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    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is receiving $14 billion in funding to focus on projects dedicated to tackling supply chain issues and climate change, some of which has been allocated from the bipartisan infrastructure law passed last year. Over 500 projects that include all 50 states and two territories will be covered under the allocation of funds secured from the bipartisan infrastructure law passed last year in addition to other appropriations, according to a White House readout.  The White House readout said that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers would be allocating $4 billion to tackle supply chain problems, including “to expand capacity at key ports, allow passage of larger vessels, and further enhance the country’s ability to move goods.” Among some of the projects that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers intends to tackle with the allocated funding include expanding Norfolk Harbor, Va., and certain channels of the Port of Long Beach, Calif. The U.S. Army said that the funding it received through the bipartisan infrastructure legislation was a part of a larger means of funding it secured...
    Pope Francis has spoken about climate change, same-sex marriage, and the importance of taking care of our planet, but his latest speech has some animal activists and progressives up in arms. According to the Seattle Times, Francis spoke on Wednesday to a general audience at the Vatican, pointing out the global decline in birthrates, something he referred to as a “demographic winter.” During his speech, he also touched on his feelings about couples who prioritize having pets over children. Needless to say, he isn’t pleased with them. He said that people who have pets instead of children are “selfish” and exhibit a “denial of fatherhood or motherhood” that “diminishes us; it takes away our humanity. ” He added that dogs and cats “take the place of children,” creating a childless future. With such a controversial topic as having children, the reactions were naturally heated. Many people pointed out the hypocrisy of the Pope, himself, for speaking out against going childless when he doesn’t have children himself! What is selfish, is the inability to support those children because of...
    GENEVA (AP) — New German Chancellor Olaf Scholz called Wednesday for a “paradigm shift” in the way the world approaches climate policy, saying his country would leverage its presidency of the Group of Seven industrial nations this year to push for standards to fight global warming. Discussions on energy use and ways to fight climate change have been a key theme this week at the World Economic Forum’s virtual meeting known as the “Davos Agenda” — a reference to the group’s annual in-person meeting in the Swiss ski town of Davos that has been delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Unlike an event like the U.N. climate conference last year in Glasgow, Scotland, the Davos gathering is more of a discussion about big ideas — not a place where concrete agreements are made on how to act, something that has drawn criticism. Scholz spoke Wednesday about issues like economic growth and Russia’s military buildup along the Ukrainian border, while focusing on Germany’s and the wider European Union’s ambitions to fight climate change. “Europe has decided to become the first...
    Baltimore (WJZ) — A new poll shows that the majority of registered voters want the Maryland General Assembly to take action on climate change during the 2022 legislative session. Maryland pollster Patrick Gonzales conducted a survey on climate change that shows 508 out of 807 registered voters would like to see greenhouse emissions trimmed 60% or more by 2030. READ MORE: Sparrows Point Distribution Center Briefly Evacuated For Hydrogen Gas LeakThe remaining poll participants were divided into two camps: 241 of them said they did not want the Maryland General Assembly to focus on climate change policies and the remaining 58 participants decided not to answer the question. “The poll shows clear majorities support cutting greenhouse gas emissions 60% by 2030 and voters support a mandate that newly constructed buildings be powered by electric-only energy systems for heating, hot water, and cooking,” according to a press statement. “Democratic voters overwhelmingly support these measures.” The poll was conducted in advance of a legislative package on climate change that will be introduced by Maryland State Senator Paul Pinsky (D) and state delegates...
    WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) — For the first time in 32 years, organizers of the Rendezvous Cross Country Ski Festival in West Yellowstone, Montana, had to cancel November’s traditional start-of-the-ski-season event due to a lack of snow. Some 300 miles away, Soldier Hollow Nordic Center in Utah offered skiing in November by building an elaborate snow-making system while a small operation in Vermont was able to double its ski days after laying new pipe to feed the water-hungry snow-blowers. That wouldn’t work at Methow Trails in northern Washington, which can’t possibly cover its 200 kilometers (124 miles) of ski tracks with artificial snow; instead, they do snow dances and work on plans to move trails to higher elevation if needed. The snow hasn’t stopped falling but it is certainly not piling up as much or as far as it used to amid climate change and it is hitting a sport that saw wild growth when COVID-19 hit in the winter of 2020. Many escaped cabin fever by hitting cross country ski trails for the exercise, the fresh air and the serenity....
    Tiger sharks are starting to move farther up north due to climate change warming oceans that have historically been too cold for the apex predator, according to a new study. A team of scientists led by the University of Miami found oceans temperatures have been the warmest on record over the last decade, allowing tiger sharks to travel 250 miles poleward. Because of the warmer oceans, sharks are also migrating 14 days earlier to waters along the US northeastern coast. Not only do these changes have ramifications for human safety, but these sharks are venturing out of areas that provide them protection from commercial fishing. Scroll down for videos  Tiger sharks are starting to move farther up north due to climate change warming oceans that have historically been too cold for the apex predator, according to a new study Neil Hammerschlag, director of the Shark Research and Conservation Program at the University of Miami, said in a statement: 'Over the past 40 years, tiger shark distributions have extended further poleward along with warming waters. 'In fact, off the northeast United...
