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    Here’s a chance to see how the right-wing outrage factory does its thing. HuffPost’s Liz Skalka traces back from a boomlet of angry tweets claiming schools in Loudoun County, Virginia, “are punishing kids who won’t wear masks by putting them in the equivalent of a rubber room without access to instruction,” in the words of one Republican congressional staffer.  The interesting question is where this story came from. Loudoun County has kept its mask mandate in place despite Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s order barring schools from such policies. And most students have complied: Out of 82,000 students, just 200 showed up without masks on Monday, and most agreed to put on a mask when asked to do so, according to the district. If students refuse to put on a mask, the district told HuffPost, the school would “send them to a common area, such as the auditorium, where they could access the Schoology platform to continue their school work. They were encouraged to email teachers if they had questions and teachers stopped by throughout the day to help students as their schedule allowed.”  So: The vast majority...
    This right-wing push for 'parental rights' in public school education has resulted in bills targeting LGBTQ-inclusive content. Following a record year for anti-LGBTQ bills, GOP lawmakers are continuing to introduce legislation that bans gender-affirming care for trans youth and prohibits trans athletes from playing on the team of their gender. There are at least 48 new anti-LGBTQ bills in legislatures across the country in addition to bills carried over to this year from 2021. Lawmakers are also ramping up efforts to control what students learn about the experiences of LGBTQ people in bills that mention "critical race theory," according to experts. Supporters of the anti-LGBTQ bills argue they protect "parental rights" and allow families to choose how their children are raised. In December, in a video summing up 2021's anti-LGBTQ bills and what to expect this year, Heron Greenesmith, senior research analyst for Political Research Associates, said so-called parental rights will be a "huge issue" for anti-LGBTQ bills this year. Some of this legislation essentially forces LGBTQ kids to be outed by...
    A university has given a content warning to students reading JK Rowling's first Harry Potter book over 'difficult conversations about gender, race, sexuality, class, and identity'. The University of Chester's English Department sounded the klaxon to freshers on its Approaches to Literature module, led by Dr Richard Leahy. It even told them they could raise concerns with him if they had 'any issues' with the topics discussed.  Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is one of the course's three set literary texts alongside Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games and Philip Pullman's Northern Lights. The trigger warning seen by MailOnline tells students: 'Although we are studying a selection of Young Adult texts on this Module, the nature of the theories we apply to them can lead to some difficult conversations about gender, race, sexuality, class, and identity. 'These topics will be treated objectively, critically, and most crucially, with respect. If anyone has any issues with the content, please get in touch with the Module Leader to make them aware.' It comes after JK Rowling's views on transgender rights has seen her...
    THOUSANDS of Americans in Maryland will be able to apply for tax credits that can help them cover their student loan debt. Governor Larry Hogan announced another $9million in tax credits on Wednesday. 1Thousands of Americans in Maryland will be able to apply for tax credits designed to help reduce student loan debtCredit: Getty The scheme is known as the Maryland Student Loan Debt Relief Tax Credit Program and almost $41million has been given out since its launch in 2017. Recipients are divided into two groups – those who attended a university in the state, and Marylanders who attended an out-of-state college, according to the Southern Maryland Chronicle. Around 9,000 residents in the state were awarded the grant last year. Marylanders that have undergraduate or graduate student loan debts of at least $20,000, and have at least $5,000 worth of debt when it comes to applying for the tax credit are eligible to file a claim. Americans can file applications from July 1 through to September 15 this year. Officials will prioritize those who didn’t get a tax credit...
    (CNN)A high school teacher in the Atlanta area has been charged with battery for allegedly shoving a 14-year-old student to the ground in front of his classmates, local officials said. Marquett Thinn, 44, was seen on video pushing a male student to the ground during an argument in a room full of students at Salem High School in Conyers, Georgia, the Rockdale County Sheriff's Office said in a news release.In edited cell phone video provided to CNN by the sheriff's office, Thinn can be heard yelling at the student and then appears to push him to the ground, according to the sheriff's office. The 14-year-old reportedly complained of wrist pain resulting from the assault, the sheriff's office said. Cindy Ball, a spokesperson for the Rockdale school district, told CNN that Tuesday was Thinn's last day of employment as a teacher and noted she could not comment further on personnel matters. Im hanging by a thread"We work diligently to investigate all allegations of employee misconduct. Rockdale County Public Schools (RCPS) expects all employees to conduct themselves professionally and ethically to provide...
    As the novel coronavirus continues to impact daily life both in the United States and across the globe, Republicans have been more than happy to stir up hysteria to keep people distracted and outraged about the wrong things. Trans youth playing sports, for example, as well as teaching students accurately and honestly about U.S. history and white supremacy. As Daily Kos recently covered, efforts to ban—if not burn—books in school and public libraries have taken hold of local school board meetings; if you want to learn more about why this is happening now, The Guardian did an excellent exploration into conservative top-dollar donors connected to these “grassroots” movements. One school board in Washington State, however, is getting national media attention because of efforts to have a famous novel removed from the required reading lists for high school freshmen. The Mukilteo school board voted unanimously to drop Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird from a required text to an optional one, as reported by local outlet KIRO 7. But the reason why is important, and the nuance is already being lost....
