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    While domestic COVID-19 restrictions will almost entirely disappear on Feb. 1, there will still likely be some protocols for international travelers. "Denmark intends however to keep some border measures in place for another four weeks, including tests and/or quarantine depending on travelers' immunity status," the Daily Mail reported. "According to Health Minister Magnus Heunicke, Denmark's recent cases of COVID were more than 46,000 daily on average; however, only 40 people are in hospital intensive care units," according to Newsweek. "We continue with a strong epidemic surveillance," Heunicke declared. "Then we ... can react quickly if necessary." Frederiksen added, "It may seem strange that we want to remove restrictions given the high infection rates. But fewer people become seriously ill." "The Danish Health Authority said that 35 percent of those in hospital with Covid were actually in hospital for another diagnosis," The Local Denmark reported. Other European nations are also significantly curbing their COVID-19 restrictions during the current Omicron wave. Starting on Thursday, England halted its mask mandate – including in classrooms. The requirement for proof...
    The WeTransfer logo on a smartphone.Gabby Jones | Bloomberg via Getty Images LONDON — The stock market has gotten a little too volatile for WeTransfer's liking. The Dutch file-sharing company said Thursday that it has cancelled plans for an initial public offering on the Euronext Amsterdam exchange, citing market volatility. It added there was still "substantial investor demand" for the IPO. "While we have decided not to proceed with our public listing due to volatile market conditions, our commitment to address the needs of our global community of 87 million monthly active users remains as strong as ever," said Gordon Willoughby, WeTransfer's CEO. "I would like to thank our users, partners, the WeTransfer team and our shareholders for their continued support." Founded in 2009, Amsterdam-based WeTransfer develops cloud-based software that allows users to send large files over the internet. It makes money through advertising and paid subscriptions. WeTransfer had planned to raise 125 million euros ($140 million) in its debut. Shares were priced at between 17.5-20.5 euros. At the upper range, WeTransfer would have scored a valuation of 716 million...
    LONDON — European stocks are expected to plunge at the open on Thursday as global markets react badly to the latest monetary policy decision from the U.S. Federal Reserve. The U.K.'s FTSE index is expected to open 147 points lower at 7,323, Germany's DAX down 379 points at 15,071, France's CAC 40 down 175 points at 6,804 and Italy's FTSE MIB 675 points lower at 25,907, according to data from IG. Global markets are reacting badly to the Federal Reserve's indication on Wednesday that it could soon raise interest rates for the first time in more than three years. The Fed's policymaking group said a quarter-percentage point increase to its benchmark short-term borrowing rate is likely forthcoming. It would be the first increase since December 2018. The post-meeting statement from the Federal Open Market Committee did not provide a specific time for when the increase will come, though indications are that it could happen as soon as the March meeting.  The statement comes in response to inflation running at its hottest level in nearly 40 years. U.S. stocks initially rallied Wednesday even after the...
    Tucker Carlson and his team jet off to Hungary for a sit-down interview with the country’s prime minister and gives Fox Nation subscribers an inside look at the alleged secret war being waged by billionaire investor George Soros in "Tucker Carlson Originals: Hungary vs Soros: The Fight for Civilization." In the January 26 episode, available now on Fox Nation, Carlson speaks exclusively with Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who harbors a long and complicated history with Soros. Orban attended Oxford University on a Soros Foundation scholarship before delving into the world of politics. Despite entering university as a Soros protégé, Orban quickly forged his own identity as an anti-communist and Hungarian nationalist, diverging from Soros’ globalist tendencies. "He is the condensed symbol of everything the Hungarian right hates," Orban tells Carlson.  KYLE RITTENHOUSE TRIAL: ‘TUCKER CARLSON ORIGINALS’ CAPTURES NEVER BEFORE SEEN FOOTAGE Orban says Soros, a man with extensive economic and political reach, is the kind of man who never respected the traditions of the Hungarian people. Instead, Soros bolstered his own philosophical and ideological convictions with the goal of forcing...
    London (CNN Business)Some are calling it the "nuclear option."As Western governments threaten Russia with a package of unprecedented sanctions aimed at deterring President Vladimir Putin from ordering an invasion of Ukraine, there's one measure in particular that appears to strike fear at the heart of the Kremlin: cutting the country off from the global banking system. US lawmakers have suggested in recent weeks that Russia could be removed from SWIFT, a high security network that connect thousands of financial institutions around the world. Senior Russian lawmakers have responded by saying that shipments of oil, gas and metals to Europe would stop if that happened."If Russia is disconnected from SWIFT, then we will not receive [foreign] currency, but buyers, European countries in the first place, will not receive our goods — oil, gas, metals and other important components," Nikolai Zhuravlev, vice speaker of Russia's upper house of parliament, said Tuesday, according to state media outlet TASS.Read MoreWhat is SWIFT? The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication was founded in 1973 to replace the telex and is now used by over 11,000...
