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    We’ve come a long way from the days of Bill “I Didn’t Inhale” Clinton and our overwrought collective freakout over ordinary and decidedly normal cannabis use. Not that long ago, video of a U.S. Senate candidate smoking weed in a field would be considered lurid oppo research. But now, at least one candidate, Gary Chambers, is featuring it in his campaign advertising.  Now, I doubt Chambers will win. Why? He was filmed smoking a blunt and the video got out—and he’s a Black man running in the Deep South. The fact that he released the footage himself may not matter that much in the end. Plus, Chambers is running for Louisiana Republican John Kennedy’s seat, and that dude will never get caught using drugs—because he is drugs. Have you ever seen Kennedy on Fox News? He’s like a 4 AM bath-salts-and-Sanka hallucination. Nevertheless, this campaign ad from Senate candidate Gary Chambers is a big, important step forward, and a great wake-up call for, well, everyone—cannabis users and John Kennedy fanboys alike.  Watch: x x YouTube Video Transcript! CHAMBERS: “Every 37 seconds, someone is arrested for possession...
    LONG BEACH, Calif. (KABC) -- Long Beach Black Restaurant Week is Jan. 23 to Jan. 30. On Tuesday, Chefs Quianna Bradley, Vida Virgillito and Ronnie Woods decided to cook food for the homeless before Long Beach Black Restaurant Week kicks off.The chefs made enough food to serve 250 people at the Long Beach Rescue Mission, which helps those who are homeless in Long Beach get food, shelter, clothing and guidance."Everybody should have a chance to have a hot meal every single day regardless if they're in a house or if they're unhoused, sleeping on couches. You know, hot meals bring a sense of comfort for most people," Woods said.Nonprofit Long Beach Food and Beverage organized the chefs participating and the two feeding sessions Tuesday.The first session was for those who are getting assistance from the Long Beach Rescue Mission and the second was for those who are still on the street."We do this because we love what we're doing. We like to share what we're doing with other folks, so why not give everybody a taste of Black Restaurant Week,"...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF/BCN) – Cristel Tullock, a longtime veteran of the Adult Probation Department in the San Francisco Superior Court system, became the first black woman to serve as chief of the department, court officials announced Tuesday. Tullock, whose term began Tuesday, has been with the San Francisco Adult Probation Department for more than two decades, first beginning her career as a deputy probation officer and eventually working her way up to become a psychotherapist and then a coordinator overseeing reentry of sexually violent predators, court officials said. READ MORE: COVID: Testing In Contra Costa County Nearly Double Pandemic Peak During Omicron SurgePrior to her appointment, Tullock previously served as acting chief deputy of the department. Tullock will replace former chief Karen Fletcher, who retired back in September after more than six years of service. Tullock is the first black female adult probation chief in the city’s history. READ MORE: Palo Alto Police Search for Armed Robbery Suspect at Stanford Shopping Center Cristel Tullock, the new chief of adult probation for the San Francisco Superior Court. (LinkedIn) “Under...
    Former NFL defensive back and Democrat-turned-Republican Jack Brewer explained why he switched parties on Tuesday’s The Story with Martha MacCallum. He said morality and Donald Trump played key roles in his decision. At a roundtable at the White House in February 2020, Brewer told then-President Trump, “You’re the first Black president.” MacCallum cited a recent Gallup survey indicating that more Americans are identifying as Republicans. “So, Jack, you fit into this pattern of political leanings,” she said. “You voted for President Obama and then you supported President Trump. So what were the factors made you go from being a Democrat to being a Republican?” Brewer replied, “Six years ago, seven years ago, I started to see something different in our nation. And it really came down to morality for me. When policy affects the moral fabric of a nation. You really have to stand up.” He said the Democratic Party is no longer about helping poor people and took it to task for its handling of the criminal justice system and education. Brewer cited the dropout rates among Black high...