    Parents, teachers and politicians have been struggling for weeks over how schools should respond to the omicron surge, trying to balance the difficulties and losses associated with at-home learning and the dangers to student health of in-person learning. The pandemic has forced institutions to choose between bad outcomes. There are no perfect solutions. But the outcomes are worse, and the choices more limited, because of America’s deliberately callous and deliberately inequitable educational system. American schools have historically been as much about protecting the status of the powerful as about cultivating the broad knowledge and engagement in democracy that a republic requires. Poor students and students of color in the United States have long received worse education than their wealthier, whiter peers. Covid has turned a slow-rolling, generational cruelty into an immediate catastrophe. Given our history, it’s unlikely that even our current orgy of failure and tragedy will prompt change. But if we want an educational system that is better prepared for a crisis, and which can better prepare the whole nation for the crisis, then change is...
    California could soon pay the fare for students to ride buses to and from K-12 schools, bringing relief to potentially millions of kids who since last fall are back to attending their neighborhood schools in-person but don’t have a reliable way to get there. SB 878 would ensure nearly all public school children in grades TK-12 — including students who are homeless or have special needs — have access to free transportation to and from their neighborhood school each day. If the bill passes, school districts or county offices of educations could launch or expand their own public school transportation systems funded by the state, or partner with public transit agencies to get students to and from school. Sen. Nancy Skinner, an East Bay Democrat, introduced the bill to bring California up to national standards for home-to-school transportation. Skinner said Tuesday she doesn’t know how much it’ll ultimately cost the state. It will depend on whether schools need to create robust transit systems, or choose cheaper routes by partnering with local transit agencies, a spokesman for her office said Tuesday....
    HOBOKEN, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Tuesday, voters in Hoboken will decide by mail or in person whether or not to approve the construction of a new high school to the tune of a 30-year $241 million bond. As CBS2’s Alice Gainer reports, it’s been contentious between the yays and nays. READ MORE: 11-Year-Old New Jersey Girl Sews Custom Hospital Gowns For Pediatric Cancer PatientsHoboken school board meetings have been heated, but it all comes down to Tuesday’s vote. The Hoboken Board of Education has proposed building a state-of-the-art high school. It would be constructed at the current high school athletic field, moving the field to the roof of the new building. It also includes: an ice rink; all kinds of laboratories for science, engineering and media; specialized learning classrooms; a theater; tennis courts, and an indoor pool. The Board of Education says these amenities will make it a resource, they say, not just for students but the entire community. The price tag is a 30-year $241 million bond. With interest, it ends up being around $331 million. During a recent informational...
    Third grade teacher Cara Denison speaks to students while live streaming her class via Google Meet at Rogers International School on Nov. 19, 2020, in Stamford, Connecticut. The COVID-19 moralizers are still at it, convinced they can get the virus to care that they think life should go back to what it was two years ago. But conditions in schools—as in hospitals—continue to show how futile and entitled that position is. (Looking at you, Emily Oster, David Leonhardt, Leana Wen.) Week after week, we see scolding in the national media about how it’s bad for schools to close or go remote, while local reports make clear again and again that school leaders do not have a choice here—and that in many cases, keeping schools open is very different from educating students, as kids are sitting in crowded classrooms without anyone available to actually teach them. If we listen to students and teachers and administrators, we also hear about deep pain being felt in schools as yet another wave threatens to drown people after nearly two years of struggle. “There is no way to...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A principal is often the heart of a school. Now their students, faculty and community have an opportunity to recognize administrators who have gone above and beyond during the pandemic.  Five Baltimore City Public Schools principals will receive the Heart of School award this year. Besides the well-deserved recognition, the principals will also win $2,500 to put toward their classrooms. READ MORE: Maryland Weather: We Could See Some Snow On FridayThe annual awards are presented by the Fund for Educational Excellence, a Baltimore-based nonprofit which highlights exceptional leaders who build strong school culture and play a significant role in lifting up their students and staff. Kevin Leary, senior program director for the nonprofit organization, said the awards are about school communities recognizing and respecting the work of their leaders and nominating them as a way of saying thank you for their efforts. “This is really all driven by school communities,” Leary said. For his efforts leading students and educators at Mary E. Rodman Elementary, David Guzman was one of five recipients of the award in 2020. READ...
    In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple prestigious American universities announced that they would not require students to submit SAT or ACT scores due to the “extraordinary circumstance” facing them. However, in recent years, standardized tests have received intense criticism from people who characterize them as unfair to poor and minority students who may not have access to expensive test preparation materials. Ibram X. Kendi, author of "How to Be an Anti-Racist" and "Stamped from the Beginning," said in October 2020 that “standardized tests have become the most effective racist weapon ever devised to objectively degrade Black and Brown minds and legally exclude their bodies from prestigious schools.” In response to charges such as Kendi’s, the American university system has not only been disregarding standardized test scores of prospective students but has begun to actively discriminate against demographics of students who routinely perform well on them. In 2020, Asian students scored in the 78th percentile of the ACT but faced discrimination when applying for admittance to Ivy League universities. A two-year investigation into Yale...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Students can soon put those number two pencils down. The SAT test is shifting to an online format, the College Board announced in a statement Tuesday. The standardized college-entrance exam is going digital for American students in 2024 and international students in 2023. READ MORE: Giant Leap For Man As James Webb Telescope Reaches Final Destination 1 Million Miles Away“The digital SAT will be easier to take, easier to give, and more relevant,” said Priscilla Rodriguez, vice president of College Readiness Assessments at College Board. “We’re not simply putting the current SAT on a digital platform — we’re taking full advantage of what delivering an assessment digitally makes possible. With input from educators and students, we are adapting to ensure we continue to meet their evolving needs.” The test will also be shorter. However, it will still take place in a proctored setting and students have to bring their own computer. If they don’t have one, the College Board can give them a loaner for the day. The changed format also shortens the test from three hours to...