    The world's plastic pollution threat constitutes a 'planetary emergency' that's equal to climate change and biodiversity loss, a new report warns.  The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) has urged nations globally to agree to a UN treaty so they're committed to legally binding targets to combat plastic waste.   Plastic pollution directly undermines our health, drives biodiversity loss, exacerbates climate change and risks 'large-scale harmful environmental changes', the EIA says.  Plastic is found in the deepest parts of the ocean, on the highest mountain peaks, in human organs and on remote and uninhabited islands.   Dedicated multilateral agreements to tackle biodiversity loss and climate change have been in place for nearly 30 years, the agency said. However, no equivalent currently exists to tackle plastic pollution, which it calls 'one of the most prevalent and destructive environmental pollutants in existence'.   The predicted rise in plastic pollution spilling into the environment constitutes a planetary emergency, the report warns. Pictured is plastic pollution at Kuta beach, Bali. Note McDonald's famous golden arches in the background AGENCY PROPOSES UN PLASTIC TREATY The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) has urged...
    New York (CNN Business)Climate change policies have become front and center for companies — not only because of ethics and reputation, but also because their employees demand it.More than three-quarters of global executives said climate change policies affect their ability to attract and retain talent, according to Deloitte's 2022 CxO Sustainability Report.That could be a wake-up call for companies facing the pandemic-era labor shortage. The climate events of 2021, including serious floods and wildfires, hammered the point home even more."It's not just a 'nice to have,' but it can affect their ability to retain staff," Kathy Alsegaf, Deloitte's global internal sustainability leader, told CNN Business.Workers' physical and mental health is affected by climate change, more than a third of the respondents said.Read MoreThe report, which is based on a survey of more than 2,000 executives around the world, found that nearly all respondents' companies had already felt some negative effect from climate change. Almost half of them also reported it has had an impact on their operations.On the flip side, improved employee morale and well-being is one of the top...
    Sarah Bloom Raskin, President Joe Biden’s pick for a top Federal Reserve role, has been heralded on the Left as a climate crusader — a reputation that will complicate her confirmation prospects. The major focus of GOP arguments against Raskin will feature her view that climate change is a systemic risk to the U.S. financial system and that the Fed should play a role in mitigating that risk. The nature of her positions, and the power the role has, will also come under Republican magnifying glasses. “Sarah Bloom Raskin has specifically called for the Fed to pressure banks to choke off credit to traditional energy companies and to exclude those employers from any Fed emergency lending facilities," said Sen. Pat Toomey, ranking member of the Banking Committee. "I have serious concerns that, if nominated, she would abuse the Fed’s narrow statutory mandates on monetary policy to have the central bank actively engaged in capital allocation. Such actions not only threaten both the Fed’s independence and effectiveness but would also weaken economic growth.” SOARING INFLATION TAKES CENTER...
    States across the country have budget surpluses, including federal coronavirus stimulus payments, and many governors are using the money for projects to fight so-called climate change. The excess cash is also from tax collection and post-lockdown consumer spending, and governors of both red and blue states are directing funds to improve protection from extreme weather, which Democrats and the press blame on human activity and fossil fuels. Gov. Jay Inslee speaks at the ceremonial ribbon cutting prior to tomorrow’s opening night for the Seattle Kraken the NHL’s newest hockey franchise at the Climate Pledge Arena on October 22, 2021 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images) The Associated Press reported on the development: Democratic governors such as California’s Gavin Newsom and Washington’s Jay Inslee have been clear about their plans to boost spending on climate-related projects, including expanding access to electric vehicles and creating more storage for clean energies such as solar. Newsom deemed climate change one of five “existential threats” facing the nation’s most populous state when he rolled out his proposed state budget this past week. In...
              by Thomas Catenacci   The Department of Energy (DOE) announced Thursday that it would begin hiring 1,000 employees for its so-called Clean Energy Corps which will be tasked with fighting climate change. The new climate unit will be composed of both current DOE employees and the 1,000 recruits, according to the announcement. The Clean Energy Corps was created by the recently-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill, which appropriated $62 billion to the DOE for accelerating the nation’s transition to renewables. “This is an open call for all Americans who are passionate about taking a proactive role in tackling the climate crisis and want to join the team that is best positioned to lead this transformative work,” Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm said in a message to applicants. “Solving the world’s greatest challenge will require the inclusion of all voices, perspectives and experiences – and we need people like you to ensure that DOE fulfills on our commitment to accelerate the clean energy transition to reduce emissions and save our planet,” Granholm said. On Friday, the DOE’s Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer offices...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — Their state budgets flush with cash, Democratic and Republican governors alike want to spend some of the windfall on projects aimed at slowing climate change and guarding against its consequences, from floods and wildfires to dirty air. Democratic governors such as California’s Gavin Newsom and Washington’s Jay Inslee have been clear about their plans to boost spending on climate-related projects, including expanding access to electric vehicles and creating more storage for clean energies such as solar. Newsom deemed climate change one of five “existential threats” facing the nation’s most populous state when he rolled out his proposed state budget this past week. READ MORE: Volcano Erupts In Pacific, West Coast Under Tsunami AdvisoryIn Republican-led states, governors want to protect communities from natural disasters and drought, even as many of them won’t link such spending to global warming. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey this past week pitched $1 billion for water infrastructure as drought grips the Western U.S., shriveling water supplies for cities and farms. Idaho Gov. Brad Little, who has acknowledged climate change’s role in worsening wildfires, proposed...
