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    A HIGH school student is reportedly on the run after allegedly shooting a classmate as the facility was placed on lockdown. Police rushed to secure Seminole High School in Stanford, Florida, on Wednesday morning after an 'incident' was reported. 1Police in Florida responded to an 'incident' at Seminole High School in SanfordCredit: Click Orlando According to News6, the injured student is in stable condition after suffering non-life-threatening injuries. Sanford police tweeted that the scene is contained and there was no longer an active threat at the school. It is unclear where the alleged shooting took place. More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The-sun.com is your go-to destination for the best celebrity news, sport news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures and must-see video. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheUSSun.
    A WOMAN has revealed what it’s really like to be a school dinner lady.  Julie Pike, 36, from Norfolk has worked as a catering assistant (dinner lady) for eight years and said she loves her job. 4Julie Pike, 36, from Norfolk has been a school dinner lady for eight yearsCredit: Supplied 4Julie shared that she loves her job but that there are some downsides to itCredit: Supplied The mum, who shares a snippet into her day-to-day life with fun TikTok videos on her channel MummaPike. One recent video saw her answer ‘the things I get asked as a school dinner lady.’ She joined in with the fun TikTok music video trend and answered burning questions for her followers. One asked: “How do you know how much food to make?” She revealed: “Meals are pre-ordered, portions counted/ weighed.” While another questioned: “Do you still serve the cake with icing and sprinkles?” Most read in LifestyleTHE MOPE SHOW Harry 'miserable' as new life in US 'far from what he hoped for' says expertNEVER ENDS Prince Harry declares WAR on royals with threat...
    The Supreme Court late last week agreed to hear oral arguments in a religious liberty case regarding a high school football coach who was fired for praying on the field after games. The case has taken several years — since 2015 — to be accepted by the highest court in the United States, and will require the justices to look at three parts of the First Amendment and how they pertain to public employees. The case surrounds high school football coach Joseph Kennedy and Bremerton School District in the state of Washington. Kennedy, a devout Christian who began working at Bremerton High School in 2008, was fired from his role as varsity assistant coach and as the junior varsity head coach after he refused to quit praying on the 50 yard line in full view of the public following games. Kennedy asserted that the school district violated the Free Speech and Free Exercise Clauses of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The district also used the First Amendment to justify its argument, claiming that Kennedy’s prayers in view of the...
    Kirk Twigg Another day, another chilling turn of events taking place in a school board here in the United States. At this point in the political cycle, if you’re not following your local school board’s decisions, I implore you to take some time and read up on it, whether or not you have loved ones in schools. Local elections aren’t always glamorous and certainly don’t get as much screen time as they deserve, but they’re deeply important. One example comes to us from the Spotsylvania County School Board in Livingston, Virginia, where Kirk Twigg was recently appointed to serve as the board’s new chair. This local appointment is getting national coverage because Twigg, who formerly served as a district member on the board, has infamously called for folks to ban and even burn books found in school libraries. What’s offensive about the books? Frankly, nothing. But Twigg—like a number of other conservatives waging similar battles across the nation—insists they’re “sexually explicit” and inappropriate for students. The reality is, of course, that the books overwhelmingly feature LGBTQ+ characters and characters of color. Sadly,...
    'Fight: How Gen Z Is Channeling Their Fear and Passion to Save America' was published by St Martin's Press on Monday A new book suggests Generation Z, which has just begun reaching voting age, overwhelmingly backs Democrats, offering President Biden and his party encouragement even as they face difficult midterm elections. The latest polling puts Biden's approval rating at less than 40 percent and Gallup last year charted a major swing from Republican to Democrat across the nation. But John Della Volpe, polling director at the Harvard Kennedy School Institute of Politics, and CEO of SocialSphere, says the latest generation of voters - shaped by the Great Recession, Greta Thunberg, race protests and the rise of Donald Trump - suggests a brighter future. 'Generational replacement will not be kind to Trump’s Republican Party,' he told Axios.  His book, 'Fight: How Gen Z Is Channeling Their Fear and Passion to Save America' was published on Monday, setting out the mindset of some 70 million Americans born from the mid-1990s onwards.  He listed the events and the themes that shaped them through their...
    THOUSANDS of families will automatically be issued $1,504 in food stamps this week without having to sign up. The Georgia Pandemic Electronic Benefits Transfer (P-EBT) began to issue the food stamps last Friday but there is still time to call and register if you haven't received the payment. 1NINTCHDBPICT000705876553Credit: Alamy The funds are to support families with children who are enrolled in Georgia schools to give help with groceries and food, according to the program’s website. It will provide extra help to families of more than 1.1million children who normally would receive free or reduced school meals through participation in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Programs. The food stamp program is part of the government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic and works in a similar way to the federal EBT program. Through P-EBT, eligible school children receive temporary emergency nutrition benefits loaded on EBT cards that are used to purchase food.  It is aimed at kids who didn't have access to free or reduced-price school meals during the last school year due to pandemic closures. "If your eligible child...