    (CNN)The SAT test taken by prospective college students across the country will go all-digital starting in 2024, the College Board announced in a statement Tuesday."The digital SAT will be easier to take, easier to give, and more relevant," said Priscilla Rodriguez, vice president of College Readiness Assessments at College Board. "We're not simply putting the current SAT on a digital platform -- we're taking full advantage of what delivering an assessment digitally makes possible. With input from educators and students, we are adapting to ensure we continue to meet their evolving needs."The transition comes months after the College Board pilot-tested a digital SAT in November 2021 in the US and internationally. 80% of students said they found it less stressful, and 100% of educators reported a positive experience, according to the College Board.The move to a digital test will apply to all of the SAT Suite. The PSATs and international SAT will go digital in 2023 followed by the US SAT a year later.In addition, the digital SAT will be shortened from 3 hours to 2 hours, with more time...
              by Peter Cordi   With cops in Austin, Texas, not supervising “hundreds of sex offender cases” due to Defund the Police budget cuts, Campus Reform spoke with students at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) about their safety. “The situation in the city of Austin has been critical for some time ever since the city of Austin council decided to defund the police unanimously in the summer of 2020, and reduce their police budget by one-third,” sophomore Carter Moxley said. Moxley also discussed UT Austin President Jay Hartzell’s decision last November to “increase [University of Texas Police Department] patrol in the west campus area and develop additional options to enhance safety for [the] students” after a violent incident near campus. “The UT PD is basically stepping in where the Austin Police Department cannot because they’re so underfunded in this situation,” he stated. Campus Reform also spoke with Daniella, a senior who requested that her last name remain anonymous. “As a young woman, I feel like my safety is so much more compromised without a reliable way to reach the police if I ever found myself...
    The Loudoun County School District - which has been plagued by scandal after scandal over critical race theory-inspired 'equity' lessons and transgender issues - is now at the center of fresh wave of controversy after schools prevented pupils from going into their classrooms if they were not wearing a facemask on Monday. Republican Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin had signed an executive action within hours of him taking office on January that aimed to let parents opt out of school mask mandates. The order was supposed to take effect on Monday but confusion has swirled over the implications since then. His instructions were either interpreted differently by some districts or plainly ignored with schools continuing to keep pre-existing mask mandates in place for students.  Republican Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin signed an executive order within hours of entering office rescinding mask mandates for schools from Monday, but it appears the policy has been met with confusion Republican J.P. Freire, Director of Communications on the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means tweeted that children were being 'punished' and kept outside classrooms or...
    When Prince George’s County, Maryland, Public Schools leaders suddenly announced that the week leading up to winter break, and the two weeks after, would feature virtual learning, they acknowledge it wasn’t a popular decision. But schools CEO Monica Goldson said the only thing school leaders could do with so many outbreaks spreading around the county was wait it out. More Education News More Prince George’s County News “We stopped the spread of COVID,” Goldson said at an event in Capitol Heights a week after kids returned to the classroom. Last week, kids were also sent home with antigen rapid tests, with instructions to parents to administer those tests Sunday, ahead of the return to class on Monday morning. Goldson said that was a success, too, with no tech issues reported. “Today was the first day where students and parents were back in schools after utilizing” their tests, noted Goldson. “We had over 85,000 tests uploaded into our database and just a few students who tested positive. So as far as I’m concerned, that’s positive, because I never want those...
    TRENTON, New Jersey (WABC) -- New Jersey is among the list of states, including New York, which are seeing more positive signs in the fight again COVID and the omicron variant.In the last week alone, the 7-day average for new daily cases in the Garden State has dropped 51%.The news comes as students in New Jersey's fourth-largest school district return to in-person learning.Paterson public schools have been conducting remote classes since students returned from winter break due to the large number of COVID cases among students and staff.Elsewhere in the state, Rutgers University announced over the weekend it will require COVID booster shots for all students before the start of the new semester.In-person classes resume in New Brunswick next week, on January 31.Students with a medical or religious exemption are excused from the new requirement.ALSO READ | 5 tax changes that can boost your refund this yearEMBED More News Videos It's almost time to file your federal tax return and there are a handful of changes you need to know about, including steps you need to take regarding child tax...
    Media personality Megyn Kelly and her guest called out America’s education system for perpetuating the culture war and killing students’ curiosity. During The Megan Kelly Show on Sirius XM Wednesday, free speech author and Foundation for Individual Rights in Education President Greg Lukianoff asserted that college students should be refunded if they are not offended at least once through the challenging of their ideas before graduating. “Being offended is what happens when you have your deepest beliefs challenged,” Lukianoff said. “If you make it [through] college without that happening, you should demand your money back.” When Kelly asked Lukianoff about why the First Amendment is so important, the author noted that free speech is actually the opposite of arrogance. “There is a humility to being in favor of freedom of speech, which is that you always take seriously the possibility you might be wrong,” Lukianoff said. “There is an arrogance to anyone who thinks they can be the perfect censor because when you are saying, ‘I can actually eliminate discussion on this topic...
