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    Clinton, who lost the 2016 presidential election to Donald Trump, has previously served as a senator from the state of New York and as the Secretary of State under President Barack Obama. "She is already in an advantageous position to become the 2024 Democratic nominee. She is an experienced national figure who is younger than Mr. Biden and can offer a different approach from the disorganized and unpopular one the party is currently taking," Stein and Schoen contend. From @WSJopinion: If Democrats want a fighting chance at winning the presidency in 2024, Hillary Clinton is likely their best option, write @DouglasESchoen and Andrew Steinhttps://on.wsj.com/3nho0Aj — The Wall Street Journal (@The Wall Street Journal) 1641942603
    More millennials are writing their wills in case they die unexpectedly in recent years than ever before and many are citing COVID-19 as the reason.  More than 30 per cent of adults under the age of 35 cited the COVID-19 pandemic as a reason for wanting to get their affairs in order, a 2020 LegalZoom and Caring.com survey found, causing an almost 10 per cent increase in 18 to 34-year-olds having wills. Only 18 per cent of 18 to 34-year-olds had wills in 2019, compared to 27 per cent in 2021. There was a decline in 2020, with only 17 per cent of young adults investing in estate planning.  The number of millennials who have wills has spiked almost 10 per cent in two years, with many citing the COVID-19 pandemic as their reasoning  More than 30 per cent of adults under the age of 35 cited the pandemic as their reasoning, as many worry about family members becoming ill. With breakthrough cases and people of all ages succumbing to the virus, more people are organizing their affairs (pictured: stock...
    Elizabeth Holmes tried to appeal to Rupert Murdoch to ask him to stop the Wall Street Journal from publishing its expose revealing Theranos' alleged fraud, prosecutors told the court on Tuesday. Her trial also heard how the former CEO's lavish lifestyle and hunger for fame fueled the fraud. The 37-year-old's reputation as a high flying successful tech CEO began to unravel, as did her luxury lifestyle of private jets, high end hotels and a team of assistants to serve her every whim, after the WSJ began investigating Theranos in 2015. Seemingly panicked, Holmes turned directly to newspaper's owner Murdoch. In a 2015 email, she appeals to the News Corp's chairman to ask him to squash the articles suggesting Theranos' devices were flawed and inaccurate, and reminding him that he had recently invested $125 million in her company.   Court sketch of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes during cross examination on Tuesday  Prosecutors also argued that the hunger for fame and fortune were behind Holmes' decision to commit fraud Holmes' email included an attachment of a briefing document sent by her attorney David Boies...
    On Tuesday, Aaron Rodgers told Pat McAfee he was suffering from Covid toe. On Wednesday, the Wall Street Journal reported Rodgers was suffering from Covid toe. Wednesday afternoon, Rodgers insisted he does NOT have Covid toe. “That’s actually called DISINFORMATION when you perpetuate false information about an individual. I have a fractured toe, so I expect a full apology,” Rodgers said of the Covid toe report. Aaron Rodgers was clearly waiting for the COVID-toe question because you can hear him say, “I don’t know if I have room to get my toe up there,” at the start of his press conference. Here’s his full answer about his fractured toe — with said toe on the screen. pic.twitter.com/hoC2UZTxME — Rob Demovsky (@RobDemovsky) November 24, 2021 Rodgers sent football fans and the media into a frenzy Tuesday afternoon after he discussed the toe injury during his weekly interview on SiriusXM. “I felt good in just a few days and didn’t have any lingering effects, other than the Covid toe,” Rodgers said. The comment was followed by...
    Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers called out the Wall Street Journal for erroneously stating he’s dealing with COVID toe right now.  Just what in the heck is going on with Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers? On Wednesday morning, the Wall Street Journal dropped a concerning report, claiming that the star signal-caller was dealing with ‘COVID toe’ after he tested positive for the virus. Well, not so fast. During his media session with reporters, Rodgers not only called out the Wall Street Journal for ‘disinformation,’ but he also showed on camera that he’s actually got a broken toe. Goodness. “I have a fractured toe.” pic.twitter.com/DFJJ1OF7LC — Matt Schneidman (@mattschneidman) November 24, 2021 Aaron Rodgers COVID toe was a fake story according to the quarterback This is the world we live in now, huh? Rodgers indeed tested positive two weeks ago and had to miss the team’s contest against the Kansas City Chiefs. They went on to lose that game, with Jordan Love playing terribly. Rodgers was able to get back on the field to power Green Bay over the...
    The Change.org effort, "End Thanksgiving Insult to Native Americans," which was started by Randy Kritkausky, has more than 50,000 signatures and calls on the Journal to censor the account from Morton and Bradford about what the Pilgrims faced because it "is full of disdain and racism towards indigenous people." From the petition:The passage includes lines such as, “What could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men?" The pilgrim writes that they were separate from “all the civil parts of the world."The Wampanoag indigenous people saved the colonists from starvation and death, a story that our nation now celebrates as Thanksgiving. But even more than this disturbing lack of gratitude is the notion that there were no civilized people in the Americas. This world view generated centuries of genocidal practices that eliminated 90% of the indigenous population, my ancestors.And indigenous people are still experiencing lethal prejudice. Just this year we learned about more than 1,300 unmarked graves at residential schools in Canada. We know that thousands of indigenous children died of abuse, neglect...
                      by Conrad Black  President Trump’s October 28 letter to the Wall Street Journal detailing some of his complaints about the 2020 election and the Journal’s editorial comment on it the following day clearly reveal the shortcomings of both sides of this argument. But the important thing to note is that there are two sides to the argument over the legitimacy of the 2020 presidential election result. The prolonged and intensive effort in which the Wall Street Journal has eagerly participated, to suppress and throttle the merest suggestion of illegitimacy surrounding the 2020 election result, has failed. It has always been understandable why there would be a great body of opinion that would wish to suppress any consideration of the question. It is a sobering and demoralizing thing to imagine that the vastly important process of choosing the president of the United States could possibly be an erroneous or even a fraudulent process. But an election where there are more than 40 million ballots that are cast by people other than those who allegedly voted and where, in places, the apparent...