    (CNN)As the US nears the start of a third year of the pandemic, many Americans are wondering when the ever-present disruptions Covid-19 has posed will diminish for good. But Dr. Anthony Fauci has cautioned that despite Omicron appearing to have less severe health implications, it's too early to predict whether we're approaching the endemic stage of when a virus becomes more manageable."When you talk about whether or not Omicron -- because it's a highly transmissible, but apparently not as pathogenic, for example, as Delta -- I would hope that that's the case," the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said Monday.The Omicron surge hasnt peaked nationwide, and the next few weeks will be tough, US surgeon general says"But that would only be the case if we don't get another variant that eludes the immune response to the prior variant," Fauci told the Davos Agenda, a virtual event being held this week by the World Economic Forum.A disease that is endemic has a constant presence in a population but is not affecting an alarmingly large number of...
              by Alpha News Staff   The University of Minnesota admitted in an email to its student body that the COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t prevent transmission of the virus — yet the school says it will “probably” require more boosters for its students. Public Health Officer Jakub Tolar sent an email to the student body answering some frequently asked questions about the virus earlier this month. “I’m vaccinated, does that mean I can’t get COVID-19?” one question reads. “No,” the school responds, stressing that omicron remains “easily transmissible” even among the university’s fully-vaccinated population. Despite this, the school indicates it will likely require more vaccines. “I’m vaccinated and boosted, am I done?” the next question reads. “Probably not,” the university responds. “Updated and amplified protection is key to staying healthy and bringing the pandemic under control,” it continues, apparently suggesting booster mandates are soon to come. Already, President Joan Gabel is sternly asking students to get another vaccine. The university has also denied the reality of natural immunity. “Based on current data, no,” previous infections do not protect people from reinfections, it says. “You...
    Prince George’s County, Maryland, parent Patrick Paschall said he and other parents were dancing on the neighborhood street corner upon learning that students would resume in-person learning this week. Virtual learning, Paschall said, has been difficult. His wife’s job requires her to go into the office most of the time, leaving Paschall to watch his kindergartner and second-grader. He finds himself juggling meetings and other requests with making sure his kids have the resources they need to participate in virtual classes. It’s often a daunting task because his second-grader has lunch at 10 a.m. and recess immediately after, and the kindergartner has lunch at 11 a.m., followed by recess. “It’s a juggle, and it’s a struggle,” Paschall, who is also running for a state delegate seat, said. “My kids were really frustrated a lot of the time because their technology didn’t work, or they couldn’t find the pieces that they need, or they took a longer break than they realized they were supposed to.” Still, Paschall and other parents have said the circumstances were better than the alternative: sending students...
    "We have deleted a post that ignored the important role parents play—and should play—in Michigan public schools. Parents need to have a say in their children’s education, end of story," the Michigan Democratic Party wrote on Facebook. "The post does not reflect the views of Michigan Democrats and should not be misinterpreted as a statement of support from our elected officials or candidates."
    Two former members of the Montgomery County school board say the interim superintendent, Monifa McKnight, should be appointed to lead the state’s largest school system for the next four years “effective immediately.” In a letter to the current Montgomery County Board of Education, Michael Durso, who served on the school board from 2009 to 2018, and Jeanette Dixon, who served from 2016 to 2020, urged the current board of education to hire McKnight, saying she is “the right person for this time.” Durso and Dixon wrote that McKnight and the current school board members have been under “excessive scrutiny and criticism” over COVID-19 protocols and changes to school operations. On Jan. 9, McKnight issued a public apology to the school community, stating that while the system dealt with bus driver and substitute teacher shortages, they should have done a better job sharing information about those challenges. “I apologize for any stress this caused our staff, students, and community members,” McKnight said. The two former board members, who also served as school principals, wrote that McKnight “knows and loves” the school...
    Jon Cherry/Getty Images) New York Magazine’s Jonathan Chait opined on Monday that it is time for progressives to come to terms with the fact that mass school closures throughout the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic and beyond were “catastrophic.” School closures of course resulted in mental health and other crises for young people, so much so that by early 2021, some were sounding the alarm about an increase in suicides among teens. Axios reported in February of 2021, “Hospitals have seen a significant increase in mental health emergencies among children, and federal officials have acknowledged that prolonged school closures have deprived students of both formal services and simple human interaction.” The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has even taken up the issue of prolonged school closures, noting: School closures carry high social and economic costs for people across communities. Their impact however is particularly severe for the most vulnerable and marginalized boys and girls and their families. The resulting disruptions exacerbate already existing disparities within the education system but also in other aspects of their lives....
    Areas that were among the first to get hit hard by the Omicron variant are starting to see their Covid-19 numbers level off or even improve. But that's not the case for much of the country, US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy said."There are parts of the country -- New York, in particular, and other parts of the Northeast -- where we are starting to see a plateau, and in some cases, an early decline in cases," Murthy told CNN on Sunday."The challenge is that the entire country is not moving at the same pace," he said. "The Omicron wave started later in other parts of the country, so we shouldn't expect a national peak in the next coming days. The next few weeks will be tough."An average of more than 750,000 new Covid-19 infections were reported every day over the past week, according to Johns Hopkins University data.That means Americans at work, school and elsewhere face a heightened risk of exposure that is unparalleled during the pandemic.The number of Americans dying every day from Covid-19 has increased in recent...
