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    George Mason University’s Arlington campus at night. The university celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/ George Mason University Gregory Washington is the eighth president of George Mason University. Courtesy Ron Aira/Creative Services/George Mason University The Center for the Arts and the Johnson Center sit by a pond on George Mason’s Fairfax Campus. Courtesy Evan Cantwell/Creative Services This aerial photograph shows the newly built George Mason College’s Fairfax campus, circa 1965. Courtesy George Mason University (1/4) Share This Gallery: Share on Facebook. Share on Twitter. Share via email. Print. When people think of universities in the D.C. area, big names such as Georgetown and George Washington University might come to mind. But there’s another George in the area, and it’s celebrating a big milestone this year. George Mason University, Virginia’s largest public research university, turns 50 in 2022 and is celebrating an impressive array of stats it has racked up over the half-century, including: An enrollment of 39,000 students, representing 130 countries. More than $200 million in George Mason-sponsored research in...
    Tiger sharks are starting to move farther up north due to climate change warming oceans that have historically been too cold for the apex predator, according to a new study. A team of scientists led by the University of Miami found oceans temperatures have been the warmest on record over the last decade, allowing tiger sharks to travel 250 miles poleward. Because of the warmer oceans, sharks are also migrating 14 days earlier to waters along the US northeastern coast. Not only do these changes have ramifications for human safety, but these sharks are venturing out of areas that provide them protection from commercial fishing. Scroll down for videos  Tiger sharks are starting to move farther up north due to climate change warming oceans that have historically been too cold for the apex predator, according to a new study Neil Hammerschlag, director of the Shark Research and Conservation Program at the University of Miami, said in a statement: 'Over the past 40 years, tiger shark distributions have extended further poleward along with warming waters. 'In fact, off the northeast United...
              by Stuart Reges   How do you make the progressives on campus so “horrified” that they spring into action to defend their sacred ideology?  Make an indigenous land acknowledgment that doesn’t match their view of history and watch them lose their minds.  Let me describe how that happened to me. Indigenous land acknowledgments have been common in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, and they are now starting to crop up on college campuses in the United States.  At the University of Washington, they are showing up all over the place.  The diversity experts in the university’s Allen School of Computer Science—where I teach—have produced a “best practices” document that encourages faculty to include these on their course syllabus.  The document also suggests replacing the phrase “you guys” with “ya’ll,” but that’s a topic for a different piece. At first, I ignored these land acknowledgments, but the more I observed how they were used, the more they reminded me of a prayer.  At our annual faculty retreat this year our director opened with a solemn land acknowledgment.  Why?  As with a prayer, a land acknowledgment...
              by Alpha News Staff   The University of Minnesota admitted in an email to its student body that the COVID-19 vaccine doesn’t prevent transmission of the virus — yet the school says it will “probably” require more boosters for its students. Public Health Officer Jakub Tolar sent an email to the student body answering some frequently asked questions about the virus earlier this month. “I’m vaccinated, does that mean I can’t get COVID-19?” one question reads. “No,” the school responds, stressing that omicron remains “easily transmissible” even among the university’s fully-vaccinated population. Despite this, the school indicates it will likely require more vaccines. “I’m vaccinated and boosted, am I done?” the next question reads. “Probably not,” the university responds. “Updated and amplified protection is key to staying healthy and bringing the pandemic under control,” it continues, apparently suggesting booster mandates are soon to come. Already, President Joan Gabel is sternly asking students to get another vaccine. The university has also denied the reality of natural immunity. “Based on current data, no,” previous infections do not protect people from reinfections, it says. “You...
    Behold, Here Cometh the Dreamer, Celebrating the legacy of MLK, Jr through the Spoken Word, is a series that gives young writers an opportunity to share their work. The event will be on January 21 at 7:30 pm at Averitt Center for the Arts. Georgia Southern University’s Dr. Stacy Smallwood is this year’s guest speaker. The event is sponsored by Davis Bozeman Johnson Law Firm. Purchase tickets online HERE. From Averitt Center for the Arts: Recognizing the importance of original writing in our society, this series has become an annual favorite bringing together young emerging writers and poets with established spoken word artists such as educators Derrick Bailey, Kimberly Foxx, and Dr. Lindamichelle Baron. The evening is structured to give the young writers / rappers a chance to perform their works and, after intermission, an opportunity to experience an accomplished wordsmith like this year’s Guest Speaker, Dr. Stacy Smallwood. Dr. Smallwood is an Associate Professor of Community Health in the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health and an affiliate faculty...
