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    On Monday’s edition of the Breitbart Daily News podcast, Breitbart News editor-in-chief Alex Marlow highlighted U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s recent false statement about American children “on ventilators” and in “serious condition” with COVID-19 as illustrative of broad-based ignorance driven by a “pandemic of misinformation.” During oral arguments on Friday as the Supreme Court considered challenges to the Biden administration’s coronavirus vaccine mandates, Sotomayor falsely stated, “We have over 100,000 children, which we’ve never had before, in serious condition, many on ventilators.” Marlow described Sotomayor’s demonstrated ignorance as a function of growing centralization of control and increasing politically-driven censorship over the digital flow of information by the technological oligopoly. “All the things that we can’t discuss because it goes against narrative … is becoming … a literal public health crisis,” Marlow stated in an interview with Rep. Byron Donalds (R-FL). He continued, “At this point, we’re not allowed to talk about certain topics because it’s inconvenient to the people who control our media and the current political class.” “Among many absurd things she said last week, was that...
    The White House acknowledged Monday that people who had three shots of the coronavirus vaccine could still catch the virus. “I had been triple-vaxxed, I had minor symptoms,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said during the daily press briefing, recalling her experience with the virus to Fox News reporter Peter Doocy. Doocy reported that he also caught the virus, despite being triple-vaccinated, asking Psaki why President Joe Biden continued to call the coronavirus pandemic “a pandemic of the unvaccinated.” Psaki defended Biden’s slogan by noting the coronavirus symptoms among the vaccinated were less severe compared to the unvaccinated. “Those are significant serious statistics,” she said, calling the health impact on unvaccinated Americans “far more dire.” Psaki said the White House and Biden always acknowledged that “breakthrough cases” would occur among the vaccinated. “I think our president has said, as have we a number of times, that there will be breakthrough cases, there will be people who get COVID,” Psaki said. White House officials argued for months that getting the vaccine would stop the virus and prevent it from spreading...
    ROME — Pope Francis said Monday that people who opt not to get vaccinated against the coronavirus are acting on “baseless information or poorly documented facts.” In his yearly address to the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the Holy See, the pontiff reiterated his belief in the effectiveness of the vaccines, stating that “in those places where an effective vaccination campaign has taken place, the risk of severe repercussions of the disease has decreased.” It is “important to continue the effort to immunize the general population as much as possible,” he declared, which calls for “a manifold commitment on the personal, political and international levels.” “Each of us has a responsibility to care for ourself and our health, and this translates into respect for the health of those around us,” Francis asserted. “Health care is a moral obligation.” People wearing face masks outdoors are seen at a Covid-19 vaccine site in Los Angeles, California, on July 6, 2021 (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images). “Sadly, we are finding increasingly that we live in a world of strong ideological divides,”...
    The establishment media on Tuesday admitted President Joe Biden failed to shut down the Chinese coronavirus amid the omicron variant and a shortage of testing kits. After Biden promised in 2020 “to shut down the virus, not the country,” the establishment media noticed that Biden conceded Monday there is “no federal solution” to shut the pandemic down. “More than nine months later, he is now admitting not enough has been done,” CNN wrote, critiquing its ally in the White House. “President Joe Biden and his team repeatedly promised more Covid-19 testing, including at-home kits that deliver rapid results, but they are now admitting a virus that is more adaptable than the politicians who fight it has outpaced them again,” CNN continued after months of praising Biden’s efforts, as in headlines like this one from January: “Biden unveils Covid-19 plan based on ‘science not politics’ as he signs new initiatives.” The Washington Post, which criticized President Trump for his poor “handling of the coronavirus pandemic and his divisive, bullying conduct in office,” has turned its sights on Biden for floundering and breaking promises. “The president made a bet in March that vaccination could...
    BERLIN (AP) — Germany’s highest court ruled Tuesday that officials must draw up rules to protect disabled people if hospitals end up having to triage patients in the pandemic. The Federal Constitutional Court said that the parliament violated a clause in the constitution stating that no one can be discriminated against because of a disability, and ordered it to rectify the situation “without delay.” The court’s ruling came after it considered complaints last year from a group of people with serious disabilities, most of whom require regular assistance. They worried that doctors could give up on them if a situation arose in the coronavirus pandemic in which there weren’t enough hospital beds for the number of patients. Germany so far has avoided that situation, although patients have had to be transferred to other regions in the most recent wave of infections because beds were scarce in some parts of the country. The federal court concluded that the plaintiffs “currently are not effectively protected against recognizable risks to top-tier legally protected rights in a situation in which they cannot protect themselves.”...
    The coronavirus pandemic has been an indisputable boon for authoritarianism. Individual liberty and personal sovereignty are in retreat around the world. Tyrannical China is rising as the dominant world power, having paid no price for unleashing the disease, while the United States and its allies are having deep second thoughts about economic freedom, free speech, and other bulwarks against authoritarian control. Here are five ways the coronavirus pandemic drove the worldwide ascendancy of authoritarianism: Growing Chinese Power The ambassador of China to Burundi, Zhao Jiang Ping (L), and The Burundi Minister of Health Thadee Ndikumana (R), sign before speaking to journalists about 500,000 donated doses of China’s Sinopharm vaccine at a ceremony in the economic capital Bujumbura on October 14, 2021. (TCHANDROU NITANGA/AFP via Getty Images) China emerges from the pandemic with more geopolitical influence than ever. Beijing used “vaccine diplomacy” to buy influence from developing nations by donating millions of doses of its dubious vaccines.  The staggering economic damage inflicted upon other nations by the coronavirus appears to have accelerated China’s timetable for becoming the dominant economic power...