    (CBS13/CNN) — Areas that were among the first to get hit hard by the Omicron variant are starting to see their Covid-19 numbers level off or even improve. But that’s not the case for much of the country, US Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy said. “There are parts of the country — New York, in particular, and other parts of the Northeast — where we are starting to see a plateau, and in some cases, an early decline in cases,” Murthy told CNN on Sunday. READ MORE: Shooting In N. Highlands Sends 1 Person To Hospital; Suspect At Large“The challenge is that the entire country is not moving at the same pace,” he said. “The Omicron wave started later in other parts of the country, so we shouldn’t expect a national peak in the next coming days. The next few weeks will be tough.” An average of more than 750,000 new Covid-19 infections were reported every day over the past week, according to Johns Hopkins University data. That means Americans at work, school and elsewhere face a heightened risk of exposure that...
    A seventh grader has died after he overdosed on fentanyl at his Hartford, Connecticut school last week. The 13-year-old boy, who has not been identified, was rushed to the hospital Thursday after he collapsed in gym class at Sports and Medical Sciences Academy. He died on Saturday, Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said.   Two other students who were exposed to the drugs Thursday were also taken to the hospital the same day, but later released.  In a statement released over the weekend, Bronin said that the city, 'grieves for this child lost, for his loved ones, his friends, his teachers' and the entire community at his school. 'We still have much to learn about the circumstances of this tragedy, and about how a child had access to such a shocking quantity of such deadly drugs, and our police (department) will continue their investigation and seek to hold accountable the adults who ultimately are responsible for this child's death,' Bronin added. Police responded to Sports and Medical Sciences Academy Thursday when three students were rushed to the hospital after being exposed to fentanyl. Drug...
              by Kendall Tietz   Students across the U.S. are planning school walkouts in protest of in-person learning as COVID-19 cases spike amid the rise of the Omicron coronavirus variant. There are nearly 3,500 schools actively disrupted as of Friday, according to Burbio’s K-12 School Opening Tracker, which tracks school closures for 1,200 districts, including the 200 largest school districts in the nation. On Tuesday, New York City students staged a walkout in protest of in-person learning over what they said were concerns about testing and safety mitigation measures. NYC Mayor Eric Adams said school was the “safest place” for children during a Friday news conference. Hundreds of kids walked out of Brooklyn Tech today to protest the continuation of in person school during the Omicron wave and to call for a remote option pic.twitter.com/0HMVAFM2YC — Jillian Jorgensen (@Jill_Jorgensen) January 11, 2022 “Of course, it’s not zero-risk to have kids in school … With this increase in transmissibility, we will likely see an increase in cases in schools, but it’s likely not higher risk than many of the other activities kids participate in when they’re not in school,” Dr....
    A nine-year-old boy in Austria was forced to take a test outside in freezing temperatures after his school refused to recognize his exemption from wearing a mask in class. In the Austrian region of Styria in the town of Voitsberg on Tuesday, a nine-year-old boy named Jason was forced to complete a test outdoors in the cold winter weather for violating the elementary school’s Chinese coronavirus rules because he could not wear a mask for medical reasons. The teacher, along with the boy’s parents, agreed to have him work on the test outside as the nine-year-old wished to participate in class. However, despite getting consent from the child’s parents, the Austrian Directorate of Education said that the move was not legal, Kronen Zeitung reports. On Friday, Austrian media reported that the school had rejected Jason’s medical exemption from wearing a mask in the school because it had been signed by a doctor in the city of Graz who was known to be critical of vaccinations. According to the local Styrian Directorate of Education, neither the teacher nor the principal of the...
    The founder of a national charter school network who once served as a White House adviser under President Barack Obama has pleaded guilty to a charge alleging he stole $218,000 from the network to get a lower interest rate on a multi-million-dollar Manhattan apartment. Seth Andrew, 42, a founder of Democracy Prep, entered the plea in Manhattan federal court to wire fraud, admitting that he moved money in 2019 from the charter schools network to other bank accounts without authorization. 'I am truly sorry for what I have done,' said an emotional Andrew, his voice cracking, to Judge John P. Cronan. 'What I did was wrong and I deeply regret my actions.' Seth Andrew, 42, stole $218,000 from a charter school network he founded in order to get a lower interest rate on a multi-million-dollar Manhattan apartment Authorities said Andrew closed three of the school's bank accounts and deposited them into fraudulent accounts that he opened. This image shows Andrew inside a bank when he was closing the third account in November 2019  The cash was used to purchase a...
    A MUM has admitted to sending her child to school with 'the worst packed lunch' ever - and we have to agree she might be onto something. The embarrassed woman confessed what she had done on Mumsnet's famous AIBU board. 1The mum sent him in with a lunch meant for birds...Credit: Getty - Contributor "I told DS [dear son] he had pasta salad for lunch," she said. "This evening he asked why we’d given him “funny mashed potato” instead. "Turns out the pasta salad was still in the fridge and he’d been eating a tub full of fat I’d saved for the birds. "Has anyone sent their child to school with anything worse or our we officially the worst parents on Mumsnet?" People were in hysterics. "How much of it did he eat?!" asked one woman. "You're not bad parents at all, it was a mistake. Now, had you intentionally sent him to school with fat ball mix, that would be a different story," added another. And other parents confessed they too had made similar blunders. Most read...