    (CNN)Roberta Metsola had double reason last Tuesday to celebrate -- marking both her 43rd birthday and becoming the youngest ever president of the European Union's Parliament. She is also the first woman in 20 years to have the job.But at the first news conference following her victory, Metsola immediately faced questions around her stance on abortion rights.Claire PiersonMetsola is a member of the center-right European People's party and is anti-abortion. She comes from Malta, which has the strictest abortion laws in Europe, criminalizing abortion under any circumstances. Malta is also the only EU member with a total ban. Indeed, Metsola voted against the 2021 EU Parliament Matic Resolution which declared abortion to be a human right, on the basis that Malta should have the right to legislate for itself on abortion.And in 2020, she voted against an EU resolution on Covid-19 which describes denial of abortion as a form of violence against women. In 2015 Metsola also signed a statement with other Maltese MEP's that stated they were "categorically against abortion."That said, Metsola was clear during her first news conference...
    PORTO legend Lima Pereira has passed away at the age of 69, the Portuguese club has announced. The European Cup winner would have celebrated his 70th birthday on 1st February. 1Lima Pereira won four league titles and the European Cup with PortoCredit: Getty He won four Portuguese top-flight titles during an 11-year career at Porto from 1978 to 1989. And he was part of the all-conquering 1986-87 campaign that saw the ‘Dragoes’ claim the European crown. Tributes have poured in for the former centre-back, who was capped 20 times by Portugal. Porto released a statement on Twitter that read: “Dragon forever. It is with deep regret that we say goodbye to Lima Pereira, sending sincere condolences to his family and friends. “See you always, Lima Pereira! You will always be one of us!” Former team-mate Augusto Inacio wrote: Today is a sad day for me. “Lima Pereira died - a friend and someone who shared with me and the team at Porto many important achievements for the club. Most read in SportAustralian Open live Dan Evans knocked out, Medvedev wins,...
    Prime Minister Ted Heath signed the treaty that took the United Kingdom into the EU on this day in 1972, a ceremony that was delayed after a protester threw a bottle of ink in the PM’s face as he arrived at the Egmont Palace. Had it not voted to leave the European Union in 2016, the United Kingdom would very likely have been marking the 50th anniversary since the historic signing of the accession treaty in 1972 today, just as the Republic of Ireland — which joined on the same day and is still a member — has. The United Kingdom joined the ‘European Community’, which included the European Economic Community (EEC), on January 1st 1973, following the signing of the Treaty of Accession on January 22nd 1972, 50 years ago today. Treaty of Accession signed on 22 January 1972 by Ireland, United Kingdom, Denmark & Norway to pave the way for membership of the EEC #Brexit pic.twitter.com/npulLuKm6s — National Archives, Ireland (@NARIreland) March 29, 2017 The document was signed on the same day as the UK by Ireland, Denmark,...
    He was a self-made Yorkshireman who redrew the map of the planet, a pioneering explorer who set foot on lands no European had ever seen, a compassionate captain who spared no effort to look after his men, a national hero whose courage and patriotism inspired millions. Yet now, poor Captain James Cook is about to be cancelled. To 'woke' activists, the great 18th-century sea captain has become a symbol of supposed colonial oppression, his memorials daubed with vicious graffiti. 'Across New Zealand, Australia and Hawaii,' reported yesterday's Guardian, 'statues of Cook have been defaced. Strutting across a pedestal in his breeches, telescope in hand, a defaced Cook wears a spray-painted bikini; around the neck of another Cook hangs a large, canvas sign that reads, simply: 'Sorry'.' The Guardian's gloating tone — it sneers at the 'myth of Captain Cook' and boasts the 'heroes of empire will fall' — is no accident.  To the preening prigs of the bien-pensant Left, a patriotic hero like Cook is an affront. The irony, by the way, is that the Guardian's assault on Captain Cook...
    Meanwhile all we get are Proud Boys and Q freaks. In a story that takes up a sizable portion of its front page, The Washington Post brings us the travails of one unvaccinated Italian man—a professional chamber musician who, due to his refusal to abide by Europe's ever-growing vaccination mandates, can no longer "check into a hotel, eat at a restaurant or get coffee at a bar." You are free to interpret the story as you wish. On one hand, it provides a gentle and sympathetic view of a phenomenon that many modern Americans do not fully believe in, namely the existence of Italy. On the other hand, it's hard to imagine anybody in this country or any other was piping up with won't somebody think of the over-eccentric chamber musicians? Or maybe it's a reminder that American anti-vax whiners have no freakin' idea how pampered they are. We're in the middle of a new world war, this one against an emergent virus that has killed millions and which we probably could have stood a chance against, if humanity spent...
    London (CNN)Maltese center-right politician Roberta Metsola has been elected as the new European Parliament President, a week after the body's previous head David Sassoli died suddenly, and she immediately faced questions around her stance on abortion rights.Metsola, who was voted into the post on her 43rd birthday, had served as the Parliament's vice-president since 2020 and was elected comfortably in Tuesday's leadership vote, winning the support of 458 of the group's 705 MEPs. She is the third woman to lead the Parliament, but has drawn early criticism over her opposition to abortion -- a procedure that is legal, if restricted, in every EU country except her own nation of Malta. Reproductive rights have become a central issue on the continent since Poland introduced a near-total ban on terminations last year.Although the role of President is largely ceremonial, Metsola takes charge of the bloc at a critical time. She will seek to contain fractures among the group's MEPs, while it also deals with the Russian military buildup near to the Ukrainian border, a complicated trade relationship with China and emerging from...