    ROME, Italy — The Vatican said Wednesday that children have been the “most vulnerable victims” of the coronavirus pandemic, despite their remarkable resistance to the disease itself. Although children have accounted for a miniscule percentage of deaths from the coronavirus, the pandemic “has thrown countless children into severe poverty and left many without parents and caregivers,” reads the text from the COVID-19 Vatican Commission. In Italy, for instance, coronavirus deaths of children under 20 years of age make up significantly less than one tenth of one percent (0.001) of all coronavirus casualties in the country, making them statistically irrelevant. But children have borne the brunt of the fallout from political and social measures established to curb the spread of the virus. “Worldwide, there has been increased exploitation of and violence against children and reduced or suspended access to educational facilities,” it asserts. “Governments, civil society organizations, and the Church must come together to alleviate the escalating suffering of the most vulnerable children among us.” “Sudden global increases in severe poverty, rising food insecurity, and public quarantine measures have put major...
    President Joe Biden falsely claimed in an interview on Tuesday that people who were vaccinated for the coronavirus could not spread the disease. “Everybody talks about freedom about not to have a shot or have a test,” Biden said. “Well guess what? How about patriotism? How about you make sure you’re vaccinated, so you do not spread the disease to anybody else? What about that? What’s the big deal?” The president commented on vaccines during an interview with local news channel WHIO-TV in Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control has acknowledged that “vaccinated people can still become infected and have the potential to spread the virus to others,” which is why they recommend that Americans continue to wear masks indoors, even if they are vaccinated. In an interview with News19, Biden also blamed the unvaccinated for spreading the virus. “[T]hose who aren’t vaccinated are the ones that continue to spread the diseases,” he said. “And so we should think of as a patriotic duty.” When asked if he would back down from his federal vaccine mandates after they were held up...
    The National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins is retiring, but as part of his goodbye he played a coronavirus-themed parody of the song “Somewhere over the Rainbow” on Tuesday. Collins debuted his performance in a Health and Human Services video featuring his final remarks to the American people before his retirement. After he spoke, he pulled out a guitar and played. “This is really a song for you, for all of us who have been going through this pandemic and trying to imagine how’s it going to feel when we’re finally past that,” he said as he began. Here are the lyrics: Somewhere past the pandemic when we’re free There’s a life I remember full of activity Somewhere past the pandemic masks will come off No more need for a nose swab every time we cough As we are gathered here today Covid’s toll has hit and sent us reeling Our partners like the ones right here Will help to make the pathway clear To find the true healing Somewhere past the pandemic life will resume. We’ll...
    The American influencer who sparked outrage in March 2020 for licking an airplane toilet seat and calling it the 'coronavirus challenge' is selling the viral video as an NFT — and hopes to fetch $42,000 for it.  As the pandemic first began sweeping the US early last year, Ava Louise, 23, set off a firestorm when she shared a TikTok video of herself licking a toilet seat in an airplane bathroom — though she later revealed it was on a private plane and she purposefully provoked people for attention. But now the Miami social media star and musician wants to turn the stunt into something good: She is selling the clip as an NFT with plans to donate proceeds from the sale to help people struggling with COVID-19. 'I see this as a chance to right my wrongdoings done when I decided to mock the pandemic in this video,' she told DailyMail.com.   The American influencer who sparked outrage in March 2020 for licking an airplane toilet seat and calling it the 'coronavirus challenge' is selling the viral video as an NFT ...
    TUNIS, Tunisia (AP) — Tunisia recorded its first case of the omicron variant Sunday after health authorities in the North African country said a man traveling in from Turkey tested positive. A member of Tunisia’s COVID-19 task force, Dr. Hachemi Louzer, said the man was from the Democratic Republic of Congo. He tested positive Friday at the Tunis international airport after arriving from Istanbul and a subsequent screening of the sample at the Pasteur Institute for Public Health in the capital, Tunis, confirmed the omicron variant, Louzer said. Several of his fellow travelers, including his brother, who tested negative for COVID-19 have been quarantined, he said. Health authorities have restricted travel to Tunisia after the spread of the omicron variant in Africa and Europe over the past week. The overall epidemiological situation in Tunisia has improved in the past two months after the country received vaccine shipments from several countries, including the United States, health experts said. More than 25,000 people have died of coronavirus in Tunisia. ___ Follow all AP stories on the pandemic at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic....
    London (CNN)The Covid-19 pandemic will not last forever.It will likely continue to fizzle and fade as it heads towards its third year, resurging with new variants and then waning in the face of vaccines, mitigation measures and human behavior. But even if the virus is never stamped out, immunity will improve and the world will eventually be able to live with Covid.On that, experts generally agree. "The large majority of infectious disease specialists think, and have thought for many months, that SARS-CoV-2 is here to stay," said Paul Hunter, professor in medicine at the University of East Anglia in the UK."Our grandchildren's grandchildren will still be catching (the virus)," he said. But "Covid, the disease, will become part of our history as the infection morphs into just another cause of the common cold."There is, however, a far more pertinent question, the answer to which is frustratingly elusive: How long will it take to get there?Read MoreAnd that answer is not up to luck -- it is, at least in large part, within our hands. Pandemics fade out of view as...