    PaviElle French is used to breaking down barriers. As a Black musician, composer, and creator, the powerhouse singer with soulful lyrics, grooving beats and layers of synth, spent quite a bit of time performing for majority white audiences. In recent years, as she’s collaborated or performed with several orchestras in town, including the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO), the Minnesota Orchestra and the Schubert Club, French worked to bring her own sound, as well as her own community, into spaces that have been historically white.  “I continue to write Black music, because I’m a Black artist,” French said when she takes the time off her busy schedule to speak with me over Zoom. “That’s the aesthetic that I go for. Part of that to me is just having the audacity to do this. To bring this type of music to the orchestra, and continue to push envelopes with sounds.” This week, the SPCO presents the world premiere of French’s “Sands of Time,” which was commissioned for the orchestra by philanthropists Bill and Susan Sands in collaboration with the American...
    Many black Americans are leaving New York and California to seek decent wages and affordable housing in southern states, according to a Washington Post article that ignores the federal policy of importing foreign people to fill jobs and homes in New York and California. “There is a noticeable lack of black people in these cities that were once the mecca for black America, for  people fleeing the Jim Crow South,” the Post’s reporter told an interviewer. The Post reported January 14 on the southern migration, which is now reversing the historic “Great Migration” of  black Americans from the South to northern cities during the 1900s: For the second census in a row, Chicago and its suburbs lost Black population, and has decreased by 130,000 since 1990. In Michigan, both the Detroit and Flint metropolitan areas lost Black population in absolute terms … Metro New York recorded its second consecutive loss in Black population, losing about 110,000 Black residents since 2000. In California, metro Los Angeles has lost 160,000 Black residents since 1990, while metro San Francisco has lost 90,000. Many people are...
    Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images The Libertarian Party of New Hampshire tweeted and deleted a Martin Luther King Jr. Day post on Monday that – to put in the most charitable terms conceivable – did not exactly meet the moment. It all began when Nikole Hannah-Jones of New York Times Magazine its 1619 Project took exception to an MLK-themed tweet by Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL). She quoted part of King’s 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech in which he said, “It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked ‘insufficient funds.'” Missing smthg: It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds. https://t.co/tIxoPKyNIj — Ida Bae Wells (@nhannahjones) January 17, 2022 Upon seeing the...
    Books possess great power. Those who own only a few, yet return to them like old friends for wisdom, comfort and knowledge, or to revisit a special memory, know this to be true. Those of us who have many books — who read and and reread them and carefully compile our collections — know this also. Our books are a type of biography in themselves, an accounting of our lives. I take my books very seriously. People know not to ask if they can borrow any of my books. The number of books a person owns reveals little about their understanding of the power of literacy and books. For too many people who have huge libraries, the whole project is one of social signaling and bourgeois habitus. One of my most personally important books is an early edition of "The Black Book." This landmark work was edited by Middleton A. Harris, Ernest Smith, Morris Levitt and Roger Furman, with a foreword by Toni Morrison. My mother purchased "The Black Book" for a community college course and wanted to make sure...
    MSNBC host Al Sharpton said Monday on “Deadline” that former President Donald Trump having said that white people were at the “back of the line” for COVID-19 treatments at an Arizona rally while black people were in the bleachers behind him was “optics” to “sell racism.” Former Sen. Claire McCaskill said, “I have just got ask the Rev, I mean, I looked at that rally, and I listened to what he said, that white people were being denied the vaccine, the clear message that black people were being prioritized for the vaccine over white people. Everyone knows what he was trying to do. He was trying to get people to be mad at black people. What did those black people sitting behind him think when he said that? It’s like I don’t get that.” Sharpton said, “The fact that we all saw them sitting there, clearly they were put there for the optics. There was one guy that went around the whole 2020 race with a ‘Blacks for Trump’ sign. It seems like now he’s got more. They are put...