    The European Space Agency has whittled down more than 23,000 aspiring astronaut applications to a shortlist of 1,391 who could potentially fly to space and the moon.  ESA is on the lookout for a new cohort of six space travellers who will spend time on the International Space Station and may one day land on the lunar surface. The agency hasn't said where in Europe the shortlisted candidates are from, but during the last round 1,900 of the 23,000 who applied were from the UK. The UK Space Agency confirmed there are British candidates among the shortlist, but couldn't say who they were, or how many had made it through to the next stage, where those remaining will undergo further testing. Of the successful next round candidates, 39 per cent were female and 61 per cent male, according to ESA, with 29 'parastronauts' out of 287 being shortlisted.  The call for applicants was made in March 2021, and ESA says it has taken longer than expected to whittle it down due to 'a high volume and caliber of applications'.   The...
    BRUSSELS (AP) — Christian Democrat Roberta Metsola of Malta has been elected president of the European Union’s parliament. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The Sentinel-1B radar satellite, part of the EU’s Copernicus Earth Surveillance Program, has not transmitted data since it went down on December 23, 2021. The Sentinel-1A and 1B satellites are located in the European Space Agency’s Copernicus zone. Photo: That Sentinel-1B is one of the most powerful Earth observation satellites, and the system problems are very serious. According to members of the Copernicus program, after the news of Sentinel-1B’s extraordinary event on December 23, 2021, they were carefully prepared to restore the satellite’s operation, including changing the structure of the satellite to prevent a recurrence. . However, during production, they discovered that the initial problem was the result of a severe malfunction in one part of the electrical system on the Sentinel-1B satellite. Operating for the past few days does not allow the power supply function required to operate the radar to be reactivated. Over the next few days experts will do a closer look at the root cause of the problem and how to fix it. Sentinel-1B was launched into polar orbit in April 2016, two years after the...
    Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez proposed treating COVID-19 as an "endemic disease" rather than a pandemic this week, saying that the country is considering a move to start tracking the virus like the flu instead of counting every case.  "I believe that we have the conditions for, with precaution, slowly, opening the debate at the technical level and at the level of health professionals, but also at the European level, to start evaluating the evolution of this disease with different parameters than we have until now," Sánchez told a Spanish radio station on Monday.  Sánchez's comments come after El País reported that Spanish health officials are preparing to roll out a new system to track COVID-19 like other respiratory illnesses by not testing every mildly symptomatic case and using smaller samples to monitor the spread.  "We are going to have to learn to live with it [the coronavirus] as we do with many other viruses," Sánchez said Friday, noting that the virus's lethality has decreased, according to the Spanish newspaper.  Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez speaks during a news...
    SPAIN could be the first European country to downgrade Covid-19 to a" flu-like" status - just two years after clocking 1,000 deaths a day from the virus. Spanish PM Pedro Sánchez pushed his EU counterparts on Monday to debate the possibility of treating Covid like the flu. 4Spain is pushing to have Covid downgraded to a flu-like statusCredit: Getty 4More than 1,000 Spaniards died daily from Covid during the peak of the first waveCredit: AFP The European leader told a local radio channel the situation in Spain "is not what we faced a year ago" and that it was time "to evaluate the evolution of COVID to an endemic illness". The move would see lockdowns and daily infection counts scrapped in favour of a system that would track Covid cases like the regular flu. It comes as a string of positive studies show Omicron is milder than other strains, with data revealing the risk of hospitalisation is 50 to 70 per cent lower than with Delta. Covid booster jabs protect against Omicron and offer the best chance to get through the pandemic, health...
    In this article GSThousands of people crowded the streets of Rome, Italy.AGF | Universal Images Group | Getty ImagesThe euro zone will grow at a faster clip than the U.S. economy in the next two years, analysts at Goldman Sachs have predicted, primarily due to a difference in government policy. The investment bank expects the 19-member euro region to grow at a pace of 4.4% this year, compared to a rate of 3.5% for the United States. Looking at 2023, Goldman foresees the euro zone growing by 2.5% and the U.S. by 2.2%. Sven Jari Stehn, Goldman's chief European economist, said that while in the near term the picture in Europe is "challenging," the region still "has more room to grow." Speaking to CNBC Tuesday, he said that there are two main factors supporting European growth. "The hit is more manageable than last year," he said, regarding the impact of recent Covid-19 restrictions on the euro zone economy. Thus far, European countries have not embarked on widespread lockdown rules despite the new omicron variant discovered in late 2021. This has...
    The three German ruling parties, with major ideological differences, continued to talk about “growing together” after their coalition came to power. But now the first split fungus has sprouted from the ground. Will the government, which sees itself as revolutionary in the field of sustainability, accept natural gas as a sustainable energy source? The European Commission’s proposal to add gas and nuclear energy to the green energy list is subject to debate, subject to certain conditions. That list is designed for investors who want to invest their money in a sustainable way and make more investments in power plants. First, it’s about money: Germany makes little difference between what you call green and what you do not, for the steps you need to take to release less CO2. At the same time, political interests abound in the play. Difficult condition The country will need new natural gas plants in the future, no doubt about it. This is because while the demand for electricity is increasing, the production of energy from other sources...
