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    Binge-watching TV can significantly raise your risk of suffering blood clots, a major review suggests. British researchers found the risk was about a third higher in adults who spent four or more hours in front of the TV a day, compared to people who watched for two-and-a-half or less. They are now urging people to take half-hour breaks between boxsets to 'stand and stretch' and cut down on snacks.  Bristol University experts also urged Netflix addicts to think about using a stationary bike.  Scientists have known for years that prolonged sitting can raises the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which kills thousands of people every year.  Long periods of inactivity lets blood to pool in the extremities, which can then lead to clots. It is for this same reason airplane travellers are advised to move frequently on long-haul flights.  But the new study found that even physically active people were still at more risk of blood clots.  Researchers also warned people who binge on TV tend to eat junk food, which can lead to other conditions such as obesity and...
    Blood clots might be soon be cleared by using microscopic robots with screw-like propellers that swim through blood vessels bearing blockage-busting drugs. Developed by engineers from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the microrobot design was inspired by the tails of bacteria like E. coli. The tiny robot and its propeller are driven by the application of an external magnetic field — and it is capable of moving with and against the direction of the blood flow. Tests in a fake vein filled with pig's blood showed the robot makes its clot-dissolving 'tissue plasminogen activator' cargo five times more effective than the drug alone.  The robot's rotor, the team said, may help to circulate the drug around the blockage site — better breaking up the clots and reducing the risk of large fragments.  These are a risk when using the drug treatment alone — and with catheter-based alternative approaches — and can lead to additional blockages 'downstream'.  As it is hard to navigate the robots long distances through the body, the researchers cautioned, the approach might be better applied to...
    Johnson & Johnson's share price nosedived on Friday morning when the markets opened in reaction to the CDC's announcement yesterday that Americans shouldn't get the company's COVID-19 vaccine because it can cause blood clots.  J&J's one-shot vaccine was popular in March and April because it was seen as more convenient than the two-shot Pfizer and Moderna alternatives.  It was briefly taken out of use in April amid a handful of cases of women who had received it, developed blood clots and then died.  It was put back into use on April 23 but this week, the CDC announced Americans should instead opt for Pfizer or Moderna when choosing which vaccine to get.  The announcement sent the company's shares down by $173 to $168 at opening bell on Monday - a drop of 2.8 percent.     The shots are, however, still available but the CDC is now recommending that Americans opt for Pfizer or Moderna instead.   The announcement on Thursday night sent the company's shares down by $173 to $168 at opening bell on Monday - a drop of 2.8 percent A dose...
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new guidance saying that people shouldn’t get the one-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 shot if the Pfizer or Moderna option is available. Citing potentially life-threatening blood clots liked to the J & J jab, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) met on Thursday, Dec. 16 following an update from the Food and Drug Administration. Federal officials halted the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine earlier this year for 10 days in April after six women experienced the blood-clotting problem — the only known cases at the time among more than 7 million people who had received the vaccine in the US. So far, at least 54 people in the US - mostly women - have been hospitalized with blood clots tied to the Johnson & Johnson jab, including nine who died - seven women and two men. The median age of the 54 people to contract blood clots was 44 years old. The panel voted unanimously in favor of deeming the mRNA vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna as the...
    Most Americans should be given the Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccines instead of the Johnson & Johnson shot that can cause rare but serious blood clots, U.S. health advisers recommended Thursday. The strange clotting problem has caused nine confirmed deaths after J&J vaccinations - while the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines don't come with that risk and also appear to be more effective, advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It's an unusual move and the CDC's director, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, must decide whether to accept the panel's advice. Until now the U.S. has treated all three COVID-19 vaccines available to Americans as an equal choice, since large studies found they all offered strong protection and early supplies were limited.  A dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is seen in a file photo. A government advisory panel advises getting Moderna or Pfizer instead RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Confirmed Omicron cases jump by a third overnight: Fauci... Have you got the sniffles, a headache or fatigue? You've... Share...
    Most Americans should be given the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead of the Johnson & Johnson shot that can cause rare but serious blood clots, U.S. health advisers recommended Thursday.The strange clotting problem has caused nine confirmed deaths after J&J vaccinations - while the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines don't come with that risk and also appear to be more effective, advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.It's an unusual move and the CDC's director, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, must decide whether to accept the panel's advice.Until now the U.S. has treated all three COVID-19 vaccines available to Americans as an equal choice, since large studies found they all offered strong protection and early supplies were limited. J&J's vaccine initially was welcomed as a single-dose option that could be especially important for hard-to-reach groups like homeless people who might not get the needed second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna options.But the CDC's advisers said Thursday that it was time to recognize a lot has changed since vaccines began rolling out a year ago. More than 200 million Americans...