    On Thursday's edition of CNN's "OutFront," national security analyst Juliette Kayyem tore into Republicans and GOP-leaning institutions for legitimizing former President Donald Trump's election lies and incitement of violence — as the Wall Street Journal did by running a lie-filled letter to the editor from the former president. "Reading what the Wall Street Journal editorial board put out today, there was a strong point-by-point fact check of the president's claims," said anchor Poppy Harlow. "They could have done that in tandem. If they're going to publish what the president says, they could have done it in real time. Big picture, what does this do to those who believe the lies?" "This is what is so outrageous about what the Wall Street Journal did," said Kayyem. "To quote the president gives a fleece vest to this radicalization. That's what the Wall Street Journal has done. You have to think about what radicalization is. You need your army. That's what Tucker is doing. Then you need people to forgive the army, saying they're not that bad. This is a perfect storm we're...
    (CNN Business)The Wall Street Journal's Opinion section published a lengthy letter to the editor from Donald Trump on Wednesday that was full of the former US president's debunked claims and conspiratorial falsehoods about the election he lost last year.One day later, the Journal's editorial board justified the decision by saying "we trust our readers to make up their own minds about his statement."Former Journal staffers said the letter fell far short of the publication's standards. And some current staffers expressed frustration on condition of anonymity. The Journal's opinion operation is separate from the newsroom — and sometimes downright oppositional toward the news side. But both are part of Rupert Murdoch's cherished newspaper, which is a key part of the News Corp portfolio.Several Journal reporters grumbled about the letter after it came out on Wednesday, but none were surprised it was published, given the Opinion section's right-wing and contrarian bent.Read More"I think it's very disappointing that our opinion section continues to publish misinformation that our news side works so hard to debunk," one of the reporters said. "They should hold themselves...
    (CNN)The fevered huckster pitch -- "And so much more!" -- in the final paragraph is a dead giveaway. The ball of confusion published Wednesday without apparent fact-checking as a letter to the editor in the Wall Street Journal is a genuine product of Donald Trump's mind. And it shows that he's all-in on his deceptions and fully committed to the cause of undermining our democracy. Michael D'AntonioSomeday the experts will complete the analysis of the former president's public derangement, but for now the best we can do is note when it takes a dramatic turn. In this case he has dumped out a grab bag of misinformation, innuendo and outright lies to insist, nearly a year after the fact, that "the election was rigged, which you, unfortunately, still haven't figured out."It is a classic Trump technique. Insist that his funhouse reality is real and then insult those who won't agree. It's notable here that he's addressing the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal, which is so indulgent of extreme right-wing opinions that last year 280 newsroom employees signed a...
    They didn't mention if the letter was written with a golf pencil. Lasts Sunday, the Wall Street Journal ran an opinion piece endorsing the Republican candidate for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. The entire article takes and an extremely pro-Trump position, arguing that the Pennsylvania court did not “defend the law as it is written” when it allowed counting of votes that were delayed in the mail due to the pandemic. It insists that the court should never have allowed those 10,097 votes to count—even if they were kept segregated from the rest of the votes. But in the midst of this editorial, the Journal admits: “This didn’t matter because Mr. Biden won the state by 80,555.” That admission of basic facts was far too much for the Wall Street Journal editorial board’s favorite person. On Wednesday, the WSJ published a “letter to the editor” from Donald Trump. [Link purposely omitted.] As might be expected, that letter contains a laundry list of lies that have been roundly disproven time and time again. In fact, most of them are claims that never had any basis in reality to...
    (CNN)On Wednesday, the Wall Street Journal opinion's section posted a lengthy letter from Donald Trump in which the former president repeatedly pushed conspiracy theories about the 2020 election in Pennsylvania."Well actually, the election was rigged, which you, unfortunately, still haven't figured out," Trump wrote at the top of his op-ed, insisting -- contra facts -- that he actually won the state of Pennsylvania.Before we go any further, let's revisit what happened in Pennsylvania in 2020.Joe Biden won 3,461,221 to Trump's 3,379,055, according to the Almanac of American Politics. That's a margin of 82,166 votes.Which is close! Read MoreAnd the closeness of that result led Trump to make several attempts in the wake of the election to have courts step in. A federal judge dismissed Trump's lawsuit in November 2020, writing: "One might expect that when seeking such a startling outcome, a plaintiff would come formidably armed with compelling legal arguments and factual proof of rampant corruption. That has not happened." Around that same time, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court rejected an attempt by Trump's campaign to stop the counting of some...