    Here’s a feel-good story for the beginning of 2022! Forbes reports that even though the golf industry has seen a boom during the pandemic, Donald Trump’s European golf interests have tanked to the tune of $100-plus million. It’s almost like the guy who has reportedly squandered hundreds of millions of unearned capitol numerous times over the last five decades continues to be terrible at everything he does. It is almost a talent to be as bad at business as Donald Trump is. You could probably run an organization better by making binary decisions using a goldfish’s location in a fishbowl. According to Forbes, the issue for Trump is that his golf courses in Europe are tied to large-scale resorts, and so while tee times increased at golf courses all over the world, people booking “resort” time decreased sharply—you know, global pandemic and all that. One of the shiniest objects on the list is Trump’s money pit investment in the Turnberry golf resort in Scotland. Turnberry was reportedly purchased for more than $60 million back in 2014. Trump then poured upwards of 200 million into the place and...
    Tourists visit the Acropolis archaeological site in Athens, Greece, on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2022.Nick Paleologos | Bloomberg | Getty Images The emergence of the highly transmissible omicron variant has seen cases of Covid-19 surge in countries all over the world. Over the past 28 days, the U.S. and the U.K. have recorded the highest number of new cases of the virus in the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. However, there are a handful of countries with a higher prevalence of Covid-19 than the U.K. and the U.S., which recorded 2,664 and 1,810 cases per million people respectively for the week to Jan. 6, figures from Our World in Data show. Among those countries are Ireland, Greece and Denmark.IrelandIn the week ending Jan. 6, Ireland had a seven-day average of 4,020 cases of Covid-19 per million people, according to Our World in Data. There were 23,817 new cases confirmed in the country on Thursday, according to official government data, marking the highest daily figure to date. In the week to Jan. 5, 40 deaths were caused by...
    Incredible new images of Orion's fireplace, the Flame Nebula, have been shared by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), revealing a 'spectacular firework display.' It was taken with the ESO-operated Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), located on the cold Chajnantor Plateau in Chile's Atacama Desert. The flame nebula sits within the constellation of Orion, about 1,500 light years from the Earth, with a cluster of newly formed stars sitting at its centre.  The new image, released to celebrate the start of the New Year, was part of the APEX Large CO Heterodyne Orion Legacy Survey (ALCOHOLS), which looked at the radio waves emitted by carbon monoxide (CO) in the Orion clouds. Dubbed Orion's Fireplace, the nebula is a cloud of dust and gas, as well as nursery for new stars that emit high-energy radiation, causing the surrounding gas to glow.  Incredible new images of Orion's fireplace, the Flame Nebula, have been shared by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), revealing a 'spectacular firework display' It was taken with the ESO-operated Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), located on the cold Chajnantor Plateau in Chile's Atacama...
    LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the 19 countries that use the euro currency hit a record high of 5% in December compared with a year earlier. The rise was led by a surge in energy prices, according numbers released Friday by the European Union’s statistical office. Inflation is now at the highest level in the eurozone since recordkeeping began in 1997 and broke a record set in November. Soaring prices are compounding problems for European Central Bank policymakers who have been keeping interest rates at ultra-low levels to stimulate the economy amid the global pandemic. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Share this: Opening February 4, 2022, the new thematic reinstallation of the Museum’s renowned holdings of nineteenth- and twentieth-century European art features nearly ninety important paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, many of which have not been on view together in Brooklyn since 2016. Monet to Morisot marks the reinstallation of the Brooklyn Museum’s collection of historic and foundational works of European art made by artists born in Europe or its colonies, highlighting nineteenth- and twentieth-century selections by artists including Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Berthe Morisot, Francisco Oller, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Gabriele Münter, Yves Tanguy, and Vasily Kandinsky. Casting fresh eyes on the collection, this presentation explores not only the profound and ongoing influence of modern European art, but also how the art historical canon itself is a site of tension. Many of these works are on view together in Brooklyn for the first time since 2016, when they began touring the United States and Asia in the acclaimed exhibition French Moderns: Monet to Matisse, 1850–1950. Monet to Morisot: The Real and Imagined in European Art is curated by...
    Citizens from across Europe have come together to demand the end of the shark fin trade in the European Union once and for all. Every year 63 to 273 million sharks are killed for their fins, creating a huge danger of extinction among many species. Not only is this an incredibly cruel practice, but it is also incredibly wasteful. The fin is often the only part of the shark that is harvested and used, leaving the rest of the shark to rot away in the ocean. Many sharks even have their fins cut off as they are still alive, and then are dropped back into the ocean to suffer a long and painful death. The ‘Stop Finning — Stop the Trade’ European Citizens’ Initiative began on February the 1st of 2020 and ends on January 31st of 2022. The goal is to get one million votes and there are only a few weeks left to reach it. The initiative calls to “end the trade of fins in the EU including the import, export, and transit of fins other...
    “According to the European regulation on recovery and recession mechanism, each member state of the EU can receive up to 13% of the upfront funding received from this mechanism for the implementation of the National Recovery and Recession Plan (PNRR). The pre-funding will be transferred to the respective states after approval by the European Commission and the EU Council’s PNRR, but only until December 31, 2021, the MEP announced. Siegfried Muresan, who is responsible for implementing the recovery and recession mechanism at the EU level, said states that did not recognize PNRRs by December 31 had, as a result, not received pre-funding. In the future. , However, they will benefit from the full amount they are entitled to if they meet all the objectives considered in the plan agreed with the European authorities. The MEP stressed that the Commission will not ignore the law when it comes to evaluating the reforms and investments that countries need to implement in the future. “But one thing is for sure, these countries will not benefit from pre-funding...