    A Duke University police officer fatally shot a man being held in custody at the Duke University Hospital late Friday night after a struggle broke out, officials confirmed.  The unidentified man was being held by the Durham Police Department and being treated at the hospital's emergency department, officials reported.   A struggle ensued when the detainee took a Durham officer's gun, authorities reported.  A Duke University police officer fatally shot a man being held in custody and treated at the University Hospital late Friday night  The man was shot after he grabbed a Durham police officer's gun in an struggle A Duke University police officer responded to the scene and fatally shot the man, Duke officials said.  Hospital staff immediately began treating the man but were unable to save him. Officials are notifying his family, a hospital spokesperson said. The Durham police officer was also treated for injuries after the shooting and since been released from the hospital, but officials did not clarify what his injuries he sustained. No one else was physically injured.   RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next ...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — ABC’s “This Week” — Dr. Vivek Murthy, U.S. surgeon general; Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C. __ NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Clyburn; Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah. ___ CBS’ “Face the Nation” — Gov. Larry Hogan, R-Md.; Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va.; Mayor Quinton Lucas of Kansas City, Missouri; Betsey Stevenson, professor of public policy and economics at the University of Michigan. ___ CNN’s “State of the Union” — Murthy; Clyburn; Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La.; Rep. Mike McCaul, R-Texas. ___ “Fox News Sunday” — Republican Glenn Youngkin, who is being sworn in Saturday as Virginia’s governor; Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Six Maryland environment professors penned a letter to the presiding officers of the General Assembly this week, imploring them to commit to reducing climate pollution in Maryland by 60% below 2006 levels by 2030. They cited recommendations by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which released a major report last summer revealing that drastic reductions in emissions are urgent and necessary to prevent a climate catastrophe. “Just last year, Maryland experienced five separate billion-dollar weather and climate disasters, including hurricanes and tropical storms. Maryland’s 3,000 miles of tidal shoreline are vulnerable to sea level rise and retreating shores, threatening habitat, agriculture, and communities,” the scientists wrote in a letter, with the support of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network (CCAN). “We need to do more and we need to do it now. Maryland is uniquely situated as a state that is both particularly vulnerable to climate change and well-positioned to mitigate it,” they continued. The letter was signed by Donald Boesch and Eric A. Davidson, who are professors at the University of Maryland...
    by Manali Mukherjee, McMaster University and Zain Chagla, McMaster University Even as the unpredictable rise and fall of COVID-19 infections continues at home and around the world, a new and ugly pandemic-related problem is emerging. We know it generically as “long COVID,” though it’s hardly generic, and we still know very little about it, including what it is, who, when or how badly it will strike, how long it might take to recover or whether complete recovery is possible for all. Long COVID, or post-COVID condition, features symptoms that can include trouble breathing, chest pain, brain “fog,” fatigue, loss of smell or taste, nausea, anxiety and depression, among others. It appears to affect about one in 10 people who have recovered from a COVID-19 infection. In Canada, a conservative estimate is that long COVID has affected 100,000 to 150,000 people so far, although the studies assessing prevalence have serious methodologic flaws.Post-viral syndromesThe medical and research community first became aware of long COVID as a sometimes debilitating post-viral syndrome that first appeared to affect patients who’d had severe COVID-19, particularly those...
    President Joe Biden has again referred to Vice President Kamala Harris as 'President Harris' in yet another slip of the tongue - this time while addressing students in Atlanta.  The gaffe-prone leader of the free world was speaking about voting rights on the campus of Clark Atlanta University and Morehouse College on Tuesday when he made the error.  Students and faculty listening to his speech at the Atlanta University Center Consortium did not seem to notice the slip-up - and he did not bother to correct himself.  Referencing last year's Capitol Hill riot on January 6, he told the crowd: 'Last week, President Harris and I stood in the United States Capitol to observe one of those before and after moments in American history.'   Students and faculty listening to President Biden's speech at the Atlanta University Center Consortium did not seem to notice the slip-up - and he did not bother to correct himself (Pictured: Biden speaks in support of changing the Senate filibuster rules to ensure the right to vote is defended, at Atlanta University Center Consortium on January 11,...
    San Jose State University has quietly settled a retaliation lawsuit with swim Coach Sage Hopkins and published a formal letter praising and apologizing to him, 12 years after he first brought forward the sexual harassment claims of more than a dozen female swimmers against an athletic trainer who went on to abuse more athletes over the next decade. A laudatory posting to the school’s website on Sunday and a tweet announcing the letter came after Hopkins recently reached a settlement to a lawsuit he filed against the university in April that accused Marie Tuite, the former athletic director, of a years-long retaliation effort against him and seeking to discredit his accusations against the trainer Scott Shaw. Hopkins did not offer any details on the agreement, only saying it was “amicable.” The letter, signed by Interim President Steve Perez and Jeff Konya, the new athletics director, thanked Hopkins “for the courage he demonstrated advocating for the safety of SJSU student-athletes” and “for his commitment to do the right thing” despite “great personal sacrifice” as he tangled with his superiors over his...
    Medicine has long benefited from robust debate among practitioners, scientists, and scholars, but the response of the United States and other nations to the COVID-19 pandemic has left some highly acclaimed doctors believing their field is in the grip of dangerous groupthink. White House COVID-19 czar Dr. Anthony Fauci and former National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins have aggressively silenced doctors who don't toe the government line on matters including vaccine mandates, natural immunity, and the safety and efficacy of inoculations. But the questions haven't gone away, and doctors who have been asking them at their own professional peril haven't, either. Below are the stories of four esteemed physicians who have challenged the COVID-19 status quo and the medical establishment they know well. Dr. Robert Malone gestures as he stands in his barn on his horse farm Wednesday July 22, 2020, in Madison, Va. Malone serves as a consultant to a Pentagon-funded program that develops medications to protect American troops from biological threats. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) Steve Helber/AP Dr. Robert Malone Malone is...
