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    Associated Press DETROIT — A federal judge in Michigan has tossed a lawsuit brought by two gay corrections officers, ruling that some of their discrimination claims weren’t sufficiently proven and that statutes of limitation barred others. Michelle Wood alleged in the 2020 suit that she was regularly singled out for taunts and homophobic slurs, then was retaliated against after she complained about them, the Detroit Free Press reported Friday. Her partner, Loretta Smith, alleged she was demoted to a midnight shift and faced a hostile work environment after Wood complained, the lawsuit alleged. The Detroit-based attorney for the plaintiffs, Jonathan Marko, expressed disappointment in U.S. District Judge Victoria Roberts’ ruling and said an appeal was a possibility, according to the newspaper. “My clients are devastated,” Marko was quoted as saying. “They feel revictimized today.” Wood retired in 2019 after more than 25 years in the job, saying in the lawsuit that she was under so much pressure in a hostile environment that her departure felt like she had been fired. Related Articles San Jose community briefs for the...
    The commissioner of the New York City Department of Corrections is warning city officials of an "emerging crisis" situation at Rikers Island prison, with COVID-19 cases among inmates rising at an alarming rate.  In a letter, Department of Corrections commissioner Vincent Schiraldi said the COVID-19 positivity rate at Rikers was over 17% as of Tuesday. He added that the coronavirus infection rate among inmates nearly doubled overnight, according to NBC News. "Our COVID positivity rate was consistently hovering at approximately 1%. Yesterday it was 9.5%. Today it is over 17%," Schiraldi wrote in the letter. He confirmed that "only 45% of our incarcerated population has received one shot of the vaccine, and only 38% is fully vaccinated." "The combination of these data indicates that the risks to the human beings in our custody are at a crisis level. As you are aware, considerable efforts were made at the beginning of the pandemic to reduce the jail population immediately in order to avert a major humanitarian catastrophe," he added. Schiraldi said in the letter that New York's jail population faces an "equal or greater level of risk from...
    One Arizona sergeant is sounding the alarm on a coronavirus vaccine requirement for all county employees who work with vulnerable populations, which includes corrections officers. The Pima County Board of Supervisors on Nov. 2 voted to approve a coronavirus vaccine requirement for county employees who work with vulnerable populations, and the board considers corrections officers part of that group. In a memorandum to the board of supervisors, Jan Lesher, the chief deputy county administrator for Pima County outlined that if there are still a substantial number of corrections officers who are unvaccinated by Jan. 1, the jail population may need to be reduced. Mike Dominguez, president of the Sheriff’s Labor Association of Pima County, told Fox News that the board of supervisors is putting "gasoline on the fire" by passing the mandate. ARIZONA COUNTY COULD 'REDUCE' JAIL POPULATION IF MORE CORRECTIONS OFFICERS DON'T GET VACCINATED Pima County Sheriff's Department Badge. (Credit: Pima County Sheriff's Department) "Our current staffing situation is terrible. I believe we've had the lowest numbers of officers currently in the last six, seven years. And...
    One Arizona county may be forced to "reduce" the number of inmates being held in jails because of a new vaccine requirement for certain county employees that is affecting jail personnel. The Pima County Board of Supervisors voted on Nov. 2 to approve a vaccine requirement for county employees who work with vulnerable populations, which includes corrections officers who are employed at the county jails. According to the approved requirement, the deadline for employees who work with vulnerable populations to get vaccinated is Jan. 1, or their employment will be terminated. In a memorandum to the board of supervisors, Jan Lesher, the chief deputy county administrator for Pima County outlined that if there are still a substantial number of corrections officers who are unvaccinated by Jan. 1, the jail population may need to be reduced. BIDEN'S CMS VACCINE MANDATE FACES STRONG OPPOSITION FROM OVER 150 REPUBLICANS LED BY JEFF DUNCAN Pima County Sheriff's Department Badge. (Credit: Pima County Sheriff's Department) "Currently we have a substantial number of corrections officers who work in the Pima County Adult Detention Center,...
    (CNN) — Video of a transgender woman being held in a chokehold by a Baltimore corrections officer, then dropped on her face and dragged, was released by her attorney as part of a civil lawsuit against the state and several of the officers allegedly involved. Amber Canter was being held at the Baltimore City Central Booking & Intake Center when the incident happened in June 2019, her civil complaint says. Canter suffered bone fractures in her face, severe bruising to the left side of her forehead, internal bleeding behind her right eye and pneumocephalus​, and had to be taken to an intensive care unit, the complaint says. READ MORE: Hogan & Scott To Welcome Sports Betting To Horseshoe CasinoThe video was provided to CNN by Canter’s attorney, Malcolm Ruff. He said the video is from the Maryland Attorney General’s Office, which represents the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (MDPSCS), the department in charge of the intake center. The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services declined to comment on the civil lawsuit to CNN. Canter first...
    (CNN)Video of a transgender woman being held in a chokehold by a Baltimore corrections officer, then dropped on her face and dragged, was released by her attorney as part of a civil lawsuit against the state and several of the officers allegedly involved.Amber Canter was being held at the Baltimore City Central Booking & Intake Center when the incident happened in June 2019, her civil complaint says. Canter suffered bone fractures in her face, severe bruising to the left side of her forehead, internal bleeding behind her right eye and pneumocephalus​, and had to be taken to an intensive care unit, the complaint says.The video was provided to CNN by Canter's attorney Malcolm Ruff. He said the video is from the Maryland Attorney General's Office, which represents the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (MDPSCS), the department in charge of the intake center. The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services declined to comment on the civil lawsuit to CNN.Amber Canter was known at the facility for being a "persistent advocate for transgender inmate rights," her lawsuit...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The corrections officers‘ union is suing Mayor Bill de Blasio over New York City’s vaccine mandate for city workers. The lawsuit filed Wednesday in Manhattan State Supreme Court seeks to stop the city’s vaccination deadline. They’re also calling for the testing option to be restored immediately so that officers who are on leave can return to work and address the severe staffing crisis. The union says officers have been working 60 hours over five consecutive days each week.