    Former President Donald Trump wrote a letter to the editor to The Wall Street Journal to complain that a newspaper editorial didn't say the 2020 presidential election was 'rigged.'  In a letter published by The Journal on Wednesday, Trump took offense that a WSJ editorial backing Pennsylvania Republican state Supreme Court nominee Judge Kevin Brobson said that now President Joe Biden 'won the state by 80,555.' 'Well actually, the election was rigged, which you, unfortunately, still haven't figured out,' Trump told The Journal.  Former President Donald Trump wrote a letter to the editor of The Wall Street Journal, which the newspaper published Wednesday, complaining that the outlet didn't agree with him that the presidential election was 'rigged'  The ex-president laid out a number of conspiracy theories that are part of the so-called 'big lie' including that the Keystone State processed '10,515 mail-in votes from people who do not exist on the Pennsylvania voter rolls at all.'   Trump also accused his Attorney General BIll Barr of pressuring U.S. Attorney Bill McSwain not to investigate election irregularities.   'And so much more! This is why...
                      by Andrew Trunsky  The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board said that a Democratic effort to crack down on tax cheating would give the Treasury Department access to almost every American’s bank account. The Thursday op-ed focused on a proposal that would require financial institutions to report individual accounts containing at least $10,000 to the IRS. That effort, the board wrote, would affect the vast majority of Americans who did not exclusively use cash to make purchases and pay bills. “The details are murky, but most Americans could still get ensnared in this dragnet unless they pay bills and buy goods in cash,” the editorial board wrote. “Democrats say banks will only have to report total annual inflows and outflows, not discrete transactions. But nearly all Americans spend more than $10,000 a year.” “The real political goal here is to create a mechanism for triggering audits—probably through an algorithm—so the IRS can rifle through all of a taxpayer’s business and other financial records,” the board added. Democrats say that the proposal is necessary to crack...
    Instagram is denying reports that the app is harmful to the mental health of young girls, despite the social media giant pausing the development of Instagram Kids just a few weeks after such incriminatory claims surfaced. The Wall Street Journal, citing a review of internal company documents that included research reports, online employee discussions and drafts of presentations to senior management, said that researchers at Instagram’s parent company Facebook have identified 'the platform's ill effects,' but failed to fix them. The most damaging and widely reported claim centered on a statistic showing Instagram made a third of teenage girls surveyed feel worse about their body image. Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, wrote in a Twitter post Monday that this will allow the company time to "work with parents, experts, policymakers and regulators, to listen to their concerns, and to demonstrate the value and importance of this project for younger teens online today." Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, appeared on an episode of the TODAY show this morning to address the Wall Street Journal's claims and the pause of...
    Andy Jassy, ​​CEO of Amazon. Archive.Europa Press It would mean a new advance for Amazon in the physical sales space, after the opening of bookstores and supermarkets It’s unclear which brands Amazon will offer in these stores, though the company’s branded products are expected to feature prominently. Amazon plans to open a series of large physical stores in the United States that will operate in a similar way to department stores to boost sales of clothing, household goods and electronics of the e-commerce giant founded by Jeff Bezos, sources familiar with the situation told ‘The Wall Street Journal’. The plan, which would represent a new step for the pioneer of online commerce in the physical sales space, after the opening of bookstores and supermarkets, contemplates that Amazon’s first department stores are located in Ohio and California. Amazon Prime products in physical store The new commercial spaces will have an area of ​​slightly less than 3,000 square meters, smaller than most department stores, which normally occupy about 10,000 square meters, and will offer articles from the main consumer...
    Staff at a publishing giant whose owner unexpectedly left his $1.2billion empire to a worker he was in a relationship with said they 'all knew' about the fling.  M Richard 'Dick' Robinson Jr's long-term relationship with staffer Iole Lucchese was an open secret among staff at Scholastic - which has now been passed onto Lucchese, who is Scholastic's chief strategy officer. A source told People magazine: 'We all knew,' the source added, especially since Lucchese - who is Scholastic's chair of the board, executive vice president and president of Scholastic Entertainment - was respected in the office because she worked there for 30 years and had Robinson's ear. M Richard 'Dick' Robinson Jr died on June 5 aged 84 after collapsing while on a walk in Martha's Vineyard with his son.He left the company to Scholastic's chief strategy officer Iole Lucchese. She alsoinherited all his personal possessions, which was unpredicted to Robinson's family but 'no surprise' to company employees.   The owner of $1.2billion Scholastic Corp M Richard 'Dick' Robinson Jr (left) died suddenly at age 84 and left the company to Iole Lucchese...
    The owner of $1.2BILLION Scholastic Corp. - which publishes books like 'Clifford the Big Red Dog' and 'Magic Schoolbus' - died suddenly in early June and shockingly left the company to a past flame who works in the company.  M. Richard Robinson Jr., who died suddenly on June 5 during a walk in Martha's Vineyard, left the the company to Iole Lucchese, the company's strategy officer; not either of his sons, siblings or ex-wife, The Wall Street Journal reported She also inherited all his personal possessions, according to the The Wall Street Journal, which reviewed the 2018 will that outlined the succession plan, which family members are reportedly unhappy about.   Family members and former colleagues said Robinson, 84, and Luccesse, 54, it was an open secret that they were in a longtime romantic relationship, but said they believed the couple broke up years ago.  Robison said in his 2018 will that Lucchese, who has been with the company for more than three decades, is 'my partner and closest friend.'  Scholastic Corp. publishes some of most-well known titles like 'Harry Potter,' 'Clifford,' 'Magic...
                        Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed former Michigan Supreme Court Justice Stephen Markman to the newsmakers line to discuss the elements of his recent Wall Street Journal article addressing gerrymandering in the state. Leahy: Steve Markman is now on the phone. He’s with Hillsdale College and he had an article about, now let’s see if I got this right. I’ve said gerrymandering, I think maybe technically it’s gerrymandering, but Steve, welcome to The Tennessee Star Report. Markman: But I think most people use gerrymandering, but I don’t think either way is any big problem. Leahy: What is the correct pronunciation, Jerry or Gerry? Markman: Well, I thought Gerry was the name of the great founder whom the term has been named, but I don’t know. Leahy: Exactly. Either is acceptable. I think you’re right. I think the founder who found this was...
