South Africa are great examples. But other countries—the United States, for one—haven’t seen the same high degree of “decoupling” between infections and deaths. Now, epidemiologists are scrambling to figure out why. Differences in vaccination rates is an obvious explanation, but demographic factors also seem to play an important role. “Countries that have average age on the younger side and generally healthier populations would be expected to do better in terms of hospitalizations and deaths,” Irwin Redlener, the founding director of Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness, told The Daily Beast. “The other big question,” he added, “is vaccination rates.” Highly vaxxed and younger countries seem to be mostly shrugging off Omicron. But under-vaxxed...
    The Florida legislature will weigh a redistricting map, proposed on Sunday by Gov. Ron DeSantis’s (R) office, during its legislative session. The proposed map is thought to give Republicans an advantage in four districts, opposed to the Senate’s previous draft that would likely garner Republicans only two additional seats. DeSantis cited legal concerns with the Senate’s map as he asked the legislature to consider his revised proposal: We have legal concerns with the congressional redistricting maps under consideration in the legislature. We have submitted an alternative proposal, which we can support, that adheres to federal and state requirements and addresses our legal concerns, while working to increase district compactness, minimize county splits where feasible, and protect minority voting populations. pic.twitter.com/rHaTdrpjgF — Rep. Anthony Sabatini (@AnthonySabatini) January 17, 2022 DeSantis’s map revealed 18 districts that would likely lean right with ten leading left. The Senate map, proposed in November, only divided up the districts with 16 leaning right and 12 leaning left. Like the Senate’s map, Rep. Stephanie Murphy’s (D-FL) district is eliminated by splitting it into two districts, one north, and...
    Apple-shaped women who carry their weight around their stomachs tend to feel worse about themselves than those who are pear-shaped, a study suggests. It considered 1,093 women and measured their bodies as well as their percentage of body fat, while asking them questions about their weight. Those with fat around their abdomen were more likely to label themselves overweight and say they wanted to weigh less compared with those who carried it on their hips, buttocks and thighs – a body type often described as pear-shaped. The researchers then studied a further 215 women to find out if their body shape had an effect on how attractive they felt. ‘Women with fat distributed in their hips, buttocks and thighs did not view themselves as less attractive nor did they have lower self-esteem, no matter how much fat they had on their bodies,’ said study author Dr Michael Barlev, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University in the US. Apple-shaped women who carry their weight around their stomachs tend to feel worse about themselves than those who are pear-shaped,...
    Los Angeles County has recently noted an increase in coronavirus deaths, but officials think they are mainly tied to the Delta variant, rather than the prolific Omicron strain that has fueled record-high infections in the county and across the state. Over the last week, the county has averaged 24 reported COVID-19 deaths a day, up from about 14 a month ago. L.A. reported 39 COVID-19 deaths Wednesday and 45 on Thursday — the latter of which is the highest daily fatality figure recorded over the autumn and winter. Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said Thursday she believes there are still people infected with the previously dominant Delta variant who have been dying in L.A. County’s hospitals. “Many people are sick for quite a while and many are hospitalized for quite a while before they pass away, so it is likely that most of the deaths we are seeing are still related to Delta, although not entirely,” Ferrer said. World & Nation Anxious. Helpless. Upset. Omicron surge leaves U.S. parents, teachers and students on edge Nationwide teachers,...
    New data from New York City shows the much higher risk for hospitalization and death than unvaccinated people faced as the initial Omicron surge swept through the city last month. For the week ending December 25, when Omicron first hit the city, unvaccinated New Yorkers were hospitalized at a rate of 179.84 per 100,000, versus 21.85 for vaccinated. That means the unvaccinated were hospitalized 8.2 times more often on a per capita basis. It is a wider gap than the 6.3 hospitalization risk multiple that unvaccinated New Yorkers have faced on average since vaccinations started.  The latest data from the New York City Department of Health also showed that unvaccinated people were 8.9 times more likely to die in the final full week of December. For the week ending December 25, when Omicron first hit the city, unvaccinated New Yorkers were hospitalized at a rate of 179.84 per 100,000, versus 21.85 for vaccinated Unvaccinated people were 8.9 times more likely to die in the final full week of December. Due to a display error on the NYC website, unvaccinated deaths...