    Georgia Department of Natural Resources An Atlanta teacher’s proposal to restore a community nature trail has earned her school a $1,000 grant from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Kendall Xides, STEM teacher at Oak Grove Elementary in DeKalb County, received DNR’s 2021-22 Conservation Teacher of the Year grant, the agency announced today. The annual award goes to a third- through fifth-grade public or private school teacher in Georgia who demonstrates exceptional energy and innovation in teaching life sciences. Funding is provided by The Environmental Resources Network, or TERN, friends group of the DNR Wildlife Conservation Section. Xides was selected for her Birdsong Nature Trail 30th Anniversary proposal, said Linda May, outreach coordinator with the Wildlife Conservation Section. “Solid learning objectives, cross-curricular creativity, community partners and a passion for empowering students to conserve wildlife habitat made Kendall Xides’ proposal rise to the top,“ May said. The funds will be used to replace disintegrating landscape timbers that define the 30-year-old trail and to buy native plants, signage and plant identification markers,...
    Georgia Department of Natural Resources An Atlanta teacher’s proposal to restore a community nature trail has earned her school a $1,000 grant from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Kendall Xides, STEM teacher at Oak Grove Elementary in DeKalb County, received DNR’s 2021-22 Conservation Teacher of the Year grant, the agency announced today. The annual award goes to a third- through fifth-grade public or private school teacher in Georgia who demonstrates exceptional energy and innovation in teaching life sciences. Funding is provided by The Environmental Resources Network, or TERN, friends group of the DNR Wildlife Conservation Section. Xides was selected for her Birdsong Nature Trail 30th Anniversary proposal, said Linda May, outreach coordinator with the Wildlife Conservation Section. “Solid learning objectives, cross-curricular creativity, community partners and a passion for empowering students to conserve wildlife habitat made Kendall Xides’ proposal rise to the top,“ May said. The funds will be used to replace disintegrating landscape timbers that define the 30-year-old trail and to buy native plants, signage and plant identification markers,...
    Ray Delva, English Instructor, Ogeechee Technical College Ray Delva, English Instructor, was recently named Ogeechee Technical College’s 2022 Rick Perkins Award for Excellence in Technical Instruction recipient at the annual Spring Faculty & Staff Meeting and Awards Ceremony held on January 18 in the Joseph E. Kennedy Auditorium. The Rick Perkins Award for Excellence in Technical Instruction is an annual, statewide competition that honors the Technical College System of Georgia’s most outstanding instructors. Started in 1991, this honor recognizes technical college instructors who make significant contributions to technical education through service, innovation, and leadership in their field. “Ogeechee Tech is one of the premier academic institutions in the region, so I feel immensely honored to be named this year’s Instructor of the Year,” said Delva. “I get to work with so many talented colleagues and inspiring students; it really is a privilege. I’m excited for the college’s potential to grow and continue serving the community.” Delva’s dedication to his student’s success was the common thread expressed by his nominators, one...
    Until this past year, Liz Schwartz had never heard her 23-year-old daughter read more than a street sign or words flashing across the TV. But now at their Sunnyvale home, Schwartz now has been listening in awe as her daughter, Paige Kowalski — who has down syndrome — reads aloud from “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio, the children’s novel about a young boy who was born with a facial deformity. It is the latest book that Kowalski’s class at Santa Clara’s Mission College has been reading over Zoom. For the last year, she has been a student at the college program for students with developmental disabilities — classes that Schwarz says have been vital for her family, and given her daughter a place to socialize, exercise and learn. “To actually read a book, this is a brand new skill that she has learned in less than a year, and I did not imagine that she would ever do that,” Schwartz said. But the program, which has been around for nearly two decades, is coming to an end in June, leaving parents...
    BOULDER, Colo. (CBS4)– After a virtual start to the semester, Friday was move-in day at the University of Colorado dorms on the Boulder campus. (credit: CBS) Students will return to in-person classes on Monday. For the past two weeks, classes have been remote due to the Marshall Fire and surge in COVID cases. Even with booster shots and mask mandates, some students believe the spread of COVID will continue on campus. (credit: CBS) “It’s hard to say if that’s enough. Especially because you can’t really stop the spread with in-person classes. But we have to do school somehow,” said CU student Maha Noorzai. CU requires everyone on campus to be vaccinated and have their booster shot.
    "That's the average of who they know, which is why rich people usually don't feel rich," another said. Still another added, "This is why the wealth gap is so toxic to our society. The rich literally have no concept of how anyone actually lives. And most people I've met do not make even 45k a year." Even journalist Soledad O’Brien chimed in to say, “Not shocking if it were, say, middle school students. But Wharton?” For others, the tweet brought back memories from the time they spent within the premier program. Rosie Nguyen, a 24-year-old Wharton grad, recalled, “My freshman year, I told a classmate I had a full ride to penn ($80k/year tuition) because my parents make only $10k/year, and they replied 'you’re so lucky, I have to pay full tuition cause my parents make too much money.'" As of Friday afternoon, Strohminger's tweet had been liked more than 215,000 times, retweeted 34,000 times, and quote-tweeted 10,000 times.What else?While many commenters specifically ridiculed the University of Pennsylvania, where the median family income of a student is $195,000, Strohminger argued...