    Most Americans should be given the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead of the Johnson & Johnson shot that can cause rare but serious blood clots, U.S. health advisers recommended Thursday. The strange clotting problem has caused nine confirmed deaths after J&J vaccinations — while the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines don’t come with that risk and also appear to be more effective, advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It’s an unusual move and the CDC’s director, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, must decide whether to accept the panel’s advice. Until now the U.S. has treated all three COVID-19 vaccines available to Americans as an equal choice, since large studies found they all offered strong protection and early supplies were limited. J&J’s vaccine initially was welcomed as a single-dose option that could be especially important for hard-to-reach groups like homeless people who might not get the needed second dose of the Pfizer or Moderna options. But the CDC’s advisers said Thursday that it was time to recognize a lot has changed since vaccines began rolling out a year ago. More...
    A government advisory panel is meeting Thursday to determine if any restrictions are needed for the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine because of rare but serious blood clots. A strange clotting problem prompted the U.S. to temporarily halt the single-dose J&J shots last April while scientists investigated. Eventually regulators decided the benefits of a one-and-done vaccine outweighed what was considered a very rare risk — as long as recipients were warned. While it’s still rare, the Food and Drug Administration told health care providers this week that more cases have occurred since the spring. They occur most in women between 30 and 49 — about once for every 100,000 doses administered, the FDA said. Overall, the government has confirmed 54 clot cases in both women and men, and nine deaths that included two men, Dr. Isaac See of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. He said two additional deaths are suspected. The CDC decides how vaccines should be used in the U.S., and its influential advisory committee is deliberating whether the newest safety data warrants any...
    UFC legend Diego Sanchez is in hospital with pneumonia and has blood clots in both legs as a result of Covid. The 39-year-old UFC icon, who refused to get vaccinated, said from his hospital bed: 'Covid is no motha f***in joke'. 4UFC's Diego Sanchez in hospital with pneumonia and blood clots in both legs caused by CovidCredit: Instagram @diegonightmaresanchezufc 4Sanchez is in hospital with his lungs struggling from CovidCredit: Instagram @diegonightmaresanchezufc 4Sanchez tried alternative treatments over getting the vaccineCredit: Instagram @diegonightmaresanchezufc The Mexican-American has been outspoken about alternative treatments to the vaccine. But having become seriously unwell, he said: "Pneumonia Covid never give up. "Blood clots in both my legs. "I have thousands and thousands prayers messages to read while I’m in the hospital again!! very inspirational!! I’m receiving churches, families and just a lot of great people putting me in their hearts and taking it to god the father." The ex-UFC star was suggesting alternatives to vaccines just last week. He said: "If you qualify for regeneron antibodies they work it’s only been 6 hours and I’m feeling better!...
                      by Debra Heine  Hospitals worldwide are being swamped with patients suffering from serious illnesses that are not believed to be COVID-related. Health officials say that the phenomenon is due to people avoiding visits to the doctor during the pandemic, and paying for it later. Others say that emergency rooms are filling up with people with vaccine injuries. Mark McGowan, the premier of Western Australia said in a recent interview that the country is seeing a huge uptick in hospitalizations, and no one knows why. “Our hospitals are under enormous pressure,”  McGowan said in an interview with Sky News Australia on Oct. 31. “This is the same in Tasmania, South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria.  This has been something no one has ever seen before, the growth in demand in our hospitals, why it is is hard, hard to know, except that there evidence of some sort of delayed reaction to COVID, but there is huge numbers of people coming through the door, so we’re doing everything we can to...
    Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine increases a person's risk of developing rare blood clots, a new study suggests. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, compared data from the general population before the pandemic to data gathered from reported vaccine side-effects suffered by Americans. They found that a person who received the vaccine was 3.5 times as likely to develop brain blood clots as an average person before the pandemic. Blood clotting, and specifically cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a well known side-effect of the J&J vaccine, and the discovery of this risk was the reason usage of the vaccine was paused in April. However, the team insists the risk is rare and that the findings must be looked at in the context of the effectiveness of the vaccine in preventing severe cases COVID-19. Researchers found that recipients of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine (pictured) were 3.5 times as likely to develop CVST - a potentially deadly blood clotting condition - than the average person  Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare but potentially deadly condition that...