    Claflin University Choir As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc, we need spiritual uplifting. Music can always help us get through another day. Last week’s edition of #BlackMusicSunday featured voices coming together to create harmony in both sound and life. Today, let’s explore the long tradition of African American spirituals, which aided Black folks in surviving enslavement and beyond, and still resonate today. These songs were initially introduced to the non-Black public via Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). These institutions’ choirs and choruses have continued to perform them for audiences worldwide. Growing up, I lived on several Black college campuses because my dad was teaching at them. My parents met at a Black college, West Virginia State, and my aunts and uncles all graduated from HBCUs, with my mom’s family members attending them right after the abolition of slavery. I grew up believing that everyone was aware of HBCUs or had some connection to them. It wasn’t until I became an adult that I realized that, though the Black American populace seemed familiar of and impacted by these schools, many white folks of my acquaintance knew nothing, or next to nothing, about them—much less...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – As the spring semester approaches for several universities across western Pennsylvania, many have changed how classes will take place as COVID-19 cases rise. READ MORE: Police Investigating After Body Found Behind South Hills HomeKDKA is constantly monitoring which universities in our area have made the decision to either begin the semester remotely, in-person, or with restrictions. Remote LearningCarlow University Carlow University is requiring all students and staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19 by January 24, 2022. As the spring semester approaches, all graduate and undergraduate classes will be virtual until that date. The university is allowing medical and religious exemptions but says most employees and students have submitted proof of vaccination. Carlow’s full Rentry And Resiliency Plan can be found at this link. Carnegie Mellon University While CMU will not be fully remote, the university has said that “the majority of classes from January 18 to January 30 will be held via synchronous remote instruction.” Students will be permitted to stay at home for those two weeks or move back to campus to...
    (CNN)Former health advisers to President Joe Biden say the US strategy for the Covid-19 pandemic needs to be updated to face a "new normal" of living with the virus, rather than aiming to eliminate it.In three pieces published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Thursday, six former Biden advisers proposed a new plan and detailed strategies for testing, mitigation, vaccines and treatments. "Without a strategic plan for the 'new normal' with endemic COVID-19, more people in the US will unnecessarily experience morbidity and mortality, health inequities will widen, and trillions will be lost from the US economy," wrote Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, a former Obama health adviser now with the University of Pennsylvania; Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota; and Dr. Celine Gounder, an infectious disease expert at Bellevue Hospital Center and at Grossman School of Medicine at New York University. It wont be a pandemic forever. Heres what could be nextAll were appointed to Biden's Transition Covid-19 Advisory Board in 2020.For this new strategy,...
    Two Pac-12 assistant football coaches earned at least $1 million in 2021. In the SEC, 16 assistants had seven-figure salaries. The top-paid strength coach in the Pac-12 was merely the 19th-highest paid in major college football. Meanwhile, the biggest recruiting budget in the Pac-12 doesn’t crack the top-12 nationally, according to a published report. The only thing easier to spot than Pac-12 bowl losses are examples of the conference not plowing as many resources into football infrastructure as its peers in the Power Five. New commissioner George Kliavkoff hopes to change that state of affairs by making the case to the university presidents and chancellors that investing in football can provide returns that benefit not only cash-strapped athletic departments but entire campuses. “Historically, I don’t think we’ve made a great case for the ROI of footbalI,’’ Kliavkoff told the Hotline. “I’m not going to take the opportunity to speak to my 12 bosses without talking about it. It’s going to be a constant topic. They are going to get tired of hearing it from me.’’ If Kliavkoff succeeds in convincing...
    This is a rush transcript of "The Ingraham Angle" on January 4, 2022. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated. SEAN HANNITY, FOX NEWS HOST: Not that complicated. That's all the time we have left this evening. Please set your DVR. Never miss an episode. Let not your heart be troubled. Laura Ingraham, hi.LAURA INGRAHAM, FOX NEWS HOST: To answer your question, if any of this happened under Donald Trump, he would be crucified.HANNITY: Oh, yes.INGRAHAM: Minute by minute on the other cables. But, of course, I was just really proud of Joe Biden getting through that presentation today with the snowy backdrop. It looked like it was a Hallmark special on COVID. It looked ridiculous.HANNITY: Did you see my snow background that we put up tonight? Did you miss that?INGRAHAM: Yes. Well, I did miss it. I was preparing for my show.HANNITY: I'm too busy prepping my own show.INGRAHAM: As much as I like to hang on your every word, there is a 10:00 o'clock show that follows your show.HANNITY: I know.INGRAHAM: You...
    Niche has released its 2022 rankings of the best colleges in New Jersey. Princeton University was ranked first among the top 10 in the state. The calculations were based on "an analysis of academic, admissions, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education along with millions of reviews from students and alumni." Niche said. "The ranking compares more than 1,000 top colleges and universities in the U.S. This year's rankings have reduced the weight of ACT/SAT scores to reflect a general de-emphasis on test scores in the college admissions process," the website added. The following colleges/universities were named: 1. Princeton University (Princeton) 2. Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken) 3. Rutgers University (New Brunswick) 4. The College of New Jersey (Ewing) 5. Rutgers University (Newark) 6. Seton Hall University (South Orange) 7. New Jersey Institute of Technology (Newark) 8. Monmouth University (West Long Branch) 9. Stockton University (Galloway) 10. Montclair State University (Montclair) Click here for the full list curated by Niche.
    A version of this piece first appeared on Common Sense  Universities are supposed to be bastions of critical thinking, reason and logic.  But the Covid policies they have adopted — policies that have derailed two years of students' education and threaten to upend the upcoming spring semester — have exposed them as nonsensical, anti-scientific and often downright cruel. Some of America's most prestigious universities are leading the charge. At Georgetown University, fully vaccinated students are randomly tested for Covid every week. Using a PCR test, which can detect tiny amounts of dead virus, asymptomatic students who test positive are ordered to a room in a designated building where they spend 10 days in confinement. Food is dropped off once a day at the door. I spoke to several students who were holed up. One of them told me she would sometimes call a friend to come and wave at her through the window, just to see a human face. Another told me that the experience in quarantine 'totally changed' her feelings about the school.  'Everyone's just fed up at this point,'...