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) predicted Wednesday that more than 62,000 people could die from COVID-19 over the course of the next four weeks.  In a Monday update, the agency wrote that 10,400 to 31,000 new deaths will likely be reported in the week ending Feb. 5.  COVID-19 HOSPITALIZATIONS REPORTED IN US HIT NEW HIGH The CDC added that state- and territory-level ensemble forecasts predict the number of newly reported deaths per week over the next month will likely increase in 33 jurisdictions. In addition, it said that national forecasts predict 17,900-48,000 new hospitalizations will likely be reported on Feb. 4. The U.S. reported 2,421 new deaths in the past day and 12,442 over the past week, according to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.  Since the pandemic's beginning, 844,562 people in America have died of COVID-19. AP TELLS STAFF TO 'AVOID EMPHASIZING' COVID CASE COUNTS AMID SHIFT IN COVERING PANDEMIC The CDC also pointed out that recent national total death forecasts have "shown low reliability, with more reported deaths than expected falling outside the forecast prediction...
    Chicago (WLS) -- A study has found that red light and speed cameras in Chicago are more likely to fine minority drivers.There are hundreds of these cameras, placed proportionately in all city neighborhoods. A recent study by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers found that speed cameras reduced fatal and serious crashes by 15% but also that camera violations were more likely in Black and brown communities.https://www.chicago.gov/content/dam/city/depts/cdot/Red%20Light%20Cameras/2022/Sutton+Tilahun_Chicago-Camera-Ticket_Exec%20Summary-Final-Jan10.pdf"More particularly Black drivers are getting speed tickets. And the question then became why," said Stacey Sutton, associate professor of UIC's Department of Urban Planning and Policy. "Roadway density is different. Population density, there are fewer businesses for people yet so there may be a good propensity to speed in those areas. And that we're seeing that would explain some of it."The story is similar for red light cameras."Thirteen percent of all cameras within 350 feet of the freeway," Sutton said, adding that many cameras near freeways ticket more.They are also more likely to ticket minorities because, she said, "Twenty-one percent are in majority-Black neighborhoods"."We are right now waiting for a second hearing and...
    ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — The Denver Broncos have cleared their final legal hurdle to begin the process of transferring ownership of the team, likely through a sale of the franchise valued at nearly $4 billion. Denver County District Court Judge Shelley I. Gilman ruled Tuesday that a right of first refusal agreement between late owners Pat Bowlen and Edgar Kaiser “is no longer valid or enforceable in any respect” and “has terminated in its entirety.” “We’re glad to put this issue behind us and move closer to transitioning ownership of the Denver Broncos,” team president and CEO Joe Ellis said in a statement. “While our focus at this time is on our head coaching search, we plan to make an announcement regarding ownership shortly after that hire is completed.” Pat Bowlen, left, and Joe Ellis, right (file photo credit: CBS) General manager George Paton has sought permission to speak with a half dozen candidates to replace Vic Fangio, whom he fired Sunday morning following Denver’s 7-10 finish that gave him a 19-30 record in three seasons. The Broncos haven’t reached...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- Governors in multiple states are issuing emergency declarations as the omicron variant depletes vital health care resources.The CDC says the variant now makes up 98% of all new cases.New numbers, accounting for the weekend backlog show the U.S. tallied a record 1.4 million cases in a single day.Among those infected health officials say the unvaccinated are 17% more likely to be hospitalized.Virginia issued a 30-day state of emergency to help health care facilities increase bed space and staff.New Jersey and DC are also under emergency orders.Maryland, Maine, and Massachusetts are all leaning on the National Guard as a record number of COVID patients flood hospitals.RELATED: What are the symptoms of the COVID omicron variant?Here are more of today's COVID-19 headlines:Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney tests positiveCongressman Sean Patrick Maloney announced he had tested positive for COVID-19 Tuesday."This morning, I tested positive for COVID-19," he said. "While I am experiencing minor cold-like symptoms, I'm grateful to be fully vaccinated and boosted, which is protecting me from more severe illness. I am following the guidance of the Attending Physician...
    The Omicron variant has fundamentally changed the dynamics of this pandemic – and it is blaring a wake-up call to Americans that the 'Covid Zero' philosophy and policies are now absurdly unworkable.  Figuratively, if not literally, everyone is going to catch Omicron eventually - and some people will be asymptomatic, and not even know they have it. The good news is that healthy vaccinated people have no reason to fear catching Omicron. If – perhaps it's more appropriate to say when - you catch the Omicron variant, it will likely seem like a bad cold, or perhaps a mild one. Or you may be asymptomatic. Vaccinations and acquired immunity from past infections mean that this ongoing Omicron wave is going to feel like a bad flu season. And we have never spent winters locked in our houses, terrified of interacting with people for fear of catching the flu. So what is so special about Omicron? It's hardly surprising that many people, two years into this pandemic, are still operating on the psychological equivalent of DefCon 1. The world has endured...