    Share this: New York City’s Public School Athletic League calls itself the largest sports league in the world, a city-run organization that provides opportunities for some 45,000 high school students to compete in soccer, bowling, cheerleading, table tennis, and more than a dozen other sports. But when it comes to middle school, there are few chances for students to face off against other schools. The education department does not support a competitive league for students in grades six through eight. A Manhattan gym teacher and local nonprofit have filled in that gap. John DeMatteo, who teaches at Manhattan Academy of Technology in Lower Manhattan, and the nonprofit Manhattan Youth Recreation and Resources, have spent years quietly building the Middle School Athletic League, or MSAL. It now includes about 125 schools, giving students the chance to wear a team jersey and travel the city to play against their peers.
    Another day, another queer person discussing their identity, journey, and humanity in an appeal to lawmakers in hopes of preventing them from doing harm. At this point, this scenario feels like it could come from almost anywhere around the United States, but this particular instance comes out of Florida. While states have been pushing a variation of anti-trans legislation, SB 1834 in Florida has a different (but still terrible) agenda. What is it? It wants to ban school districts from discussing sexual orientation or gender identity with children. Like many other pieces of anti-LGBTQ+ legislation, this bill is titled “Parental Rights in Education,” because framing the issue as being about parental rights reads a lot less nefariously than outright saying you want to prevent young people from knowing LGBTQ+ people exist. Luckily, a video of a brave man speaking up to lawmakers in the state has started to gain traction online, hopefully helping to get people’s attention on this horrifically prejudiced legislation. In specifics, the bill seeks to “prohibit” district school boards from “encouraging classroom discussion about sexual orientation or gender identity in primary...
    George Mason University’s Arlington campus at night. The university celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/ George Mason University Gregory Washington is the eighth president of George Mason University. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/George Mason University The Center for the Arts and the Johnson Center sit by a pond on George Mason’s Fairfax Campus. Courtesy Evan Cantwell/Creative Services This aerial photograph shows the newly built George Mason College’s Fairfax campus, circa 1965. Courtesy George Mason University (1/4) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. When people think of universities in the D.C. area, big names such as Georgetown and George Washington University might come to mind. But there’s another George in the area, and it’s celebrating a big milestone this year. George Mason University, Virginia’s largest public research university, turns 50 in 2022 and is celebrating an impressive array of stats it has racked up over the half-century, including: An enrollment of 39,000 students, representing 130 countries. More than $200 million in George Mason-sponsored research in...
              by Stuart Reges   How do you make the progressives on campus so “horrified” that they spring into action to defend their sacred ideology?  Make an indigenous land acknowledgment that doesn’t match their view of history and watch them lose their minds.  Let me describe how that happened to me. Indigenous land acknowledgments have been common in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and they are now starting to crop up on college campuses in the United States.  At the University of Washington, they are showing up all over the place.  The diversity experts in the university’s Allen School of Computer Science—where I teach—have produced a “best practices” document that encourages faculty to include these on their course syllabus.  The document also suggests replacing the phrase “you guys” with “ya’ll,” but that’s a topic for a different piece. At first, I ignored these land acknowledgments, but the more I observed how they were used, the more they reminded me of a prayer.  At our annual faculty retreat this year our director opened with a solemn land acknowledgment.  Why?  As with a prayer, a land acknowledgment...
              by Alpha News Staff   The University of Minnesota admitted in an email to its student body that the COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t prevent transmission of the virus — yet the school says it will “probably” require more boosters for its students. Public Health Officer Jakub Tolar sent an email to the student body answering some frequently asked questions about the virus earlier this month. “I’m vaccinated, does that mean I can’t get COVID-19?” one question reads. “No,” the school responds, stressing that omicron remains “easily transmissible” even among the university’s fully-vaccinated population. Despite this, the school indicates it will likely require more vaccines. “I’m vaccinated and boosted, am I done?” the next question reads. “Probably not,” the university responds. “Updated and amplified protection is key to staying healthy and bringing the pandemic under control,” it continues, apparently suggesting booster mandates are soon to come. Already, President Joan Gabel is sternly asking students to get another vaccine. The university has also denied the reality of natural immunity. “Based on current data, no,” previous infections do not protect people from reinfections, it says. “You...
    Prince George’s County, Maryland, parent Patrick Paschall said he and other parents were dancing on the neighborhood street corner upon learning that students would resume in-person learning this week. Virtual learning, Paschall said, has been difficult. His wife’s job requires her to go into the office most of the time, leaving Paschall to watch his kindergartner and second-grader. He finds himself juggling meetings and other requests with making sure his kids have the resources they need to participate in virtual classes. It’s often a daunting task because his second-grader has lunch at 10 a.m. and recess immediately after, and the kindergartner has lunch at 11 a.m., followed by recess. “It’s a juggle, and it’s a struggle,” Paschall, who is also running for a state delegate seat, said. “My kids were really frustrated a lot of the time because their technology didn’t work, or they couldn’t find the pieces that they need, or they took a longer break than they realized they were supposed to.” Still, Paschall and other parents have said the circumstances were better than the alternative: sending students...