    Every January, as I read and listen to the tributes to Martin Luther King Jr., I think not only about what Dr. King gave the world, but also about what he gave me personally. On his 1963 visit to Cleveland, Dr. King spoke from the back of a flatbed truck at a park not far from our neighborhood. My mother, who’d grown up in Alabama during the reign of Jim Crow, took me, then 9 years old, with her to see her hero. She made sure to arrive early enough to claim a space near the front of the crowd. And when Dr. King leaned down to shake hands, my mother lifted me up and thrust me forward, thrilled to see the civil rights icon clasping her daughter’s small, outstretched hand. My mother was rapturous. I was too young to understand the hullabaloo, but I felt for a moment as if I had encountered a deity. Honestly, I don’t remember much of what Dr. King said. His lilting cadence captivated me, but I was too young and ignorant of history...
    Subsequent generations have continued the downward trajectory. The movement used to be powered by people who believed in equality under the law. They fought so that skin color would not be a barrier to opportunities. Now the movement is powered by people inking lucrative book deals and collecting millions in donations from middle-class black people, guilty white people, and Big Tech CEOs. The worst part of this transformation isn’t the fact that activists have gotten rich; it’s that their ideas only improve their lives, not ours. They have a perverse incentive to paint America as a hopelessly racist country. That is why I can’t imagine that someone like Dr. King, who fought so hard against racial injustice, would support Ibram X. Kendi’s belief that the only way to remedy past discrimination is present discrimination and the only way to remedy present discrimination is future discrimination. I also can’t imagine that a man who was killed in the midst of organizing a multiracial “Poor People’s Campaign” would subscribe to characterizing black millionaires and billionaires as “oppressed” while berating...
    Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA) said Sunday on MSNBC that Sens. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) did not “care” about black people. According to Waters, they were unwilling to ditch the filibuster to pass voting legislation. We have two Democrats, Manchin and Sinema, and they are holding up the Democratic agenda. They have decided that they are going to stick with support of the filibuster, and they don’t care whether or not they undermine the rights of minorities and blacks in this country. You know, blacks have fought very hard to make this a stronger democracy. We have worked hard for equal rights, for civil rights and voting rights, and these two are basically saying to us they don’t care. They don’t choir about us. they don’t care what it means to weaken the ability to participate in this democracy.” She added, “It’s not what Democrats need to do. We’re doing everything that can be done. It’s what Republicans need to do. Why is it we don’t have one Republican, not one that will stand up for the voting rights for...
    On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day in 2019, I got up early and went into my office at St. Paul City Hall before anyone else had arrived. I was there to resign. This was not a decision I made lightly. I had been hired to lead the way on “community-first public safety,” a supposedly visionary transformation away from traditional policing — over-policing, really — and toward real safety in the city. I was honored to serve under Melvin Carter, the city’s first Black mayor, and optimistic about the progress he and others had campaigned on. Unfortunately, it only took 10 months for me to realize that transformation wasn’t actually on the agenda. Carter and the supposedly progressive city council continued to dump money into policing as usual while disregarding and refusing to fund genuinely transformative initiatives from the community or my office. I felt tokenized, used as a prop, as though my role in improving the city started and ended the moment they could announce they’d hired me, a reformed ex-drug dealer and gang member. Article continues after advertisement The...
    (CNN)More than a half a century has passed since the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial calling for freedom and equality -- and the fight for social justice appears to be far from over.Activists and athletes fighting for equality in the Black, Latino, Asian American, Native American and Muslim American communities took a moment to reflect on King's words when asked by CNN last year. They shared their thoughts weeks after the insurrection at the US Capitol and months after the police killing of George Floyd sparked widespread protests and rekindled the Black Lives Matter movement. A year later, their views remain relevant as more than a dozen states have moved to enact restrictive voting laws and King's family demands action on federal voting rights legislation.Each of the activists and athletes who spoke with CNN selected a quote from the civil rights movement leader and shared why it resonates with them. Here are their responses, some of which have been edited for clarity: Read MoreDolores HuertaHuerta, a Mexican American civil rights icon, formed...