    More than 40 years after Al Gore started sounding the alarm that global warming threatened the planet and human existence, the former vice president is still preaching the perils of climate change. Gore’s 2006 film An Inconvenient Truth made him a wealthy man and he won an Oscar and a Nobel Peace Prize, even though his predictions have not panned out. His latest interview with the left-wing media, which embrace and advance the ideology, was with CBS News on Gore’s 400-acre farm in Tennessee where he has lived during the coronavirus pandemic and where he leaves the toil to others. CBS News asked Gore if people think of him as a farmer. “I don’t think so and truth to tell, I don’t have many calluses on my hands either,” Gore said. “His team handles most of the farm work, tending to the sheep and raising the animals that help fertilize the land where they are growing everything from carrots and beets to a variety of greens,” CBS News reported. CBS reported that Gore’s farm is his “climate change laboratory:” There...
    (RNS) — Tu BiShvat, the Jewish new year of the trees, barely registers on most Jewish calendars, except as an occasion to plant trees or eat fruit and nuts. But the one-day holiday, which begins Sunday (Jan. 16), has gotten a boost these past few years as environmentalists have reimagined it as the Jewish Earth Day. This year, Tu Bishvat started early with the Big Bold Jewish Climate Fest, a five-day online event (Jan. 10 -14) that has drawn hundreds of Jews to reexamine ways to make climate action a central priority of the Jewish community. Despite the growing urgency of tackling the global climate crisis, environmental values haven’t always been at the forefront of Jewish institutional life. Judaism doesn’t have a pope who can issue an encyclical on climate change like Pope Francis did in 2015 with his ecological manifesto, “Laudato Si’.” But multiple Jewish organizations are beginning to consider the environment, spurred by rising global temperatures and growing climate weather disasters. ___ This content is written and produced by Religion News Service and distributed by The Associated Press....
    Former President Donald Trump opposed wind power because wind turbines 'kill' birds — but climate change kills many more. The Biden administration on Wednesday announced plans to make a major sale of wind leases off the coasts of New York and New Jersey, which it has projected will lead to 80,000 new jobs by 2030. The New York Bight, an area of 480,000 acres between Long Island and New Jersey, will be open to wind energy production forecast to generate up to 7 gigawatts of clean energy. According to the Department of the Interior, the power from the project would be enough to power 2 million homes. "The Biden-Harris administration has made tackling the climate crisis a centerpiece of our agenda, and offshore wind opportunities like the New York Bight present a once-in-a-generation opportunity to fight climate change and create good-paying, union jobs in the United States," Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said in a press release. Transmission lines to deliver the newly generated power will be built using funds from the...
    A mesmerising new animation shows the Earth 'breathing' in and out carbon with the changing of the seasons throughout the year.   Parts of the globe can be seen sinking as the Earth's plants suck carbon out of the atmosphere, but inflate when these plants release carbon.   The animation was created by Professor Markus Reichstein, an ecologist at the Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany.  It shows the carbon cycle — the process in which carbon atoms continually travel from the atmosphere to the Earth and then back into the atmosphere.  Professor Reichstein's animation is based on satellite observations and hundreds of carbon-monitoring stations worldwide. 'The visualisation is really just a fun project,' Professor Reichstein told Live Science. 'This carbon cycle and how it changes from month to month tells us a lot.'  "It basically is showing how important it is to protect the carbon sinks.'   Generally, the continents can be seen deflating during spring and summer, like a football without enough air, as the Earth's plants suck carbon out of the atmosphere during their growth process. In the winter, meanwhile, the continents can be...
    Imagine if every sip of beer sent stark visions of the blazing wildfires, deadly floods, melting icecaps, and 100-plus-degree heat waves that occur around our world each day. Hold your beer, because it can happen. One of the lesser-known consequences of global warming is its impact on the beer industry. Experts believe increased temperatures and devastating droughts will hit the industry supply by the end of the century. According to the World Wildlife Fund, the U.S. beer supply could fall by up to 20%, and consequently, drive prices up. Causes The concerns primarily surround the industry’s intense water usage as the average beer contains about 90-95% water. However, the issue doesn’t only apply to the final product. The average gallon of beer requires five to six gallons of water to make as beer’s most flavorful ingredients require significant amounts of water during irrigation. For example, barley can require 17 inches of water to complete its growth cycle, while hops can require four times more. “As erratic weather and droughts driven by climate change impact crops and freshwater, the...
    Joe Biden has nominated three people to the board of the Federal Reserve in what would usher in the most diverse group in the Fed's history - and the most woke. The president is intent on nominating a white woman, Sarah Bloom Raskin; a black woman, Lisa Cook; and a black man, Philip Jefferson.  If they are confirmed to their posts, the seven-person Fed board would have four women, one black man and two white men - the most diverse team in the Fed's 108 years of existence.  All three have proven liberal credentials. Bloom Raskin, 60, is married to Congressman Jamie Raskin - a Democrat representing Maryland in the House. Sarah Bloom Raskin, 60, is in line to be appointed as vice chair of supervision of the Fed - policing the nation's biggest banks. She has been a vocal advocate for more regulation to combat climate change Bloom Raskin is seen with her husband Jamie Raskin, a Democrat congressman for Maryland She spent four years as a Fed governor before being tapped as a deputy Treasury secretary from 2014 to...