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- The New York City Department of Correction will move to 12-hour shifts as the vaccination requirement for its workers goes into effect.The longer shifts are intended to assure adequate staffing.73% of workers are vaccinated.The union representing correction officers says these longer shifts will negatively impact officers and inmates."Our essential officers have already suffered immensely by being forced to work 24 hours plus without meals and rest since the pandemic. Increasing their tours from eight to twelve hours and allowing the DOC to order them to work back-to-back 12-hour tours, 24 consecutive hours, without meals and rest is nothing short of torture," said COBA President Benny Boscio in a statement.ALSO READ | 2 men impersonating NYPD officers rob home in the Bronx: New videoEMBED More News Videos New video has been released of two men who posed as NYPD officers to tie-up and rob homeowners in the Bronx. ----------* Get Eyewitness News Delivered * More New York City news* Send us a news tip* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts * Follow us on...
              more   The Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) had a vacancy rate of 27.4 percent, or 1,680 correctional officer vacancies by September 30, 2021, according to a November 15 report from the Public Safety Compensation Work Group. That’s an increase from the average number of vacancies between fiscal years 2018 and 2020, which ranged between 650 and 682 each year. “There was a dramatic increase since the beginning of the pandemic,” House Appropriations Committee Analyst Michael Jay told the Joint Committee of the House Health, Welfare and Institutions and Public Safety and Senate Judiciary on Tuesday. “Since then it has gone up about 60 each month and it is now at almost 1,700 vacancies. Some individual facilities have seen higher vacancies, with one correctional facility having turnover of 54 percent in the last calendar year,” Jay said. “VADOC’s agency turnover rate as of July 2021 is 25.8 percent compared to the 15.7 percent rate for all state agencies. Since FY 2019, VADOC’s turnover rate has increased by 4.0 percent annually compared to a 0.3 percent annual increase for all state...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A federal judge rejected a preliminary injunction request by Allegheny County police and corrections officers against the county’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate, according to our news partners at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. READ MORE: Allegheny Co. Executive Rich Fitzgerald Sets Dec. 1 Deadline For Employee COVID-19 VaccinationsThe unions representing the officers went to court in October to block the county’s order that all employees be vaccinated by Dec. 1 or face termination. READ MORE: Allegheny County Police And Corrections Officers Unions Sue Over COVID-19 Vaccine MandateThe unions filed for injunctions, calling the vaccines experimental and unproven with unknown side effects and saying any mandatory order must be negotiated. A lawyer representing the unions said the county’s workforce could be nearly cut in half if unvaccinated employees are fired, the Post-Gazette said. The federal judge sided with the county on Monday, saying the unions are unlikely to win their court battle or suffer irreparable harm, the Post-Gazette reported. MORE NEWS: City, County Employees Protest COVID-19 Vaccine RulesCounty solicitor Andy Szefi told the Post-Gazette that about...
    A six-year-old Pennsylvania girl is battling a rare form of cancer and her father’s coworkers have come up with a clever way to raise money for her family: “The Fat & Furious Hundred-Yard Dash.” Adaleigh Evans and her parents recently discovered a lump on her shoulder and in October, she was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, according to WNEP.  “You don’t ever want to see your kids in any type of pain,” her father Brandon said. “So it was a very, very emotional time and it still is.” Brandon works as a corrections officer near the family’s home in Waymart and recently learned of a fundraiser his coworkers put together.  His colleagues Justin Gisinger, Wilfredo Mieja, and Marc Fenkner put together “The Fat & Furious Hundred-Yard Dash,” where the three men planned to race each other and collect donations for Brandon’s family during tumultuous times.   “I’m like what is this? You know? And I don’t like … this this this has to be a joke, and they were like no, like they stepped up and they wanted to do...
    A Louisville woman is suing two female corrections officers whom she says stripped her down and forced her to walk naked in front of a large group of people at a drug treatment program she was entering last year.  Darcella Means, 38, had been court-ordered in September 2020 to enter the 90-day Enough is Enough substance abuse treatment program, which is operated by the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections. According to Means' lawsuit, when she arrived at the Metro Corrections facility in downtown Louisville on September 2 for booking and processing, officers Lasha Bearden and Keshonda Rudolph strip-searched her after an initial pat-down search and three separate trips through a body scanner failed to turn up any contraband. Darcella Means, 38 (pictured from the back), is suing Louisville corrections officers Lasha Bearden and Keshonda Rudolph for allegedly violating her rights by forcing her to walk naked in front of people RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Two Oklahoma cops are convicted of second-degree murder... 'Soho Karen' says she wishes she had 'apologized... ...