    From ‘airship drones’ to stay in the stratosphere for months, to future European space rider space capsules, new materials for reusable rockets and lunar colonies will be passed on: these are just a few of the many research projects underway at the Italian Space Research Center (CIRA). ) Presented on the eve of National Space Day. “Space is one of the frontiers of humanity, and on a day like today, as we celebrate the past, we see those who created the conditions and many perspectives that lie ahead of us today,” said Giuseppe Morcelo, the leader of the Syracuse. At Chira headquarters in Kapua ahead of the day. Many guests alternately presented chira and future development plans. Founded in 1984, Chira is in the process of in-depth renovation with new projects and infrastructure integrated with new projects and infrastructure such as the Vega Launcher built by Avio and the European Space Agency’s Space Rider space shuttle. Esa) The return-to-Earth capsule was born from the development of IXV. “We are developing a series of laboratories and infrastructures in...
    French President Emmanuel Macron and Italy's Prime Minister Mario Draghi.Alessandra Benedetti - Corbis | Corbis News | Getty Images The balance of power is changing in the European Union's three largest economies which could have significant implications for financial markets. Germany has just turned the page on Angela Merkel's 16 years of leadership, France is bracing itself for an uncertain presidential election in the spring, and Italy is anxiously waiting to find out whether Mario Draghi will leave his prime ministerial post. "We may well be in for a rather profound 'watershed moment,' with significant positive implications for policies," Erik Nielsen, group chief economist at UniCredit, said in a note to clients in December.Germany"The new German government will bring in significant reforms in Germany, if less headline-grabbing and straightforward then desirable, and it will, very likely, also facilitate reforms in Europe," Nielsen said. The newly established government has promised to decarbonize the German economy and to invest in digitalization. At the same time, its idea is also to follow a sound fiscal policy from 2023 onward, once stimulus to deal...
    Published: 02/01/2022 – 09:42 NASA announces that the lifespan of the International Space Station (ISS) has been extended back to 2030. The announcement should be verified first by a congressional budget vote, but it is already important for space science research. Launched in 1998, the International Space Station is now 20 years old, a strategic tool that has enabled it to make tremendous strides in various fields of technology. So ISS functions still run extensions to the delight of NASA researchers. Today, with a living space equivalent to a Boeing 747 weighing 419 tons and 100 meters long, the station was originally scheduled to cease operations in 2016, but will continue to operate again under the management of Joe Biden, who has decided to extend his lifespan. 2030. A total of sixteen countries are participating in the ISS, including Russia, Japan, several European countries and Canada. A team of six astronauts occupied the structure permanently with rotations for up to six months. An important geopolitical declaration Dedicated to research, this laboratory is the largest ever put into orbit,...
    The euro — the centralised currency of the European Union — has turned 20 years old on Saturday. The European Union’s main currency, which is used by 19 of the bloc’s 27 members, has entered its second decade of use on January 1st, 2022. Since its inception, the euro has been the centre of both praise and controversy, with it being lauded as a source for European unity as well as derided as the cause of division. Commenting on the euro’s 20th anniversary, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde said that the currency has become a fundamental part of European identity. “It has helped unite us as Europeans,” Lagarde wrote in the Irish Independent. “In the latest Eurobarometer survey, when asked what the European Union means to them, 41pc of citizens said they think of the euro. Our single currency was second only to freedom of movement.” “Clearly, Europe and the euro have become inseparable. And for young Europeans, who have only ever known the single currency, it must be almost impossible to imagine Europe without it,” the ECB head continued....
    Decryption – The activity of the island’s ports has increased by more than 50% in one year. At the same time, its trade relations with France are tightening. To understand the changes in international trade is like looking at the operation of ports. Especially when it comes to the islands. Quantity of goods to be traded British ports This year is expected to reach a 40-year low of 408 million tonnes, the lowest in forty years, compared to 2019. In the first ten months of the year, the country recorded a 15.7% decline in trade in commodities, according to the European Reform Center. Read moreDirect ferry links between France and Ireland are on the rise In contrast, Irish port activity rose more than 50% in the first nine months of the year. At the port of Dublin, traffic for the traditional British ally fell 21%, while for the EU it increased by 36%. It has been a year since Brexit came into force, The restoration of the exchanges is placed in place. Earlier, Irish exporters had to cross the British...
    New car models sold in the EU from mid-2022 will be required by law to record driving data that can be viewed in the event of an accident. New car models, as well as any other road vehicle, sold in the EU from mid-2022 will be required to record technical data, such as the direction of the steering wheel and vehicle speed, so that it can be used in the event of a crash. The new rule will coincide with the forced introduction of Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) systems for new vehicle models next year. According to a report by Der Spiegel, a so-called “Event Data Recorder” — also referred to as a “black box”, similar to those already found in aircraft — will possibly enable police to understand if an accident was caused by driver error, depending on the incident. However, an AFP report claims that, although law enforcement will indeed have access in the event of an accident, insurance companies will not be permitted access to any data recorded. All data gathered by black boxes will also be anonymised,...