    SRV hands Dougherty Valley its first defeat Leading by eight points with less than three minutes to play Friday night, San Ramon Valley found itself tied on the road against Dougherty Valley as the final seconds ticked off the clock. Seamus Deely made sure there’d be no overtime. The San Ramon Valley sophomore slid across the lane to rebound a teammate’s missed 3-pointer, turned, and shot. The ball banked off the backboard and dropped through the hoop as time expired, giving SRV a 63-61 victory that left Dougherty Valley tasting defeat for the first time this season. The winners improved to 8-2 overall and 2-0 in the East Bay Athletic League. Dougherty Valley, ranked second by the Bay Area News Group, dropped to 14-1, 2-1. No. 17 SRV seemed comfortably in control earlier in the fourth quarter, leading 59-51 with under three minutes to go. But Dougherty Valley had a late run. MORE BASKETBALL Bay Area News Group boys, girls basketball rankings Top-ranked Campolindo holds off Clayton Valley Dougherty Valley...
    MUMS and dads - be prepared to be insulted. A school reception worker has offered her candid opinion on what your kids' names REALLY mean. And she's brutal. 3Penelopes are sweet - but forgetfulCredit: Tiktok/theschoolofficelady Because while some names are obviously controversial (earlier this week we told you about little baby Lucifer) others seem pretty, well, nice. Alas, it seems we were wrong. Manda Dee, who is also known as The School Office Lady on TikTok, has uploaded a variety of videos sharing her insights into baby names. And it's bad luck if your kid is called Paisley, Penelope, Daniel, Jack, Olivia or many, many, more names. "Paisley is super cute... from far away," she said. "But she's a hot mess. "Hayden is running someone's life. I don't know if it is the teacher's or yours - you've gotta tone it down, you've gotta stop spoiling that child. 3Xander's parents wanted a girl, she claimedCredit: Tiktok/theschoolofficelady 3She was brutal about the name PaisleyCredit: Tiktok/theschoolofficelady Most read in LifestyleTHE MOPE SHOW Harry 'miserable' as new life in US 'far from what...
    Tucker Carlson slammed the head of a Satanic Temple for hosting an 'after-school Satan club' meeting, which had drawn the outrage of some parents after fliers advertising the event were seen in the Illinois elementary school. The Fox News host questioned the group's leader, Lucien Greaves, who appeared on his 'Tucker Carlson Tonight' program on Friday, just a day after protesters stood outside Jane Addams Elementary School in Moline, Illinois, to push back on the satanic after-school club. 'So could there be an "I hate gays" club?' Carlson asked on Friday. 'Or a "black people are inferior" club?' 'The answer of course, is no, because the community has some say in what its kids are exposed to on government property, i.e. a public school,' he said. 'So you're just telling me that everyone is just kind of going along with it because of the Supreme Court?' 'I don't want to use profanity on air but, what you're saying is ridiculous, we both know it's ridiculous, I just want to be really clear on this.'  Greaves, who's Satanic Temple runs the...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- As the Omicron variant tears through Southern California, the CDC is now updating its guidance telling Americans that cloth masks provide "the least protection," while surgical masks, N95s, and KN95s, can offer more."They're better because they fit better. They have more layers of protection built into them," said Los Angeles Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer.Ferrer says "fit" is most important, which is why she wears a KF94 mask."It fits really, really tightly over your nose, under your chin," she said.Added protection is a top concern as the Los Angeles Unified School District struggles with absences. Officials say that nearly a third of students missed school after the winter break. A rapid rise in cases in the Culver City Unified School District prompted school closures next week to give students and staff time to "recoup and recover.""This isn't that every school is going to shut down at all. This is a situation that in some schools, it may be untenable," Ferrer said.Across Southern California, about 70 percent of staffed beds are occupied. San Bernardino is the highest...
                 Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed the Executive Director & CEO of Professional Educators of Tennessee, JC Bowman in studio to talk about their organization and the failed Achievement School Districts concept. Leahy: We are joined in studio now by our very good friend JC Bowman, the President of Professional Educators of Tennessee and one of the original contributors to The Tennessee Star. Good morning, JC. Bowman: Good morning. How are you doing, Michael? Leahy: I’m delighted to have you. This is the first time you’ve been in studio with us, isn’t it? Bowman: Oh, yeah, absolutely. Leahy: Kind of fun, isn’t it? Bowman: Oh, yeah, it’s great, too. And you really have a good show. So I appreciate the opportunity to be here. Leahy: Now talk about the beginnings of The Tennessee Star. We will be celebrating our fifth anniversary on February 7th. And do you know who wrote the...