    Having a recent tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis can skyrocket a person's likelihood of dying from COVID-19, a new study finds. Researchers from the California Department of Health gathered statewide data to identify how much of an increased risk of death TB patients suffered during the pandemic. They found a person who was diagnosed with both TB and Covid within 30 days was 20 times as likely to die than someone who only had the virus, and twice as likely to die when compared to someone diagnosed with TB before the pandemic. The findings show the high risk people with TB - a condition that can severely damage a person's lungs - face during the pandemic. Researchers found a direct correlation between how recent a TB diagnosis is and the likelihood of dying of Covid. A person diagnosed with TB within 30 days of Covid infection are 20 times as likely to die than the average person, and twice as likely to die as someone infected with TB before the pandemic TB is a potentially devastating bacterial infection that can cause permanent...
    Blue Michigan, led by famed lockdowner Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D), has the highest coronavirus case rate in the nation, with the peak spiking at 59 percent in the last two weeks as other states such as Florida see record low numbers. According to the New York Times’ coronavirus data tracker, Michigan is reporting a daily average of 8,457 cases, or 85 per 100,000. That represents a 59 percent increase over the last 14 days. In that same time frame, hospitalizations in the state jumped 41 percent, reporting a daily average of 4,092 hospitalizations.  Whitmer stood as one of the most prominent pro-lockdown figures throughout the pandemic, extending restrictions well into summer 2021. What is more, she sought police enforcement of her unconstitutional rules, actively seeking the “assistance of the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association (MSA) and Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police on a plan to urge Michigan residents to call law enforcement on alleged order violators,” as Breitbart News reported in June.  People demonstrate during the Michigan Conservative Coalition organized “Operation Haircut” in Lansing, Michigan on May 20, 2020. The group opposes...
    A report on the United Kingdom’s response to the Chinese coronavirus crisis has found that the government was “underprepared” for such a pandemic, stating that there were no “detailed plans” to deal with a coronavirus outbreak. The National Audit Office (NAO) – the UK’s independent spending watchdog – found that the British government did not have the structures in place to effectively deal with an emergency such as the one brought on by the Wuhan virus. The report states that the government failed to set out an overarching level of risk that they were willing to accept within pandemic scenarios. Additionally, the report found that the level of risk the government found acceptable was inconsistent, shifting early on in the pandemic. The NAO wrote: “Like many other governments across the world, the UK government was underprepared for a pandemic like COVID-19. It will need to learn lessons from its preparations for and handling of whole-system risks, which will include making judgements on what level of preparations is appropriate.” “The UK government and devolved administrations, along with the emergency services and other...
    BRATISLAVA, Slovakia (AP) — Slovakia is planning new restrictions on unvaccinated people in an effort to tame the latest surge of coronavirus infections that has caused a “critical” situation in the country’s hospitals, the prime minister said Tuesday. Prime Minister Eduard Heger said his government will vote Thursday on the latest proposals by an advisory group of medical experts that will be effective for three weeks. Among the proposed measures, people who have not been vaccinated will be banned from all non-essential stores, shopping malls, gyms, pools and hotels. They also won’t be allowed to attend any mass public gatherings like sports events. “The situation in hospitals is critical,” Heger said, adding that some hospitals are already at their limit for COVID-19 patients in their intensive care units and have been transferring new patients to other facilities. Unvaccinated people will be able to get into their workplaces with negative virus tests. If the situation doesn’t get any better in the next three weeks, the government is ready to impose even more restrictions, the prime minister said. He urged unvaccinated...
    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The Netherlands recorded its highest weekly number of positive coronavirus tests over the last seven days, and lawmakers discussed legislation as cases continued to soar Tuesday to limit unvaccinated people from using the country’s COVID pass system. The country’s public health institute reported Tuesday that the number of positive tests rose by 44% to 110,558, the highest weekly total since the pandemic began. Hospital admissions for COVID-19 patients rose 12% and admissions to intensive care units by 3%, it said. The institute said 173 people died of COVID-19 during the past week, bringing the Netherlands’ death toll in the pandemic to 18,785. Cases rose sharply among children ages 4-12 years, most of whom have yet to be vaccinated against the coronavirus. Vaccines made by Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech have been cleared for use in children ages 12 to 17 in Europe; the European Medicines Agency is evaluating whether to authorize them for 5 to 11 year olds. A new partial lockdown came into force Saturday across the Netherlands, with bars, restaurants and supermarkets ordered to...
              moreby Ross Pomeroy   The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the national public health agency of the United States, so it made sense that during a once-in-a-century pandemic the agency would be given a leading role. With that leadership, however, came limelight. And in so many ways during the COVID-19 pandemic, the CDC, under the spotlight, undeniably flopped. In his recently published book, Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic, former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb critiqued numerous aspects of the worldwide response to COVID-19. Many CDC actions garnered forceful rebukes. While Gottlieb recognizes that a lot of talented, smart, and dedicated individuals work within the CDC, he says it’s hard to deny that the respected governmental agency failed in a lot of vital respects. Here are six of them: 1. The CDC Failed to Make a Reliable COVID-19 Test. Of all the collective institutional failures during the U.S. response to the COVID-19 pandemic, this was almost certainly the worst. Very early on in 2020, the CDC was tasked with creating and disseminating a diagnostic...
    Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers is not backing down from his ideas about the coronavirus vaccines and is now saying that the “hate” he has faced will not deter him. After appearing on the Pat McAfee Show last week to tell America exactly where he stands on the coronavirus vaccines and why Rodgers was beset by angry leftists all over again because he is reluctant to take any of the coronavirus vaccines. Despite the onslaught by the left-wing press, Rodgers now says he remains undeterred in the course he has chosen for his treatment plan. On Tuesday, Rodgers once again spoke with McAfee and said that he is standing by his decisions. “Hate isn’t going to bring us out of this pandemic, and I’m not gonna hate on anybody who has said things about me,” he exclaimed. Watch: "Hate isnt going to bring us out of this pandemic & Im not gonna hate on anybody who has said things about me. Everybody is entitled to their opinion & I will always believe that" ~@AaronRodgers12#PatMcAfeeShowLIVE pic.twitter.com/p05RgbkocF — Pat McAfee (@PatMcAfeeShow)...
    Aaron Rodgers has no regrets about discussing being unvaccinated. The Green Bay Packers quarterback made serious waves after talking with Pat McAfee this past Friday about being unvaccinated, and people were not happy at all with the interview. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) Aaron Rodgers says he’s listening to Joe Rogan’s advice on how to battle COVID-19 and he’s also taking Ivermectin. Prepare for media heads to explode. pic.twitter.com/DXjGJrwif6 — David Hookstead (@dhookstead) November 5, 2021 Well, he’s not backing down. He spoke with McAfee again Tuesday and said that he stands by what he said Friday, and added, “Hate isn’t going to bring us out of this pandemic and I’m not gonna hate on anybody who has said things about me.” You can watch him explain the situation below. “Hate isn’t going to bring us out of this pandemic & I’m not gonna hate on anybody who has said things about me. Everybody is entitled to their opinion & I will always believe that” ~@AaronRodgers12#PatMcAfeeShowLIVE pic.twitter.com/p05RgbkocF — Pat McAfee (@PatMcAfeeShow) November...
    (CNN) — Covid-19 is here to stay. It’s highly unlikely that the United States, let alone the world, will be able to completely eliminate the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. READ MORE: Now Is The Perfect Time To Adopt A PetBut there will come a day when it’s no longer a pandemic, when cases are no longer out of control and hospitals aren’t at great risk of overflowing with patients. Many experts predict the spread of coronavirus will look and feel more like seasonal influenza. What’s less clear is how and when that will happen. “There’s not even a measurement to say that something is an epidemic or pandemic. All of this is in the eye of the beholder — and that’s part of the issue,” Dr. Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan and acting chair of the US Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, told CNN. “So, all of this is not based on rules. It’s based typically on what you have to do to control the outbreak,” Monto said....
    (CNN)Covid-19 is here to stay.It's highly unlikely that the United States, let alone the world, will be able to completely eliminate the coronavirus that causes Covid-19. But there will come a day when it's no longer a pandemic, when cases are no longer out of control and hospitals aren't at great risk of overflowing with patients. Many experts predict the spread of coronavirus will look and feel more like seasonal influenza. What's less clear is how and when that will happen. Fewer Covid-19 hospitalizations, more vaccinations show US may be turning corner in pandemic but experts warn: Were still in two Americas"There's not even a measurement to say that something is an epidemic or pandemic. All of this is in the eye of the beholder -- and that's part of the issue," Dr. Arnold Monto, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan and acting chair of the US Food and Drug Administration's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee, told CNN.Read More"So, all of this is not based on rules. It's based typically on what you have to...
    Football without fans in the stadium is simply not the same thing. Following the action on the field is only part of the pleasure of going to a game; breathing in the atmosphere created by the supporters is also important to the experience. Football fans are not spectators. they are active participants. 3Fans of Flamengo cheer on their side against Atletico MineiroCredit: Reuters The mood they create in the stands has a profound effect on what happens on the pitch - for better or for worse. With the coronavirus pandemic now under relative control in Brazil, fans are gradually being allowed to return to the stadiums. It has come at a decisive moment. The league comes to a conclusion in early December. The campaign is now in the final straight, and emotions are running high. There is a built in level of insatisfaction in Brazilian football. The tradition of the game in such a giant country is strongly local - there was no genuinely national championship until 1971, and for years being champion of the local city was seen as...
    MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico returned Sunday to mass commemorations of the Day of the Dead, after traditional visits to graveyards were prohibited last year because of the coronavirus pandemic. But the one-year hiatus showed how the tradition itself refuses to die: Most families still celebrated with home altars to deceased loved ones, and some snuck into cemeteries anyway. Gerardo Tapia Guadarrama on Sunday joined many others at the cemetery as he visited the grave of his father Juan Ignacio Tapia, who died in May 2020 of a thrombosis. Even though cemeteries in Mexico were closed to visitors last year to avoid spreading the virus, so strong is the tradition that his son still slipped into the cemetery in the eastern Mexico City suburb of Valle de Chalco to visit him. ’Lat year it was prohibited, but we found a way,” Tapia Guadarrama said slyly. Much of graveyard has low walls that can be jumped. “To live is to remember,” he said. “What they (the dead) most want want is a visit from those they were close to...
    A 55-year-old man has died after being gored by a bull at a festival in Spain - marking the first death of its kind in the country since the start of the Covid pandemic.  The animal was filmed Saturday lifting the reveller in the air on the end of its horns and dumping him on the ground as shocked onlookers took shelter in a shop doorway just a few feet away.  Other party goers in Onda, in the eastern province of Castellon, tried to entice the bull away to stop it attacking the injured man again as he lay unconscious on the ground.  He was rushed to hospital where he was pronounced dead after haemorrhaging blood from a gore wound in his left thigh near to his groin which had perforated his femoral artery.  Onda town hall officials announced they were suspending the rest of the night's events when they learned he had lost his life.  The animal was filmed Saturday lifting the reveller in the air on the end of its horns and dumping him on the ground as...