    A woman was stunned when she got home from the airport and discovered that the $3,000 worth of gifts she'd purchased in Europe were missing from her suitcase — and in their place was dog food.  Gina Sheldon, an attorney from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was happy to have her Christmas shopping taken care of as she returned home from a trip overseas. She had spent 11 days traveling across Italy, and along the way, she purchased presents to give to her family for the holidays - including a leather jacket, wristlet purses, and more.  But when she returned home and opened up her suitcase, she discovered that all of the pricey presents she bought on her trip were gone, and instead, they had been replaced with piles upon piles of dog food, as well as a few dirty old T-shirts and a bottle of shaving cream. Horrified: A woman was stunned when she got home from the airport and found the $3,000 worth of gifts that she had bought in Europe missing Instead, they had been replaced with piles upon...
    In this article LSPD-CASequoia Capital Global Managing Partner Doug Leone speaks onstage during Day 2 of TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2018 at Moscone Center on September 6, 2018 in San Francisco, California.Steve Jennings | Getty ImagesLONDON — Some of America's most successful venture capital firms have been finding it difficult to recruit people to lead their new European outposts, multiple industry sources have told CNBC. U.S. VC heavyweights including Sequoia Capital, Bessemer Venture Partners, Lightspeed Venture Partners and General Atlantic have all either opened new European offices or started notable expansions in the last 12 months. Hussein Kanji, co-founder of U.K. venture capital firm Hoxton Ventures, told CNBC that the big U.S. VC firms are finding it "super, super hard" to hire the right people in Europe, adding that there have only been a handful of notable appointments. "There are few trained general partners in Europe," he said. A key difference, Kanji said, was U.S. VCs tended to focus on growth whereas European VCs were more likely to prioritize reducing or removing risk. To some extent, the U.S. VCs are also...
    King George III called slavery 'repugnant' in an essay he wrote five decades before he signed Abolition, it has been revealed.  The monarch's arguments against trading in human life come in a 200-page manuscript called 'Of Laws relative to Government in general', written while he was under the intellectual mentorship of John Stuart, 3rd Earl of Bute. In the mid-1750s, when George would have been a teenager, he wrote a precis to a 1748 political treatise by Montesquieu, the French jurist, saying slavery is 'equaly [sic] repugnant to the Civil Law as to the Law of Nature', The Times reports.  He also said the 'European traffic of Black slaves' was not justifiable because the 'very reasons urg'd for it', including that it would not be possible to cultivate New World colonies without them, 'will be perhaps sufficient to make us hold this practice in execration'. The king's essay is included in the Georgian Papers Programme, a collaboration between King's College London, the Royal Collection Trust and others who aim to make historical materials relating to the Hanoverians more accessible.  The king's essay is included...
    INTERNATIONAL travel is already tricky with Covid restrictions and requirements varying from country to country. Now, traveling to some European countries will soon require another piece of paperwork and an added fee. 1US citizens traveling to certain European countries soon will be pre-screened In 2022, the European Commission will require travelers from 60 countries, including the US, to fill out a European Travel Information and Authorization System (Etias) card. It's a system that will pre-screen travelers before they board a plane. All the information on the card will be checked against a security database. Once the visa waiver program goes into effect, all travelers will need to be pre-screened. The program was originally expected to go into effect in 2021, but it's been pushed to 2022. The European Parliament approved the visa waiver program in 2016. Most read in moneyMORE MONEY '$1,104 checks' could start arriving 10 days as couples could get $154 a monthBIG BUCKS IRS sent ‘$3,600 stimulus’ checks out as deadline for January 15 payments nearsBIG BOOST $3,000 checks being sent out now as New Year surprise...
    A pair of satellites designed to observe the sun have captured video of the bright green Comet Leonard as it speeds past the Earth for the first time in 70,000 years.  Since its discovery in January this year, the comet has been fast approaching both the Sun and Earth, at nearly 160,000 miles per hour.  The ball of ice and dust is about half a mile wide, and was captured by the NASA Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Aspacecraft (STEREO-A), and the European Space Agency (ESA) Solar Orbiter observatory. STEREO-A has been focused on following the green comet since November, and the team from NASA were able to produce a short animation from dozens of images. NASA published a 'difference image' to highlight 'outbursts' from the comet, caused when it throws off volatile material like gas and water ice - changing its brightness. The ESA spacecraft, a joint project with the US space agency, captured a video of the comet streaking across its field of view between December 17 and 19, 2021. But according to scientists, it may already be splitting...
    The grapes used to make popular French, Italian and Spanish wines may not be from Europe but instead from the Western Asian country of Georgia, a study has suggested.  Italian scientists analysed 204 genomes of common grape vines in Georgia and found that evidence to suggest that a single 'domestication event' occurred in Western Asia.  The experts found that the birth of the grapes used in wines such as Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir took place during that event, which was followed by numerous and pervasive interbreeding with grapes from Georgia and Europe, reports The Times.  The grapes used to make popular French, Italian and Spanish wines may not be from Europe but instead from the Western Asian country of Georgia, a study has suggested. Pictured: A vineyard in Georgia  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Racehorses, flashy cars and £20million in jewellery: The... Are these the facts that gave Boris Johnson pause for... Share this article Share The grapes were dispersed from West Asia to Europe in a move driven...