    Niche has released its 2022 rankings of the best colleges in Pennsylvania. The University of Pennsylvania was ranked first among the top 10 in the state. The calculations were based on "an analysis of academic, admissions, financial, and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education along with millions of reviews from students and alumni." Niche says. "The ranking compares more than 1,000 top colleges and universities in the U.S. This year's rankings have reduced the weight of ACT/SAT scores to reflect a general de-emphasis on test scores in the college admissions process," the website says. The following colleges/universities were named: 1. University of Pennsylvania (Philadephia) 2. Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh) 3. Haverford College (Haverford) 4. Swarthmore College (Swarthmore) 5. Villanova University (Villanova) 6. Lehigh University (Bethlehem) 7. Lafayette College (Easton) 8. Bucknell University (Lewisburg) 9. Penn State University (State College) 10. Bryn Mawr College (Bryn Mawr) Click here for the full list curated by Niche. Photo courtesy of the Montgomery County Planning Commission via Flickr.
    The University of Memphis created a grant program that offers select professors $3,000 to infuse curricula with the tenets of “diversity, equity, inclusion, and social justice,” according to a report from the Washington Free Beacon. The grant will be given to 15 to 20 faculty members who work on the program from the spring of 2022 to the spring semester of 2023, according to an email obtained by the Washington Free Beacon. Staff members who are chosen will be asked to attend “extensive pedagogical and theoretical training and workshop experiences” alongside their curricula redesign, according to the email. “The Eradicating Systemic Racism and Promoting Social Justice Initiative at the University of Memphis is offering an opportunity for interested faculty to critically consider methods and approaches to redesign existing courses housed within their departments to better advance the tenets and charge of the University’s commitment to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Social Justice,” the email reads. Staff will give presentations throughout the year-long program and a “university-wide post-conference presentation” to share “strategies, foci and best practices and approaches to focused course redesign.”...
    Tenured law professor Amy Wax has come under fire for making racist comments during an online interview with a fellow academic A tenured professor at the University of Pennsylvania has come under fire for making racist comments during an online interview with a fellow academic - and it's not the first time she's faced backlash for such remarks. 'The United States is better off with fewer Asians and less Asian immigration,' law professor Amy Wax brazenly declared in a December interview with Brown University's Glenn Loury. The off-color comment came during a conversation between the two academics concerning US immigration. 'It’s just harder to assimilate those people or to have confidence that our way of life will continue if we bring a lot of people in who are not familiar with it. These are not original ideas on the [political] right,' Wax told Loury on his web show, which covers topics ranging from academia, journalism, and various social issues.  'This might result in a shift in the racial profile of people who come in,' Wax went on. 'Obviously, we'll have...
    The start of 2022 at the University of California feels like March 2020 deja vu for some students. Most campuses started the winter quarter Monday with two weeks of remote classes — a decision announced days before Christmas as Omicron cases prompted new warnings for caution from health experts and public officials. But the online reality has reminded students of March 2020 when a two-week shutdown turned into campus shutdowns that sundered their traditional college experience. With coronavirus cases rapidly surging, driven largely by younger adults, many students are already wondering if the delay to in-person classes will expand. “I’m worried that campus will fully lock down as it once did, and that those of us that rely on our campus jobs for income will be left to dry,” said Esmeralda Quintero-Cubillan, 23, who is the UC Student Assn. president. “If I’m honest, I’m concerned that I won’t have an answer until the end of next week.” Quintero-Cubillan, a resident assistant at UC Santa Barbara, said that roughly 40 of their 80 supervised students have returned to campus...
              by Antoinette Aho   Campus Reform is monitoring the colleges and universities starting the 2022 academic year online. These institutions are imposing the changes due to the Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus. Seven out of the 10 University of California chancellors decided to begin the winter quarter remotely. This includes UC Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. The university system also mandated booster shots to be considered fully vaccinated. UC Berkeley and Merced operate on a semester schedule. UC Berkeley will resume in-person classes as intended for the upcoming semester, while Merced has not announced 2022 plans. In a statement to chancellors, the President of the UC System, Dr. Michael Drake stated, “Given the differences in local conditions and campus operations across the university, the length of this remote instruction period may vary from campus to campus.” Five Ivy League schools announced plans to begin 2022 online, including Cornell University which experienced a spike in positive cases at the end of the fall quarter, Harvard University, the University of Pennsylvania, Yale University, and Columbia University. Barnard College, which is affiliated with Columbia University, will also start online. Stanford University also announced a two-week plan for remote classes, along...
    Iron is essential for the evolution of complex life on Earth and for the possibility of survival in other worlds Researchers have discovered the importance of iron in the development of complex life on Earth, which may also indicate the possibility of complex life on other planets. Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth and prosperity of almost all living things. The amount of iron in the Earth’s crust is controlled by the conditions under which the planet formed, and this has serious consequences for how life formed. Now, researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered a mechanism by which iron influences the evolution of complex life forms, which could be used to determine how likely (or not) life forms are on other planets. This study was recently published in the journal PNAS. The initial amount of iron in the Earth’s rocks is “adjusted by the accumulation conditions of the planets, in which the Earth’s mineral center is separated from the crust”, said John Wade, associate professor and professor of planetary materials at the University of Oxford. “Life...