    WHEN Robyne Toseland was hospitalised for two weeks her family were told to ‘prepare for the worst.’ Robyne was just 23-years-old when her life was turned upside down by a near fatal blood clot on the lung. 5Robyne Toseland suffered her first blood clot when she was just 23-years-old and has been plagued with health issues ever since 5The issues have meant that her and her husband Carl are unable to have children as doctors say she could dieCredit: PA Real Life 5Over the last 13 years Robyne has been admitted to hospital several times because of her health issuesCredit: PA Real Life It is now 13 years since Robyn was hospitalised and she now faces the devastating fact that pregnancy could kill her. She has suffered multiple blood clots over the years, leaving scars on her lungs and her dreams of having a family are now in tatters. Robyne who lives in Cambridge said: “I always assumed I would get married then have kids, but it’s very unlikely that me and Carl will be able to have a baby...
    Australia is set to stop manufacturing the AstraZeneca vaccine onshore with the life-saving jab falling victim to 'negative press'. The federal government in November last year had shelled out $1.7billion for Australia biomedical firm CSL to produce 50 million doses of the Oxford University vaccine at its manufacturing hub in Melbourne. At the time worldwide vaccine development for the coronavirus was in its fledgling stages and policymakers prioritised domestic production as a necessity during the crisis. Australia is set to stop manufacturing the AstraZeneca vaccine onshore with the life-saving jab falling victim to 'negative press'. Pictured: Prime Minister Scott Morrison touring the CSL vaccine manufacturing facility on February 12, 2021 The federal government in November last year had shelled out $1.7billion for Australia biomedical firm CSL to produce 50 million doses of the Oxford University vaccine (pictured, a woman being vaccinated in Melton, Victoria) But just one month after its launch in March 2021, the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation pulled the pin on younger Australians receiving the dose due to the extremely rare risk of fatal blood clots -...
    What else? This isn't the only study professing the possible benefits of aspirin in COVID patients. Earlier in October, Medical Express reported that researchers from the University of Minnesota and Basel University in Switzerland came to the same conclusion. The researchers' findings were published in Lancet's Open Access eClinical Medicine and revealed that patients on blood thinners before getting COVID were admitted less often to the hospital despite being older and having more chronic medical conditions than their peers. The findings also revealed that blood thinners — whether started before or after COVID-19 infection — reduced death by nearly half. Lead author Sameh Hozayen said, "We know that COVID-19 causes blood clots that can kill patients. But, do blood thinners save lives in COVID-19? Blood thinners are medications prescribed to prevent blood clots in patients with a prior blood clot in their lungs or legs. They also prevent blood clots in the brain secondary to abnormal heart rhythms, like atrial fibrillation. Blood thinners are the standard of treatment in these diseases, which is why we looked at data...
    Heart damage and blood clots a year after survivors shake off COVID-19 have shown that the effects of the virus extends well beyond the initial infection, a new study says. According to the study, even people who never showed enough symptoms to be hospitalized with the virus are in danger of developing heart failure or potentially deadly blood clothes a year later. Researchers at the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System in Missouri reported that COVID-19 survivors who weren’t hospitalized had a 39 percent increased risk of developing heart failure in the first year compared to someone who never had the virus. They also had a 119 percent increased risk of developing a potentially fatal blood clot and a 24 percent increased risk of having a stroke. For those who were hospitalized with COVID-19, the numbers increased even further, with a 482 percent chance of cardiac arrest, 270 percent chance for heart failure and an 855 percent chance of blood clots. The study states that one in seven patients who were admitted to an ICU with COVID-19 were...
    While the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) increases with age, blood clots can affect anyone. DVT is a blood clot in a deep vein, usually in the lower leg, thigh or pelvis.  WHO IS AT RISK FOR DEVELOPING BLOOD CLOTS? That said, it can occur in other places, like the arm and if it breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs, it can cause a pulmonary embolism (PE): a blockage of arteries in the lungs.  DVT and PE together are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). which can cause serious illness, disability and death.  As many as 100,000 people die from blood clots each year in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and VTE affects as many as 900,000 Americans each year. On average, one American dies of a blood clot every six minutes. That said, many VTE events are preventable and can be treated if found early.  People who are obese, have lung disease, have heart disease, have inflammatory bowel disease, have recent or recurrent cancer or are on...