    Scientists are working to create a vaccine that could combat of all types of coronaviruses in an effort to potentially prevent the next pandemic. The La Jolla Institute for Immunology, in San Diego, California, has received a $2.6 million grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to work on their ambitious project to potentially prevent future pandemics. Researchers believe they could build on the research and development used to create the current crop of COVID-19 vaccines to prevent other similar viruses. Their goal is to identify parts of the structure of the virus that are unlikely to mutate as the virus changes, and target those parts in particular.  Researchers in San Diego have received a grant from NIAID to work on a vaccine that could be effective on all present and future forms of coronavirus. On top of Covid, it would also be effective against MERS and SARS. Pictured: vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid vaccine Dr Erica Ollmann Saphire (pictured), president of the La Jolla Institute, said that her team hopes their research could prevent the need to...
    by Melissa Hawkins, American University People were washing their hands so much early in the pandemic that sensitive skin and soap shortages were common problems in 2020. All this focus on hand-washing was for good reason. The science uniformly demonstrates that frequent hand-washing reduces the risk of a variety of illnesses. It is low-hanging fruit in terms of an easy, healthy habit to practice. However, people today aren't washing their hands as often as at the beginning of the pandemic, and many are wondering: Should I still be washing my hands more often because of the coronavirus? The short answer is yes. That is because you probably weren't washing your hands nearly as often as you should have been before the pandemic. I am an epidemiologist and mom of three boys, one girl, two cats and one dog. Between sports and a busy household, there are a lot of opportunities for germs to spread in our house, coronavirus or no coronavirus.Hand-washing: How often?You wash your hands after going to the bathroom, but when else should you be washing?...
    A majority of Americans believe the Chinese coronavirus pandemic is getting “less serious” in the United States, and a plurality do not believe public health officials want to ease restrictions as the threat dissipates, a Convention of States Action/Trafalgar Group survey released Tuesday found. The survey asked, “Do you believe the COVID-19 pandemic is currently getting more or less serious in America?” Overall, 63.1 percent said it is getting “less serious,” while 26.1 percent said it is getting “more serious.”  Of those who think it is getting less serious, 25.9 percent believe it is getting “much less serious.” Opinions vary slightly on party lines. A plurality of Democrats, 48.9 percent, believe the pandemic is getting “less serious,” but over one-third, 38.8 percent, believe it is getting more serious. Far more Republicans, 71.5 percent, say it is getting less serious, and even more independents, 74.5 percent, hold that same view.  The survey also asked respondents if they believe President Joe Biden and government health officials such as Dr. Anthony Fauci actually want restrictions and mandates to ease up as the threat...
                      by Ross Pomeroy  A plethora of politicians and government officials across the globe screwed up in their handling of the COVID-19 Pandemic. The Chinese government, however, was acutely damaging with its ineptitude, because it, more than any other entity, had a chance to limit the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus when it first emerged in late 2019. Instead of trying to contain the virus with the help of the international community, however, the Chinese government lied, misled, and stalled. All of humanity has experienced the disastrous result of this negligence. In his new book, Uncontrolled Spread, physician, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb focused his considerable expertise on pointing out the ways in which the world’s response to COVID-19 fell short, and how we can better prepare for the next inevitable pandemic. Early on in the book, he chronicled numerous examples of the Chinese government’s inept, corrupt handling of what was then an emerging outbreak. Here are ten of them: 1. Silencing Genetic Sequencing. In late...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — A recent study has ranked Pennsylvania in the top 20 safest states to be in during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study, conducted by Wallethub, ranked Pennsylvania 19th out of 50 states and Washington D.C. It also said that West Virginia tied with Idaho for having the worst COVID-19 death rate. The study said it based its rankings of the states on COVID-19 transmission rates, the number of positive COVID-19 tests, hospitalizations and deaths related to the virus, and the number of eligible people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19. The study was released on Thursday. On Friday, the Pennsylvania Department of Health said that 1,502,124 total cases and 30,418 total deaths have been recorded since the start of the pandemic, and over 70% of the state’s population 18 and older are fully vaccinated. Wallethub said the safest state was Connecticut and the least safest was Idaho, with West Virginia being ranked second-to-last overall. MORE NEWS: WalletHub: Pennsylvania Among Least Safe States During PandemicThe results of this study by Wallethub...
    With coronavirus case rates on the downswing nationally — and especially in California — there’s growing optimism that the highly infectious Delta variant may finally be starting to lose its months-old grip. Still, COVID-19’s presence, while not as potent as earlier in the year, looms large, especially heading into the fall and winter. “We seem to have turned a corner in our fight against COVID. But we’ve turned corners before only to run into oncoming trains,” Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of UC San Francisco’s Department of Medicine, said at a recent campus forum. “Part of the challenge for us relates to the fact that Delta is far better at its job of infecting people than the original virus was. So our future will be determined in part by the answer to this question: Is Delta as bad as it gets?” The even bigger question, though, is what’s the endgame, what’s the path out of the pandemic? California Halloween still presents scary COVID-19 risk. How you can celebrate safely This Halloween seems set to more closely...