    A seventh grader has died after he overdosed on fentanyl at his Hartford, Connecticut school last week. The 13-year-old boy, who has not been identified, was rushed to the hospital Thursday after he collapsed in gym class at Sports and Medical Sciences Academy. He died on Saturday, Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said.   Two other students who were exposed to the drugs Thursday were also taken to the hospital the same day, but later released.  In a statement released over the weekend, Bronin said that the city, 'grieves for this child lost, for his loved ones, his friends, his teachers' and the entire community at his school. 'We still have much to learn about the circumstances of this tragedy, and about how a child had access to such a shocking quantity of such deadly drugs, and our police (department) will continue their investigation and seek to hold accountable the adults who ultimately are responsible for this child's death,' Bronin added. Police responded to Sports and Medical Sciences Academy Thursday when three students were rushed to the hospital after being exposed to fentanyl. Drug...
              by Kendall Tietz   Students across the U.S. are planning school walkouts in protest of in-person learning as COVID-19 cases spike amid the rise of the Omicron coronavirus variant. There are nearly 3,500 schools actively disrupted as of Friday, according to Burbio’s K-12 School Opening Tracker, which tracks school closures for 1,200 districts, including the 200 largest school districts in the nation. On Tuesday, New York City students staged a walkout in protest of in-person learning over what they said were concerns about testing and safety mitigation measures. NYC Mayor Eric Adams said school was the “safest place” for children during a Friday news conference. Hundreds of kids walked out of Brooklyn Tech today to protest the continuation of in person school during the Omicron wave and to call for a remote option pic.twitter.com/0HMVAFM2YC — Jillian Jorgensen (@Jill_Jorgensen) January 11, 2022 “Of course, it’s not zero-risk to have kids in school … With this increase in transmissibility, we will likely see an increase in cases in schools, but it’s likely not higher risk than many of the other activities kids participate in when they’re not in school,” Dr....
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Hundreds of local students will be pounding the pavement Sunday as they tackle a half-marathon in Pasadena. The 13.1 mile course was expected to get underway at the Rose Bowl. READ MORE: Health Officials Describe Winter COVID Surge At 'Near Crisis Level'Among its participants were Students Run LA, a program that teaches at-risk youth long-term goals through continuous races. READ MORE: Legal Battle Over Prince's $156 Million Estate Comes To An End“It is an opportunity to make them understand that they are young, youthful, that they really haven’t reached their peak and that they have a long road ahead of them, that they can achieve long-term goals,” said Sam Scruggs, who works at Locke High School with Students Run LA. Scruggs added that the program assist its participants in knowing that they can accomplish anything. MORE NEWS: Authorities Increase Security At Local Synagogues Following Texas Standoff“It gives me a sense of accomplishment and knowing that I am able to run 13.1 miles,” said Denise Garcia, a runner. “Every time I check my pace,...
                 State Senator Ryan Aument (R-Lititz) on Thursday introduced legislation that will expand parents’ access to school choice during the coronavirus pandemic. The measure, Senate Bill 1015, will create an Education Savings Account, allowing parents to potentially receive funding to send their children to schools that are better equipped to address their child’s needs. “Parents have seen the negative impact on their children from not having in-person instruction,” said Senator Aument. “If schools will not remain open, students and their families deserve options to ensure every child receives a high-quality education.” Because of transitions to virtual learning, parents who meet the eligibility requirements would be given funds to offset certain costs connected to educational alternatives to their current public school. Some examples include tutors, at-home instructional content, tuition, and testing. “By removing financial barriers to accessing these valuable tools, Pennsylvania students struggling with learning loss will have a greater chance of getting back on track,” wrote Aument in a recent opinion piece. “Education Savings Accounts will increase access to expanded educational options, offering students, parents, and teachers alike more learning...
    (CNN)A 13-year-old male is in grave condition after he overdosed at his Hartford, Connecticut, school on Thursday from a presumed fentanyl exposure, according to authorities. Two other male students involved were also taken to the hospital, according to police. On Thursday morning, the Hartford Police Department (HPD) responded to the Sport and Medical Sciences Academy (SMSA), a statement from HPD says. A male was unconscious "upon arrival, CPR was being administered by responding Fire and EMS," they noted."Evidence of narcotics was located in close proximity to the juvenile, which a later presumptive test revealed the presence of fentanyl," HPD said.All three, who are 7th graders, were transported to Connecticut Children's for treatment and evaluation.Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez, superintendent for Hartford Public Schools, said in a statement that the boy collapsed while in gym class.1 in 100,000: The story of a fentanyl victim Read MoreDuring a news conference Thursday, Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the one student who remains hospitalized did ingest the drug, but added, "we do not know for certain whether the other students ingested the fentanyl.""Our staff acted quickly...
              by JC Bowman   It is back to work for state legislators. The first week of the legislature has been very busy. While criticizing politicians is a national activity and a form of amusement for many, the truth is that most of these folks are good people, working hard, and trying to do the right thing for our state. It is always the good, bad, and ugly in any political system. The Tennessee Constitution requires the General Assembly is required to provide for the maintenance, support, and eligibility standards of a system of free public schools. The current formula is subject to ongoing litigation, and the amount the state currently spends on public education is among the bottom in the nation. We are optimistic that we can move forward. On Tuesday, January 11th the Commissioner of Education, Penny Schwinn unveiled a potential new school funding formula she calls the “Funding for Student Success.” The process has been somewhat rushed, and they should have started much earlier. There are some concerns about use of Gates Foundation money, and involvement of national groups...