                 Republicans in the Tennessee General Assembly will reportedly create multiple congressional districts to represent Nashville, and this move will likely benefit the GOP. This, as state legislators redraw new Congressional maps to comply with required redistricting. Tennessee Speaker of the House Cameron Sexton (R-Crossville) addressed the matter with The Tennessee Star on Monday. “The House Select Committee on Redistricting will meet Wednesday at 10 a.m. to unveil a fair and constitutional Congressional redistricting plan,” Sexton said in a statement. “This plan meets all state and federal constitutional and statutory requirements. It also represents the distinctive voices of all Tennesseans.” Sexton did not elaborate. On Monday, however, The Hill reported that members of the Tennessee GOP “intend to create multiple congressional seats in Nashville.” Sexton reportedly told the publication that the exact number is either two or three, representing all of Davidson and Dickson counties as well as part of Cheatham County. “Though the state’s Republican governor, Bill Lee, has the authority to veto the finalized map, he is not expected to object,” according to The Hill. Currently, only two...
    Giving alcoholics low doses of ketamine could help them stay sober, according to a study.  University of Exeter experts tested the effects of the illegal party drug on 96 addicts, who drank the equivalent of 50 pints of beer per week.  They were all split into four separate groups to test the effects of taking ketamine, on top of routine talking therapy.  Volunteers given ketamine were two-and-a-half times more likely to still be sober six months later, compared to addicts given a placebo.  Results also showed that those who received the drug, which is also used as a horse tranquilliser, were abstinent for 162 of 180 days, on average. For comparison, the figure stood at around 130 days for the placebo groups.  Professor Celia Morgan and colleagues also discovered patients given ketamine had lower rates of depression and better liver function six months later.  She said: 'Alcoholism can destroy lives... We urgently need new ways to help people cut down. 'We found controlled, low doses of ketamine combined with psychological therapy can help people stay off alcohol for longer than...
    BOXING superstar Canelo Alvarez is 'much more likely' to face WBC middleweight king Jermall Charlo than challenge for the cruiserweight title in his next fight. The pound-for-pound king stunned boxing fans across the world last November by announcing he'd challenge Ilunga Makabu for the WBC cruiserweight strap. 4Canelo Alvarez unified the super-middleweight division last NovemberCredit: GETTY 4And he promptly announced a show move up to cruiserweight to face Ilungu MakabuCredit: WBC 4But a showdown with WBC middleweight king Jermall Charlo is reportedly 'more likely' for the MexicanCredit: GETTY Canelo's shock bid to become a five-weight world champion, however, has seemingly gone cold. And according to boxing journalist Mike Coppinger, a long-awaited showdown with Charlo on Cinco De Mayo weekend is now 'more likely' for the Mexican. During an appearance on ESPN, Coppinger said: “I’m hearing it’s much more likely he’ll fight Jermall Charlo on Cinco de Mayo. "There are talks right now for that fight." Canelo created history in November by knocking out Caleb Plant to become the first undisputed super-middleweight champion of the world. And Showtime Sports president Stephen...
    The time when corsets were worn as everyday wear may be long gone but women are still suffering for fashion, a study suggests. Researchers found that they are up to 12 times more likely than men to wear uncomfortable shoes. They are also significantly more willing to wear clothing that leaves welts on their skin, makes them lose focus, or even prevents them from taking a deep breath. The time when corsets were worn as everyday wear may be long gone but women are still suffering for fashion, a study suggests Women were also significantly more likely to wear items that distracted them, required ongoing monitoring and adjusting throughout the day.  Study author Renee Engeln, a professor of psychology at Northwestern University in the US, said: ‘I think there are trade-offs. At times, uncomfortable clothing could make a woman be perceived as more attractive, professional or powerful. ‘It can be helpful to be perceived this way in the workplace. But if your clothing limits your ability to move, breathe, or focus, that’s a high cost to pay just to be...