    Federal prosecutors subpoenaed materials related to the production of Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s book “American Crisis” last month, according to a Monday report from the Wall Street Journal. Prosecutors assigned to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York subpoenaed emails and pitch materials related to Cuomo’s book as part of their ongoing probe into the Cuomo’s March 2020 executive order directing nursing homes to accept patients infected with COVID-19 into their facilities, according to the Wall Street Journal. Federal prosecutors have subpoenaed material related to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s 2020 memoir and are interested in its coverage of nursing homes as part of a widening probe into Covid-19 deaths in New York nursing homes, people familiar with the matter said https://t.co/m2nTfs0MGs — The Wall Street Journal (@WSJ) June 7, 2021 Cuomo’s administration later pressured New York State Health Department officials to underreport the actual number of nursing home residents that died from COVID-19 in a July 2020 report. Cuomo signed a $5.1 million dollar book deal with Penguin Random House in October 2020 for the...
    Graduating seniors of the class of 2020 wait to go up on stage while maintaining social distance in Jefferson Township, PA. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images High school graduation rates are expected to fall at US public schools this year, the Wall Street Journal reported.  While this year's data is not yet available, early projections point to what will likely be the first decline in ten years.  Students, educators, and health professionals cite difficulties with remote learning, social isolation, and mental health.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. High school graduation rates are expected to decline this year as a result of the pandemic's impact on education and teenage mental health.  The graduation rate among high school seniors at US public schools in 2019-2020 school year was 86% and has been on the rise for the past 10 years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. While 2020-2021 data is not yet available, early projections indicate a coming percentage drop, with students and educators citing the challenges of remote learning and social isolation.  According...
    In this article NKELionel Bonaventure | Getty ImagesNike's partnership with soccer superstar Neymar da Silva Santos Jr. — better known simply as Neymar — came to an end last year because of a sexual assault investigation launched by the company that involved the player and an employee, The Wall Street Journal reported late Thursday. The company announced last summer it had parted ways with Neymar, but had not given a reason for the sudden move. According to the report, Neymar's contract with Nike still had eight more years remaining. The report, which cites people familiar with the matter and reviewed documents, said the company was investigating an allegation that the Brazil native had sexually assaulted a female employee. A spokeswoman for Neymar told the WSJ he denies the allegations. The complaint was filed to Nike in 2018, the report said. In 2019, the company hired outside council to carry out an investigation. Nike later decided to stop featuring Neymar in its marketing, the report added. Nike did not immediately respond to CNBC's request for comment. In 2017, Neymar left Spanish...
    Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images The Wall Street Journal editorial board came to the defense of Liz Cheney, with her expulsion from House GOP leadership expected next week. Cheney has been one of the most outspoken Republicans calling out former President Donald Trump’s big lie about the 2020 election. Intra-party friction has spilled into the public, with House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy’s comments about dissatisfaction with Cheney in the conference (not to mention his hot mic comments going after Cheney himself). The Journal editorial board writes that McCarthy clearly knows Cheney is right and that the election wasn’t stolen. “Yet Mr. Trump wants an endorsement of his stolen claim to be a litmus test for every Republican candidate. He’s the one who wants to refight his losing campaign,” it reads. The editorial says Cheney “may be ousted because she is daring to tell the truth to GOP voters—and at personal political risk,” and “purging” her for that would just “diminish the party.” The piece warns Republicans about looking “foolish” if they keep re-litigating the 2020 election based on Trump’s nonsense....
    An internationally-renowned cartoonist has died of a brain haemorrhage - shortly before his wife recovered from a heart attack which their family claim was caused by the tragedy. Father-of-three Rod McKie, 63, died on March 26, a few days after suffering a stroke. Mr McKie had his first cartoon published in 1980, and was the youngest ever person to have a cartoon published in Punch magazine.  His widow Lis McKie, 62 - who he met in school 48 years ago - had a heart attack soon after.  The couple's daughter Kim Paton, 33, said her mother's 'heart is struggling as a result of his death'. She said Mrs McKie is 'alone for the first time ever' and has found it 'overwhelming'. Father-of-three Rod McKie, 63, (pictured) died from a brain haemorrhage on March 26 a few days after suffering a stroke Self-taught Mr McKie, from Gracemount, Edinburgh, scribbled gag cartoons at school.  His work later appeared in The Sun, the Wall Street Journal, Playboy and the Harvard Business Review. Cancer survivor Mr McKie died at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh and his family...
    This noise is tightening on the owners of restaurants, fitness centers and other small businesses in the United States who are trying to hold on until the economy fully reopens. Unlike most large businesses, the burden is often deeply personal. Townsend Vents borrowed money from his family to open his first gourmet restaurant in Philadelphia in 2014. The cook exploited the shares in his house, erased any resemblance to the pension account, and embezzled college funds for his daughter in his business. About 1.5 million personal investment is now pending. The epidemic has closed its five bases again and again for some parts of the year. In addition, the 53-year-old Mr. Vents holds a personal warranty on a site that is responsible for about 40 540,000 rents over five years and an additional 5,000 175,000 for a liquor license. Mr Weintz hangs on to the co-worker as he handles phone bills, tax obligations, lease payments and other expenses. “It’s like trying to stand in the quicksand,” he said. He hopes all his restaurants will reopen this month. Small business...