    Lingering COVID-19 symptoms in "long haulers" may be caused by an overload of inflammatory cells "trapped" inside insoluble microscopic blood clots, according to researchers at Stellenbosch University in South Africa.   Professor Resia Pretorius, a member of the university’s Physiological Sciences Department, made the finding with her research team while studying micro clots in blood samples of individuals with "long COVID."  "We found high levels of various inflammatory molecules trapped in micro clots present in the blood of individuals with long COVID," Pretorius stated in a news release. "Some of the trapped molecules contain clotting proteins such as fibrinogen, as well as alpha (2)-antiplasmin".  A study found "long COVID" symptoms may be caused by trapped inflammatory cells in micro blood clots. (iStock, File) FRANCIS COLLINS, LONGTIME HEAD OF NIH, TO RESIGN  Fibrinogen is a protein involved with clot formation, while the molecule, Alpha (2)-antiplasmin, prevents the breakdown of blood clots, the authors explained in the release.   Typically, the body is able to maintain a balance between the process of blood clotting (thickening of the blood to prevent blood loss after...
    Long Covid could be caused by an overload of tiny clots 'trapped' inside people's blood weeks after they clear the initial infection, scientists say. The small study found patients who are 'long haulers' have a large amount of inflammatory molecules trapped in their bloodstream.   These blockages have the potential to disrupt the body's ability to distribute oxygen and vital nutrients, they said. It could explain long Covid's most common symptoms, such as fatigue, headaches and breathing difficulties. The South African researcher who made the discovery said the micro clots may be the cause of long Covid or one of several contributing factors.   A scientist has found long Covid patients have micro clots in their blood months after the initial infection. On the left is an image of healthy blood plasma (blood plasma is the largest type of fluid which forms blood, accounting for 55 per cent of the total) and on the right is an image of one of the micro clots found in the blood. The material contained in both samples were highlighted using florescent materials for analysis.   The...
    Scott Mikell, M.D., family medicine physician with East Georgia Medical & Surgical Associates, Statesboro Family Practice / EGRMC EGRMC and Dr Scott Mikell advise on the importance of learning your risk factors to prevent life-threatening blood clots: The pandemic has heightened attention to the dangers of blood clots including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and clot-provoked stroke. According to the National Blood Clot Alliance (NBCA), blood clots kill 274 Americans each day when they restrict blood flow and cause a medical emergency. While different types of blood clotting are being reported among people affected by COVID-19, particularly those who become severely ill after infection with the virus, everyone is at risk for blood clots regardless of age, gender or race. Obesity, smoking, hypertension and a personal or family history of blood clots increase your chances of developing clots. Women’s risk is increased by birth control pills, pregnancy and hormone replacement therapy. People at the highest risk include those with clotting disorders, atrial fibrillation (a-Fib), cancer, traumatic injury, lengthy immobility and...
    COVID jabs are no more likely to cause blood clots than the flu vaccine – and much less likely to than catching coronavirus, scientists say. Under-40s were stopped from having the AstraZeneca jab in May because of the clotting scare – and the cases have stopped happening since.  1The risk of getting a blood clot is much higher if you get sick and don't have the vaccineCredit: PA A study led by Oxford University found vaccines do increase the risk, but it is a small rise and the danger is “substantially higher” for people who get sick with the virus instead. Professor Carol Coupland explained that if 10million people got the AstraZeneca jab, it could cause blood clots in the veins of 66 more people than average. By comparison, if the same number of people caught Covid it could cause more than 12,500 extra clots. The same pattern was also seen for a condition called thrombocytopenia, which leaves people with unusually low blood platelets. Prof Aziz Sheikh, from the University of Edinburgh, said: “These are similar orders of risk as...
    The risk of blood clots is 'much higher' in people who catch Covid compared to those who get a Covid jab, a major UK study has found. Britain, like several other countries in Europe, currently does not give the AstraZeneca vaccine to people under 40 after it was linked to clotting disorders in the spring. But the latest Oxford University study suggests the risk from clots is higher from the virus itself than the British-made vaccine. In the biggest study of its kind, researchers looked at the medical records of 29million people in England who had either tested positive or had a vaccine by April. Among those who caught Covid, 12,614 per 10million suffered blood clots in a vein who would not have otherwise developed the condition. Whereas the risk among those given the AstraZeneca vaccine was significantly lower at 66 per 10million.  For Pfizer's vaccine — which uses a different technology to AstraZeneca's jab — the researchers did not spot any links between the jab and a clotting complication.   The latest findings suggest that countries with scare resource that are still...
    Long Covid may be triggered by the virus's abnormal blood-clotting complication, researchers say. Hundreds of thousands of patients have survived the initial infection only to be struck down several months later with fatigue and headaches.  But academics tasked with pinning down the debilitating condition are still baffled over the exact cause. Now experts at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland have moved one step closer to an answer – and say the body's clotting system 'may be involved'. Hundreds of thousands of patients have survived the disease only to be struck down several months later with fatigue and headaches (stock) The new research, published in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, offers hope of finding a cure for the condition. Medics examined 50 patients with long Covid symptoms – and compared them against 17 healthy volunteers. The affected patients had an average age of 50 and were analysed roughly 10 weeks after first getting infected. Blood samples were taken from all of the participants, allowing the researchers to spot any key differences between the groups. Inflammation levels among...