    U.S. employers added just 199,000 jobs in December - far below predictions - as the economy struggles with inflation and supply shortages. The number was a major miss from the 422,000 that was forecast and was the fewest jobs added in any month of 2021. It comes as businesses are struggling to fill jobs with many Americans remaining reluctant to return to the workforce. The unemployment rate fell to 3.9% from 4.2% in November, marking a new pandemic-era low.  The below-expectations job gains in December likely reflect labor shortages as well as anomalies with the so-called seasonal adjustment, used by the government to strip out seasonal fluctuations from the data.  President Joe Biden's approval numbers have fallen with much of that coming from voters' disapproval of his handling of the economy. In a November Washington Post-ABC News poll, 70% of voters rated the economy negatively and about half of voters blamed Biden for inflation. Omicron did not likely play a huge role in the low December numbers but its affect will likely be felt in January. December's numbers come after a record 4.5 million...
    The White House stepped in to defend President Biden on Wednesday after he was criticized for characterizing the COVID-19 crisis as a 'pandemic of the unvaccinated' despite thousands of breakthrough cases. A former White House testing czar said the president's words were simply 'false' and might undermine public health efforts.   The White House defended the president, saying that the unvaccinated were far more likely to suffer hospitalization or death. Press Secretary Jen Psaki said: 'We also know that you are 17 times more likely to die of COVID if you're not vaccinated, and 20 times more likely to be hospitalized. 'So I think in terms of the impact. the dire impact on people across the country, we should be very clear about the impact of not getting vaccinated - people who will be be hurt, be hospitalized and face the threat of death the most, and those are the people who are unvaccinated,' she said.
    Despite there being absolutely zero scientific evidence to support it, Fox News host Tucker Carlson suggested Wednesday night that getting vaccinated makes you more likely to get infected with Covid-19. The seemingly throw-away but dangerous suggestion came at the end of a brief rant about the distribution of monoclonal antibodies for those fighting Covid-19, and how racial demographics have played a part in public health strategies, which, unto itself, is a completely reasonable topic for discussion. Before introducing former Trump advisor — and frequent Fox News guest — Stephen Miller, Carlson offered what many will see as dangerously irresponsible commentary on the efficacy of the Covid-19 vaccination. “Meanwhile, it seems like Covid makes it more likely that you’re gonna get, the shot, makes it more likely you’re going to get Covid,” Carlson said. With signature Valley Girl exasperation, he added, “Whatever! It’s crazy.” Yes, Carlson stumbled over his words, but his intent is clear: to deride the benefits of the Covid vaccines to his viewership, a significant portion of which is looking for reasons NOT to get vaccinated. It is not...
    Americans agree that democracy is in trouble, but members of the two political parties have starkly different opinions on the January 6 Capitol attack.  A new USA Today/Suffolk University poll found that 51 per cent are 'very worried' about the future of American democracy, while 46 per cent said it's likely a similar attack on the Capitol could happen again.  But Republicans were seven times more likely than Democrats to say the attack was a protest aimed at preventing a fraudulent election, versus one trying to overturn a legitimate presidential election.  A new poll showed that 46 per cent of Americans believed it was likely another attack, similar to January 6 (pictured), could occur in the future  There's a stark difference in how Republicans and Democrats view January 6, with a majority of Republicans believing it was a protest aimed at preventing a fraudulent election  Overall, 53 per cent of those polled did believe January 6 was a protest aimed at overturning the results of a legitimate presidential election.  However that sentiment was held by 85 per cent of Democrats and...
    A World Health Organization official today hailed a growing body of evidence showing Omicron is milder than earlier strains, describing it as 'good news'.  Dr Abdi Mahamud, the WHO's Covid incident manager, said the agency was seeing 'more and more studies' hinting the new strain struggles to penetrate the lungs. Despite being ultra-infectious, the Omicron wave has so far caused far fewer hospitalisations and deaths than previous outbreaks of new variants. Doctors believe rising levels of protection from vaccines and natural immunity has played the biggest role but an increasing number of studies suggest it's also intrinsically weaker.  Dr Mahamud told reporters in Geneva: 'We are seeing more and more studies pointing out that Omicron is infecting the upper part of the body. Unlike the other ones, that could cause severe pneumonia.' Increasingly, studies are suggesting that Omicron's ability to spread so quickly might also be the reason it causes milder illness. A study by researchers in Hong Kong found it multiplies 70 times faster in the airways compared to Delta, which could make people more infectious more quickly. But...
              by Christopher Roach   End of the year reviews, along with predictions for the coming year, are a staple around this time. But, as Yogi Berra wisely said, “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” I took a look at what I wrote last year, and a lot of it held up reasonably well (You can be the judge). I argued that the system and its managers are not doing a great job, the coronavirus crisis exposed their incompetence and malevolence, and that bad economics and crime would be major factors in marring the year ahead. Specifically, “a crisis of authority and legitimacy is emerging from failures in the most fundamental tasks of a society: the provision for basic needs, physical security, and a fair and accepted means of making decisions and picking leaders.” The year 2021, in many respects, was a less dramatic, slow motion encore performance of 2020, complete with renewed COVID restrictions, sustained high levels of violent crime, and with media and Big Tech going even deeper down the censorship rabbit hole. Change is afoot....