    Anil Dash, The Atlantic Before the term NFT or non-fungible token became mainstream, the idea of a blockchain-backed system for verifying digital art was meant to be a means of asserting ownership rather than making a profit. Glitch CEO Anil Dash hatched the idea for a system with an artist in 2014, and he explains how the idea of giving creators power over their creation “has yielded a lot of commercially exploitable hype.”  Charles Holmes, The Ringer We’re three weeks into Marvel’s second high-profile series for Disney+, and so far the studio is delivering everything fans could hope for. The showrunner and director of The Falcon and the Winter Solider discuss how the series grapples with the fact that a beloved hero is gone and his shield has been passed to someone else. Christopher Mims, The Wall Street Journal Computer chips have been using silicon for over 70 years, but as computational power gains begin to slow down, the material could soon be replaced by, or at least combined with, other options. The Wall Street Journal explains how things...
    The Wall Street Journal, owned by billionaire Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp., is banning its reporters from using the term “illegal immigrant” and “illegal” to refer to illegal aliens living in the United States. This week, in an update its style guide, the Journal states that while it will allow reporters to continue using the term “illegal immigration” to describe the process of illegal aliens arriving and staying in the U.S., it will no longer permit reporters to describe individuals as “illegal” or “illegal immigrant” in an effort to stop “labeling people.” The Journal style guide revisions now state: Illegal immigration describes the actions of people who cross borders illegally or remain in a country after their legal right to stay has expired. Use illegal to refer only to an act, not to a person or people: illegal immigration, but not illegal immigrant(s). When describing a broad category of immigrants, use alternatives such as immigrants who entered the country illegally … people living in the U.S. unlawfully or without the legal right…. When needed, the phrase lacking permanent legal status is accurate shorthand covering both those in the country illegally and those with...
    (CNN)In a phone call to the Georgia secretary of state's office in December, then-President Donald Trump urged a top investigator to find fraud in the 2020 presidential election, telling her that she would be "praised" for overturning results that were in favor of Joe Biden, according to newly reported audio of the call obtained by The Wall Street Journal.The report is the latest example of Trump's extraordinary efforts to influence Georgia election officials as they certified the results, even though there is no evidence of widespread fraud in the election. Trump's actions have drawn the attention of Georgia's Republican secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, as well as a Fulton County prosecutor who has launched a criminal investigation."When the right answer comes out, you'll be praised," Trump tells Frances Watson, the chief investigator at the Georgia secretary of state's office, in a six-minute conversation on December 23, according to the Journal."I won everything but Georgia. And I won Georgia, I know that. By a lot. And the people know it. And something happened there. Something bad happened," Trump reportedly told Watson...
    Washington (CNN)Russia's intelligence agencies have been working to undermine confidence in the development, safety and efficacy of two of the coronavirus vaccines being used in the US, The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday. Citing conversations with US officials, the Journal said Russia is making use of online publications to wage the disinformation campaign, with one State Department official identifying four outlets that have "served as fronts" for the effort. Though the newspaper noted that the outlets' readership is small, the sites "played up the vaccines' risk of side effects, questioned their efficacy, and said the US had rushed the Pfizer vaccine through the approval process, among other false or misleading claims." "We can say these outlets are directly linked to Russian intelligence services," the State Department official told the Journal. "They're all foreign-owned, based outside of the United States. They vary a lot in their reach, their tone, their audience, but they're all part of the Russian propaganda and disinformation ecosystem."The campaign comes as the US and other countries race to vaccinate people using three vaccines developed in record time...
    Drew Angerer/Getty Images Former President Donald Trump hit back at the Editorial Board of The Wall Street Journal, as well as Senator Mitch McConnell and the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) in a scathing public statement released on Thursday. Using the fiery rhetoric familiar to those who followed his now-suspended Twitter account, the former President followed his time-honored “best defense is a good offense” strategy, with a dash of Roy Cohn’s “hit back ten times harder” in this statement. Trump’s ire appears to have been raised by a column published Tuesday by the WSJ Editorial board that mocked the former President’s “grievances” and ridiculed CPAC enthusiasts who continue to prioritize Trump’s personal complaints over a Republican agenda. WSJ noted that under Trump, the Republican party lost control of the White House, the House, and the Senate and criticized the GOP for focusing on Trump’s grievances: Mr. Trump said Sunday that he won’t form a third party because it would divide the center-right coalition and elect Democrats. But he also laid out his political enemies list and is clearly bent on revenge against anyone...
    A 90-year old Los Angeles resident has taken out two quarter-page newspaper ads to tell AT&T's CEO that his internet service is too slow.  Aaron Epstein spent $10,000 for the two ads to be featured in two separate editions of The Wall Street Journal on February 3 - despite friends and family urging him to use social media to get his message out.  But Epstein - who has been an AT&T customer since 1960 - does not have Twitter or Facebook, and decided to take a more old fashioned approach in order to get the attention of the telecommunication company's boss, John T. Stankey.  Epstein settled on taking out an ad in the Dallas, Texas edition of The Wall Street Journal, where the company is based.  He also placed an ad in the New York City edition of the same publication, hoping it would attract the attention of investors.   Aaron Epstein spent $10,000 on two quarter-page newspaper ads telling AT&T's CEO that his internet service is too slow Epstein's open letter (pictured above) was published in both the Dallas...
    Before the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump beat some experts’ economic expectations and pursued policies that kicked the American economy into gear. During Trump’s four-year tenure as president, the American economy saw levels of growth and employment that beat the expectations of some economic experts in academia and government. Trump’s tax cuts, deregulation, and other economic policies helped business confidence soar, and led to larger disposable incomes for America’s poor and middle class before the coronavirus pandemic. Based on then-candidate Trump’s policy proposals during the 2016 campaign, economic optimism quickly set in before Trump was inaugurated. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) Business Confidence Index quickly saw business confidence in the United States shoot up to match Obama-era highs. The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Small Business Optimism Index, which hit just over 100 only one time before during the Obama years, increased 10 points to nearly reach 106 in December 2016. Outgoing US President Donald Trump waves as he boards Marine One at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2021. (Photo by MANDEL...