    In this article AZN-GBA paramedic prepares doses of AstraZeneca vaccine for patients at a walk-in COVID-19 clinic inside a Buddhist temple in the Smithfield suburb of Sydney on August 4, 2021.Saeed Khan | AFP | Getty ImagesA new study has given more details about the "rare but devastating" blood clotting complications associated with the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine. In a peer-reviewed paper published in The New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday, scientists from the Massachusetts Medical Society analyzed the first 220 cases of the condition reported in the United Kingdom. The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine — now one of the most widely used Covid vaccines in the world — was rolled out in the U.K. in January, making it the first country to administer the shot. A very small number of people who have been inoculated with the AstraZeneca vaccine have suffered blood clots. The condition, described by health authorities as "extremely rare," is characterized by blood clots accompanied by low platelet levels.VIDEO3:3003:30Doctor discusses AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine blood clot concernsCapital ConnectionThe Massachusetts Medical Society's study used data from 294 patients who presented to U.K....
    VACCINE blood clots are no longer a problem in the UK and the last case was a month ago, scientists say. Experts led by Oxford University have declared the scare over because health chiefs stopped giving the AstraZeneca jab to under-40s. 2Health chiefs in the UK stopped giving the AstraZeneca vaccine to under-40s in the springCredit: PA In a study they linked 220 clots directly to the vaccine, with nearly nine out of 10 in people younger than 60. One in four patients – 23 per cent – died after developing the condition, now named vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis, or VITT for short. This death rate was three times higher in people who developed the clot in their head and also had a brain bleed, at 73 per cent. But the NHS stopped giving the AstraZeneca jab to under-40s on May 7 and the number of new cases has “dramatically reduced” as a result. Dr Sue Pavord, a blood doctor at Oxford University Hospitals, said: “Thankfully the surge of cases is largely over and we haven’t really seen a...
    A blood clot can be a serious medical problem. It can even lead to a heart attack, stroke or death. In fact, 274 people die every day from blood clots, according to the National Blood Clot Alliance. So what does a blood clot look or feel like? And how do you know if you have one? A blood clot is a gel-like collection of blood cells in the veins or arteries that blocks blood flow. Without proper blood flow, important parts of your body like the heart, brain and legs may not get the oxygen they need. Blood clots can be as small as a grain of rice or as long as a Polish kielbasa, says Dr. Lawrence “Rusty” Hofmann, a professor of interventional radiology at Stanford University Medical Center in Palo Alto, California. Types of Blood Clots Millions of years ago, blood clots helped stop humans from bleeding to death after they were bitten by saber-tooth tigers, Hofmann explains. Nowadays, blood clots can still be helpful if we get injured, but they also can form for other reasons, which...
    Getting an annual flu shot may offer protection against COVID-19 as well, a new study suggests.  Researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine studied medical records from almost 75,000 Covid patients. They found patients who had recently gotten inoculated against influenzas had better outcomes, including almost 60 percent less likely to visit the emergency department and more than one-third less likely to develop severe blood clots. Scientists aren't yet sure whether the shot itself is protective, or if a person who gets a flu vaccine is likely to be overall healthier than those who skip the shot. Still, flu vaccination appears to be beneficial - and may be a useful tactic in countries that don't yet have access to Covid vaccines, the researchers say. A flu shot provides protection against severe outcomes from COVID-19, according to a new study (file image) Flu vaccination reduced patients' risk of visiting the ER and of experiencing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a severe form of blood clotting, the study found Because much of the world likely won't have widespread Covid...
    YOUR risk of a deadly blood clot is higher if you don’t get the vaccine and catch the coronavirus, a study has warned. Vaccines have been linked with cases of blood clotting in a tiny number of people since March, but are still deemed safe and effective. 1A vaccine is better than no vaccine when it comes to blood clots, experts have suggestedCredit: Reuters Health chiefs have urged people to keep coming forward for their shots regardless of the tiny risk. And a new study further confirms people are better off accepting their jab invite than not. It looked at six million people in Catalonia, Spain, of which some 1.3 million had been vaccinated with either one or two doses of AstraZeneca of Pfizer. A further 222,710 people who had previously had Covid were included in the study. Researchers in Spain, funded by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), were looking for cases of blood clotting disorders. Scientists said the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines had “similar safety profiles” in this study, meaning one was no worse than the other. But they...