    PHOTO VIA FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONSCorrectional officers will receive base-pay increases of at least $5,000 and newly hired officers will get one-time bonuses of $3,000 from money saved by shuttering a nearly century-old prison and more than 70 prison dorms throughout the state, under a proposal approved Thursday by lawmakers. The salary boosts and bonuses will come from $67.8 million in savings derived by closing New River Correctional Facility in Bradford County, closing 73 dorms at facilities scattered throughout Florida and placing “in reserve” 1,290 permanent positions at the Department of Corrections. The plan, unanimously approved Thursday by the Joint Legislative Budget Commission, will give workers at the lowest end of the wage scale the biggest increases. It is aimed at mitigating chronic staffing shortages that Department of Corrections Secretary Mark Inch repeatedly has blamed for a prison system “in crisis.” Under the plan, base pay for correctional officers will start at $38,750, a nearly 16 percent hike over the current $33,500. Base pay will go from $36,850 to $42,100 for sergeants; from $40,535 to $45,535 for lieutenants; and from...
    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought severe staffing shortages to U.S. prisons as corrections officers, burnt out with the low pay and grueling nature of the work, have quit in droves.  The situation is becoming dire as prison populations, which dropped during the pandemic, are once again on the rise. Having fewer guards means more dangerous conditions and for the officers left behind, worsening shortages have made an already difficult job unbearable, many say. Lance Lowry, a recently retired corrections officer with the Texas State Penitentiary, holds his ID badge on the front porch of his home, Oct. 27, 2021, in Huntsville, Texas. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke) In Georgia, some prisons report up to 70% vacancy rates. In Nebraska, overtime hours have quadrupled since 2010, as fewer officers are forced to work longer hours. Florida has temporarily closed three prisons out of more than 140 facilities because of understaffing, and vacancy rates have nearly doubled there in the last year.  FORMER LABOR SECRETARY CHAO WARNS WORKER SHORTAGES COULD BE ‘TOMORROW’S NEW NORMAL' In Kansas, state Department of Corrections Secretary Jeff Zmuda...
    U.S. prisons are experiencing staffing shortages as officers retire, quit and risks associated with COVID-19, the Associated Press reported on Monday. Corrections officers are exposed to dangerous working conditions including exposure to COVID-19, and paid low wages, contributing to widespread staff shortages, according to the AP. At the same time, prisoner populations are starting to increase after dropping off at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. “I would have liked to stay till I was 50,” said former Texas corrections officer Lance Lowry, 48, the AP reported. “But the pandemic changed that.” Lowry served as a corrections officer for 20 years and quit for a truck driving job after losing superior support and seeing coworkers die of COVID-19, according to the AP. Prison populations are particularly vulnerable to the spread of COVID-19 because “basic disease prevention measures are either against the rules or simply impossible,” says @keribla of @MarshallProj. “It’s not always possible to wash your hands regularly.” pic.twitter.com/exDfKlYxq6 — Democracy Now! (@democracynow) March 10, 2020 Unions representing corrections officers said vaccine mandates will likely cause unvaccinated employees...
    PHOTO VIA FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORREECTIONS/FACEBOOKAmid fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic and worker shortages, Florida lawmakers will consider proposals to inject nearly $100 million into nursing homes and boost pay of state correctional officers. The Joint Legislative Budget Commission, a panel of House and Senate members that can make mid-year budget decisions, is slated to take up the issues during a meeting Thursday. The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration has proposed providing $99.5 million in state and federal money to nursing homes over a three-month period through increased Medicaid payment rates. In a request to the Legislature, the agency said the money would help nursing homes “in their current financial crisis caused by significant occupancy declines and a tight labor market with increasing wages and shortage of staff resources.” Meanwhile, the state Department of Corrections is asking the legislative panel to sign off on closing the New River Correctional Institution in Bradford County and shutting down 73 dorms at other facilities throughout the state. Savings would be used to provide higher pay and bonuses to correctional workers. The prison...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM/AP) – After watching friends and coworkers die from COVID-19, Lance Lowry quit after 20 years as a corrections officer in Texas to become a long-haul trucker. With dwindling support from his superiors, he said he couldn’t bear the job any longer. “I would have liked to stay till I was 50,” said Lowry, 48, “but the pandemic changed that.” READ MORE: US Supreme Court Set To Hear Arguments Over Texas Law That Bans Most AbortionsStaff shortages have long been a challenge for prison agencies, given the low pay and grueling nature of the work. But the coronavirus pandemic — and its impact on the labor market — has pushed many corrections systems into crisis. Officers are retiring and quitting in droves, while officials struggle to recruit new employees. And some prisons whose prisoner populations dropped during the pandemic have seen their numbers rise again, exacerbating the problem. There is no one thing pushing prison employees out in high numbers now. Some are leaving for new opportunities as more places are hiring. University of Michigan economist Betsey Stevenson...
    At a Georgia state House of Representatives hearing on prison conditions in September, a corrections officer called in to testify, interrupting his shift to tell lawmakers how dire conditions had become. On a “good day,” he told lawmakers, he had maybe six or seven officers to supervise roughly 1,200 people. He said he had recently been assigned to look after 400 prisoners by himself. There weren’t enough nurses to provide medical care. “All the officers … absolutely despise working there,” said the officer, who didn’t give his name for fear of retaliation. In Texas, Lance Lowry quit after 20 years as a corrections officer to become a long-haul trucker because he couldn’t bear the job any longer. Watching friends and coworkers die from COVID-19, along with dwindling support from his superiors, wore on him. “I would have liked to stay till I was 50,” said Lowry, 48. “but the pandemic changed that.” Staff shortages have long been a challenge for prison agencies, given the low pay and grueling nature of the work. But the coronavirus pandemic — and its impact...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Amid the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic and worker shortages, Florida lawmakers next week will consider proposals to inject nearly $100 million into nursing homes and boost the pay of state correctional officers. The Joint Legislative Budget Commission, a panel of House and Senate members that can make mid-year budget decisions, is slated to take up the issues during a meeting Thursday. The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration has proposed providing $99.5 million in state and federal money to nursing homes over a three-month period through increased Medicaid payment rates. In a request to the Legislature, the agency said the money would help nursing homes “in their current financial crisis caused by significant occupancy declines and a tight labor market with increasing wages and shortage of staff resources.” Meanwhile, the state Department of Corrections is asking the legislative panel to sign off on closing the New River Correctional Institution in Bradford County and shutting down 73 dorms at other facilities throughout the state. Savings would be used to provide higher pay and bonuses to correctional workers....