    A view of the Exxon Mobil refinery in Baytown, Texas.Jessica Rinaldi | Reuters Shares of Exxon slipped more than 5% on Friday after The Wall Street Journal reported that the Securities and Exchange Commission opened an investigation into the oil giant over how it valued a key asset in the oil-rich Permian Basin. The whistleblower complaint, filed by an employee, alleged that Exxon pushed staff toward inaccurate forecasts including the rate at which wells could come online, according to the Journal, which reviewed a copy of the complaint. The report follows a difficult year for Exxon, and the oil and gas industry more broadly. In December, Exxon said that it will write down the value of its assets by up to $20 billion in the fourth quarter. With the pandemic wreaking havoc on oil prices in 2020, Exxon underwent an aggressive cost-cutting strategy, including reducing its workforce. Wall Street analysts believe that some of these initiatives will ultimately pay off, and have recently become bullish on the stock. Barclays upgraded the stock to an overweight rating on Thursday, saying "a...
    Monday, FNC’s Tucker Carlson reacted to the backlash Wall Street Journal op-ed writer Joseph Epstein has faced for an article he penned last week questioning the credential of future first lady Jill Biden. Carlson agreed with Epstein and likened the “doctor” moniker associated with Jill Biden to that associated with soft drink Dr. Pepper and disgraced entertainer Dr. Bill Cosby. Partial transcript as follows: CARLSON: Well, one of the hallmarks of a third-world autocracy is you absolutely cannot under any circumstances make fun of the fake titles of the people in charge give themselves. The Wall Street Journal the other day, broke that rule, and they raised the question, Dr. Jill Biden? What is she a doctor of? We will tell you what happened next. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) WHOOPI GOLDBERG, HOST, “THE VIEW”: I’m hoping Dr. Jill becomes the Surgeon General. Joe Biden’s wife because she’s — you know, he would never do it, but she thinks — yes, she’s a hell of a doctor. (END VIDEO CLIP) CARLSON: Yes, Jill Biden is one hell of a doctor says Karen....
    Dr. Jill Biden introduces her husband, then-Democratic candidate Joe Biden, at campaign event Sept. 30, 2020 in Cleveland, Ohio. Unfortunately, the incoming first lady is not exempt from the rudimentary chauvinism applied liberally to women with careers. Most predictably, Wall Street Journal writer Joseph Epstein penned a now-viral op-ed, “Is There a Doctor in the White House? Not if You Need an M.D.” In it, he argued Dr. Jill Biden shouldn’t be respected as a doctor because she didn’t attend medical school. “Madame First Lady—Mrs. Biden—Jill—kiddo:“ he began in the ode to sexism, “a bit of advice on what may seem like a small but I think is a not unimportant matter. Any chance you might drop the ‘Dr.’ before your name? ’Dr. Jill Biden’ sounds and feels fraudulent, not to say a touch comic.” He went on to mock Dr. Biden for earning a doctorate of education and called “unpromising” the title of her dissertation, “Student Retention at the Community College Level: Meeting Students’ Needs.”   Worse yet, the Wall Street Journal's editorial page editor Paul Gigot backed Epstein's piece on Sunday and criticized Dr. Biden’s media team for...
    Bitcoin (BTC) front page of the Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal is one of the world references in terms of financial market analysis, but until then, he had not turned his gaze to Bitcoin. However, the Traders’ Bible has changed course: it published yesterday a graph of the BTC price, with an analysis of the reasons that propelled cryptocurrency to its all-time high: #Bitcoin front page of the Wall Street Journal ???? pic.twitter.com/wD7TUuMcTp – WebbDesignz (@DesignzWebb) November 23, 2020 The Wall Street Journal recalls that Bitcoin has taken more than 50% nothing than over the last month : a performance unmatched in the world of traditional finance. ???? Read our tutorial: How to buy Bitcoin (BTC)? Discover BTC on Binance » The institutions behind this breakthrough? Regarding the reasons for this craze, the publication indicates that the arrival of major investors could have allowed the BTC to explode. Renowned investors Paul Tudor Jones and Stanley Druckenmiller have both expressed their enthusiasm for cryptocurrency. The latter had even explained: “Frankly, if the gold...
            by Chuck Ross  An English-language newspaper controlled by the Chinese Communist Party’s propaganda department paid U.S. media companies nearly $2 million for printing and advertising expenses over the past six months, even amid heightened scrutiny over Beijing’s disinformation efforts in the West. China Daily paid The Wall Street Journal more than $85,000 and the Los Angeles Times $340,000 for advertising campaigns between May and October 2020, according to a disclosure that the propaganda mill filed this week with the Justice Department under the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). China Daily also paid Foreign Policy magazine $100,000, The Financial Times, a U.K.-based newspaper, $223,710, and $132,046 to the Canadian outlet Globe & Mail for advertising campaigns, according to the filing. The Beijing-based outlet paid several newspaper companies a total of $1,154,666 for printing costs, including $110,000 to the Los Angeles Times, $92,000 to The Houston Chronicle and $76,000 to The Boston Globe. Overall, China Daily spent more than $4.4 million on printing, distribution, advertising and administration expenses over the past six months, according to the FARA filing. China...