    CHICAGO (CBS) — It’s looking like a snowy start to 2022. A winter storm is developing that could drop three to six inches of snow across the Chicago area. However, the track of the storm could still change, leading to more rain than snow, according to CBS 2 meteorologist Laura Bannon. READ MORE: 1 Police Officer Dead, Second Officer In Critical Condition After Hotel Shooting In Kankakee CountyThe snow is currently expected to start around noon on New Year’s Day and continue though early Sunday morning, especially along Lake Michigan. High winds are also expected, which could make traveling difficult. Then, temperatures turn colder, with lows in the single digits Sunday night. READ MORE: Woman Shoots Man Who Was Sexually Assaulting Her In EnglewoodBig New Year’s storms have happened before. Many might remember the New Year’s Day storm of 1999, when a total of 21.6 inches fell at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. That ranks as the second biggest snowfall in Chicago history. There is currently no indication that a storm this weekend would reach totals like that. MORE NEWS: Woman...
    The number of “child” migrants found to be lying about their age in Britian has more than tripled in just a year, official figures have revealed. In the year to September 2021, some 1,118 migrants were found to have lied about being children — likely due to the fact that being a child, and especially a so-called unaccompanied minor, speeds up asylum applications and makes removal from the country harder — according to Home Office figures reported by The Telegraph. The true figure is likely higher, as it has been policy not to even challenge migrants claiming to be children — that is, 17 or younger — unless they appear to be “at least 25 years old”. Indeed, a previous scheme to import supposed migrant children directly from Calais, France was quietly wrapped up after photographs of what were supposed to be stringently-vetted arrivals showed the great majority had the appearance of being men who in some cases were not even particularly young.   More fears over real age of child migrants arriving from Calais https://t.co/PmjsmTkmeb pic.twitter.com/wpx7tAQALu — Daily Mail U.K. (@DailyMailUK) October...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — We’re seeing one of the highest COVID-19 case counts ever in Illinois. More than 20,000 people testing positive Tuesday. The only day with more COVID cases was last Friday, Christmas Eve. The COVID death toll is also rising. There were 96 deaths in Illinois from COVID-19 reported on Tuesday, the highest number in a single day since February. READ MORE: Chicago Weather: Snow Turns To RainIt was around this time Monday that the CDC was downgrading the isolation and quarantine times for those with positive COVID tests. With some time to think about it, some leading experts on the virus are questioning what motivated that change. CBS 2’s Chris Tye reports why workforce shortages were very likely at play. Medical experts call the move short sighted. It may reduce canceled flights and staff shortages at doctors offices for now. But the fear is it could make this wave linger longer. “Right now in Chicago, if you have a sniffle or a scratchy throat, you are more likely to have COVID than the common cold.” It’s lead to...
    ANTI-VAXXERS who have not been jabbed are 60 times more likely to end up in an ICU after contracting Covid.  Startling figures have revealed that those who are unvaccinated and in the older bracket of the population are likely to be hit hardest.  3Unvaccinated people are more likely to end up in intensive careCredit: AFP 3Omicron cases in the capital have skyrocketed in the past few weeksCredit: w8media Hospital admissions in London are still skyrocketing, and are teetering close to the Governments threshold of 400 for introducing lockdown restrictions across the UK.  A string of hugely positive studies show Omicron IS milder than other strains, with the first official UK report revealing the risk of hospitalisation is 50 to 70 per cent lower than with Delta. Covid booster jabs protect against Omicron and offer the best chance to get through the pandemic, health officials have repeatedly said. The Sun's Jabs Army campaign is helping get the vital extra vaccines in Brits' arms to ward off the need for any new restrictions. Figures from the Intensive Care National Audit and Research...