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Across Allegheny County, public employees are fighting vaccine mandates but none as hard as those in law enforcement, which has suffered some of the highest losses from the disease. The unions representing the county police and the corrections officers have gone to court to block the county’s order that all employees be vaccinated or be fired. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Weather: Cool Morning With Mid-Day Warm-UpAccording to the National Fraternal Order of Police, 743 police officers have reportedly died of COVID-19, but while the FOP is encouraging officers to get vaccinated, the union opposes mandates, calling vaccines a personal health decision. Sheriff Bill Mullen has decided for his deputies to either get vaccinated or be terminated. “It’s a difficult decision but I believe strongly it’s the right decision in light of the fact that so many police officers throughout the country have died. There has to be something we can do to stop it,” he said. Come Dec. 1, all county employees must show proof of vaccination or face firing. But late last week, the unions representing the...
    Members of the Massachusetts corrections officers union told a judge this week that they shouldn't be subject to the state's vaccine mandate, according to news reports. The Massachusetts Corrections Officers Federated Union and corrections officers Michael Mosher, Zac Gustafson, Denina Dunn, and Angela Pucci have filed suit against Gov. Charlie Baker and Carol A. Mici, commissioner of the state’s Department of Corrections, over the governor’s vaccine mandate, as reported by Boston 25 News. On Aug. 19, Baker issued an executive order requiring all Executive Department employees to provide proof they have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 by Oct. 17 or face disciplinary action that could lead to termination. In the suit, the union and officers are asking the court to rule that the order violates the collective bargaining agreement and rights contained in the document and interferes with the officers right to deny unwanted medical treatment. In addition, the union and officers claim the order deprives them of their right to employment security, specifically the order interferes with the 14th Amendment, causing irreparable harm, as officers would be deprived of...
    The Florida Department of Corrections (DOC) has transferred 3,500 inmates and 1,500 staff to other facilities after closing three prisons because of a shortage of corrections officers. DOC Secretary Mark Inch is asking state lawmakers for $171 million to increase corrections officers’ starting salaries from $33,400 a year, or $16.70 per hour, to $41,600 annually, or $20 an hour, to fill 5,000 vacancies. But while there’s bipartisan support for raising corrections officers’ salaries again – lawmakers did so in 2020 and authorized a transition from 12-hour to 8-hour shifts this year — Inch’s request has drawn a fusillade of reproach from Senate President Wilton Simpson, R-Trilby. “We are not just going to write a bigger check because they think they need it. That is not going to happen. They’re going to have to do the right thing. We are not going to waste the taxpayers’ dollars,” Simpson told The News Service of Florida last week. Simpson said the DOC can save money by closing up to four of its 50 prisons – many aging, some half-empty – and using the...
    Share this: Gov. Kathy Hochul declared a disaster emergency and signed an executive order expanding the use of virtual court appearances at New York City’s Rikers Island jail on Tuesday, saying it would expedite hearings for inmates and lessen some of the burden on corrections officers at a facility in crisis. The order allows a court to have virtual appearances from any party or witness instead of requiring them to be in person for a range of different kinds of hearings, even allowing pleas and sentences to be virtual with defendant consent. In announcing the order, Hochul said allowing more use of virtual appearances instead of requiring inmates to be physically transferred would make the legal process go faster for them. She said corrections officers would be able to focus more on supervision and safety without having to spend as much time on transporting detainees.
    PHOTO VIA FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONSA top corrections official offered a stark picture of Florida’s prison system Wednesday, warning that lawmakers must boost salaries of corrections workers to avert a looming disaster as the system grapples with high turnover rates, dangerously low staffing levels and fatigued employees. Department of Corrections Deputy Secretary Ricky Dixon said the agency wants to increase prison officers’ starting salaries from the current $33,400 a year --- $16.70 per hour --- to $41,600 a year, or $20 per hour, to address staffing issues that have prompted officials to temporarily shutter two prisons, close hundreds of prison dorms and suspend work squads throughout the state. “Here’s the bottom line. I’ve been doing this for over 25 years in this system, in this state. The difference is, back then we had the given resources to do the job right,” Dixon, who began his career as a corrections officer, told the House Criminal Justice & Public Safety Subcommittee on Wednesday. “Today, this evening and tonight, many of those officers working in dormitories throughout our state, they have no one...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Controversy is brewing over a prison contractor hired to train corrections officers at the Allegheny County Jail. The Jail Oversight Board gathered Monday for a special meeting and voted 4-3, with one person abstaining, in a motion to end the C-SAU training led by Joseph Garcia. READ MORE: Leaders Expected To Discuss Proposed Plan To Make Liberty Avenue Safer Board members told KDKA’s Meghan Schiller ahead of Monday’s vote that Garcia would not disclose information about his alleged prior military background or any alleged criminal background. They also claimed they had not received any of his references from any previous employers. Allegheny County Controller Chelsa Wagner called that unacceptable, saying the company’s earmarked to receive nearly $350,000 of taxpayer money. Garcia runs C-SAU which stands for Corrections Special Applications Unit. It won a no-bid contract by Allegheny County to train corrections officers with less-lethal tactics to restrain inmates. “There was a study published in 2017 that found that three percent of people hit by rubber projectiles died of the injury. Fifteen percent of the 1,900 people were...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A special meeting is underway about a contractor hired to train corrections officers at the Allegheny County Jail. The county is paying the company’s leader nearly $350,000, but board members say they never received his resume. READ MORE: In GOP Race For Senate Nomination, Jeff Bartos Calls Sean Parnell Unelectable, Bringing Tough Response From Parnell The Jail Oversight Board will talk about Joseph Garcia Monday night. They claim the man who just earned a $350,000 contract with the county jail will not disclose information needed to properly vet the company. KDKA’s Meghan Schiller was told Garcia won’t attend Monday’s special Jail Oversight Board meeting — a meeting specifically called by the board seeking more information about his professional resume, his references and his alleged military background. Garcia runs C-SAU, which stands for Corrections Special Applications Unit. It won a no-bid contract by Allegheny County to train corrections officers with less lethal tactics to restrain inmates. KDKA’s Meghan Schiller looked at C-SAU’s website, and Garcia’s other website called K1KK9” as she attempted to get in touch with Garcia...