    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The European Union’s regulator gives green light to Novavax, the 5th COVID-19 vaccine for use in the 27-nation bloc. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Following Australia’s setback in the Indo-Pacific strategy, the Kwai D’Orsay decided to reconsider its alliances in the region. France has committed itself to a “strengthened partnership”Indonesia, The largest country in Southeast Asia, was announced by the Foreign Minister in Jakarta on Wednesday Jean-Yves le Drian. He therefore signed with his Indonesian envoy Redno Mersudi “an action plan to strengthen this strategic partnership” since 2011, he said during the two-day visit. In 2022 the relationship will be deepened “in security and maritime affairs, especially by creating bilateral maritime dialogue,” but also health, energy and Climate change. Towards arms procurement Jean-Yves le Drian also met with Indonesian Defense Minister Prabovo Subiando on Tuesday, while Indonesia has been in talks for months to buy 36 Rafale. Amid growing tensions between Beijing and countries bordering the sea, Jakarta is also interested in submarines, corvettes and other military equipment. China South. France has seen its strategy split in the regionAustralia Agreement on the purchase of French submarines and the announcement of a strategic alliance called AUKUS between this country, the United States and the United...
    Almost 48 hours after being asked to name President Biden's biggest foreign policy wins, Press Secretary Jen Psaki came up with an answer on Thursday: restoring American leadership, rebuilding alliances and taking action in the Indo-Pacific. But the president's most consequential decision - ending the U.S. war in Afghanistan - merits no mention, even though Biden himself described the resulting evacuation of Kabul as an 'extraordinary success.' Her response quickly renewed criticism of an administration that has trumpeted its foreign policy expertise.   'Thanks to Patsy Widukaswara for a thoughtful question about our single biggest foreign policy success this year,' tweeted Psaki, referring to the the softball query she was asked on Tuesday. 'Thoughtful questions deserve thoughtful answers so here are 3 of the accomplishments [the president] and our team are proud of this year. More to come. She listed the Biden administration's role in international institutions and convening world leaders to make progress on the pandemic, climate change and economic recovery;  restoring our alliances, including with Europe, and ending some significant trade disputes; and in the Indo-Pacific, developing new platforms...
    On June 1, 2022, a valuable poster will be featured. Following the expansion of cooperation between CONMEBOL and UEFA, Argentina and Italy will play “Finalism” in London, winning both Copa Am அமெரிக்காrica and Euro 2020, respectively. The relationship between the South American Football Federation (CONMEBOL) and UEFA will last for a few more years. This Wednesday, the two authorities announced that they would extend this cooperation until June 30, 2028. To celebrate this event, football fans will receive a valuable poster between countries. As part of this cooperation, a meeting between Argentina and Italy will take place on June 1, 2022 in London. This “finalism” is a symbol of this alliance between CONMEBOL and UEFA. The choice of these is illustrated by the fact that they both won the big trophies of Copa America and Euro 2020 last summer. In one Was contacted Alexander Seferin, President of the European Union, expressed his interest in participating in such a confrontation: CONMBOL’s Boss Reaction: In addition to the UEFA boss, CONMEBOL boss Alejandro Dominguez was delighted with the expansion of this collaboration....
    The head of the European Union's executive branch said Wednesday that omicron is expected to be the dominant coronavirus variant in the 27-nation bloc by mid-January, amid concerns that a dramatic rise in infections will leave Europe shrouded in gloom during the holiday season.  European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said the EU is well prepared to fight omicron with 66.6% of the bloc's population fully vaccinated. Von der Leyen expressed disappointment that the pandemic will again disrupt year-end celebrations but said she was confident the EU has the "strength" and "means" to overcome COVID-19.  VACCINATED PEOPLE NO LONGER HAVE TO FOLLOW LOCKDOWN RESTRICTIONS IN AUSTRIA  European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen delivers a speech during a plenary session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021.  (Julien Warnand, Pool Photo via AP) "Like many of you, I'm sad that once again this Christmas will be overshadowed by the pandemic," she said.  Continental Europe can look to Britain for a sense of what lies ahead as omicron spreads.  The head of the U.K. Health Security...
    Malta will become the first European country to legalise cannabis for personal use this week, setting a precedent that is expected to be followed by others. The legislation, expected to pass through the Maltese parliament in a vote tomorrow, will also let those who are 18-and-over possess up to seven grams of cannabis (about a quarter of an ounce). It will also permit people to grow up to four cannabis plants at their homes, but it must be out of sight of the public. Malta will become the first European country to legalise cannabis for personal use this week, setting a precedent that is expected to be followed by others The legislation is set to be quickly signed off by Malta's president George Vella. Europe's smallest member state is expected to be followed by similar moves in Germany, Switzerland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Italy also intends to hold a referendum on whether to legalise cannabis next year. Local news website Lovin Malta said the reforms are intended to regulate personal cannabis use and to reduce the harm it can do. It also...
    A small delegation of House Democrats is in Ukraine's capital to assess Russia's aggressive military buildup along the smaller country's eastern border, one of the lawmakers currently in Kyiv revealed on Sunday. 'We need to accept that this may happen, this may be the largest land invasion in the European theater since World War II,' Rep. Ruben Gallego of Arizona said on CNN.  Russia has captured the world's attention in recent weeks by amassing troops and military equipment at its border with Ukraine at lightening speed. Officials in Kyiv are pleading for help from Western allies, claiming an attack is imminent.  Ukrainian officials have said there are currently as many as 120,000 Russian soldiers at its border in the Donbas region.  Gallego, who serves on the House Armed Services Committee as chair of the Subcommittee on Intelligence and Special Operations, revealed today that he hatched a plan to lead a group of his colleagues to Kyiv to assess the situation firsthand. 'I had planned this about a couple of weeks ago recognizing there was this kind of buildup happening, so...