    MIRAMAR (CBSMiami) – A 49-year-old woman who survived a fierce battle with the coronavirus while hospitalized is speaking out, saying she regrets her initial reluctance to get vaccinated and could have lost her life. Her story also prompts a plea from Dr. Todra Anderson-Rhodes, the chief medical officer for Memorial Hospital Miramar. READ MORE: Grab Your Tickle Stick: Florida Lobster Mini-Season Begins Wednesday Night “Please consider getting vaccinated. We implore you to do so. We call it the surge of the unvaccinated. Across our health care system, more than 98 per cent of our new COVID patients are unvaccinated. We implore you to get the correct information and we encourage people to talk to their health care providers about the science of being vaccinated. We know now it’s very safe and the side effects are very minimal,” said Dr. Anderson-Rhodes. Kayasa Cobb, the patient who is now at home, spoke with CBS4’s Peter D’Oench. “I was concerned. I did a lot of praying and said thanks to God we are here. That’s what I said and I am extremely grateful...
    A Las Vegas teenager who underwent three brain surgeries from blood clots after getting the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine has only just returned home and is still unable to walk after three months in the hospital.  Emma Burkey, 18, was rushed to a Las Vegas hospital after she started suffering seizures following the one-dose COVID shot back on April 1.  Burkey suffered what has since been described as a one in a million reaction to the J&J shot after developing blood clots.   The teenager ended up being airlifted to a hospital in California where she was placed in a medically induced coma, intubated and underwent three operations to repair the clots in her brain.   Three months on, Burkey is still unable to walk and her family are now preparing to sell their home given it is not wheelchair-accessible.  Emma Burkey, 18, was rushed to a Las Vegas hospital when she started suffering seizures after receiving the one-dose COVID shot back on April 1. She underwent three brain surgeries to repair blood clots and is only just returning home now...
    “The AstraZeneca vaccine is safe, effective and the benefits outweigh the risks” as reiterated by the European Medicines Agency EMA, which sees no links to blood clot problems. The agency’s risk assessment committee in an extraordinary meeting has reached the same conclusion as during its first assessment. The only change for the EMA would be that the risk of blood clots should be included in the vaccine insert because it also recognizes that there have been rare cases of clots combined with platelet loss and bleeding. The agency has explained that they will continue to investigate these thrombus events that, it repeats, are less frequent than those observed in the general population and recalls that the coronavirus itself is capable of causing circulation problems of this type. The EMA explains that these cases have occurred more frequently in young women, while the United Kingdom has used it often in older people, although it also recalls that it is too early to draw conclusions. The announcement took place at a press conference that has generated unusual expectations for the until recently...
    Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford have begun studying whether or not modifying their COVID-19 vaccines can reduce or eliminate the risk of rare, deadly blood clots. First reported by The Wall Street Journal, sources say scientists are working to  identify the causes behind the blood clots and potentially re-engineer the shots to be distributed by next year. Both the J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines have been linked to clots along with a low platelet-count condition known as thrombocytopenia, which researchers have dubbed vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT).        A J&J spokesman told The Journal that the New Jersey-based company supports 'continued research and analysis as we work with medical experts and global health authorities' but did not answer specific questions about the early-stage research. An AstraZeneca spokesperson elaborated and said the firm is 'actively working with the regulators and scientific community to understand these extremely rare blood-clotting events, including information to drive early diagnosis and intervention, and appropriate treatment.' Although it's unknown if the vaccines can even be modified, it might lead to changes in either ownership rights...
    A 72-year-old woman has died almost three weeks after receiving the AstraZeneca Covid jab.  Health officials said on Monday the South Australian woman's death is 'likely' linked to her consumption of the vaccine, making her just the fourth person to die of complications relating to the shot out of more than five million who have already had their first dose.  The woman is believed to have developed thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) some time between having the jab on June 24 and becoming unwell 11 days later on July 5. The ultra-rare condition can cause blood clots and is a side effect of the vaccine. But of the five million doses that have been dolled out in Australia, there are just 45 known cases of the condition and an additional 31 'probable' cases. The woman's death is the first to be linked to the Oxford AstraZeneca virus in South Australia.  She died in Royal Adelaide Hospital overnight after spending several days in intensive care.   Three other deaths nationwide are believed to be linked to the jab. More than five million Australians have...