    The New York City Department of Correction on Wednesday handed out suspensions to 20 officers for failing to show up to work amid an ongoing crisis at the notorious Rikers Island jail.  The crackdown took place just one day after Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a warning that any DOC staff member who was AWOL 'will be held accountable with 30-day suspension without pay.' During his daily press conference on Tuesday, the mayor unveiled a five-point plan to address the dire situation at Rikers Island, which has long suffered from being critically overcrowded and understaffed. 
    TOWSON, Md. (WJZ) — Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski Jr. on Tuesday announced hiring bonuses for new members of the Baltimore County Police Department and Baltimore County Department of Corrections. Members of the next police recruiting class, whether they are entry-level or making a lateral move, will receive a $10,000 bonus if they stay with the department for three years following graduation from the academy. READ MORE: Baltimore Congressional Delegation Announces $9M For Baltimore County To Reimburse COVID-19 Expenses “We are committed to doing everything we can to recruit the best-qualified candidates into these vital roles in order to keep our communities safe,” Olszewski said in a statement. “This common-sense strategy strengthens our ongoing work to attract individuals with diverse backgrounds and a deep desire to serve our neighborhoods.” The new incentive does not impact the agency’s existing internal referral bonus program. READ MORE: How Extreme Heat Hits Our Most Vulnerable Communities The Hardest “The Baltimore County Police Department is seeking service-minded individuals who are committed to protecting our communities,” Baltimore County Police Chief Melissa Hyatt said in a statement....
    PHILADEPHIA (CBS) — There’s a new lawsuit against Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf’s proposal to require COVID vaccines and testing of state employees. The Pennsylvania State Corrections Officers’ Association is behind the legal action. The organization says the policy doesn’t apply to inmates, outside contractors or visitors despite those individuals facing restrictions at the height of the pandemic. READ MORE: Former U.S. Attorney Bill McSwain Joins 2022 Race For Pennsylvania Governor The group wrote in a statement: This, coupled with the administration’s inconsistent policies during the pandemic, has made work conditions dangerous for our members.” READ MORE: SEPTA Warns Of Delays Due To Shortage Of Bus Drivers Eyewitness News reached out to the Wolf Administration for a response. MORE NEWS: Bus Drivers Needed: Glassboro School District Adjusts Dismissal Times Due To Bus Driver Shortage They called the union’s opposition “extremely disappointing” and said the initiative is meant to give officers the tools to protect themselves, their families, and their coworkers.
    Screams filled the air as a bus carrying prisoners between correction facilities caught fire while traveling in the area. The crash took place around 7:45 p.m., Friday, Aug. 27 in Dutchess County on Route 9D by the overpass in Fishkill, said the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision. The bus stopped and was safely evacuated, the department said. Nearly two dozen prisoners and corrections officers were onboard at the time of the fire.  Two correction officers and four prisoners were taken to local hospitals for examination, the department said.  All were treated and released.  The remainder of the incarcerated were transported to facilities via department vehicles dispatched to the scene, DOCCS officials said.  Witness Freddie Beltran said screams were heard and there was panic on board the bus as prisoners tried to get out. Fights reportedly even erupted between inmates and corrections officers as the crush to get out ensued.  New York State troopers on the scene said a mechanical issue caused the bus to catch fire.  The investigation into this incident is ongoing.
    Conditions for correction officers guarding inmates on New York City’s notorious Rikers Island have deteriorated so significantly over the past year – and have allegedly left personnel understaffed, overworked and vulnerable – that it has become "impossible" for them to do their jobs, a union official tells Fox News. Inmate housing arrangements, understaffing of correction officers and lack of support from city officials have contributed to a dangerous work environment for those tasked with protecting the detainees and the infamous facility, Correction Officers' Benevolent Association President Benny Boscio said. NEW YORK CITY JAIL WHERE JEFFREY EPSTEIN KILLED HIMSELF SHUTTING DOWN 'AT LEAST TEMPORARILY' "We're working 25-plus hours straight, no meal breaks, the conditions of having gang members in the same housing areas – gang affiliated housing – we're being assaulted with impunity," Boscio told Fox News.  WARNING: THIS VIDEO CONTAINS GRAPHIC IMAGES VideoFox News has obtained several videos that show inmates’ violent attacks on correction officers, which sources say took place on Rikers Island. The videos show inmates repeatedly punching or kicking officers in the head and body, and...