    MOSCOW — Russia has registered another record number of daily coronavirus deaths as it faces a rapid surge of contagion amid low vaccination rates. The government coronavirus task force reported 973 coronavirus deaths Tuesday, the highest daily toll since the start of the pandemic. The country has continuously registered new coronavirus death records this month. Daily infections also have been hovering near all-time highs, with 28,190 new confirmed cases Tuesday. Despite the rapidly mounting coronavirus caseload and deaths, the Kremlin has ruled out a nationwide lockdown, delegating the power to make decisions on tougher coronavirus restrictions to regional authorities. ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — Russia registers another record in daily deaths at 973 — Report says UK’s slow virus lockdown cost thousands of lives — Moderna has no plans to share its COVID-19 vaccine recipe — Merck asks FDA to authorize promising COVID-19 pill ___ See all of AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic ___ HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING: ISLAMABAD — Pakistani authorities on Tuesday reported less than 700 coronavirus cases for the first time since...
    By The Associated Press MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has extended through the end of the October a COVID-19 state of emergency that relaxes some health care regulations to help hospitals with coronavirus patients. The order was scheduled to expire Tuesday. The order was aimed at helping hospitals adjust to the caseload from the virus, al.com reported. Ivey first ordered the “limited, narrowly-focused” state of emergency on Aug. 12 because of a surge from the delta variant of the coronavirus and Alabama’s low vaccination rate. The governor’s office said Friday’s proclamation relaxes regulation to allow expanded capacity in health care facilities and easier shipment of emergency equipment and supplies. It also allows out-of-state doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to practice in Alabama under expedited licenses or temporary permits. The number of patients in Alabama hospitals with COVID-19 fell under 1,000 on Friday, the first time since July. The number of new daily cases in Alabama has dropped more than 70% since early September, the governor’s office said. However, the governor’s proclamation says the pandemic “continues to present a serious...
    MOSCOW (AP) — Russia’s daily coronavirus infections soared Thursday to their highest level so far this year as authorities have struggled to control a surge in new cases amid a slow pace in vaccinations and few restrictions in place. The daily coronavirus death toll topped 900 for a second straight day, with 924 new deaths reported Thursday — a day after reaching a record 929. Russia already has Europe’s highest death toll in the pandemic — topping 213,000 — and a conservative way of calculating the number suggests the actual number could be even higher. On Thursday, the government’s coronavirus task force reported 27,550 new confirmed cases, a nearly 10% rise from the previous day. New infections in Moscow soared by nearly 50% to 5,404 cases. A quick rise in infections and deaths began in late September, with authorities blaming it on the low vaccination rate. As of Tuesday, almost 33% of Russia’s 146 million people had received at least one shot of a coronavirus vaccine, and 29% were fully vaccinated. Despite surging infections, the Kremlin has shrugged off...
    President Joe Biden on Wednesday hoped relief was coming for Americans still suffering from the coronavirus pandemic, even as the country passed a grim milestone for deaths from the virus in 2021. “God willing, I think we’re just about to turn the corner again on the pandemic,” Biden said during an event on the White House complex. Biden spoke about the pandemic as more than 353,000 coronavirus deaths have been reported since January 1, 2020, according to an ABC News story citing data from Johns Hopkins University, which is more than the 352,000 deaths in 2020. The news breaks as fewer Americans trust Biden’s leadership on the pandemic than when he first took office. A Morning Consult/Politico poll released Wednesday shows that only 43 percent of Americans say that Biden’s handling of the coronavirus is excellent or good. The majority of Americans, 52 percent, say Biden’s handling of the pandemic is either poor or fair. WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 27: U.S. President Joe Biden rolls up his sleeve before receiving a third dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine in the...
    A majority of voters say President Joe Biden has handled the Chinese coronavirus pandemic fair/poor, a Politico/Morning Consult survey released this week found. The survey asked respondents to rate how Biden has handled the coronavirus — a key issue he promised to prioritize upon taking office. Over and over, Biden pledged to “manage the hell” out of the federal government’s pandemic operation. Yet, Americans do not have a positive view on his handling of the situation. Fifty-two percent rate his handling as either “poor” or “just fair.” Of those, 38 percent say “poor.” Twenty-two percent rate his handling “good,” followed by 21 percent who say “excellent,” and 5 percent who expressed no opinion on the matter. Similarly, Congress overall saw bad marks as well, as 68 percent rated its handling as either “poor” or “just fair.” Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is joined by Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), updates reporters at the Capitol in Washington, DC, September 23, 2021. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, file) The survey, taken October 2-4, 2021, among 1,998 registered voters, has a margin...
    Getty Images As the coronavirus pandemic drags on, many Americans have learned to cope with the new normal. Saving for emergencies and long-term goals, such as retirement, is still a top concern, however. More than 60% of Americans said in June they were either extremely concerned or somewhat concerned about the state of their finances, according to a survey released Sept. 30 from the National Endowment for Financial Education. The survey, conducted online by the Harris Poll in June, questioned more than 2,000 American adults on the state of their money. More from Invest in You:How to prevent fear and anxiety from ruining your financial lifeA budget is the first step to financial wellnessHere's the budget this millennial used to save $100,000 While that's a decline from April 2020, when 77% said they were concerned about money, it still shows that many are struggling with their finances. "The fact that still over half of us are concerned about that probably says more about our daily financial lives than it does the influence of the pandemic," said Billy Hensley president and...