    A group of Canadian researchers published a study Wednesday highlighting a previously unknown link between certain amino acids and rare blood clots in AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine recipients. Researchers said it could assist doctors in identifying and treating the blood clots which result from an immune-driven mix of coagulation and loss of platelets that stop bleeding, the Wall Street Journal reported. A team of researchers at McMaster University in Ontario published the findings in the Nature scientific journal, which builds on recent research in Europe about blood clots associated with the vaccine, and some scientists call vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT). An illustration picture shows vials with Covid-19 Vaccine stickers attached and syringes, with the logo of the University of Oxford and its partner British pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, on November 17, 2020. (Photo by JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images) AstraZeneca vaccine recipients first reported blood clots in the spring and the shot has been widely used in European countries. VITT has killed 170 vaccinated adults in the U.K, Europe and the U.S. according to government data, the WSJ reported. (RELATED: Study Finds Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine...
    Jeff Bezos is stepping down as Amazon CEO. Hell still have huge power at the company 15 States Spending the Most on Parks and Recreation 4 Cards With Massive Sign Up Bonuses (Get $200 Fast) Ad Microsoft 39 Hottest Gifts Of 2021 (Hurry, These Will Be Gone Very Soon) Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/10 SLIDES © Provided by Eat This, Not That! 7 Signs You've Got a "Deadly" Blood Clot Inside You German scientists recently shared a hypothesis why some vaccinates can cause rare blood clots. "While the harmless part of the virus is being made in the nucleus, bits of genetic material can break off, creating 'mutant' proteins that leave the cell and travel around the body," reports Insider. "Blood vessel walls respond to these proteins, which triggers blood clots, they said." Read on to hear about the 7 symptoms of a blood clot—and to ensure your health and...
    Doctors have documented what they believe to be the first known case of a U.S. patient developing blood clots after receiving the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. In a case report, researchers document a 65-year-old man who visited Allegheny Health Network in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 10 days after his second and final dose. He was diagnosed with blood clots in his legs, which they determined to a rare even caused by the immunization - and he ultimately passed away. It was previously believed that the rare but life-threatening condition only occurred in people who received Johnson & Johnson or AstraZeneca vaccines, both of which combine genetic material from the coronavirus with the genes of the adenovirus - which causes the common cold - to induce an immune response. The team says its findings show the side effect can also occur after someone gets a vaccine that uses messenger RNA (mRNA) but that, because blood clots after vaccinations are uncommon, it should not dissuade people from getting the COVID-19 jab.  A 65-year-old man was admitted to Allegheny Health Network in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 10...
    BOSTON (CBS) — Dr. Mallika Marshall is answering your coronavirus vaccine-related medical questions. If you have a question, email her or message her on Facebook or Twitter. Dr. Mallika is offering her best advice, but as always, consult your personal doctor before making any decisions about your personal health. Cindy writes, “I was wondering if my husband and I still need to spray mail & packages that come to the house if we are fully vaccinated? Do we need to wash our hands after handling said mail and packages?” If you’re fully vaccinated and not immunocompromised then you are at very low risk of getting really sick from COVID-19. So no, you do not need to continue to wipe down packages or groceries like we were all doing at the beginning of the pandemic. But you should continue to wash your hands regularly to reduce your chances of other respiratory viruses that can cause, for example, the common cold. Don on Facebook writes, “I have a history of blood clots in my feet and legs. Would it be safe to take COVID shots?” In general,...
    A mother in Utah has claimed that COVID-19 vaccines are to blame after her 17-year-old son and her husband were both hospitalized with blood clots soon after receiving the shots. 'There's no other explanation for what happened to my son and my husband, we are pretty certain that it was a direct result of the vaccine,' Cherie Romney said in an interview with Fox News on Wednesday.  Romney's son Everest, a healthy six-foot-nine high school basketball player, got his first Pfizer shot on April 21 and began experiencing severe symptoms less than 24 hours later, and her husband Preston suffered clots after getting a Moderna shot, she has said. Public health officials including the CDC say that the Pfizer and Moderna shots are not associated with an increased risk of rare blood clots, which were however seen in a small number who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Nevertheless, Romney believes her troubling anecdote is important to share as pressure mounts to vaccinate children, who are at incredibly low risk from COVID-19, and as more colleges require young and healthy...
    Tria Potts, who was 15 at the time, recovers from her stroke. "I"m forever, ever, ever grateful for OHSU," Potts said of Oregon Health and Science University. Tria Potts Tria Potts had a stroke after going on birth control at age 15. Doctors thought it was drugs. She was in rehab for five months, but still became the first in her family to graduate high school.  Potts had a severe blood clot while pregnant at 25, but was turned away at the first hospital.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Tria Potts doesn't remember losing consciousness at age 15 while her eyes rolled toward the back of her head. Her grandmother told her about that. Her memories of coming-to in a hospital bed after 27 days in a coma are fuzzy too. Her mom told her her first words were "Michael Jordan" before she reverted to using sign language, which the straight-A student been studying. Speaking, like eating and walking, would be something she'd have to relearn.  Potts, now a 37-year-old mom of two in Battle Ground,...
    AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccine has today been linked to another rare bleeding disorder. Researchers say around one in 100,000 people given the jab will suffer idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The condition can cause minor bruising around the body and can leave some with a purple-dotted rash.  Almost 350 Brits have been struck down with a separate rare clotting disorder after getting the AstraZeneca vaccine, which was developed by Oxford University.  The complication — blood clots occurring alongside abnormally low platelet levels, cells which cause blockages — spooked health chiefs into advising under-40s are given a different jab. ITP can cause minor bruising around the body and can leave some with a purple-dotted rash called petechiae (pictured) Edinburgh University experts, who uncovered the link to ITP, did not say how many people also went on to develop clots.  But they said it was likely to be a 'manifestation' of the main troubling complication. Researchers spotted the link after analysing data from 5.4million people in Scotland between December 8 and April 14. By then, 1.7million had received their first dose of the Oxford...
    Giving critically ill Covid patients aspirin does not boost their odds of surviving the disease, a major study revealed today.  Oxford University scientists hoped the cheap blood-thinner would work because it cuts the risk of blood clots — a common and deadly complication of the virus.  But results from the RECOVERY trial – one of the world's leading coronavirus drug studies – have shot down the theory.    Professor Peter Horby, one of the main researchers, also said there was no evidence that an infected patient was less likely to need a ventilator after taking aspirin.  Professor Horby, an infectious diseases expert at Oxford, claimed there was a 'small increase' in the likelihood of patients being discharged alive. But he said that 'this does not seem to be sufficient to justify its widespread use for patients hospitalised with Covid'. The RECOVERY trial has been one of the most successful for finding treatments and proved that dexamethasone cuts the risk of death. The £5 steroid is now credited for saving hundreds of thousands of lives worldwide.  The RECOVERY trial hoped the...
    A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:___Claim about airline meeting on vaccine liability is falseClaim: Airlines recently met to discuss the risks and liability of carrying passengers vaccinated against COVID-19 since they could develop blood clots.The facts: There's no evidence that major airlines had a recent meeting to discuss the risks of transporting vaccinated passengers or that flying will trigger extremely rare blood clots associated with some COVID-19 vaccines, such as those manufactured by Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca. But a popular Instagram post spread misinformation on that topic. "Airlines are meeting today to discuss the risks of carrying vaxed passengers due to the risk of clots and the liabilities involved," the false post states. "Oh the irony only the non vaxed can fly." In response to the post, International Air Transport Association spokesperson Anthony Concil told The Associated Press: "I can confirm that this is...
    A MUM-of-three died after suffering with blood clots following the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine. Tanya Smith, 43, was rushed to hospital after waking with stomach cramps days after her jab. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest updates 4Tanya Smith, 43, pictured with her family, tragically died following blood clotsCredit: BPM 4Her partner, Kenneth, has told of his heartbreak after her deathCredit: BPM The childminder had felt "pretty rough" after having the vaccination in March, her partner said. After being admitted to Plymouth's Derriford Hospital it was found she had multiple blood clots. Tanya, from Mutley in Plymouth, suffered a heart attack and then deteriorated before dying in hospital on April 3. Her partner, Kenneth Edwards, said: "She was just amazing, selfless, She was a childminder, a really good childminder for 19 years. "She leaves three children behind, two grown up children and a 12 year old little girl with disabilities. She was the only woman, apart from...
    BOFFINS claim to have cracked the cause of rare blood clots linked to Covid jabs and say they know how to solve it. They say the phenomenon is caused by “floating mutant proteins” which occur when the spike protein of the Sars-Cov-2 virus is sent into the wrong part of a cell. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest updates 3Boffins claim to have cracked the cause of rare blood clots linked to Covid jabs and say they know how to solve it.Credit: AFP Lead scientist Rolf Marschalek said his lab at the Goethe University in Frankfurt had not yet discussed its findings with AstraZeneca. He said: “They never contacted us so we never spoke to them, but if they do I can tell them what to do to make a better vaccine.” The German researcher believes the cause behind the clots in people who have received either the Astra Zeneca or Johnson and Johnson jabs are “floating mutant proteins.” He said the issue lies with the adenovirus vectors - which both the J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines use...