    Lael Brainard, President Joe Biden’s nominee for the Federal Reserve’s No. 2 spot, said Thursday that the Federal Reserve would not pressure banks not to lend to fossile fuel companies or other sectors targeted by the environmental left. The notion that the Fed should push a climate change agenda through its bank supervision powers has gained popularity in the Democratic Party, especially among politicians associated with the so-called Green New Deal. Pressed on the issue by Republicans on Thursday, Brainard rejected the idea. From the Associated Press: Several Republican senators expressed concern that the Fed might increasingly take account of climate change in its policymaking and use its supervisory authority over banks to discourage them from lending to oil and gas companies. Brainard pushed back against such a likelihood. “We would not want to tell banks what sectors to lend to, or not to lend to,” she said. Sen. Steve Daines, a Republican from Montana, questioned whether the Fed has the “experience or expertise” to incorporate climate change into its regulation of banks. Last year, Brainard had suggested that the...
    Don’t Look Up filmmaker Adam McKay believes his Netflix comedy has the power to change the course of politics, saying his fervent wish is for Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) to watch the satirical movie and experience an epiphany on climate change, which the director called “the biggest threat in the history of humankind.” McKay described his oddly specific desire in a long interview with Indiewire, in which he also explained why he recently lashed out people on social media who trashed his movie. “My sweaty fever dream of a situation,” McKay told the outlet, “would be Joe Manchin sitting down with his family, thinking, ‘Let’s watch this, it’s supposed to be a comedy, my kids like Leonardo DiCaprio, my grandkids like Ariana Grande.’ And then that ending comes. My dream would be that for one second, Joe Manchin feels it in his bones. For even a second!” (Sean Gallup/Getty Images) Sen. Manchin provoked the ire leftists when he declined to support President Joe Biden’s “Build Back Better” plan, citing in part his opposition to Biden’s intention to replace the nation’s coal...
    Even if some version of the much-diluted Build Back Better bill somehow manages to squeak by in the Senate come March or later, it is obvious its 10-year-long government investment in climate defense—even though it is accurately described as “unprecedented”—won’t be nearly enough to deal with a crisis beyond anything Homo sapiens have encountered since modern humans left Africa. Even before it was chopped to appease the unappeasable Joe Manchin, the bill’s advocates viewed this as a first step, important to be sure, but definitely not the last word.  Wind turbines generating electricity on an Iowa farm The bill with its climate and social infrastructure provisions passed the House of Representatives in June without a single Republican aye. It okays about $50 billion a year for climate defense at a time when, all told, the national defense gets more than $1 trillion a year if the Veterans Administration budget is included, as it should be. “Unprecedented” in the case of BBB’s climate provisions still means a piddling amount given the gargantuan task before us. Imagine if America’s leaders had said in 1941 that taking on the fascist Axis would be too expensive....
    Katherine Calvin, Chief Scientist and Senior Climate Advisor at NASAPhoto courtesy NASA The new top scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration wants the famed space agency to become a leading voice on climate change science, too. "When people hear NASA, I want them to think of climate science alongside planetary science," said Katherine Calvin, who was appointed as NASA's chief scientist on Monday. "All of the chief scientists of NASA have had specialty areas. Mine is climate," Calvin told CNBC, speaking from NASA headquarters in Washington DC. The agency already does a lot of scientific work that ties into climate change. Calvin's role will be to connect NASA scientists with other scientists and to communicate their science outside of the agency. "NASA is already a world leader in climate," Calvin told CNBC. "And so I'm just communicating that science and connecting it to other agencies, to the public." NASA has more than two dozen satellites orbiting the Earth observing and measuring climate change variables, like changes in the oceans, clouds, and carbon dioxide levels. NASA uses this data...
    Lael Brainard, President Joe Biden’s pick for vice chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, faced questions from Republicans during a confirmation hearing on Thursday about the Fed’s role relating to climate change. Brainard, who is well-liked by the Left for her approach to financial regulation, emphasized that while climate change is a broad risk that the Fed reviews, she does not advocate for the Fed trying to influence what sectors banks lend money to. “We would not tell banks which sectors to lend to or which sectors to not lend to, but we do want to make sure that they are measuring, monitoring, and managing their material risks,” she said. POWELL PLEDGES TO BRING DOWN INFLATION DURING CONFIRMATION HEARING Republicans have been keenly interested in the intersection of the Fed and climate change and fear that the central bank could become too politicized if it starts turning its focus to that and other broader societal issues. Sen. Pat Toomey, ranking member of the Banking Committee, has for months been going after regional Fed banks for their research...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Six Maryland environment professors penned a letter to the presiding officers of the General Assembly this week, imploring them to commit to reducing climate pollution in Maryland by 60% below 2006 levels by 2030. They cited recommendations by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which released a major report last summer revealing that drastic reductions in emissions are urgent and necessary to prevent a climate catastrophe. “Just last year, Maryland experienced five separate billion-dollar weather and climate disasters, including hurricanes and tropical storms. Maryland’s 3,000 miles of tidal shoreline are vulnerable to sea level rise and retreating shores, threatening habitat, agriculture, and communities,” the scientists wrote in a letter, with the support of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network (CCAN). “We need to do more and we need to do it now. Maryland is uniquely situated as a state that is both particularly vulnerable to climate change and well-positioned to mitigate it,” they continued. The letter was signed by Donald Boesch and Eric A. Davidson, who are professors at the University of Maryland...