    A report published on Monday by Australian cybersecurity firm Internet 2.0 found that China’s purchases of coronavirus testing equipment skyrocketed in the spring of 2019, months before the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) warned the world about the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic. The report, entitled Procuring for a Pandemic, found that purchases of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests in Hubei province began surging in May 2019, eventually reaching double the amount spent on such tests in 2018. Hubei is the province where Wuhan is located. China’s Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) suddenly became very interested in ordering PRC test gear around that time. In July, the Wuhan University of Science and Technology sharply increased its orders for PCR tests, racking up an 800% increase in spending by the end of 2019. This photo taken on May 30, 2021, shows a man receiving a nucleic acid test for coronavirus in Guangzhou in China’s southern Guangdong province. (STR/AFP via Getty Images) PCR tests are not solely used for coronaviruses or Covid-19, so the massive search in orders is...
    Humans may have decreased their mobility during the COVID-19 pandemic, but birds have significantly upped theirs, moving closer to areas that are inhabited by humans, a new study has found.    Researchers from the University of Manitoba and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology looked at the records of 4.3 million birds from March to May in the years 2017 to 2020 and found that 80 percent (66) of the 82 species were in 'greater numbers' in areas where humans live and flock to, such as airports, major roads and urban areas. The researchers found that bald eagles, the national bird of the U.S., were spotted more frequently in cities with the strongest lockdowns. Birds have moved closer to areas inhabited by humans during the pandemic. Bald eagles were spotted more frequently in cities with the strongest lockdowns Other birds, such as the red-throated hummingbird, were three times as likely to be seen within two-thirds of a mile of an airport.  It's unclear at this time why the birds have been spotted closer to humans, the researchers said. However, they speculate...
    The new evidence may corroborate the lab leak theory proposed by many who believe the pandemic originated from a laboratory in Wuhan rather than from a natural source, as the Chinese government has claimed. Experts and the media initially dismissed the lab leak theory as another partisan conspiracy theory, but the tide turned toward the possibility of an artificial source for the pandemic after more evidence was discovered and documented by online sleuths. In July, World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus admitted that the organization dismissed the possibility of a lab leak far too prematurely. He also said that the investigation into the sources of the pandemic were stymied by efforts from the Chinese government to withhold important documents and information related to the probe. In June, Chinese state media quoted a senior epidemiologist calling for the United States to be investigated as the possible origin of the coronavirus. "All bio-weapons related subjects that the country has should be subject to scrutiny," said Zeng Guang. Here's more about the lab leak...
    By The Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Alaska on Saturday activated emergency crisis protocols that allow 20 health care facilities to ration care if needed as the state recorded the nation’s worst COVID-19 diagnosis rates in the U.S. in recent days, straining its limited health care system. The declaration covers three facilities that had already declared emergency protocol, including the state’s largest hospital, Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage. Among the factors that led the state to activate the crisis of care standards include scarce medical resources within some facilities, limited staff and difficulty transferring patients to other facilities because of limited bed availability. Other factors included limited renal replacement therapy and oxygen supplies. According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering, one person in every 84 in Alaska was diagnosed with COVID-19 from Sept. 22 to 29. The next highest rate was one in every 164 people in West Virginia. Statewide, 60% of eligible Alaskans are fully vaccinated. ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — COVID-19 deaths eclipse 700,000 in US as delta variant...
    By The Associated Press Three Alaska hospitals have now instituted crisis protocols that would allow them to ration care if needed as the state recorded the worst COVID-19 diagnosis rates in the U.S. in recent days. According to data collected by Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering, one person in every 84 in Alaska was diagnosed with COVID-19 from Sept. 22 to 29. The next highest rate was one in every 164 people in West Virginia. Fairbanks Memorial Hospital activated the protocol Friday because of a critical shortage of bed capacity and staffing, along with the inability to transfer patients to other facilities. Two other Alaska hospitals, in Anchorage and Bethel, have invoked the same protocol. Fairbanks Chief Medical Officer Dr. Angelique Ramirez said the decision to move to crisis standards was because of many factors, including community spread caused by the low vaccination rates and a high number of patients waiting to be admitted. Statewide, 60% of eligible Alaskans are fully vaccinated. The Fairbanks North Star Borough is the third-worst region for vaccination rates in Alaska,...
    By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden mourned “the painful milestone” of 700,000 American deaths from COVID-19, a day after the U.S. surpassed that mark on Friday. The president says in a statement “the astonishing death toll is yet another reminder of just how important it is to get vaccinated.” He says the nation has “made extraordinary progress” in the fight against the coronavirus in the past eight months because of vaccines. Biden says thanks to vaccines, “hundreds of thousands of families have been spared the unbearable loss that too many Americans have already endured during this pandemic.” Biden adds they “will help us beat COVID-19 and move forward, together, as one nation.” ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — US virus deaths hit 700,000; unvaccinated frustrate health care providers — Russia: Antibody tests for COVID-19 remain popular, factor in low vaccine rate — Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor allows NYC school vaccine plan — Pediatrician: Keep mask mandates in Mississippi schools ___ See all of AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic ___ HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING: RENO, Nev. —...
    By The Associated Press JACKSON, Miss. — The leader of a Mississippi pediatricians’ organization is urging school districts to keep mask mandates in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. Dr. Anita Henderson of Hattiesburg is president of the Mississippi Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She says about 30% of youths ages 12 to 17 in the state are vaccinated, and “now is not the time to let our guard down.” Mississippi has reported nine pediatric deaths from COVID-19. Some school districts are repealing mask mandates. Among them are the Madison County and Rankin County districts in central Mississippi and the Ocean Springs district on the Gulf Coast. Mississippi had a significant surge in COVID-19 cases, deaths and hospitalizations starting in July. Numbers have slowly decreased in recent weeks. However, Mississippi is among the lowest vaccinated states in the nation. ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — US virus deaths hit 700,000; unvaccinated frustrate health care providers — Russia: Antibody tests for COVID-19 remain popular, factor in low vaccine rate — Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor allows NYC school vaccine...