    Drew Angerer/Getty Images The Wall Street Journal editorial board shot down President Donald Trump’s claims that the election was rigged in Joe Biden’s favor, explaining why the allegations are unlikely. In its most recent article on Tuesday, the editorial board wrote, “President Trump has so far been unwilling to concede to Joe Biden, and his latest argument is that the voting machines must have been rigged,” before questioning, “Where’s the evidence?” “Strong claims need strong proof, not rumors and innuendo on Twitter,” they declared. The board then ran through the rigging allegations, which largely center around electronic voting company Dominion Voting, and pointed out why the claims are either unlikely or make no sense at all. The article ruled, “so far there’s no good evidence of voting problems that would come close to Mr. Biden’s lead of 73,000 votes in Pennsylvania or 145,000 in Michigan,” adding, “If Georgia’s recount doesn’t find big irregularities, then these claims should be put to rest.” “In the George W. Bush years, the conspiratorial left focused on Diebold, a maker of electronic voting machines. It...
    The thing about “fake news” is that it suddenly seems authentic when it’s on your side. For all of President Trump’s attacks on the “enemy of the people”--and some criticism from the Bernie Sanders wing that derides the corporate-controlled media--nonpartisan journalists can still be useful in the role of umpire. And that’s why the president, and politicians of all stripes, try to orchestrate favorable coverage, especially on controversial issues. This enables them to point to a news story as validation of whatever political charge they’re hurling at the moment. Such stories give their rhetoric a certain gravitas, a patina of credibility. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP But--and here’s the rub--nowhere near as much as in the past. A huge swath of the country no longer trusts the elite media, which has been battered by Trumpian attacks as well as their own increasingly blatant biases and blunders. Many people no longer believe the fact-checkers will deliver the facts. Many reflexively dismiss a story in the New York Times or Washington Post, no matter how well-documented, as trash because...
    Before the New York Post broke the story about Hunter Biden’s alleged laptop, Trump allies and one of Hunter Biden’s business partners, met with a Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reporter to discuss a similar story, The New York Times (NYT) reported. Wall Street Journal reporter Michael Bender reportedly met with White House lawyer Eric Herschmann, former White House counsel Stefan Passantino and Arthur Schwartz, an associate of Donald Trump Jr., in early October in McLean, Virginia. The purpose of the meeting was to give Bender “a cache of emails detailing Hunter Biden’s business activities.” Hunter Biden’s business partner Tony Bobulinski was on on speakerphone, according to NYT. “Mr. Bobulinski was willing to go on the record in The Journal with an explosive claim: that Joe Biden, the former vice president, had been aware of, and profited from, his son’s activities,” NYT added. (RELATED: These Reports Are Essential Reading For Understanding The Hunter Biden Story)   Our media columnist @benyt gives a look inside the White House’s secret, last-ditch effort to change the narrative, and the election. https://t.co/yILcn8Jxil — The New...
    Allies of President Donald Trump tried to run the story on Hunter Biden’s business dealings through The Wall Street Journal before it ended up breaking in the New York Post. New York Times’ Ben Smith reports that White House adviser Eric Herschmann and others close to the Trump family were concerned about the president’s re-election prospects and needed something to shift the 2020 election narrative. This resulted in a meeting with WSJ reporter Michael Bender in early October, in which the group pitched him a story of the Biden family’s business dealings. From the Times: They delivered the goods to him there: a cache of emails detailing Hunter Biden’s business activities, and, on speaker phone, a former business partner of Hunter Biden’s named Tony Bobulinski. Mr. Bobulinski was willing to go on the record in The Journal with an explosive claim: that Joe Biden, the former vice president, had been aware of, and profited from, his son’s activities. The Trump team left believing that The Journal would blow the thing open and their excitement was conveyed to the president. After...
    Even before the debate last night, Wall Street Journal editorial page writer Kimberley Strassel was on Twitter handing out teases of an upcoming column that would “relay a disturbing story of Hunter, Joe and the Chinese.” The column that appeared a few hours later is based on emails and interviews with investor Tony Bobulinski. Bobulinski was Donald Trump’s guest at the debate on Thursday night, an honor that he earned by claiming that he had been in a meeting in which Joe and Hunter Biden talked about the “the Biden family business plans with the Chinese.” Over on the editorial page, this is described as “Sinohawk Holdings, a venture between the Bidens and CEFC China Energy.” Which leaves out the fact that Sinohawk Holdings was actually Bobulinski’s company. He was both the CEO and majority owner, with other partners dividing up what was left. It also leaves out the fact that after years of scheming, Bobulinski’s plan was an absolute failure. However, anyone flipping to The Wall Street Journal’s own reporting on the subject gets a slightly fuller take on the story. Because what the actual journalists concluded...
    As the election draws nigh, both presidential campaigns look to capitalize on their opponent’s scandals. Hide Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has an arguably easier task in this regard, as President Donald Trump has no shortage of scandals to choose from: taxes, a secret Chinese bank account, lying to Americans about the coronavirus, hush money to porn stars, the list goes on. Hide For his part, Trump has focused almost entirely on Hunter Biden, the former vice president’s sole surviving son, whom conservatives are determined to cast as ne’er do well cashing in on his famous name, with, they allege, his father’s blessing and even involvement. This week, the right-leaning Wall Street Journal seized on Hunter’s former business partner’s allegations that Joe Biden was involved in a deal with a Chinese oil company that later fell through. Hide On Oct. 22, a scathing op-ed by Kimberly Strassel, a member of the Journal’s editorial board, relied on text messages provided by Hunter’s former business partner Anthony Bobulinski to lay out this claim. The op-ed followed a previous piece in which the...