    The World Economic Forum just released their annual Global Risks Report, and 84% of respondents reported being worried about the direction we are healing in. The worsening climate crisis was officially named as the top global risk on the report. After climate change came extreme weather and biodiversity loss, both of which are closely linked to climate change. WEF president Børge Brende said, “Our planet is on fire, and we have to deal with it. This is a risk we really know, so we cannot say we are faced with a blind spot. A lack of implementation of what was agreed at Cop26, [as well as] a lack of implementation on the net-zero way of thinking in this century.” Social cohesion erosion, livelihood crisis, and infectious diseases were also grave concerns and followed climate-related issues on the report.  The authors of the report said, “Given the complexities of technological, economic and societal change at this scale, and the insufficient nature of current commitments, it is likely that any transition that achieves the net-zero goal by 2050 will be disorderly.”...
    In this article GOOGL UBER A driver uses the Uber app to drop off a passenger.Chris J. Ratcliffe | Bloomberg via Getty ImagesIn the annual ranking of top U.S. companies on ESG metrics conducted by research nonprofit Just Capital, there were some major moves in 2022, both up and down the list. Meta Platforms dropped 691 spots due to concerns about spread of misinformation on Facebook and Instagram's negative social influence, while Uber Technologies rose 825 places, to No. 41. Both were unusual circumstances, but Uber's ranking may say more about the most important issue to the American public when it comes to environmental, social and governance issues: treatment of workers. It is the No. 1 issue, but that's not revealed in the fact that Uber vaulted into the JUST 100 — it's because Just Capital took the unusual step of denying Uber the "seal" that the top 100 companies usually get. The 2022 JUST 100 ranking: The full list of companies Uber, along with Lyft and DoorDash — though neither made the top 100 overall like Uber —...
    A WOMAN claims her holiday's been ruined after a hairdresser destroyed her hair to the point where it snapped off. Jackie Robles shared the mortifying experience on her TikTik account, where it's since taken the social media giant by storm with almost 370 thousand viewers tuning in the journey. 5Jackie was excited to have a hair change before the holidayCredit: tiktok @loveely_jackiie ''Little did I know this would be one of my worst days,'' Jackie said, revealing she was scheduled to go to on a holiday to Tulum, Mexico the following day. According to her, she had gone to a licensed hairdresser - because this took place during the pandemic, the professional had arranged the appointment at her house. After getting a head full of red locks, Jackie was pleased with the final result. FABULOUS BINGO: GET A £5 FREE BONUS WITH NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED ''Until I washed it the next day.'' Jackie was mortified when she realised that half of her long locks had snapped off, leaving her with a very uneven and messy look. She then added:...
    Lawmakers are facing some controversial issues on the legislative agenda ahead of Jan. 12: The opening day of the 444th session of the Maryland General Assembly. Among them, climate change and the legalization of recreational marijuana. They'll also have to decide how to manage a $4.6 billion budget surplus, which has been largely a result of federal pandemic aid. Democrats, who are in control of the General Assembly, say they want to make upgrades to parks, bridges, schools, and information technology systems a priority. Meanwhile, Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, is proposing what he says is the largest tax-relief package in state history with the surplus. The majority of it would go to small businesses, families and retirees, he says.
    CBS4) – CBS4 Meteorologist Ashton Altieri is among the TV meteorologists who gathered for “Operation Sierra Storm” to discuss weather and climate-related topics like hurricanes and tornadoes. This year that conference also included our devastating wildfires. That conference is held at Heavenly Resort in South Lake Tahoe, an area hard hit by the Caldor Fire last year. That fire burned more than 200,000 acres, leaving the area vacant for months. The group also took up the devastating Marshall wildfire that raced through south Boulder County December 30. Altieri had a chance to talk with Dr. Daniel McEvoy with the Desert Research Institute at the Western Regional Climate Center. He asked directly about extreme weather events like the Marshall firestorm being tied to human-caused climate change. (credit: CBS) “The setup and the wildfire potential, there’s a very strong connection to climate change,” McEvoy said. “It’s a very straight forward connection that the increasing temperatures lead to more rapid drying of the land surface. So that connection is very clear.” Another part of the equation is where people are building homes. (credit:...
    The Department of Homeland Security has announced a "climate change professionals program" while the historic number of illegal border crossings continues to increase.  Officials expect illegal crossings at the southern border to hit 2 million in 2021 for the first time in history, but DHS officials announced a program to tackle the "growing focus on adapting to climate change and resilience."  Migrants, many from Haiti, are seen at an encampment along the Del Rio International Bridge near the Rio Grande, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. The options remaining for thousands of Haitian migrants straddling the Mexico-Texas border are narrowing as the United States government ramps up to an expected six expulsion flights to Haiti and Mexico began busing some away from the border. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) "The Climate Change Professionals Program will be instrumental in helping the Department adapt to our changing climate by providing hands-on experience and guidance to young professionals interested in climate adaptation and resilience," said Secretary Mayorkas.  MORE THAN 47,000 MIGRANTS RELEASED INTO US BY BIDEN ADMIN IN 2021 FAILED TO REPORT...
    A recent study took a closer look into how the global food system and climate would change if 54 high-income countries were to switch to eating more plant-based foods.  It showed that animal-based foods have higher carbon and land footprints than plant-based alternatives. It also found that richer countries consumed the largest amounts of animal products. As a result, high-income countries could significantly cut back their agricultural emissions by consuming fewer animal products and more plant-based products. By reducing animal product consumption, these countries would also free up areas of land larger than the European Union as livestock takes up nearly 80% of global agricultural land while only supplying 20% of the world’s food. The freed-up land, if left to go back to its natural state, could significantly help to reduce climate change and reverse pollution.  Just the impact of freeing up land to grow and thrive as it used to would have a significant impact on global warming and pollution. It could help reverse some of the damage that has already been done by animal agriculture. With...