    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The union that represents about 10,000 guards in Pennsylvania’s state prisons told Gov. Tom Wolf Thursday it plans legal action to stop his effort to force them to get COVID-19 vaccines over the next month. The president of the Pennsylvania State Corrections Officers Association sent a letter to the Democratic governor two days after Wolf ordered the guards and some other state workers to get fully vaccinated by Sept. 7 or face weekly testing. READ MORE: Camden Unveils Interactive Mural At City Hall Highlighting Historically Significant People, Places And Events Union president John Eckenrode told Wolf his policy announcement was “a slap in the face — and frankly, way too late because thousands of our members already have been infected, due to your inaction.” “This is the latest episode of what has been a woefully inconsistent vaccination/testing/masking policy by this administration in our state prisons,” Eckenrode wrote, adding the union “has instructed legal counsel to challenge this latest proposed policy change.” Wolf press secretary Lyndsay Kensinger said Thursday the initiative was designed to protect the guards,...
    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A man was brutally beaten by corrections officers and denied medical treatment at a Valencia County jail in Los Lunas after guards mistook dentures in the inmate’s mouth for contraband, according to a civil rights lawsuit. The New Mexico Prison and Jail Project, a watchdog group for improving prison conditions, filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court this week on behalf of former inmate Marvin Silva. The group said Silva was left naked in a holding cell with no security cameras after a medical checkup, when a guard insisted that the inmate was hiding contraband in his mouth. They said several other corrections officers arrived and beat Silva. The lawsuit seeks compensation to Silva for injuries and emotional harm, punitive damages against the jail and health care employees and attorney’s fees. Administrators at the Valencia County Adult Detention Center could not immediately be reached for comment. The lawsuit levels charges of excessive use of force at four corrections officers and accuses prison health care provider CorrHealth and two of its employees of deliberate indifference...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — One of the first corrections officers to break through the door, after the murder of a friend and colleague is fighting for change at the State Capitol. The trauma from Joe Gomm’s death three years ago ended some officers’ careers early. WCCO found out how a duty disability retirement in Minnesota doesn’t cover health insurance, something former corrections officers’s say they need now more than ever. READ MORE: Woodbury Man Charged With 8 Felony Counts Of Child Pornography This month marked three years since Justin Haller’s worst moment as a corrections officer. “It’s hard to get out of the house it’s hyper vigilant all the time,” Haller said. “Flashbacks, nightmares all that stuff.” Clinically diagnosed with PTSD, anxiety, and depression after the gruesome scene he ran to when Joe Gomm was murder inside Stillwater prison’s metal shop. “It wasn’t just a coworker it was a personal friend,” he said. Haller jumped on Edward Johnson and put him in handcuffs that day. “I can’t return to the same career I’ve been doing for 16 and a half years,”...
    More On: department of corrections City probing death of Rikers Island inmate after guard left post Inmate captured after daring escape from NYC’s floating prison barge NYC corrections captain approved his own bogus overtime hours: sources Was this over-the-top cell-ebration on Rikers Island held on your dime? City correction officers are so desperate to escape their jobs in the Big Apple’s jails that hundreds have recently joined the NYPD — even amid violent anti-cop protests and the progressive “defund the police” movement, The Post has learned. The newest class of 555 NYPD recruits that was sworn in during a ceremony Thursday at the Police Academy contained 42 former correction officers, a law-enforcement source familiar with the matter said. One of them was Tyliek Dyches, 28, who joined the Department of Correction in June 2017 and worked on Rikers Island. Dyches said he learned that he’d been accepted by the NYPD on June 28 while vacationing in Miami, and he immediately headed to Rikers to empty out his locker when his flight home landed July 5. “My last day I...
    GREELEY, Colo. (CBS4)– A SWAT team helped Greeley police capture an escaped inmate. About 3:30 p.m. Thursday, officers surrounded an apartment on 30th Street by the Greeley Mall. Ramon Hetzel (credit: Dept. of Corrections) Ramon Hetzel was reportedly causing a disturbance. Officers discovered he had a felony escape warrant from the Department of Corrections. Police surrounded the building and tried to get him to surrender. Eventually, a SWAT team was called in to help get Hetzel to turn himself over to officers. Hetzel, 30, was taken into custody and booked into the Weld County Jail.
    More On: corrections officers DOC captain, NYC hit with wrongful death suit over inmate suicide Cooks, nurses guard inmates with US prisons down 6K officers DOC captain charged with homicide after instructing subordinates not to help hanged inmate NYC corrections officer sues to get gun back after bizarre crash incident Eight Texas jail guards who were fired or resigned after the in-custody death of a schizophrenic inmate will not face any state criminal charges, local reports said Tuesday. A grand jury in Collin County declined to indict the jailers in the March 14 death of Marvin Scott III, who was restrained, pepper-sprayed and covered with a spit mask, The Dallas Morning News reported. “After careful consideration of the applicable law and all the relevant facts we find the no probable cause exist to charge any person with a criminal offense related to the death of Mr. Scott,” the grand jury said in a statement. Possible charges could have ranged from misdemeanor assault to murder, according to KTVT. Scott’s death was ruled a homicide last month. A medical examiner found that the...