    By The Associated Press NEW YORK — Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor denied an emergency appeal from a group of teachers to block New York City’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for public school teachers and other staff from going into effect. Sotomayor ruled on Friday, after the teachers filed for the injunction with her on Thursday to keep the mandate from going into effect. Under the mandate, the roughly 148,000 school employees had until 5 p.m. Friday to get at least their first vaccine shot. Those who didn’t face suspension without pay when schools open on Monday. An original deadline this week was delayed after a legal challenge, but a federal appeals panel said New York City could go ahead with the mandate in the nation’s largest school district. In August, Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett also denied an emergency appeal from students at Indiana University to block that institution’s vaccine mandate. ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — US virus deaths hit 700,000; unvaccinated frustrate health care providers — Russia: Antibody tests for COVID-19 remain popular, factor in low vaccine...
    COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Denmark seems to have failed to reach its target of 90% of people over the age of 12 having been vaccinated twice by Oct. 1 as the latest official figures show 84.9% have gotten both shots. The latest official figures by Danish Health Authorities show that 4,366,235 people have gotten both shots. Those who have gotten the first shot — 4,453,321 people — represent 86.6% of those over the age of 12. The vaccine is voluntary and free of charge in Denmark, which on Sept. 10, declared that it no longer considers COVID-19 as “a socially critical disease” because of the large number of vaccinations. All restrictions have since been removed. The Scandinavian country has a total population of 5.8 million. ___ MORE ON THE PANDEMIC: — Primetta Giacopini’s life began in one pandemic and was ended by another — As COVID-19 deaths rise, vaccine opponents find a foothold in Bosnia — Am I fully vaccinated without a COVID-19 vaccine booster? — Singapore’s strategy of living with COVID-19 raises concerns, hope — Japan’s next leader sees higher...
    GENEVA — The World Health Organization reported that the global number of new coronavirus cases and deaths continued to fall in the past week, with an estimated 3.3 million new infections and about 55,000 deaths, marking a 10% drop in both. In its regular assessment of the pandemic issued on Tuesday, the U.N. health agency said the biggest drops in new cases were seen in the Middle East, the Western Pacific and the Americas. WHO first reported a substantial decrease in cases in mid-September at 4 million new cases, with declines seen in all areas of the world, the first time in more than two months that COVID-19 cases had fallen. WHO said all regions reported more than a 15% decline in deaths, except for Europe, where the number of deaths was similar to the previous week and Africa, where there was about a 5% rise. In Asia, the number of deaths dropped by nearly a quarter. WHO warned there would likely be more spikes of COVID-19 as the Northern Hemisphere enters winter. The disease spreads more easily...
    Despite a vocal cohort suspecting otherwise, many scientists continue to believe the novel coronavirus that has killed nearly five million people emerged when the deadly pathogen made the jump from animals to humans, a process called zoonosis. Suffice it to say that after 20 months of lockdowns and despair, the world desperately wants to avoid another global-health crisis like this one. Now, a trio of scientists at the University of Glasgow in the U.K. think they have just the tool: an A.I. model that can identify animal viruses with a high risk of one day infecting humans. Early tests, detailed in a new study in PLOS Biology, even purport to show how this very technology might have helped identify SARS-CoV-2, the technical name for the virus that causes COVID-19, before its documented emergence in Wuhan, China, in late 2019. This is far from the first time A.I. has been dangled as a tool to help us understand how animal viruses can lead to human infections. Just this year, scientists at the University of Liverpool said they used A.I. to predict...
    VIDEO5:2405:24Dr. Gottlieb: I believe we will have a Covid antiviralSquawk Box Dr. Scott Gottlieb told CNBC on Monday he believes vaccinating children against Covid is a crucial step in changing the way many Americans view the coronavirus going forward. "I think the reason why a lot of people are overestimating the risk of coronavirus, or are still worried about it even if they're vaccinated ... is because the kids are still vulnerable," the former Food and Drug Administration commissioner said on "Squawk Box." "Once adults are able to vaccinate their kids, the anxiety about getting a breakthrough infection — knowing that you're probably not going to get very sick, your odds of getting very sick are very low if you're vaccinated, but you could bring it back into the house — I think that's going to start to resolve," he added. Gottlieb, who now serves on the board of Covid vaccine maker Pfizer, acknowledged the process will be a "slow evolution," especially after the highly transmissible delta variant has caused a surge in new Covid infections, hospitalizations and deaths in...
    By The Associated Press SYDNEY — Australia’s prime minister says he expects his country to open its international border well before the end of the year. Australian governments have agreed to ease tight restrictions on overseas travel when 80% of the population aged 16 and older was fully vaccinated. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the first steps would allow Australians to leave and fully vaccinated citizens and permanent residents to return home. “That will occur before the end of the year. It could happen well before that,” Morrison told American broadcaster CBS News. More than 90% of the target age group in Australia’s most populous state and the worst impacted by the nation’s COVID-19 outbreak, New South Wales, will be vaccinated by the end of November, New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said. New South Wales reported 787 new locally acquired infections on Monday and 12 deaths in the latest 24-hour period. Sydney’s lockdown would ease on Oct. 11 after 70% of the state’s population had received second doses of vaccine, Berejiklian said. With 85% of the target population already...