    California Democrat Rep. Maxine Waters claimed her Senate colleagues, Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., "don't care" about minorities and Black people during an MSNBC interview with host Aaron Gilchrist Sunday. Waters blasted the senators for giving the Republicans the opportunity to filibuster the Democrats' sweeping voting bill that passed in the House Thursday.  Both Sinema and Manchin have said they oppose eliminating the filibuster. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema  (REUTERS/Elizabeth Frantz) "They have sent the signal. They have been clear about it. They don't care about minorities. They don't care about Blacks. They don't care about people in their own districts who they're going to deny their voting rights and undermine their voting rights," Waters said. "I must always be optimistic. But this is a very difficult time for Democrats," Watters said. "We have two Democrats, Manchin and Sinema, and they are holding up the Democratic agenda. They have decided that they are going to stick with support of the filibuster, and they don't care whether or not they undermine the rights of minorities and Blacks in this...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — In honor of Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday yesterday, one organization was helping local Black-owned businesses gain more exposure. READ MORE: Weather Blog: Pittsburgh Braces For Winter StormRespect marketing held a Black-owned business expo at the Comfort Inn and Suites in the North Shore Saturday afternoon. READ MORE: Public Works Crews Say They Are Ready To Treat The Roads Ahead Of Snow Storm17 total vendors were there, including food, cosmetic and clothing businesses. “I just want these brands to get as much exposure as possible,” said Tiara Smith, owner of Respect Marketing LLC. “Get in front of people they might not be able to get in front of. Let people know these brands do exist and they are here and they are from Pittsburgh.” MORE NEWS: Pittsburgh Weather: 5-10 Inches Of Snow Expected In Our Area; Snowfall Starts This AfternoonIf you missed today’s expo there will be another at the same location on February 26.
    Let’s dive right in! John Blake of CNN writes that Jan. 6, the day of the Capitol insurrection, and Jan. 15, the birthday of The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. offer “two radically different visions” of what the United States of America stands for. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. has been called a socialist, a Republican, an "angry Black man" and a "teddy bear." It's an annual ritual on the birthday of the iconic civil rights leader: Pundits offer provocative interpretations of King to make him relevant for a contemporary audience. But these commentators won't have to work as hard this year to explain why King matters. Anyone who wants to remind Americans about the urgency of King's message can now cite January 6, 2021. That's when supporters of President Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol and tried to block Congress' certification of the 2020 presidential election because they wrongly believed Trump had won. Lawrence H. Tribe and Dennis Aftergut write for NBC News, applauding Thursday’s “historic indictment” of 11 people by the Justice Department, focusing on the specific charge of “seditious conspiracy.” There are three...
    (CNN)An illustration of a Black fetus in the womb went viral last December with many people commenting on social media that it was the first time they had seen a depiction of a dark-skinned fetus or pregnant woman.The attention came as a surprise to Chidiebere Ibe, the Nigerian first-year medical student who created the image, and describes it as "just one of my drawings to advocate for diversity in medical illustrations." The image started a discussion about a lack of representation in these illustrations -- images that are mostly found in textbooks and scientific journals to show medical pathologies and procedures.Ibe, 25, who is creative director at the Association of Future African Neurosurgeons, has now been invited to have some of his illustrations published in the second edition of a handbook designed to show how a range of conditions appear on dark skin."Mind the Gap: A clinical handbook of signs and symptoms in Black and Brown Skin," was first published in 2020. Co-author Malone Mukwende, a medical student in London, wrote over email that "Chidiebere's work ... unearths some of...
    MSNBC regular and The Nation’s justice correspondent Elie Mystal said Wednesday on “The ReidOut” that white Republicans in the Southern states are “doing now and what their ancestors did when they owned people” while discussing abortion laws. Mystal said, “There are a lot of people who are center, center-left people, who think that, you know, it’s fine for the states to choose for themselves and that really, if I’m, you know, a northeastern liberal, you know, whatever. Who cares about Florida? Who cares about Mississippi? I live in New York. I live in California. I’m going to be fine. And there are a couple of real, deep problems with that. One of them is that most African Americans in this country still live in the states where their ancestors were enslaved.” He continued, “If you look at the top states of African American population by population, you’ll see Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Florida, those are the states. It ain’t California. It ain’t New York. It ain’t Minnesota. It’s these states. So, when these Republicans, as you saw — I don’t know if...