    It's a common yet curious tale: a household hit by Covid, but one family member never tests positive or gets so much as a sniffle.  Meanwhile there are those who have had Covid and been double-jabbed and boosted, yet still pick up the virus again. As infections continue to soar in the new Omicron wave – an astonishing one in 25 people in England have Covid, according to Office for National Statistics data – cases of people who managed to stay free of the infection become ever more remarkable. Is it sheer luck? Some kind of superpower? Now scientists may have an answer: there is mounting evidence that some people are naturally Covid-resistant. For reasons not fully understood, it's thought that these people were already immune to the Covid virus, and they remain so even as it mutates.  The phenomenon is now the subject of intense research across the world.  Nasim Forooghi (pictured), 46, a cardiac research nurse at St Bartholomew's Hospital in Central London, has been potentially exposed to hundreds of people infected with Covid since the start of...
    Despite age-appropriate physical abuse, Renே Nira overcame adversity and graduated almost sixty years later. “I think his colleagues were motivated and inspired to see him,” his granddaughter admitted. An inspiring story took place this week at the University of Texas, where A.J. Grandfather The 87-year-old, a few days after his 88th birthday, graduated in economics in the same class he attended. Granddaughter. Rene Nira, American, continued his studies in Anglo-Saxon country after starting in the 50s. For the past four decades, he has been relentlessly returning to the classroom, and it was only in 2021 that he was finally able to complete his journey. “We never held classes together, but sometimes we would meet for lunch at a restaurant, or sometimes we would study together in the library.”His granddaughter, Melanie Salazar, pointed to the chain CBS. The graduate, who was at the core of Nira’s milestone, said, “I think his classmates were motivated and inspired to see him. Despite the fact that the old man did not officially receive the credits needed to graduate, the university decided to...
                 Two minority students at Arizona State University (ASU) posted a video on Instagram on December 22 announcing that ASU has disciplined them for forcing two white students on September 23 to leave the university’s multicultural center, an event captured on video that went viral. ASU first charged undergraduate student Mastaani Qureshi and graduate student Sarra Tekola with two Code of Conduct violations in November, stalking and interfering with university activities. A third student, Sarra Tekola, was also charged with the violations, but ASU later dropped them. According to Qureshi and Tekola in their video response announcing ASU’s discipline, the university first gave them a warning, then required them “to write a 3-page paper on how next time we talk to white people about race in society, we will be civil.” Qureshi said she will not comply with writing the statement and does not regret her actions. State Rep. Jake Hoffman (R-Mesa), a graduate of ASU who called for defunding ASU along with 19 other state legislators if the university did not discipline the students, denounced the slight disciplinary...
    Have you made any New Year’s resolutions yet? If you are looking for inspiration, then here are some of the tried-and-tested things I have incorporated into my own life, which you, too, could take on to ensure a healthier, happier 2022. Try a keto diet A 2021 survey by Public Health England revealed that nearly half of us have put on around half a stone (just over 3 kg) during the pandemic. So how best to get rid of those Covid kilos? Over the autumn months I put on a few pounds, creeping into the overweight category (my BMI, which for years had been around 24, was 25). I tried a new approach to slim down for Christmas: a short-term ‘keto’ diet — where you cut your consumption of carbs to less than 50g a day, while eating plenty of healthy fats, such as olive oil, oily fish and nuts, plus lots of veg. It forms the basis of my book, The Fast 800 Keto, which has just been published. A 2021 survey by Public Health England revealed that nearly half of...
    Princeton University has notified students that "personal travel" outside the county or township is not allowed until at least mid-February due to an increase in coronavirus omicron variant cases. Princeton University's Dean Jill Dolan and Vice President. W. Rochelle Calhoun announced on Monday that students are barred from traveling outside of Mercer County or Plainsboro Township, where Princeton University is located. "Beginning January 8 through mid-February, all undergraduate students who have returned to campus will not be permitted to travel outside of Mercer County or Plainsboro Township for personal reasons, except in extraordinary circumstances," the administration officials announced. The officials said that the travel policy will be in place from Jan. 8 until at least Feb. 15. PRINCETON STUDENT SAYS HIS COLLEGE EXPERIENCE 'BASICALLY RUINED BY COVID' Princeton, New Jersey - April 14, 2017: People wander around the Princeton University Campus during early spring. (iStock) "Student groups that currently have events planned for outside Mercer or Plainsboro should contact their sponsoring office for guidance. We’ll revisit and, if possible, revise this travel restriction by February 15," they continued. Fox...
    College campuses looked different in 2021. Many required students to wear masks or get vaccinated to attend campus, and some are requiring booster shots for all eligible students. However, one thing did stay consistent this year — the level of left-wing insanity that took place on America’s nearly 4,000 campuses nationwide. Here are the top 10 moments of campus insanity in 2021: 10. University Redesigns Mascot To be Gender-Neutral, Climate Fighting Social Justice Warrior The New School in New York City revealed its new gender-neutral mascot named Gnarls, a Narwhal whose family was booted from the Arctic due to climate change, according to the university’s website. The mascot’s story includes graduating with a dual degree in communications and environmental studies, which could later “bolster Gnarls in [the programs’] environmental justice initiatives and make their signs all the rage at climate change protests.” 9. California Professor Berates Student For Calling Cops “Heroes” A professor at Cypress College in Southern California berated a student during a Zoom class for calling the police “heroes.” The professor insisted that shows such as “Paw Patrol”...