    In the latest episode of Fox Nation's "Tucker Carlson Today", former UKIP Member of European Parliament Nigel Farage, widely considered the leader of the Brexit movement in Great Britain, recounted the disdain he was treated with on his final day as an MEP. Farage told host Tucker Carlson that he had an amiable relationship with the other members of the European assembly, but that his successful endeavor to have Britain break from the globalist coalition did not sit well with E.U. leadership. He also suggested that touting national identity causes the E.U. version of Trump Derangement Syndrome among the elites. CLICK TO GET FOX NATION Carlson went on to play a clip from Farage's final speech in 2020: "So this is it-- the final chapter, the end of the road. A 47-year political experiment of this power," he said. "And I can promise you both in UKIP and indeed in the Brexit party, we love Europe. We just hate the European Union." VideoFarage ruffled the presiding leadership's feathers when he and several British lawmakers seated near him stood up and waved tiny Union...
    United Kingdom The European Commission on Thursday rejected a deadline set Friday for resolving a dispute over Vin’s licenses. Peach Mail- Brexit With France, it accuses London of bad faith and promises to go to trial. A spokesman for British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said Thursday evening that “we have never set a deadline.” “They set up one, but that’s not what we work on.” Possible obstacles Opinion of French President Emmanuel MacronAfter a few minutes, all disagreements with London (fishing, immigration, security): “I want to have a government that wants to work with us in good faith,” he told a news conference. . Earlier in the day, the French maritime minister had warned that France would go to “arbitration” at the European level and “go to court” if all the fishing licenses demanded were not granted by Friday evening. Eleven months after the post-Brexit trade agreement and as the marathon negotiations continue, France has agreed to oppose the European Commission’s “softness” and set a deadline of December 10 in London. The patience of the French fishermen has reached...
    Since the 2016 Brexit of Great Britain from the Belgium-based confederation known as the European Union, many populist civilians have begun to take note that not even elected officials on their own flank truly believe in democracy or republicanism as-defined, Brexit Party founder Nigel Farage told Fox Nation on Wednesday. Farage, who resigned as leader in March and was succeeded by developer Richard Tice in the now-monikered Reform UK Party, told "Tucker Carlson Today" the Brexit movement and its electoral success revealed more than expected in terms of how tightly elected officials subscribe to globalism over democracy. Farage joked the U.S.-based Tea Party, organized in 2010 following President Obama's sudden leftward lurch of American politics – via the passage of ObamaCare and other programs – are "newcomers" and that he has been a populist leader since the 1990s. Nigel Farage campaigned with then-candidate Trump in 2016. (AP) "I guess the advantage we had [as Brexit proponents was] it was a very clear, simple prospectus," he said. "We (the United Kingdom) joined something called the European Union, a political union....
    An employee at a testing station in the city centre takes a swab from a woman. In Lower Saxony, stricter Corona rules apply in many areas.Hauke-Christian Dittrich | picture alliance | Getty Images The World Health Organization on Wednesday said the highly mutated omicron variant of Covid-19 could change the course of the pandemic.  The exact impact is "still difficult to know," WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a media briefing from the group's Geneva headquarters. Scientists across the world are scrambling to determine just how contagious and lethal the mutated virus has become. "Certain features of omicron, including its global spread and large number of mutations, suggest it could have a major impact on the course of the pandemic," Tedros said. Genetic changes to the virus affect its virulence and indicate it could be considerably more infectious than previous strains, according to WHO. Too early to tellMaria Van Kerkhove, WHO's technical lead on Covid-19, said preliminary evidence from South Africa may suggest that omicron is milder than the delta strain but it is "too early to conclude...
    He noted that the EU must remember to consider the perspectives of each of its member nations and should not force every country into a monolithic worldview. "The European Union must take in hand the ideals of the founding fathers, which were ideals of unity, of greatness, and be careful not to take the path of ideological colonisation," the Pope said. "This could end up dividing the countries and [causing] the European Union to fail. The European Union must respect each country as it is structured within, the variety of countries, and not want to make them uniform. I don't think it will do that, it wasn't its intention, but be careful, because sometimes they come, and they throw projects like this one out there and they don't know what to do. "Each country has its own peculiarity, but each country is open to the others," he continued. "The European Union: its sovereignty, the sovereignty of brothers in a unity that respects the individuality of each country. And be careful not to be vehicles of ideological colonisation. That is...
    Dornoch Firth, Scotland (CNN)Professor William Sanderson, or Bill as he likes to be known, wades into the shallows of the Dornoch Firth as the sun breaks over the ragged skyline of the Scottish Highlands, turning the waters gold. Something in the water catches his eye and he stoops to pick it up. "This is a European native oyster," he explains. "They used to be very abundant in this site thousands of years ago right up to the 1800s."The shell in his hand is flatter and rounder than the faster growing Pacific oysters common in European restaurants today. It is also very rare, having been fished almost to extinction in British waters during the Industrial Revolution. "Rail networks opened up urban markets, and what had been localized oyster fisheries suddenly found markets for many millions in the major cities like London, Paris," explains Sanderson, who is based at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. At the time, oysters were considered a "poor man's food" and sold as street food, says Sanderson. "You could even pay your rent in oysters in Edinburgh if you...