    APPRENTICE star and West Ham United vice-chair Karren Brady answers your careers questions and meets an inspirational CEO. She gives career advice to a mum who wants to build a customer base at her daughter's new school despite there being existing competition. 1Karren Brady, Baroness Brady, CBE is a British business executive and television personality Q) I love baking and recently I’ve been researching setting up a business making cakes for kids’ birthday parties in our local area, especially now that my eldest child has started school. The problem is, I’ve found out that another mum who has kids in the same school already has a very similar business, though I’ve heard that a few parents have been disappointed with her cakes. As my daughter and I are new to the school, I don’t want to upset anyone, but obviously it’s a great place for me to build up a customer base. Should I push ahead and print some flyers to give out in the playground or is this unfair on the other mum? Emmie, via email Most read in...
    The temperature of the top 2,000 meters of all oceans rose significantly in 2021, despite it being a La Niña year. Once again, the world’s oceans are setting records that are annually broken. In a paper published on Monday in the journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences, researchers found that 2021 was not only the hottest year on record for humans, but also for ocean temperatures. When it comes to tracking the heat of the ocean, scientists measure that in joules. Joules track the energy taken to move 1 kilogram of mass at 1 meter per second. One joule is the equivalent of one-3,600th of a watt hour, which is not a lot of power generated in a small amount of space. Being that even the smallest ocean, the Arctic Ocean, has a surface area of more than 14 million kilometers, scientists measure ocean heat in zettajoules, with zetta referring to 1 sextillion.  One of those researchers who co-authored the 2021 paper and past findings, John Abraham, offered a startling example of just how much energy and heat the ocean is absorbing in The Guardian last year. “The amount of heat we...
    BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Romania’s president wants to add sections on climate change and environmental issues to the national school curriculum to enable students to learn more about the challenges the world faces from climate change. President Klaus Iohannis on Tuesday launched a public debate over a 141-page proposal and attended a meeting at the presidential palace on it with Prime Minister Nicolae Cuica, Romania’s environment and education ministers, teachers, students and nongovernmental organizations. The report suggests increasing the amount of climate change and environmental education that students receive, creating a national network of 10,000 environmental ’mini inspectors,’ supporting nature-based activities, and creating digital learning materials on climate change. Longer-term goals in the report include improving the sustainability of school infrastructure and cutting schools’ carbon footprints in half by 2030. “Education is one of the pillars of improving the response to climate change, as education leads to changes in human behavior, in the sense of a greater responsibility to protect nature and the future of society as a whole,” Iohannis said Tuesday. “What we want more than anything...
    A British skier crashes through wooden fencing on a downhill corner and slams into a pole, breaking his leg. An American hits an icy patch at the bottom of a hill and crashes into a fence, breaking one ski and twisting the other, also breaking his leg. Another American, training before a biathlon race, slides out on an icy corner and flies off the trail into a tree, breaking ribs and a shoulder blade and punctures a lung. These were not scenes from high speed Alpine or ski cross events. They happened on cross country ski and biathlon tracks made with artificial snow. Many top athletes say crashes like these are becoming more common as climate change reduces the availability of natural snow, forcing racers to compete on tracks with the manmade version. Olympic and World Cup race organizers have come to rely on snow-making equipment to create a ribbon of white through the hills since natural snowfall is less reliable. Johanna Taliharm, an Estonian Olympic biathlete, said racing on manmade snow comes with risks. “Artificial snow is...
    Germany's new climate minister said Tuesday that the country faces a "gigantic" task if it wants to achieve its goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions while ensuring sufficient energy for its energy-hungry industry.  Robert Habeck, a member of the environmentalist Greens, told reporters in Berlin that Germany is on track to halve its emissions by 2030 compared to 1990 levels — far off the government's target of 65%.  Pandemic-related effects that allowed Germany to achieve its interim goal of a 40% reduction by 2020 fell away last year, resulting in a renewed rise in emissions for 2021.  COVID-19: GERMANY TO TIGHTEN RESTAURANT RULES WHILE CUTTING QUARANTINE TIME   German Economy and Climate Minister Robert Habeck shows a cardboard with a graphic to expand wind energy and photovoltaic during a news conference about the German government climate policy in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2022. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber) One reason for Germany's rising emissions is the decision to switch off all nuclear power plants by the end of this year, increasing reliance on coal-fired power plants.  The government plans to phase...