    A new year is coming, and it brings along concerns over imminent holiday celebrations in light of the Omicron variant.The coronavirus strain, the latest "variant of concern," according to the World Health Organization, is spreading across the United States quickly. In the next week or 10 days, the virus circulating from holiday gatherings could boost daily numbers to more than half a million, estimates CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Jonathan Reiner, a professor of medicine at George Washington University.People often ring in the new year with large, raucous parties, so health experts are cautioning the public to keep the virus in mind. Some cities across the world are canceling or scaling back events to protect against spread."There is so much coronavirus in communities around the country that you should assume that Omicron is likely to be at whatever gathering you're going to, and with that in mind, your decision-making should take that into account," said CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Leana Wen, who is an emergency physician and professor of health policy and management at the George Washington University Milken Institute School...
    See those bulging biceps and toned calves on Jeff Bezos? They're not from doing the heavy lifting at the Amazon warehouses himself. According to an article in the New York Post, they're thanks to his fitness trainer, Wesley Okerson, who has trained other celebrities including Katie Holmes, Sacha Baron Cohen, Gerard Butler and more. Okerson found his passion for fitness in college pitching, for the Frostburg University baseball team. He transferred to the University of Maryland, where he earned his Bachelor of Sciences degree in kinesiology, then moved to Los Angeles. The trainer then appeared on NBC’s “STRONG” as the trainer for the Gray team.  Click here for more on Okerson from the New York Post.
    Pressure from corporate donors, public relations firms, and anti-union consultants has chilled research by labor studies academics. By Jo Constantz, for Capital & Main Throttled by both strong-arm tactics from anti-union interests and a chronic lack of support from universities, the field of labor studies has dwindled in the U.S. in recent years. Researchers in the field have been the target of legal threats and lawsuits; onerous public records requests; and misinformation campaigns from union avoidance consultants, business executives, corporate lawyers, and conservative think tanks. It’s one aspect of the business lobby’s relentless war against unions in recent decades, which has seen companies spend more than $340 million a year on consultants to defeat organizing efforts by their employees and helped sink union membership. “The 50-100 Pay Gap” examines the crisis of income inequality in the U.S. A recent RAND study found that a full-time worker earning the median national wage of $50,000 would be making close to $100,000 if pay had kept up with worker productivity and economic growth. Our series will portray the human impact of this enormous income gap, investigate...
    Duke University has announced that it will require all faculty and staff to get a Covid-19 booster shot before the start of February or 28 days after they are eligible. Any employee who fails to provide proof of a booster or apply for an exemption will be placed on administrative leave. If employees do not get booster-jabed within a week of their leave, they will be fired. The policy is the strictest of the North Carolina colleges, with North Carolina State and UNC Chapel Hill requiring tests for staff and students returning to classes in January but not requiring vaccines or boosters. Duke, an Ivy League school, joins a raft of elite colleges which are pressing ahead with booster requirements, including Harvard, Yale, Notre Dame, Dartmouth, Columbia, Brown, Cornell and Syracuse. It comes amid soaring cases of the rapidly spreading Omicron variant - with the US setting a record with a seven-day average of 254,496 cases reported on Tuesday as infections doubled on two weeks ago. The famous Duke University gothic chapel in Durham, North Carolina The country's...
    Christmas shoppers in London on Dec. 23, 2021.Hasan Esen | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images LONDON — Horrific scenes seen in previous Covid-19 waves are "now history," according to John Bell, a regius professor of medicine at the University of Oxford and the U.K. government's life sciences advisor. Speaking to BBC Radio 4 on Tuesday, Bell analyzed data from the U.K., where cases are breaking records and hospital admissions are at their highest since March. He said that the number of people in ICUs who are vaccinated remains "very, very low." "The incidence of severe disease and death from this disease [Covid] has basically not changed since we all got vaccinated and that's really important to remember," he told the BBC. "The horrific scenes that we saw a year ago — intensive care units being full, lots of people dying prematurely — that is now history in my view and I think we should be reassured that that's likely to continue." Discussing the new omicron variant, he added: "The disease does appear to be less severe, and many people spend a relatively...
    Head lice found on ancient mummies contain more DNA than a tooth, according to scientists, who say it could help shed light on ancient people and migration. A team were able to extract the DNA from the 'cement' head lice used to glue their eggs to hairs on mummified bodies in South America, thousands of years ago.  The DNA extracted from the cement was of better quality than that recovered through other methods, according to the team led by the University of Reading. It revealed clues about pre-Columbian human migration patterns throughout South America, including that  the original population of the San Juan province migrated from the land and rainforests of the Amazon in the North of the continent. 'There is a hunt out for alternative sources of ancient human DNA and nit cement might be one of those alternatives,' said study first author Dr Mikkel Winther Pederson, from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.  Head lice found on ancient mummies contain more DNA than a tooth, according to scientists, who say it could help shed light on ancient people...