    Most of the media is ignoring the emails found in Hunter Biden's laptop, but that doesn't mean they aren't news. Joe Biden has an obligation to answer questions about his son's influence-peddling and his own financial dealings -- notably regarding China.  TUCKER CARLSON: AMERICA’S MOST POWERFUL PEOPLE WANT YOU TO SHUT UP ABOUT HUNTER BIDEN The New York Post last week obtained the contents of a laptop purported to belong to Hunter. The Post has been transparent that it obtained its copy of the hard drive from Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who says he received it from the owner of a Delaware computer-repair shop, where it was abandoned in 2019. Mr. Biden derides this as a "smear campaign," while House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff calls it without evidence "Russian disinformation."  VideoCLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe says the government has no intelligence to support the disinformation claim. A repair-shop order from April 2019 contains Hunter's name and what appears to be his signature. The shop owner supplied a subpoena showing the computer and...
    The coronavirus pandemic still presents an ongoing public health crisis both in the United States and globally but one notable impact of the pandemic has been its effect on the American healthcare system and medical infrastructure. Hospitals were initially put under considerable strain following the first wave of infections in the U.S. early this year, according to The Wall Street Journal. Hospital beds in a number of areas were filled up, ventilators were in short supply and there was a lack of research and coordination. Doctors and administrators say they are now more optimistic about how to respond to the coronavirus, The Wall Street Journal reported. Months of responding to the pandemic has given medical experts a better understanding of how to treat patients and supply critical equipment like masks and ventilators.
    VIDEO0:4800:48Disney to cut 28,000 jobs in parks, experiences and products divisionClosing Bell Check out the companies making headlines in midday trading.  Datadog — Shares of Datadog popped more than 11% after the cloud security platform announced a new strategic partnership with Microsoft's cloud computing service Azure. Datadog will now be available in the Azure console as a first-class service, the company said. Nikola — Nikola soared 11% after the embattled electric truck start-up reconfirmed its business plans and production targets. The rebound followed founder and former Executive Chairman Trevor Milton's resignation last week amid two women's sexual assault allegations against him. General Motors said Tuesday it would extend talks on a $2 billion deal with Nikola, which would give the Detroit automaker an 11% stake. The stock has fallen more than 50% this month. Micron — The semiconductor stock lost more than 4% despite the company beating Wall Street expectations for its fiscal fourth quarter. KeyBanc said in a note that Micron's guidance for the current quarter was "mixed" in part because of the ban on working with Chinese company Huaweii. KeyBanc and...
    Here’s a question that won’t get asked in Tuesday’s presidential debate: Does Joe really want this? Is his heart truly in the project that the modern Democratic Party has become? This is a man whose entire adult life has been spent in the embrace of a political culture that is now denounced by the ideological shock troops who drive much of the agenda of his party. NEWT GINGRICH: PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE – WHICH BIDEN WILL SHOW UP ON STAGE WITH TRUMP? On Planet Biden, somewhere in that America he thinks he still inhabits, Joe is running for president in about 1956, back when he had his first full head of hair, an age when the Democratic Party still regarded white men as human beings rather than patriarchal oppressors and racial supremacists. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP (Come to think of it, maybe he did run for president in 1956? It’s easy to lose count. He’s taken more shots at the presidency than your average Molotov cocktail-wielding peaceful protester has taken at a police cruiser in the past few...
    ERIC PIERMONT/AFP via Getty Images Residents across the country have reported receiving unsolicited packages of mysterious seeds to their homes since July.  Amid mystery seeds complaints, Amazon is restricting seed sales from foreign merchants, a policy that took effect on September 3, according to an original report by The Wall Street Journal.  "Moving forward, we are only permitting the sale of seeds by sellers who are based in the US," a spokesperson from Amazon told the Wall Street Journal in a statement on Saturday.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon issued new guidelines, that went into effect on September 3, blocking seed sales from foreign sellers to the US, according to The Wall Street Journal.  "Moving forward, we are only permitting the sale of seeds by sellers who are based in the US," a spokesperson from Amazon told the Wall Street Journal in a statement on Saturday.  The restriction comes after residents across from all 50 states reported receiving mysterious seed packages from China that they did not order with some mislabeled and marked as jewelry since...
    Leading after Steve Jobs isn’t a mission anyone could have successfully taken on, but with style far removed from popular Apple co-founder Tim Cook has come out on top. Almost ten years after his appointment as CEO of the company that today claims to be the most valuable in the world and the most important in the field of technology, The Wall Street Journal has shared an extensive article on the profile of the current Apple representative. Although it has been a job focused on his role as an executive of the company, this allows to see many faces of Tim Cook, built on the stories of his peers and of course, backed by the quantitative achievements achieved by Apple during his role as CEO. There are no tricks in Tim Cook’s success The report begins by highlighting the differences in leadership between Cook and Steve Jobs, including Cook’s more non-interventionist approach to engineering and product design. The profile emphasizes that Cook kept much of his routine the same when he took over as Apple’s CEO in 2011: “Since taking...
    The Wall Street Journal's opinion section had a scathing response Thursday to the 280 staffers who had signed a letter this week claiming it pushed 'misinformation'.  In a note published by the section's editorial board late Thursday night, the fiery rebuttal vowed that the opinion section wouldn't 'wilt under cancel-culture pressure' following the protest letter sent to publisher Almar Latour.   The board said that it would not be responding directly to staffers who signed the letter but hoped to reassure readers that it will continue to fight back against 'a culture of growing progressive conformity and intolerance'.   The Wall Street Journal's opinion section published a scathing rebuttal following a protest letter from journalists in other sections who accused it of pushing 'misinformation' The letter was sent to publisher Almar Latour (pictured) and leaked to the press It added that the opinion section answers to publisher Latour  and that the 'anxieties' of the signers 'aren’t our responsibility in any case'.    The board said that it had been 'gratified' by the 'outpouring of support' following the leaking of Tuesday's letter.  'But the...
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