    Students across the U.S. are planning walkouts to protest in-person learning amid a national spike in COVID-19 omicron cases. More than 4,100 schools nationwide were closed as of Tuesday — a slight reduction from the more than 5,400 schools closed last week following winter break, according to community event website Burbio, which tracks school closures in more than 5,000 U.S. school districts. The closures came largely due to increasing COVID-19 cases and related staffing shortages. NEW YORKIn New York City, students at Brooklyn Technical High School made headlines Tuesday after videos posted to social media showed swaths of students leaving a school building in the middle of the day, protesting in-person learning amid an apparent lack of testing for students and staff, according to local reports. "We don’t feel safe at school," a Brooklyn Tech junior told The New York Post Tuesday. "It’s pretty much that simple. There are so many cases going around and we think more should be done." Sources told the Post that some teachers gave students a green light to leave classes while others said they...
    (CNN)College campuses have fewer students on them, and it's not just because of remote learning. There are about 1 million fewer college students enrolled since before the pandemic began, according to a report released Thursday.Undergraduate enrollment declined by 3.1% or more than 465,000 students between fall 2020 and fall 2021, according to the report released by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. A look at the past two years of the pandemic shows there are an estimated 1,025,600 fewer undergraduate students than were enrolled in fall 2019."That's about a six and a half percent decline, which is the largest two-year drop that we've ever seen, at least in the last 50 years in the US for undergraduates. It's about twice as steep a decline as the previous largest," said Doug Shapiro, the executive director of the center, a research arm of the National Student Clearinghouse. Interactive: Tracking America's recovery The last time there was a decline like this was in 2013, when enrollments were coming off "an all-time high driven by the Great Recession," Shapiro told CNN. That's normal, he...
    Today, Governor Brian P. Kemp delivered his fourth State of the State Address to a joint session of the Georgia General Assembly. Read and watch below.  FY 2022 Governor’s Report – FINALLt. Governor Duncan, Speaker Ralston, President Pro Tempore Miller, Speaker Pro Tempore Jones, members of the General Assembly, members of the judiciary, and my fellow Georgians. Three years ago, when I stood before this body and the people of our state for the first time as your governor, I said, “I know there will be adversity… those who want to tear us down. There will be difficult days and dark nights. But together, we will overcome. Like Coach Henderson said, ‘It can be done’.” Standing before all of you today in the final year of my first term in office, I didn’t know then how true these words would become. But, just like I saw firsthand all those years ago under the Friday night lights at Clarke Central High School, legendary football Coach Billy Henderson was right again. Despite the divisive...
    PALO ALTO – Instead of going home after dropping off her daughter at El Carmelo School on Wednesday morning, Delmey Walker stuck around to help test students for COVID-19 and keep them from getting too too rowdy in the library. Walker, a mother of two students in the Palo Alto Unified School District, was among hundreds of parents who have answered the call to join a unique new program — “1 Palo Alto” — that district administrators hope will prevent schools from shutting their doors again as the omicron variant continues to raise fears that spring 2022 might be a lot like 2020. To shore up staffing at all schools as droves of teachers and support personnel call in sick, Superintendent Don Austin this past weekend sent out a plea through the district’s website for community volunteers to pitch in. Within the first 20 minutes, 51 parents had signed up. By Monday morning the number had climbed to 350, and a day later it more than doubled to 756. “We expected a solid response,” Austin said. “But I didn’t expect...
    An updated lawsuit filed against a Michigan high school documents Ethan Crumbley's 'unusual' behavior before he allegedly opened fire.  The suit reveals warning signs leading up to the shooting which included 15-year-old Crumbley bringing a bird's head in a Mason jar filled with yellow liquid three weeks before the massacre took place, according to the Detroit Free Press, which reported its findings after exclusive access to the revised lawsuit. Crumbley was also revealed to have allegedly brought bullets to class and put them on display and researched ammunition on his phone only a day before the shooting.  In the $100 million lawsuit filed against Oxford High School, officials are being targeted as the responsible party for the November 30 shooting that saw four students killed and seven others injured.  Crumbley allegedly posted on Twitter later on November 29, writing: 'Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds. See you tomorrow Oxford,' the Detroit Free Press reported Friday. The Michigan high school has since been singled out for being made aware of Crumbley's behavior but taking no action as they were...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- The surge of coronavirus cases is having a major impact on classrooms -- So much so, that one school instituted an emergency closure for the rest of the week.It's the Oakland School for the Arts, which is a nonprofit charter school, and not part of the Oakland Unified School District."During our 7th period class teachers told us that our school would be closing for the rest of the week," said 8th grader Jayla Brown.RELATED: UC Berkeley students push for remote start to spring semester amid COVID surgeThat's because 20 teachers at Oakland School for the Arts are out with COVID-19 or out after having been exposed to the virus."Two of my teachers were out today," said 7th grader Micah Head."My Art teacher was gone the whole last week, and my math teacher was gone, and my English teacher was gone," said 7th Grader Zion Fort.VIDEO: CA official explains what state can do to keep schools open amid omicron surgeEMBED More News Videos There is growing concern that more Bay Area schools could return to remote learning...
    (CNN)As Covid-19 cases skyrocketed across Britain in late December, Stuart Guest spent his vacation poring over scientific reports about air cleaning and filtration systems.Guest, a head teacher at an elementary school in Birmingham, England, scoured Amazon for affordable air purifiers in the hopes of stopping the more transmissible Omicron variant from spreading among his 460 students, who are between 3 and 11 years old. The British government recommends two models made by Dyson and Camfil, but at £424 ($575) and £1,170 ($1,590), respectively, they were too expensive. Guest ultimately bought £200 ($270) portable units for each classroom."I got what I think is the best air purifier for the budget I have available. I hope I've got something that's doing the job, but I'm not an expert. And there's been no guidance put out by the Department for Education. I've had to do it all myself, and I shouldn't have to do that when it's a national crisis," Guest said. Millions of British students have returned to school following the Christmas and New Year holidays, amid a record surge in infections...