    Students, staff, and faculty at Providence College will be required to receive and show proof of receiving a COVID-19 booster shot for the Spring 2022 semester. School-approved exemptions will be considered, the college said. The Monday announcement places the Roman Catholic school in the company of other Rhode Island institutions that have mandated booster shots for the upcoming spring, according to a report. FEMALE NCAA ATHLETE SPEAKS OUT AGAINST 'UNFAIR' TRANSGENDER COMPETITION These include Brown University, Salve Regina University, and the University of Rhode Island. Students at Providence will be mandated to present a negative point-of-origin test result within five days of when they return to campus, according to the announcement. "The college is implementing these measures to build on the successes of the fall semester and to help maintain the elements of an in-person academic and community student experience in the face of health and safety challenges related to the COVID-19 coronavirus, especially the omicron variant," the college said in a statement. Officials at Providence College are requesting that the school's...
    Researchers have discovered a new organ in the human body that confirms the presence of undiscovered organs. When you look at your face in the mirror every day you found a new organ next to the jaw bone. The discovery of the new element was published in the academic journal Annals of Anatomy. A new organ was discovered in the master muscle of the jaw, which was visible during biting and chewing. Until now it was thought that the master muscle had two layers. However, there are already indications that these may have three layers, but so far no clear evidence is available. This third layer is mentioned in the 38th edition of Grace Anatomy, a British anatomical reference book written by Henry Gray in 1858. An earlier study, published in Germany in 1784 by Grundris der Physiology Fourr vorlesungen, suggested a similar possibility. Researchers at the University of Basel are now developing evidence that the potential for a new element is being explored. For this, the heads were removed from 12 bodies and stored in a formaldehyde solution...
    A USA Swimming official who resigned in protest at trans athlete Lia Thomas has said she is 'destroying women's swimming.' Cynthia Millen stood down last week after working for the presiding body for more than three decades saying she could 'no longer participate in a sport that allows biological men to compete against women.' Thomas, 22, who previously competed as a man at the University of Pennsylvania for two full seasons, is now dominating the women's field and smashing records. NCAA rules mean she can participate because she takes testosterone suppressing drugs. 'It's horrible,' Millen told Fox News last night. 'The statement for women then is you do not matter, what you do is not important, and little girls are going to be thrown under the bus by all of this, he's going to be destroying women's swimming.' 'It's horrible,' Millen told Fox News last night. 'The statement for women then is you do not matter, what you do is not important, and little girls are going to be thrown under the bus by all of this, he's going...
    Among nearly two dozen women revealed as contestants on the next season of "The Bachelor" is one from Pennsylvania. Kira Mengistu, 32, of Philadelphia, will be competing for love on the next season of "The Bachelor," Cosmopolitan Magazine reports. This season's lead is 28-year-old Clayton Echard, a medical sales representative, and former NFL player from Missouri who appeared on Michelle Young's season of "The Bachelorette." Mengistu works as a physician at Penn Medicine, where she provides direct care to medically complex patients suffering from life-threatening illnesses such as COVID-19, according to her LinkedIn profile. She holds a medical degree from UNC-Chapel Hill, as well as a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania, according to her ABC bio. Her bio says she is looking for someone who is mature, social, always willing to try new things, and appreciates the corny things in life. Here are three things you may not have known about her: She taught herself to write hieroglyphics as a child. She loves nachos. She has two cats, Olga and Oksana. A New Jersey native...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — After a crushing loss in Kansas City, the Pittsburgh Steelers are making changes. READ MORE: The Frick Pittsburgh Hosting 'First-Ever' Winterfest This WeekOn Monday, Steelers Communications Director Burt Lauten confirmed that offensive lineman coach Adrian Klemm is being let go “effective immediately” and will assume a similar role with the University of Oregon football team. The #Steelers have given permission to OL Coach Adrian Klemm to leave the team, effective immediately, & accept a similar position with the University of Oregon football team. Asst. OL Coach Chris Morgan will handle the offensive line duties for the remainder of the 2021 season. — Burt Lauten (@SteelersPRBurt) December 27, 2021 READ MORE: City Of Pittsburgh Announces Development Project For Veterans Housing Chris Morgan, an assistant offensive lineman coach for the Steelers, will take on Klemm’s responsibilities for the rest of the regular season. MORE NEWS: Route 51 Reopens After Pedestrian Hit And Killed By CarStay With KDKA.com For More Details
    A painting which depicts George Floyd as Jesus as a baby being cradled by Mary has twice been stolen from the Catholic university where it was displayed, with students banning the artwork and branding it blasphemous.  The piece, called Mama, was painted by white artist Kelly Latimore in summer 2020, and first hung at the Catholic University of America in Washington DC during February. It was stolen in November, shortly after the Daily Signal published a piece by a student about the artwork, and replaced shortly afterwards with a smaller copy, which has now also been stolen.    But students at the law school of the Catholic University of America, where Latimore's 'Mama' was on display, were not happy about the ambiguous message and branded the piece 'sacrilegious,' 'disrespectful' and 'at the very least confusing.' They launched a petition to have it permanently removed, with the college's student council also voting to ban it for depicting an identifiable person as Jesus.  'Mama', which emulates the famous 'Piete' and depicts a black Mary holding Jesus in her arms, was stolen twice from...
    NASA is looking to the heavens for help with assessing how humans will react if alien life is found on other planets and how the discovery could impact our ideas of gods and creation. The agency is hiring 24 theologians to take part in its program at the Center for Theological Inquiry (CTI) at Princeton University in New Jersey, which NASA gave a $1.1 million grant to in 2014. CTI is described as building 'bridges of under understanding by convening theologians, scientists, scholars, and policymakers to think together - and inform public thinking - on global concerns.' The program aims to answer questions that have baffled us since the begging of time such as what is life? What does it mean to be alive? Where do we draw the line between the human and the alien? What are the possibilities for sentient life in other places? Now that NASA has two rovers on Mars, several probes orbiting Jupiter and Saturn and is set to launch the James Web Telescope tomorrow that study galaxy, star and planet formation in the universe,...