                 State Senator Ryan Aument (R-Lititz) on Thursday introduced legislation that will expand parents’ access to school choice during the coronavirus pandemic. The measure, Senate Bill 1015, will create an Education Savings Account, allowing parents to potentially receive funding to send their children to schools that are better equipped to address their child’s needs. “Parents have seen the negative impact on their children from not having in-person instruction,” said Senator Aument. “If schools will not remain open, students and their families deserve options to ensure every child receives a high-quality education.” Because of transitions to virtual learning, parents who meet the eligibility requirements would be given funds to offset certain costs connected to educational alternatives to their current public school. Some examples include tutors, at-home instructional content, tuition, and testing. “By removing financial barriers to accessing these valuable tools, Pennsylvania students struggling with learning loss will have a greater chance of getting back on track,” wrote Aument in a recent opinion piece. “Education Savings Accounts will increase access to expanded educational options, offering students, parents, and teachers alike more learning...
    On Friday’s Fox News Primetime, host Rachel Campos-Duffy ran a segment on Satanism in public schools that was reminiscent of the satanic panic of the 1980s. “For two years, the left has claimed that schools are unsafe for children due to Covid,” she said. “But there’s something much more terrifying lurking in the halls of one school in Illinois.” The host informed her audience that a Satan club – sponsored by the Satanic Temple – had held its first ever meeting at an elementary school in Illinois. “That’s right – a Satan club.” Campos-Duffy cited a letter released by the school stating that no school employees were involved and the institution is not allowed to discriminate against different religions. “But that isn’t an isolated incident,” Campos-Duffy said. “Satanists are taking up cultural space all across America, like in the Illinois state house where they successfully put up a statue of baby Satan. And you have heard of Comic-Con, right? “Well, there’s a Satancon taking place next month in Arizona.” She then turned to Catholic podcast host Taylor Marshall, who proceeded...
    It’s a year when foolish ideas for new laws are being proposed—or worse yet, passed—by Republicans everywhere. This includes the GOP in Idaho fighting back against teaching kids math, a Republican lawmaker in Virginia insisting that kids should learn about the debates between Abraham Lincoln and Fredrick Douglass, and an Indiana law that makes it illegal for corporations to microchip their employees. Republicans have been doing yeoman work when it comes to increasing the national surplus of facepalms. But for anyone looking for a compendium of awful; for a single source that just boils down everything bad and pours it over a state in a stinky slurry of rotten ideas and poisonous policy, there’s only one place to look. As the Miami Herald reports, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and the GOP-dominated state legislature have cooked up “the worst” ideas imaginable. That includes laws deliberately meant to “inflame racial anxieties, election lies and partisan anger.” Just as an example of one of the bills being proposed, a new law would make it possible for both businesses and individuals to sue city and county governments over...
    St. Francis running back Viliami Teu stood on a dark pathway that led from the Westmont High football field to the locker rooms. He was being interviewed after his team’s only defeat this fall, a 16-12 loss to Serra in the Central Coast Section Division I championship game that ended the Lancers’ magical season. As Serra players and family members walked up the pathway to leave the stadium that late November night, a number of them stopped to tap Teu on the shoulder pads, paying respect to a player who was special all season. Teu, whom his friends call “Juju,” ran for an average of 184.3 yards per game. He finished with 2,211 and scored 28 touchdowns. Along the way, he broke the West Catholic Athletic League’s single-season rushing record with 1,449 in seven league games. For this, Teu is the Bay Area News Group’s player of the year. In the regular season, the San Jose State-bound Teu ran for 344 yards in a league-record 45 carries as St. Francis pounded Serra 44-21. He rushed...
    For anyone that happened to play De La Salle this fall, Zeke Berry’s presence had to be noted in red ink. The 6-foot, 195-pound free safety used his speed to blanket receivers and knock away passes and his strength to deliver bone-rattling blows, a powerful combination that made him a clear choice for Bay Area News Group defensive player of the year. “Ten is legit,” Folsom coach Paul Doherty said after his team stunned De La Salle 28-27 in the NorCal regionals. “Ten is the best player in NorCal. He’s incredible.” Berry finished with 35 tackles, forced two fumbles, and had an interception. He accounted for nearly 400 yards rushing and receiving in spot duty on offense. He returned two kickoffs for touchdowns, including one to open a regular-season game at Folsom in October that De La Salle won 31-10. He signed with Michigan in December. “Best player on the field,” Amador Valley coach Danny Jones said. Added another NCS coach, “Was a tremendous leader and excelled in a bunch of different positions on...
    (CNN)A 13-year-old male is in grave condition after he overdosed at his Hartford, Connecticut, school on Thursday from a presumed fentanyl exposure, according to authorities. Two other male students involved were also taken to the hospital, according to police. On Thursday morning, the Hartford Police Department (HPD) responded to the Sport and Medical Sciences Academy (SMSA), a statement from HPD says. A male was unconscious "upon arrival, CPR was being administered by responding Fire and EMS," they noted."Evidence of narcotics was located in close proximity to the juvenile, which a later presumptive test revealed the presence of fentanyl," HPD said.All three, who are 7th graders, were transported to Connecticut Children's for treatment and evaluation.Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez, superintendent for Hartford Public Schools, said in a statement that the boy collapsed while in gym class.1 in 100,000: The story of a fentanyl victim Read MoreDuring a news conference Thursday, Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the one student who remains hospitalized did ingest the drug, but added, "we do not know for certain whether the other students ingested the fentanyl.""Our staff acted quickly...