    A British skier crashes through wooden fencing on a downhill corner and slams into a pole, breaking his leg. An American hits an icy patch at the bottom of a hill and crashes into a fence, breaking one ski and twisting the other, also breaking his leg. Another American, training before a biathlon race, slides out on an icy corner and flies off the trail into a tree, breaking ribs and a shoulder blade and punctures a lung. These were not scenes from high speed alpine or ski cross events. They happened on cross country ski and biathlon tracks made with artificial snow. Many top Nordic skiers and biathletes say crashes like these are becoming more common as climate change reduces the availability of natural snow, forcing racers to compete on tracks with the manmade version. Olympic and World Cup race organizers have come to rely on snow-making equipment to create a ribbon of white through the hills since natural snowfall is less reliable. Manmade snow has a higher moisture content, making it ice up quickly, skiers and...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday proposed a $286.4 billion budget that sets off months of budget talks with his fellow Democrats, who control the state Legislature, before the new fiscal year begins July 1. Newsom focused much of his budget proposal on some of the state’s biggest issues — climate change, homelessness, education, abortion, high-speed rail, the pandemic, crime. READ MORE: PG&E: El Dorado County Power Fully Restored, Hundreds More In Foothills Still In The DarkCLIMATE CHANGE Newsom wants to spend $22.5 billion over the next five years to fight climate change and protect communities most at risk from changing weather patterns. About $15 billion would go to climate-related transportation projects such as helping low-income people purchase electric cars; expanding charging infrastructure in disadvantaged neighborhoods and helping schools buy electric buses. Newsom also proposes to release $4.2 billion in bond money for the controversial high-speed rail project that advocates say will eventually reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Assembly Democrats stalled the funding last year. Another $2 billion would boost clean energy development and storage, along with...
    (CNN)CNN has a team of journalists covering the climate crisis full time, and they have published five separate stories in recent days that represent the past, present and future of the crisis.The past:The last 7 years have been the warmest on record as planet approaches critical threshold 'Off the charts': Weather disasters have cost the US $750 billion over past 5 years The present:Read MoreMajor US cities will feel like they're below zero this week. Find out where Under current policies, planet-warming emissions surged faster in the US than expected in 2021, analysts sayThe future: Separate climate bill not being seriously considered in Senate, despite Manchin's support of the measuresMore succinctly, these stories reflect that Earth has warmed nearly 1.5 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels, a threshold scientists have suggested is when the worst impacts of climate change will begin to occur.They reflect that there are already disastrous effects from climate change. The world is not curbing emissions fast enough to change the trend.New analysis from the nonpartisan Rhodium Group shows the US is (still) headed in the wrong...
    Former Congressman Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) appeared to lose interest and veered off-script in a segment on Fox’s Outnumbered Monday, in which actor Leonardo DiCaprio was being called out for hypocrisy on climate change. Fox anchor Harris Faulkner was the first panelist to show disinterest in DiCaprio’s apparent hypocrisy for being on a superyacht while at the same being an outspoken advocate for sustainable living as a means to fight climate change. “I don’t care what he says, I don’t care,” Faulkner said. “I don’t care and I can vote with my feet and never see it another Leo Dicaprio movie. I have that choice, I don’t care what he says.” Co-host Emily Compagno, who was leading the segment, then tried to get back on track and asked Chaffetz to weigh in on DiCaprio’s “performative activism,” asking doesn’t DiCaprio’s behavior “take everyone back two steps?” Chaffetz, also not seeming to care much about what DiCaprio’s messaging on climate change, responded, “Yeah, I just keep looking at that picture and I’m like, ‘Hey Leo, shave those pits, will you?’ Don’t...
    SACRAMENTO —  Built on projections of a ninth consecutive year of surplus tax revenue — a streak that has made California’s deficit-ridden past a distant memory — the $286.4-billion spending plan Gov. Gavin Newsom unveiled Monday builds on the state’s recent efforts to address the COVID-19 pandemic, homelessness and a worsening drought while surpassing K-12 school funding records set just last year. In all, the governor’s plan lays out close to $10 billion in new spending on what a fact sheet from his office calls “five of California’s biggest challenges: COVID-19, climate change, homelessness, inequality, and keeping our streets safe.” In broad terms, Newsom’s proposal to the Legislature is consistent with budgets written in recent years. While it directs surplus tax revenue toward the state’s cash reserves and pays down some long-term debts, there is plenty left over to prioritize programs championed by the Democratic governor and his party’s legislative leaders. “We have the capacity to invest in our growth engines, invest in the future, as well as making sure that we prepare for the uncertainties that the future presents,” Newsom...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA/AP) — Pittsburgh native Michael Keaton won a Golden Globe last night for his role in the Hulu miniseries “Dopesick.” Keaton took the top prize in the category for Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television. READ MORE: Michael Keaton To Play Batman In Upcoming 'Batgirl' Film“Dopesick” is based on a book of the same name and deals with the nation’s opioid crisis. Next up, Keaton will once again wear the “Batsuit.” Although Warner Bros. would not confirm the report of his casting, Keaton is expected to appear in HBO Max’s upcoming “Batgirl” movie, according to Variety. Keaton famously brought Batman to the big screen in 1989, first with “Batman” and its sequel “Batman Returns.” He will also appear as the Caped Crusader in the upcoming film, “The Flash.” READ MORE: 'You Can't Just Have An Opinion About Climate Change:' Michael Keaton Investing In Pittsburgh And Combating Climate ChangeLast night’s Golden Globe Awards ceremony went on without the fanfare of awards show season. None of the winners appeared to be...
    Jane Fonda recently made the days of eight high school students after she appeared on zoom to watch their climate change presentations. A student had earlier reached out to Jane Fonda, asking her if she would consider donating to help students take a climate change class. To his surprise, Fonda got back to him and actually agreed to pay his and seven other students’ way to a climate change class. She appeared as a zoom guest to watch them present their final projects saying, “I’m just so proud of you. Look at you all. I’m just thrilled.” Source: Idaho Statesman Fonda, an activist in her own right, was greatly moved by the students’ presentations on current climate change issues and possible solutions. She praised their commitment to learning about climate change. Fonda said, “I am so moved and so impressed. This has gone way beyond what I ever thought. You are stellar, you are all amazing and smart and inventive.” The group of students also received her praise for holding a protest in the hopes of having climate...