    The human body still ceases to amaze scientists who recently discovered an overlooked layer of muscle in the lower jaw. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland found an additional muscle layer in the masseter muscle, which sits on the back of your cheeks and plays a major role in helping us chew. The masseter muscle was previously described as having one superficial and one deep part, but an additional, even deeper layer was found after scientists dissected human heads donated to the lab. The new layer, which scientists have named M. masseter pars coronoidea (coronoid part of the masseter), can be felt by pressing your hand against the back of your jaw while you chew. Scroll down for video  Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland found an additional muscle layer (c) in the masseter muscle, which sits on the back of your cheeks and plays a major role in helping us chew Dr Szilvia Mezey from the Department of Biomedicine at the University of Basel, said in a statement: ‘This deep section of the masseter muscle is...
    The University of Richmond in Virginia has suspended the Kappa Sigma fraternity after a video emerged showing some of the organization's members performing a racist song. The video, which was first obtained by The Collegian, a student newspaper at the University of Richmond, shows a gaggle of shirtless white men shouting 'the South will rise again' at top volume while laughing and clapping. The short clip also features one of Kappa Sigma's members crying out, 'I want to be a slave owner,' and others singing the lyrics to the 19th Century song 'Dixie's Land,' which celebrates the Confederacy. The video was said to have been recorded last year.  The University of Richmond has suspended its chapter of the Kappa Gamma fraternity after a  video of its members singing a racist song was leaked last week (screenshots from the video are pictured above)  Kappa Gamma's national organization also has suspended the University of Richmond's chapter over the offensive video   A shot of a big-screen TV hanging on the wall in the room shows what appears to be a program about the...
    DNA analysis of 35 people buried in a Neolithic tomb in the Cotswolds has revealed that most were descended from four women who all had children with the same man 5,700 years ago. Researchers said they couldn't be sure whether it was an example of polygamy – which involves being in a relationship or married to more than one partner – or serial monogamy, where a person has one 'other half' at any one time. But genetic testing showed that 27 of the individuals were from five generations of a single extended family, allowing experts to put together 'the oldest family tree ever reconstructed'. The group lived about 3700 to 3600 BC — around 100 years after farming had been introduced to Britain. Discovery: DNA analysis of 35 people buried in a Neolithic tomb in the Cotswolds (pictured in a reconstruction) has revealed that most were from five generations of a single extended family Lineage: The majority of the individuals, 27 in total, were descended from four women who all had children with the same man and lived around 3700 to 3600 BC. Researchers...
    People walk on the Columbia University campus on March 9, 2020, in New York City. The university canceled classes for two days after a faculty member was quarantined for exposure to the novel coronavirus. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images) by Alexandra Martinez This article was originally published at Prism Six weeks after it began, the student workers’ unfair labor practices strike at Columbia University has become the largest ongoing labor strike in the nation. The union has been on strike since Nov. 3, with workers calling for higher wages and more protections for graduate and undergraduate student workers. As decided by the National Labor Relations Board, the union comprises undergraduate and graduate students performing instructional services such as teaching assistants, and all graduate research assistants. According to the union, many of their members are international students, caregivers, first-generation college students, or low-income students who are working as teaching assistants to help finance their education. Without a living wage, they can’t afford their education, let alone living in New York City. “So many of us came to New York...
    (Caracas) Due to high inflation, low-paid professors and students have to choose between “eating and studying” and deteriorating infrastructure … Venezuela’s Central University is celebrating its 300th anniversary in crisis. Released December 19, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. Stephen Rojas French Media Company “We can not believe we’re so low,” said Mobd Daniel Teren, 43, a historian and professor at UCV University, whose monthly salary was $ 11, enough to buy two kilos of meat. He survives by providing some personal lessons or collaborating on projects or translations abroad. “I continue to work,” says Antonio Silva, a 51-year-old computer professor who earns between $ 8 and $ 10 a month, while his colleagues in South America earn between $ 2,000 and $ 5,000. According to the NGO International University Observatory, one-third of professors do not have enough money to eat three meals a day. Result: Many chairs are vacant due to shortage of teachers. UCV has lost 1,200 of its 9,000 employees in the last four years. The country has...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci and the head of the National Institute of Health (NIH) colluded on a way to discredit an alternative plan to deal with COVID from a group of experts, released emails reveal.  The emails, some of which were tweeted out by Phil Magness, senior research faculty and interim research and education director at the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER), show Fauci and Francis Collins attempting to coordinate a 'devastating takedown' of the Great Barrington Declaration. AIER, a libertarian think tank, sponsored the declaration, which largely abandons lockdowns in favor of a herd immunity strategy that allows life to return to normal.  In an October 8 email from Collins to Fauci, the head of the NIH calls the GBD the work of 'three fringe epidemiologists' that 'seems to be getting a lot of attention.'  Collins adds that 'there needs to be a quick and devastating published takedown of its premises. I don't see anything like that online yet - is it underway?'  Later in the day, Fauci sends Collins a Wired op-ed that refutes the notion of herd...