    New York (CNN Business)Jasmine Moorman is having a difficult week. The single mother of five is trying to sort out a logistical mess. She has to take her three oldest children to and from school because their bus driver is out, making her late to her job administering Covid-19 tests.Her sons stay late at an after-school program, so she can pick them up after work. But her daughter isn't old enough to be eligible for the program, and needs to be taken home earlier — while Moorman is supposed to be at work. She had to scramble to find a family member to help out, and is crossing her fingers that the bus driver will be back soon. Another complication: Her two younger children aren't old enough to go to school. A nearby daycare is dealing with its own staffing issues and isn't accepting more children at the moment. For now, Moorman's grandmother is caring for them, but she's getting older and taking care of two young kids is hard work. For some working parents, Omicron feels like a...
    Berkeley soccer player Marlow Buettner is the Bay Area News Group’s boys high school athlete of the week after receiving 59.02% of the vote by the 5 p.m. deadline Wednesday. Serra basketball player Miles Klapper finished second and Miramonte basketball player James Frye took third. Congratulations to all the candidates for this week’s recognition. Buettner, a sophomore, scored two goals as the Yellowjackets cruised past San Lorenzo 5-0 in West Alameda County Conference Foothill League play. Berkeley began this week 5-3-2 overall and 4-0-1 in the league. To nominate an athlete for next week’s honor, email highschools@bayareanewsgroup.com by Monday, Jan. 17, at 11 a.m. We also review stats submitted to MaxPreps.com by coaches/team statisticians for consideration. Winners are announced each Friday on the Mercury News & East Bay Times websites. Past winners Dec. 13-19: Derek Sangster, Archbishop Mitty basketball Dec. 6-12: Petelo Gi, Serra football Nov. 29-Dec. 5: Roland Legaspi, Piedmont Hills soccer Nov. 22-28: Ivan Nisa, Aragon football Nov. 15-21: Guardian Harper, Benicia football Nov. 8-14: Carsten Peters, De...
    James Lick soccer player Ximena Heredia has been selected Bay Area News Group girls high school athlete of the week after receiving 7,493 votes (31.40%) by the deadline at 5 p.m. Wednesday. Palo Alto soccer player Katherine Thomsen finished second and Foothill soccer player Olivia Walinski took third. Congratulations to all the candidates for this week’s recognition. Heredia, a junior forward/defender, had seven goals in victories over San Jose and Yerba Buena. She scored five in the win over Yerba Buena. The Comets began this week 2-0 in the Blossom Valley Athletic League’s West Valley Division. To nominate an athlete for next week’s honor, email highschools@bayareanewsgroup.com by Monday, Jan. 17, at 11 a.m. We also review stats submitted to MaxPreps.com by coaches/team statisticians for consideration. Winners are announced each Friday on the Mercury News & East Bay Times websites. Past winners Dec. 13-19: Gabrielle Abigor, Berean Christian basketball Dec. 6-12: Anjali Yella, Harker basketball Nov. 29-Dec. 5: Samantha Wallace, Piedmont Hills soccer Nov. 22-28: Haylie Wakayama, Mission San Jose basketball...
    How do you differentiate between a quarterback who threw for more than 3,000 yards and a running back who accounted for more than 3,000 all-purpose yards, much of it against top competition? How do you choose one over the other? In our case, you don’t. Menlo-Atherton quarterback Matt MacLeod and Wilcox running back Luther K. Glenn are the Bay Area News Group’s co-offensive players of the year. MacLeod, who coincidentally burst onto the scene as a freshman when he came off the bench in 2018 to rally M-A past Wilcox for a Central Coast Section championship, threw for 3,326 yards and 36 touchdowns as the Bears won the Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division title and reached the semifinals of the CCS Division I playoffs. Glenn ran for a CCS-best 2,366 yards while leading Wilcox to the section’s Division II title and Division 2-A state championship game. The senior had 3,098 all-purpose yards and scored 37 touchdowns. He averaged 10.2 yards per attempt. “Glenn broke open our game with 2 long drives where he...
    It was early October, and Campolindo was facing the possibility of having its worst season in over a decade. For the second time, the Cougars had been walloped at home, this time by Diablo Athletic League-Foothill Division rival Benicia 35-0. Campo was 3-3 after the Benicia defeat. Earlier in the season, the Cougars had been demolished by Aptos 49-0, also at home. A running clock was used for the entire second half. Coach Kevin Macy realized he needed to make changes. The running game became a bigger part of the offense. He preached the importance of being physical. The Cougars won their next seven games, including the North Coast Section Division II championship, before finally losing to McClymonds 40-21 in the CIF NorCal 3A regional. For this, Macy has been picked as the Bay Area News Group’s Coach of the Year. Macy, who has been the Cougars’ head man since 1996, is one of Northern California’s elite coaches. Campo has won at least 10 games in a season for 10 of the last 11 years. The...
              by JC Bowman   It is back to work for state legislators. The first week of the legislature has been very busy. While criticizing politicians is a national activity and a form of amusement for many, the truth is that most of these folks are good people, working hard, and trying to do the right thing for our state. It is always the good, bad, and ugly in any political system. The Tennessee Constitution requires the General Assembly is required to provide for the maintenance, support, and eligibility standards of a system of free public schools. The current formula is subject to ongoing litigation, and the amount the state currently spends on public education is among the bottom in the nation. We are optimistic that we can move forward. On Tuesday, January 11th the Commissioner of Education, Penny Schwinn unveiled a potential new school funding formula she calls the “Funding for Student Success.” The process has been somewhat rushed, and they should have started much earlier. There are some concerns about use of Gates Foundation money, and involvement of national groups...