    NEARLY 2,000 flights have already been canceled this weekend and more are likely on the way as the new Covid variant wreaks havoc on the holiday season. Flight-tracking website FlightAware reported that nearly 1,000 flights that were leaving, entering, or set to fly within the US on Saturday were canceled. 7Travelers are seen going through security at Denver International Airport during Christmas weekend 7Nearly 1,000 flights were canceled on Christmas Day alone thanks in part to the Omicron surge 7A family is seen donning festive pajamas and matching masks at Orlando International AirportCredit: AP That number is up from the 690 domestic flights that were canceled on Friday, while more than 250 flights have already been scrapped for Sunday.  Globally, more than 6,000 flights have been canceled between Christmas Eve to December 26.  Airports in New York City, Washington, DC, Chicago, Denver, Dallas, San Francisco, and Los Angeles were among the hardest hit on Saturday.  On Friday, Delta, United, and JetBlue had all said the Omicron variant was causing staffing problems, and leading to flight cancelations.  “This was unexpected,” United...
    Mark Dallas, University of Reading About two in ten people over the age of 65 have mild cognitive impairment – a noticeable change in their memory, problem-solving abilities or attention. This is caused, in part, by the same brain changes that occur in dementia. While mild cognitive impairment often has little effect on a person’s way of living, 5-10% of people with it will develop dementia. Why some people with mild cognitive impairment develop dementia while others don’t has long been a mystery. But a recent study from Columbia University has identified several factors that determine whether a person is more or less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment. These findings might give us a clue about who might be more likely to develop dementia. The researchers looked at 2,903 people aged 65 or over and tracked their brain function for nine years. Cognitive impairment was diagnosed by looking at whether participants struggled with a memory task, if they reported difficulty performing certain daily tasks (such as using the phone) and hadn’t been diagnosed with...
    RICHMOND, Va. — A new report says Black youths in Virginia were more than twice as likely to be referred to the juvenile justice system compared to their white peers. The Washington Post reported Friday that the report offers a far-reaching examination into how the state handles young offenders. The report was conducted by the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission. The analysis also found that many teens in the state fail to get quality legal representation. Recidivism is high because rehabilitation programs are ineffective. And officials are paying for facilities where 70 percent of beds are unoccupied. The report did offer some good news. It found that a 2016 state plan reduced the number of teens in the system. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    More Americans plan to attend a religious services this Christmas after attendance waned during the coronavirus pandemic last year, a Rasmussen poll released on Friday found. This year, 44 percent of American adults plan on attending a religious service, up from 39 percent last year when the pandemic and government induced shutdowns “suppressed attendance.”  Forty-three percent of Americans said they will not be attending a service, and 13 percent said they are unsure. However, the percentage of religious service attendees is not as high at 2019. Before the pandemic, 49 percent of those polled planned on attending a religious service during the holidays Fifty-nine percent think Christmas is one of the United States’ most important holidays, which is up from 55 percent last year. Only 7 percent think Christmas is one of the least important, and 28 percent rank it “somewhere in between.” More Americans Will Attend Religious Service This #Christmas… https://t.co/JFssSsi6Dg #BreakingPoll pic.twitter.com/vLv9itQCXC — Rasmussen Reports (@Rasmussen_Poll) December 24, 2021 “These findings are consistent with surveys for years. The Fourth of July ranks second as the holiday most important to...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Airports are gearing up for the holiday rush as health experts warn passengers are more likely to get COVID-19 on planes because of the Omicron variant. “If you’re sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with other people it’s going to be pretty hard to avoid the virus, HEPA filter or not,” said Dr. Robert Klugman of UMass Memorial Health. “The Omicron variant is just a supercharged virus. Much more contagious, easy to pass, easy to contract. It takes less virus, less particles, less air to get this virus.” READ MORE: Massachusetts Reports 7,817 New COVID-19 Cases, 33 Additional DeathsThe McDermott family made sure they had plenty of KN95 masks on hand on their flight from Boston to Orlando, Florida. “We’re just really cautious about hand sanitizing, wearing the mask all the time, not eating at restaurant,” said Rebecca McDermott. Some travelers at Logan Airport in Boston say they understand the risks but feel comfortable flying because they’ve done what they can to do so safely. “My husband and I have been doubly vaccinated and boosted, we’re wearing...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The Bay Area has long had one of the most competitive and expensive rental markets in the country and it's even more difficult for Black renters to sign a lease in the city, according to a new study."If you don't get a response you have no way of accessing that property," said Peter Christensen, assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois.Christensen is one of the authors of a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research that found Black and Hispanic/Latino renters in America's 50 largest cities are less likely to hear back from rental properties than White renters."In almost all of the markets, both African American and Latinx renters received systematically lower response rates to inquiries to the same properties than White renters," he said.According to the study, Black renters in San Francisco faced the sixth worst response rate in the country in the experiment conducted over the course of nine months in 2021."Discriminatory behavior that is affecting housing access of African American households is pretty...