    DEAR JOAN: Every year, we have six or more acorn woodpeckers at our bird feeders daily though the spring and summer. We love their cackling calls, red heads and colorful faces. They all disappear in September and return in the early spring. We were surprised to see two of them back this month. Where did they go for four months? It’s not warm enough for them to have returned from a migration, or do they migrate for other reasons? We also have a nesting pair of Western bluebirds that came back in December this year. They’re in the birdhouse making a nest! They usually come in the spring after leaving in September or October, just like the woodpeckers. Two species returning earlier than usual. Is this somehow related to climate change? Or just something weird about our yard? Teresa S., Danville For more wildlife, garden and backyard topics, sign up for our new, free Flora+Fauna newsletter. DEAR TERESA: Climate change is having an impact on wildlife and the world in general, but I’m not certain that’s what’s going on in your...
    ROME — Pope Francis once again appealed for a concerted international effort to battle climate change Monday, insisting that no one is exempt from this task. In recent years there has been “a growing collective awareness of the urgent need to care for our common home, which is suffering from the constant and indiscriminate exploitation of its resources,” the pope asserted in his yearly address Monday to members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the Holy See. “Here I think especially of the Philippines, struck in these last weeks by a devastating typhoon,” Francis said, “and of other nations in the Pacific, made vulnerable by the negative effects of climate change, which endanger the lives of their inhabitants, most of whom are dependent on agriculture, fishing and natural resources.” This realization “should impel the international community as a whole to discover and implement common solutions,” he declared. “None may consider themselves exempt from this effort, since all of us are involved and affected in equal measure.” WOKE POPE: The Vatican suggested Thursday that a Biden presidency might inject new life...
    Within three decades, the San Joaquin Valley’s annual average temperature could increase by 4 degrees, worsening water quality and health hazards in the impoverished communities of California’s agricultural heartland, according to a new regional climate change report. Those hit hardest by the increasing heat will be poor farming communities that lack the resources necessary to adapt, according to the UC Merced report. That conclusion was based on dozens of recent scientific studies on a variety of issues related to climate change, and assumes a worst-case scenario for global carbon emissions. “Many families in San Joaquin Valley rely on agriculture as their main source of income,” said Jose Pablo Ortiz-Partida, a climate and water scientist for the Union of Concerned Scientists and co-author of the report. “Now, climate change is gunning for them. They need all the help they can get.” The report, part of California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment, paints a dire portrait of life in the southern Central Valley as increasing water scarcity, poverty, low air quality and rising temperatures conspire to erode health, economic opportunity and environmental...
    A Cal Fire firefighter from the Lassen-Modoc Unit watches as an air tanker makes a fire retardant drop on the Dixie Fire as trees burn on a hillside on August 18, 2021 near Janesville, California.Patrick T. Fallon | AFP | Getty Images The last seven years have been the hottest on record, with 2021 ranking as the fifth hottest year as the world continues to see a rise in climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions, according to a report released on Monday. The annual findings by the Copernicus Climate Change Service, an intergovernmental agency that supports European climate policy, show a continuing upward trend in temperatures as fossil fuel emissions trap more heat in the atmosphere. "2021 was yet another year of extreme temperatures with the hottest summer in Europe, heatwaves in the Mediterranean, not to mention the unprecedented high temperatures in North America," said Carlo Buontempo, director of the Copernicus service. Muddy water flows into Alaknanda river two days after a part of a Himalayan glacier broke off sending a devastating flood downriver in Tapovan area of the northern state of Uttarakhand, India,...
              by Jon Miltimore   A recent study published in American Political Science Review, a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Cambridge University, begins with a teasing question: “Is authoritarian power ever legitimate?” For many, the answer is clearly no, concedes the study’s author—Ross Mittiga, an assistant professor of political theory at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. But Mittiga, in the abstract to the study, suggests otherwise: “While, under normal conditions, maintaining democracy and rights is typically compatible with guaranteeing safety, in emergency situations, conflicts between these two aspects of legitimacy can and often do arise. A salient example of this is the COVID-19 pandemic, during which severe limitations on free movement and association have become legitimate techniques of government. Climate change poses an even graver threat to public safety. Consequently, I argue, legitimacy may require a similarly authoritarian approach.” ‘Explicitly Argues for Authoritarian Governance’? The study caught the eye of Alexander Wuttke, a Twitter user who studies political behavior at the University of Mannheim in Germany. “In my reading, it explicitly argues that we must put climate action over democracy and adopt...
    Prince William is ushering the new year by seeking out the next group of innovative ideas to combat the current climate crisis for his 2022 Earthshot Prize. The Earthshot Prize aims to promote impactful approaches to the world’s most pressing environmental and climate challenges. Its recipients include some of the world’s greatest climate-related ideas and projects. The initiating process is a long one that involves much detailed work to figure out who has the most inventive solutions. Once that is done, 30 nominations will advance to the next stage, where five winners will be chosen. The winners of the 2021 Earthshot Prize and 10 more finalists will continue to receive mentoring to help scale up their climate projects. He said, “The 2021 Winners and Finalists have set the bar incredibly high. As the nominations for 2022 open, I can’t wait to see what solutions the Prize helps to champion this coming year. In 2022, we are determined to go further by seeking even more nominations from every corner of the world, ensuring that we spotlight and scale the very best...