                 Michigan’s 2020 Teacher of the Year openly promotes his political beliefs in his high school classroom. Owen Bondono teaches ninth grade at Oak Park High School. He won Michigan’s Teacher of the Year in the 2020-2021 school district. He is also a TikTok personality, clocking in at over 11,000 followers. Bondono describes himself as non-binary and transgender. In a video posted to his TikTok page, Bondono shows off his classroom. A small rainbow colored plaque on the door says “You are safe here.” Inside the classroom, Bondono hangs a gay pride flag with a Black Lives Matter (BLM) solidarity fist, a regular BLM flag, and a transgender pride flag. @owenbondonoget those chill vibes before break #teacher #teachertok #queerteacher #chillwithtiktok ♬ animal crossing ~ new horizons lofi – Closed on Sunday The post is tagged #queerteacher. In another video, Bondono admits that Critical Race Theory (CRT) – though not a part of the official curriculum – is being taught in K-12 schools, and provides his ideas for getting the political right to stop criticizing the practice,...
    Students across the U.S. are planning walkouts to protest in-person learning amid a national spike in COVID-19 omicron cases. More than 4,100 schools nationwide were closed as of Tuesday — a slight reduction from the more than 5,400 schools closed last week following winter break, according to community event website Burbio, which tracks school closures in more than 5,000 U.S. school districts. The closures came largely due to increasing COVID-19 cases and related staffing shortages. NEW YORKIn New York City, students at Brooklyn Technical High School made headlines Tuesday after videos posted to social media showed swaths of students leaving a school building in the middle of the day, protesting in-person learning amid an apparent lack of testing for students and staff, according to local reports. "We don’t feel safe at school," a Brooklyn Tech junior told The New York Post Tuesday. "It’s pretty much that simple. There are so many cases going around and we think more should be done." Sources told the Post that some teachers gave students a green light to leave classes while others said they...
    Today, Governor Brian P. Kemp delivered his fourth State of the State Address to a joint session of the Georgia General Assembly. Read and watch below.  FY 2022 Governor’s Report – FINALLt. Governor Duncan, Speaker Ralston, President Pro Tempore Miller, Speaker Pro Tempore Jones, members of the General Assembly, members of the judiciary, and my fellow Georgians. Three years ago, when I stood before this body and the people of our state for the first time as your governor, I said, “I know there will be adversity… those who want to tear us down. There will be difficult days and dark nights. But together, we will overcome. Like Coach Henderson said, ‘It can be done’.” Standing before all of you today in the final year of my first term in office, I didn’t know then how true these words would become. But, just like I saw firsthand all those years ago under the Friday night lights at Clarke Central High School, legendary football Coach Billy Henderson was right again. Despite the divisive...
    Feed the Boro’s next Food Drop event will be held Saturday, January 15 at Statesboro High School, located at 10 Lester Road/10 Coach Lee Street. Food distribution begins at 8:00 a.m. and ends at 11:00 a.m. or when all food/supplies have been distributed. Anyone in need of food is invited to come and get a week’s supply of groceries. There are no financial requirements. This event’s presenting sponsor is Georgia Southern Athletics, in partnership with the Second Harvest Food Bank. The Bulloch County Literacy Council, with its Bulloch Book Bus, will also be on hand to distribute bags of free books for children of participating families as they drive through. Bulloch Co Schools: Food insecurity and access to books at home are issues for many of our students’ families. The pandemic has increased the need for community services like these. Feed the Boro has provided more than 500,000 meals through food drops during the pandemic. Volunteer & Sponsorship Opportunities If you are interested in volunteering, visit Feed the Boro’s website or Facebook site and...
    PALO ALTO – Instead of going home after dropping off her daughter at El Carmelo School on Wednesday morning, Delmey Walker stuck around to help test students for COVID-19 and keep them from getting too too rowdy in the library. Walker, a mother of two students in the Palo Alto Unified School District, was among hundreds of parents who have answered the call to join a unique new program — “1 Palo Alto” — that district administrators hope will prevent schools from shutting their doors again as the omicron variant continues to raise fears that spring 2022 might be a lot like 2020. To shore up staffing at all schools as droves of teachers and support personnel call in sick, Superintendent Don Austin this past weekend sent out a plea through the district’s website for community volunteers to pitch in. Within the first 20 minutes, 51 parents had signed up. By Monday morning the number had climbed to 350, and a day later it more than doubled to 756. “We expected a solid response,” Austin said. “But I didn’t expect...