    CRESCENT CITY — The California Supreme Court declined a petition to examine and possibly throw out an appeals court’s decision to allow mayhem and assault charges against inmates in connection with a 2017 riot at the state’s most secure prison. The Supreme Court’s decision last week essentially upholds a March ruling by the First District Appellate Court, which found that mere participation in the May 2017 riot — not necessarily evidence of attacking and injuring guards — was enough to charge defendants with mayhem and assault on the corrections officers. The court found that given the “scope” and violent nature of the riot, “a person of ordinary prudence could have entertained a reasonable suspicion that mayhem, battery, and assault,” were “reasonably foreseeable” circumstances. Prosecutors in Del Norte County charges four men — all validated Mexican Mafia associates — with felony mayhem, battery, assault, torture, and misdemeanor charges of delaying or resisting a peace officer. A magistrate judge through out the case at the preliminary hearing, then rejected prosecutors’ attempts to re-file all but the torture counts, court records show. But...
    (CNN)New Jersey's only women's prison will close, Gov. Phil Murphy announced this week, following the release of a scathing independent report that detailed allegations of abuse against inmates. Corrections officers at Edna Mahan Correctional Facility for Women (EMCF) were accused of committing graphic acts of brutality against inmates on the night of January 11 in the report, commissioned by Murphy that month. Murphy said in light of the report's findings, the "only path forward is to responsibly close the facility." "While this will not happen overnight, I intend to work with legislative leadership during the current budget cycle to allocate funding to begin this multi-year process," he said in a prepared statement, urging the state's Department of Corrections (DOC) to implement reforms on body cameras and training, among other policies. Inmates will be transferred to a new facility or existing ones, Murphy said.Three New Jersey correctional officers charged after assault at a womens prisonLaw firm Lowenstein Sandler LLP conducted the investigation, led by former state comptroller and federal prosecutor Matthew Boxer. Read MoreThe report outlines a series of abuses that...
    (CNN)Two Bureau of Prisons guards who were on duty at the Metropolitan Correctional Center when Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide have entered into agreements with Manhattan prosecutors that could end the criminal case against them if they cooperate with an ongoing Department of Justice Inspector General review, authorities said Friday.In November 2019, the guards, Tova Noel and Michael Thomas, had pleaded not guilty to conspiracy and filing false records in connection with their actions the night Jeffrey Epstein died in prison.They will now provide "truthful information related to their employment by the Bureau of Prisons, including about the events and circumstances described in the Indictment," according to a letter from federal prosecutors that was filed in court papers Friday. The guards will also complete 100 hours of community service.They are due in court Tuesday for a judge to approve the agreement.CNN has reached out to lawyers representing Noel and Thomas.Read MoreNew York City's chief medical examiner ruled Epstein's August 10, 2019 death a suicide by hanging, though a former medical examiner hired by Epstein's legal team has disagreed with that...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — NYC Pride doesn’t want police at its events anymore, until at least 2025. The organization says effective immediately, it is banning corrections and law enforcement officers. READ MORE: COVID Vaccine In New Jersey: Vaccination Clinic For Children Ages 12 And Up Opens In Hoboken That includes at its signature Pride march, which is set to take place in June. The group says while law enforcement is meant to provide safety, they can sometimes be threatening and dangerous to their community. READ MORE: Israeli Airstrike In Gaza Destroys Building Housing Foreign Media The ban includes the Gay Officers Action League, or GOAL, which addresses the needs of LGBTQ officers. In a statement, GOAL said it “is disheartened by the decision,” adding the “abrupt about-face in order to placate some of the activists in our community is shameful.” MORE NEWS: Over A Third Of States Are Ending COVID-19 Mask Mandates A spokesperson for the NYPD also called it “disheartening” and said they’ll still be at the march to ensure traffic safety and good order.
    More On: department of corrections Accused killer mistakenly released from Rikers Island finally caught NYC corrections officer sues to get gun back after bizarre crash incident NYC corrections commissioner rushed to hospital Suspected killer on the loose after he’s mistakenly released from Rikers NYC Department of Correction Commissioner Cynthia Brann is set to resign by the end of the month, according to the union representing the city’s correction officers. Brann, who has served as commissioner for three-and-a-half years, is expected to work her last day in the role on May 31, according to the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association. Union president Benny Boscio issued a blistering statement early Tuesday, blasting the violence in city jails during Brann’s tenure and what he described as “gross mismanagement.” “Under her watch, Cynthia Brann presided over one of the darkest chapters in the history of our agency, marred by record levels of jail violence, including thousands of assaults on Correction Officers, the botched management of COVID-19 in the jails, resulting in the death of nine officers, and most recently, the gross mismanagement that has...
    A suspended Monmouth County Corrections officer faces criminal charges after shoplifting in West Long Branch, authorities said. Suzanne Simone, 53, of Ocean Township, a 22-year-veteran of the Monmouth County Correctional Institution in Freehold, has been charged with shoplifting, according to Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher J. Gramiccioni.  Simone is accused of skipping scanner  payments at a local home improvement store, Gramiccioni said.  In one instance, Simone was wearing her jail uniform while committing the theft, the prosecutor said. She scanned multiple smaller items, but skipped scanning larger items, or pretended to scan them before leaving the store without paying for them, Gramiccioni said. Of the stolen goods, the estimated value is $661, he said. Some of the stolen items were later recovered from her residence. Simone has been suspended from her job at the Monmouth County Jail. “No one is above the law,” Gramiccioni said.  “It is essential to our criminal justice system that officers maintain the public’s trust. This officer broke the law that she was sworn to uphold, all over a measly $600," Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden said, “Any member of law enforcement who violates their...