    California is poised for a surge in new coronavirus infections as a far more contagious version of the disease spreads among holiday parties and family gatherings forced indoors by a series of winter storms.But experts say the nation's most populous state is likely to avoid the worst scenario - spikes in hospitalizations and deaths - because most Californians have either been vaccinated or already been infected. That gives the state a higher level or protection against the omicron variant that, while not guaranteeing people won't get sick, means they are less likely to need to go to the hospital."It's a highly transmissible respiratory virus and people are going to get it. And they are going to get it every winter," said Dr. Monica Gandhi, a professor of infectious diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. "We have to go toward measuring our true success with a disease, which is how we're doing with hospitalizations."California has fared far better than many other states so far, with areas in the Midwest and Northeast seeing the biggest surge in cases and hospitalizations...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — California is poised for a surge in new coronavirus infections as a far more contagious version of the disease spreads among holiday parties and family gatherings forced indoors by a series of winter storms. But experts say the nation’s most populous state is likely to avoid the worst scenario — spikes in hospitalizations and deaths — because most Californians have either been vaccinated or already been infected. That gives the state a higher level or protection against the omicron variant that, while not guaranteeing people won’t get sick, means they are less likely to need to go to the hospital. READ MORE: UC Davis Considers Dropping Biweekly COVID Testing Requirement“It’s a highly transmissible respiratory virus and people are going to get it. And they are going to get it every winter,” said Dr. Monica Gandhi, a professor of infectious diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. “We have to go toward measuring our true success with a disease, which is how we’re doing with hospitalizations.” California has fared far better than many other states so far,...
    Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) would be more likely to make the switch to an independent, rather than a Republican, if he does exit the Democratic Party following his potential death knell to President Joe Biden’s Build Back Better Act. Manchin on Fox News Sunday essentially closed the door on his party’s agenda when he told host Bret Baier, “I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation. I just can’t. I tried everything humanly possible. I can’t get there… This is a no on this legislation.” Manchin cited, among other things, his fear that the $1.7 trillion bill would add to inflation. His comments came as Democrats, including Biden, Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had all negotiated to get him onboard. Democrats Sunday launched a series of attacks on the West Virginian as the announcement he would oppose the bill was compounded by the fact that the stunning news broke on Fox News. Amid speculation Manchin might exit the Democratic Party over the fracas, Axios reported Monday that if he indeed were to make a...
    The former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said that there was no indication that the new Omicron variant of COVID causes more severe illness. Dr Scott Gottlieb spoke with CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday to discuss new developments of the variant which was first detected in South Africa in late November.  Despite being considered more transmissible, Gottlieb made an effort to ease fears surrounding Omicron based on the low number of hospitalizations of patients infected with the new variant.      'There's no indication that it causes more severe illness,' he told network host Margaret Brennan. 'What we've seen in South Africa in particular, is a decoupling between the cases and hospitalizations,' meaning those infected are less likely to need professional medical treatment.  CBS News Privacy Policy Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on Sunday that there is no indication the new Omicron variant is a more severe illness Gottlieb spoke with CBS Face the Nation host Margaret Brennan about the new developments with the Omicron variant Gottlieb also added that the hospitalization rate was down 30 percent...
    PEOPLE are five times more likely to get Covid for a second time with Omicron – but boosters still protect against hospital admission. Imperial College London modelling, led by “Prof Lockdown” Neil Ferguson, has shed new light on how immunity holds up against the mega-strain. 1Imperial College London experts said boosters are still vital for protection against severe diseaseCredit: Paul Reid It said protection given by past infection is around 5.4 times less effective than it was against Delta, stopping only 19 per cent of cases. The same figures are likely to apply to people who have had two doses of a vaccine and not a booster. It highlighted how critical the third jabs are, with protection from hospitalisation falling to 80 per cent even after three doses. Professor Ferguson said: “This study provides further evidence of the very substantial extent to which Omicron can evade prior immunity given by both infection or vaccination. “This level of immune evasion means that Omicron poses a major, imminent threat to public health.” Dr Alexandra Hogan added: “The rapid spread of the Omicron...