    Author Toni Morrison posed on Sept. 21, 2012 during a reception sponsored by the U.S. ambassador at his residence in Paris as part of the 10th America Festival. A resident of Katy, Texas, a city about 30 miles west of Houston, penned a message to Newbery Medal-winning author and illustrator Jerry Craft six months ago that some of his books were being pulled from the shelves of a school library. “I was caught off guard,” Craft, the author of the graphic novel New Kid, told NBCBLK in a piece published on Thursday. “I felt bad for the kids because I know how much they love ‘New Kid’ and ‘Class Act.’ I know what my school visits do … I felt bad if there was going to be some kids that would not be able to take advantage of that.”  Craft’s books shed light on the experiences of Black boys who experience racism at school, but racists have redefined his work as a pursuit of critical race theory, a framework for interpreting law that maintains racism has an undeniable effect on the legal foundation of American society....
                 Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer will deliver the annual State of the State address remotely, according to a release from her office. The top executive detailed the event, scheduled for January 26, will be held virtually “to ensure everyone can safely partake” during the coronavirus pandemic. “The State of the State address is a tradition rooted in history. It is an opportunity for Michiganders to hear about the work of state government and see Republicans and Democrats come together to focus on the issues that will put Michigan families, communities, and small businesses first. This year, we’ve agreed that the State of the State address should once again be held remotely to ensure everyone can safely partake in this time-honored event,” Whitmer said in a joint statement with House Speaker Jason Wentworth. In recent weeks, the state has witnessed a spike in positive coronavirus cases, as health officials point to the prominence of the Omicron variant as fuel for the high case count. However, studies have suggested that the new variant poses less risk for severe illness and hospitalization....
    An updated lawsuit filed against a Michigan high school documents Ethan Crumbley's 'unusual' behavior before he allegedly opened fire.  The suit reveals warning signs leading up to the shooting which included 15-year-old Crumbley bringing a bird's head in a Mason jar filled with yellow liquid three weeks before the massacre took place, according to the Detroit Free Press, which reported its findings after exclusive access to the revised lawsuit. Crumbley was also revealed to have allegedly brought bullets to class and put them on display and researched ammunition on his phone only a day before the shooting.  In the $100 million lawsuit filed against Oxford High School, officials are being targeted as the responsible party for the November 30 shooting that saw four students killed and seven others injured.  Crumbley allegedly posted on Twitter later on November 29, writing: 'Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds. See you tomorrow Oxford,' the Detroit Free Press reported Friday. The Michigan high school has since been singled out for being made aware of Crumbley's behavior but taking no action as they were...
    Former NFL running back Jerome Bettis, also known as the "Bus," is going back to the University of Notre Dame. The Super Bowl champion made the announcement Monday from the snow-covered campus of Notre Dame in a video posted to Twitter. "I have always told my kids that whatever you start, you finish. Today I started my final semester at the University of @NotreDame. I knew when I left 27 years ago to go to the @NFL that I would be back one day. It's never too late to pursue your dreams and further your education," Bettis said. WATCH: JOE ROGAN RIPS HARRIS FOR COMPARING JAN. 6 TO PEARL HARBOR AND 9/11 The star running back left Notre Dame before his senior year and played 27 years in the NFL for the Los Angeles / Saint Louis Rams and the Pittsburgh Steelers. I have always told my kids that whatever you start, you finish. Today I started my final semester at the University of @NotreDame. I knew when I left 27 years ago to...
    The debate over whether schools should be in-person or remote is reaching new levels of willful ridiculousness. Recent days have seen another round of “I am absolutely, I promise, really a liberal, but school closures have me rethinking everything” articles thanks to Politico and The Atlantic. There are two distinct problems with these (redacted) takes. One problem comes if you take them on their own terms—more about that later. The other problem is that they’re irrelevant to what is going on with schools now. Schools around the country are going remote, but it’s not because of anything you’ll encounter in the “my kids’ schools shouldn’t have been closed in 2020-2021 and therefore I am disenchanted with Democrats” takes. It's because the current levels of COVID-19 in this country—thanks to omicron and a population that’s just, like, tired of the pandemic and wearing masks and not going to bars—are so high that many schools cannot remain open. In many places where schools are technically open, they’re basically warehousing kids in what Josh Marshall perceptively described as “COVID perseverance theater in the classroom.” Marshall was talking about something close...
    President Biden's Education Secretary Miguel Cardona apparently solicited the controversial letter from the National School Boards Association that said threats made by protesting parents should be taken as seriously as domestic terrorism, according to emails released on Tuesday. The NSBA, in an internal memo sent on October 12, revealed that they had held discussions with White House officials before sending the much-criticized letter to President Joe Biden.  Attorney General Merrick Garland later said the letter, setting out worries about threats, was the starting point for plans for a task force to protect members of school boards. Now, emails obtained by Parents Defending Education through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, suggest that Cardona himself was part of the process that led to its production. In an exchange on Oct. 5 email, NSBA Secretary-Treasurer Kristi Swett wrote that the group's interim chief executive Chip Slaven 'told the officers he was writing a letter to provide information to the White House, from a request by Secretary Cardona.' 'Should this allegation be true, it would reveal that this administration's pretextual war on parents...