    (CNN)The current Covid-19 surge in the US, fueled by the Omicron variant, could peak later this month -- but the next couple of weeks are critical, a health expert says.Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, warns long-term planning is needed to avoid continued stress on the health care system, as hospitals become full, schools struggle to keep students in class and testing remains difficult to access."We're seeing two sets of things happening: A lot of vaccinated people getting infected. We're doing fine. Largely avoiding getting particularly sick, avoiding the hospital; a lot of unvaccinated people and high-risk people who have not gotten boosted and they're really filling up the hospitals, and so our hospital systems are under a lot of stress," Jha told ABC's "This Week.""Then we have to start thinking about a long-term strategy for how do we manage this virus and not go from surge to surge feeling like we don't have a longer-termed approach," said Jha. Nearly a quarter of hospitals are reporting a critical staff shortage as Omicron drives a...
    America’s latest mental health crisis is kids and parents with PTSD over public school closures—the ones they’ve already been through, and the thought that more shutdowns are on the horizon. While other cities brace for the worse, Chicago is getting there. The nation’s third-largest school district is in the grip of a hostage crisis orchestrated by the Chicago Teachers Union. The crisis isn’t limited to the district’s 340,000 students and their families. It impacts the entire city because, after all, most parents have to go to work and good luck with that if children are home and not in school. And if your coworker can’t come to the office, or even particularly participate fully from home for those who still work remotely, it’s likely that you will have to pick up the slack. That will impact your own productivity. There is a direct link between our schools staying open, and our economy continuing to function as it should. It can feel sometimes as if COVID-19 was visited upon the United States to remind Americans of this simple fact. As...
    (CNN)Negotiations between the Chicago Teachers Union and city officials stretched into another week Monday as students will miss their fourth consecutive school day amid a disagreement over how schools should handle the city's Covid-19 surge. The union wants a period of remote learning, while the city wants kids in classrooms.Chicago Public Schools cancels classes for fourth consecutive day As of Friday, Chicago was averaging more than 5,200 new cases a day, a 16% increase over the prior week, according to the city health department's Covid tracker. The city's Covid-19 test positivity rate had a daily average of 21.1%."Out of fairness and consideration for parents who need to prepare, classes will be canceled again Monday. Although we have been negotiating hard throughout the day, there has not been sufficient progress for us to predict a return to class tomorrow," Mayor Lori Lightfoot tweeted late Sunday. "We will continue to negotiate through the night and will provide an update if we have made substantial progress," she said.Chicago Public Schools (CPS) is the third-largest school district in the country, serving more than 340,000...
              by Irit Tratt   Last week, a friend phoned to tell me that her child would be unable to make a playdate with my 8-year-old scheduled for the following day. Her son had tested negative for COVID that evening, yet she planned to take him for another PCR test the next morning “out of an abundance of caution.” Days earlier, a neighborhood mom was so distraught that her daughter had shared the same bus with a classmate who was later discovered to have had COVID that she insisted on stocking up on at-home testing kits for use every day that week. Despite displaying no symptoms and being fully vaccinated, the child and her siblings were subjected to daily nasal swabs. While television programs like HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm poke fun at liberals who stockpile COVID essentials, progressive professionals who retain the luxury and time to devote to their hypochondria are inevitably contributing to the nationwide shortfall of available tests while undermining the efforts of Americans whose testing needs revolve around a real exposure to the virus. Yet, as has been the case...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Students in Baltimore County won’t be in school to start the week. The District is closed January 10-11. It’s being called a temporary transition to virtual learning in Baltimore County. Taking the two days off was part of the contract the Teachers Union agreed to, to give staff the time needed to prepare lessons. READ MORE: Officer Keona Holley's First Public Viewing Was Held SundayCindy Sexton is the President of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County. “Last time, it was really about Covid and the concern about the virus and the unknowns,” she says. “Now we’re in a very different place. Right now, we’re in a staffing crisis,” said Sexton. More than 17 thousand Covid cases Statewide Sunday with 52 new deaths are dominating the key metrics. Science, social studies, language arts and math will be done online. It’s not adding up for everybody though. Debra Nickey says, “This makes zero sense.” Carol Maenner says, “Save the children. Keep schools open.” Sexton adds more. READ MORE: Bundle Up Baltimore: Coldest Air Of The Season Arrives“TABCO is a...
    Gene Wade, CEO, the Propel Center The Propel Center, the global HBCU technology and learning hub intended to level the playing field and open greater doors of opportunity for their students, has announced the naming of respected social entrepreneur and education advocate Gene Wade as chief executive officer. Wade most recently served as Founder and CEO of Honors Pathway in Oakland, California, a social venture that enabled low-income students to attend their first year of college at no cost while receiving over 500 hours of in-person coaching and mentoring. He also serves on several non-profit boards, including the Pahara Institute, Portal Schools, and Make-A-Wish Greater Bay Area, ideal foundations for his new role with Propel Center. Over his 25-year career, Wade also co-founded and led several entrepreneurial social ventures, including UniversityNow, which developed a self-paced online learning management system designed to lower the cost of higher education that was acquired and is currently serving hundreds of thousands of online students; Platform Learning, which developed a network of free after school tutoring programs that...