    (CNN)NFL players are about four times more likely to die of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, than the general public, researchers found in a study published Wednesday.The researchers from Harvard University and Boston University's CTE Center evaluated all 19,423 NFL athletes who played one or more games between 1960 and 2019, the largest study to date on the relationship between football and ALS. Previous studies had found a similar link between football and ALS but among much smaller numbers of athletes.In the new study, published in the journal JAMA Open Network, the researchers also found that NFL players diagnosed with ALS had longer professional football careers than those without the disease, suggesting an association between the disease and increased exposure to head trauma. Those who had ALS had an average career of 7 years, compared with 4.5 years among players who didn't have ALS. Experimental treatment could be game-changing for genetic ALS, experts say"We believe this novel finding linking a longer career to increased risk of ALS adds to the growing evidence that repetitive head...
    A Maryland school board approved a calendar change to provide teachers more time off, which infuriated parents over concerns that it will set their children back academically. On Dec. 7, the Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) school board approved a calendar change for the 2021-22 school year that will give MCPS staff and faculty more time off, Fox 5 reported. One MCPS parent, Dr. Jennifer Linton Reesman, joined “Fox & Friends First” to criticize the board’s rationale in approving extra time off. “They’ve given us conflicting reasons, saying that on one hand it’s for professional development, on the other hand it’s for planning time, which are two very different things,” Reesman said. “All we know is that they’ve cut instructional time for children across the board here in Maryland and parents here, we are furious, we’re fed up about this.” Watch the latest video at foxnews.com Reesman said these changes will have long-term, negative effects on children, and she said that instructional time should not be reduced as overall, reading and math scores are already down. “We know that children who are...
    Working from home under current government guidelines means it's easier than ever to do work out of hours over this festive period.  But a new report warns of the costly physical and mental effects of letting work creep into your schedule over the Christmas holiday. Researchers at the University of South Australia surveyed 2,200 academics and professional staff this year across 40 Australian universities.  They found that checking your work emails over Christmas could lead to burnout, mental distress and poor physical health – and can even affect family relationships.   Will you check your emails over Christmas? Surveying more than 2200 academics and professional staff across 40 Australian universities, researchers found that employees who responded to digital work communications out of hours were more likely to suffer from burnout, psychological distress and poor physical health (stock image) LACK OF WORKPLACE SUPPORT 'LEADS TO DEPRESSION': UniSAA University of South Australia study published in June 2021 found poor management increases risk of staff depression by 300 per cent. Men are also likely to become depressed because most workplaces tend to overlook their mental health.  Lead author Dr...
    Women are 15 percent more likely to die or suffer a serious injury if they're operated on by a man than a surgeon who is their own gender, a study shows.  Researchers from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee and the University of Toronto, in Canada, investigated the likelihood of someone to suffer either death or another severe complication based on the gender of their surgeon. They found that when women operate on women, men on men, or women or men, there was no increased risk of death or other complications. When men operate on women, though, the person receiving the procedure is at a 15 percent increased likelihood to either die, or suffer another negative outcome. Researchers cannot explain why exactly this happens, and say further research is needed into why being operated on by a man is more dangerous for a female patient.  Researchers found that women who were operated on by a male surgeon were 15% more likely to either die or suffer severe complications as a result of the operation. There was no increased risk found if...
    Stress may make women more likely than men to crave alcohol. While both sexes tend to drink heavily after being put under pressure, a study found one key difference. Although men drank to excess once offered alcohol, women appeared to fancy a stiff drink before having their first sip.  This followed stressful tasks such as public speaking and mental arithmetic. Experts suggest women may face more social pressure over how they appear to others, which could leave them craving a drink. Researchers recruited 105 men and 105 women, setting up a simulated bar in their laboratory. Around half the group were given five minutes to prepare a speech on what they liked and disliked about their own personality, appearance and life, then speak for five minutes. They were told they would be evaluated on psychological factors including how defensively or openly they spoke. Stress may make women more likely than men to crave alcohol. Experts suggest women may face more social pressure over how they appear to others, which could leave them craving a drink (File image) RELATED ARTICLES Previous...
    Sharks are more likely to attack humans when the moon is full, according to researchers who found that shark bites may be related to lunar phases. The shark scientists from Florida and Louisiana looked at nearly 50 years of shark attack data from across the globe to see if there’s a relationship between shark attacks and moon phases. The researchers discovered there were more attacks during lunar phases closer to a full moon, and fewer shark attacks during phases closer to a new moon. “There have been long-term questions about what may be driving shark attacks, so we were looking at environmental factors to help us better understand when and where they happen,” said Stephen Midway, an assistant professor in Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences. “We found that there’s some signal between moon phases and shark attacks,” he said, later adding, “Unfortunately, we don’t have a smoking gun yet, so looking closer at how the moon affects the environment should be studied further.” The researchers found that more shark attacks than expected occurred when the lunar...