    Loading the player... A corrections officer in New York faces criminal charges after an inmate died by suicide under her watch. Read More: NY lawmakers introduce bill to ban fired officers from joining other departments ABC News reported Rebecca Hillman, 38, was charged with negligent homicide after Ryan Wilson took his own life at the Manhattan Detention Complex in November 2020. Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced the charges Monday, saying she showed a “callous disregard” for life. “The death of Ryan Wilson wasn’t just a tragedy — it was a crime,” Vance said according to the report. “Our investigation shows that Captain Hillman ordered her subordinates not to take potentially life-saving measures to help Mr. Wilson, and failed to call for medical assistance expediently.” He added, “This callous disregard for Mr. Wilson’s safety resulted in an irreversible loss to his family and friends, and must be held criminally accountable.” A Correction Department badge on an officer at the Vernon C. Bain Correctional Center at Rikers Island, in the Bronx. This is the only prison bardge in the US,...
    A New York City corrections captain is set to be charged after an inmate killed himself in his prison cell, according to reports.  Ryan Wilson, 29, died on November 22 last year at Manhattan Detention Complex, which is known as The Tombs.  Officers were accused of waiting 15 minutes to call for help despite seeing his body hanging from a noose.  Now Capt. Rebecca Hillman faces unspecified charges over his death, The New York Daily News reports.    She had already been suspended along with Correction Officer Oscar Rojo.  DailyMail.com has contacted the Department of Correction for comment.   Ryan Wilson and his sister Elayna. Ryan Wilson, 29, died on November 22 last year at Manhattan Detention Complex, which is known as The Tombs. Officers were accused of waiting 15 minutes to call for help despite seeing his body hanging from a noose A New York City corrections captain is set to be charged after an inmate killed himself in his prison cell. Ryan Wilson, 29, died on November 22 last year at Manhattan Detention Complex, which is known as The Tombs (stock...
    Loading the player... A new report filed by the New York Times found that out of roughly 270 corrections officers disciplined over a 20-month period, more than half either lied in their reports of incidents or filed them incompletely or inaccurately. According to the newspaper, about 56 percent of the more than 270 correction officers who were disciplined from January 2019 to August 2020, misled investigators who were looking into these incidents. 12 of these officers held supervisory positions. The data also found that at least 17 officers made false statements in interviews during official investigations. Read More: Black teenager attacked by corrections deputy Councilman Keith Powers, a Manhattan Democrat, said the data analyzed by the Times is indicative of a larger, systemic issue that “highlights how broken this process is.” He continued, “It’s a turning point to providing more visibility to an often invisible criminal justice system.” A Correction Department badge on an officer at the Vernon C. Bain Correctional Center at Rikers Island, in the Bronx. This is the only prison bardge in the US, and is...
    PORTSMOUTH — A former Scioto County Sheriff’s Office corrections officer has been indicted on felony charges for his role in the death of a jail inmate. Billy Thompson was indicted by a Scioto County grand jury Friday, April 16, on charges of murder, an unclassified felony; voluntary manslaughter, a felony of the first degree; and reckless homicide, a felony of the third degree. If convicted, Thompson could get 15 years to life in prison. Bailey, a 56-year-old from Portsmouth, died after a May 26 altercation with officers. He died at a Columbus hospital that following Monday, his autopsy revealing “complications of blunt force trauma to his head, neck and torso,” to be the causes of death and was investigated by the BCI as a homicide. Bailey’s sister Karen Skaggs has been trying to get justice for her brother ever since that May 26 incident and said she will be in the courtroom Tuesday. “The Ohio Attorney General’s Office contacted me about it,” Skaggs said. “I will definitely be there.” On June 4, 2020, the Daily Times reported on the...
    Taco bout trouble. Two corrections officers in Maryland have been accused of driving into a Taco Bell following a feud with employees last week. On Tuesday, the Charles County Sheriff's Office announced the arrest of Tanesha Renea Williams and Diamond Shanay Johnson in connection with the crime. TACO BELL AIMS TO HIRE 5K PEOPLE FROM OUTDOOR HIRING PARTIES On March 31, just before 10:30 p.m., a suspect argued with a drive-thru worker at a Taco Bell in Waldorf. Then, the would-be customer allegedly exited the vehicle, assaulted the employee and got back inside the car. From there, the silver sedan drove around to the front of the restaurant, where a group of people had gathered. Those on foot screamed at the car, before the driver reversed and accelerated forward, knocking the people to the ground and shattering the chain’s glass entrance on impact. Footage of the frightening sight has been viewed over 140,000 times since it hit Twitter. After the crash, the driver fled the scene, NBC Washington reports. Authorities responded to restaurant, and several people were treated for injuries that did not appear...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Three Baltimore Central Booking and Intake corrections officers are accused of assault and misconduct charges this week, with one accused of choking an inmate who refused their orders until she went unconscious. A Baltimore City grand jury indicted Correctional Officer II Zanel Santana, Correctional Officer Sergeant Monyette Washington and Correctional Officer II Uchenna Okeke. READ MORE: Anne Arundel County Police Launch Community Engagement Website Ahead Of Body-Worn Camera Program All three work for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. According to the indictment, on June 14, 2019, all three were on duty and working at the Baltimore Central Booking and Intake Center when video surveillance caught Washington, at around 4:16 p.m., respond to the 3 North Building Location when she was told a detainee was refusing to go back to their housing unit. The indictment claims Washington saw the detainee was inside of a vestibule on the floor and was refusing to go back to the unit. The detainee was allegedly asked several times by Washington to go back, however allegedly, the detainee refused....
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