    MSNBC guest Elie Mystal said that White Republicans in the south are attempting to break from the country, and in doing so, might take “their black people with them” during an attack on federalism Wednesday. Mystal and fellow guest Heather McGhee joined The ReidOut with host Joy Reid to discuss a range of topics, including the Supreme Court, the culture war, and Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). Reid opened the segment by attacking DeSantis over his handling of Florida’s Covid-19 response. The host opined that under the leadership of the governor, the Sunshine State is a “giant natural herd immunity experiment.” But Reid also attacked the Republican and southern leaders broadly over their opposition to focusing on race issues in classrooms and also a general opposition to abortion. “If you’re not already convinced that Republican suppressing the vote and taking over the country would seriously harm our democracy, look no further than Ron DeSantis’ Florida,” Reid said. “An authoritarian harbinger wants to come for all of us if Republicans take over this country in total.” McGhee and Reid then discussed states which are majority conservative, with both attacking the Supreme...
    What do spoof western Blazing Saddles, cross-dressing comedy Tootsie, boxing drama Rocky and The Wizard of Oz have in common? Apart from being hugely successful, much-loved films, no connection may spring to mind. But according to a new expose of the chilling effect that ‘wokeness’ has had on Hollywood, all are now ‘verboten’ in industry circles. Blazing Saddles (co-written by black comedian Richard Pryor) sends up racism with its black sheriff protagonist; Tootsie’s Dustin Hoffman pretends to be a woman to get acting work; Rocky’s bad guy is black; and The Wizard of Oz hired people with dwarfism to play its Munchkins. Which means none of these classic movies would stand any chance of getting commissioned today, according to prominent directors and writers. Prominent directors and writers say movies including Rocky, whose bad guy is black, would not stand any chance of getting commissioned today Hollywood, an industry that once prided itself on pushing boundaries, is now in thrall to a stultifying politically correct orthodoxy that is destroying creativity, driving off talent and creating films and TV shows so detached...
    Activists with Black Lives Matter Los Angeles have sued the city over the LAPD’s response to a protest outside Mayor Eric Garcetti’s home in December 2020, alleging they were brutalized by baton-wielding officers in violation of their constitutional rights. The activists said their demonstration, held in opposition to Garcetti getting a job in President Biden’s administration, was entirely peaceful. Still, they said, Los Angeles Police Department officers violently stormed into the crowd and began assaulting people — offering no justification other than that one individual with a bullhorn was violating a noise ordinance. “There were children there at the time, there were elderly people there at the time, and [the police] overreacted,” said Greg Akili, 73, a BLM L.A. leader and lead plaintiff in the case. “Too often we have seen LAPD want to demonstrate their capacity to control a situation, and when they do that and it’s Black people involved, then they overdo it, they go too far, and we get hurt.” The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status to represent the involved protesters as a collective, alleges about 50...
    Rep. Byron Donalds, R-Fla., ripped President Biden's much-criticized speech on voting rights, telling "America Reports" Wednesday the embattled commander-in-chief is pushing for election reform because he and Democrats have nothing to run on. REP. BYRON DONALDS: George Wallace would never give praise to me, but he sure did give it to Joe Biden when he was in the Senate and now being the current president. Let’s be clear about this: This is all politics.  … The Democrats have nothing to run on. Joe Biden has failed America. And because of this, the only place that Democrats always go are [sic] to these voting rights issues, saying that Black people, frankly, are not going to have the right to vote. That is a lie.  … Florida has the best election laws in the country, something the Democrats don’t agree with. But there are no issues in my state about allowing Black people or any other ethnic minority to vote in the state of Florida. They should follow our lead, not Joe Biden’s. WATCH THE FULL VIDEO BELOW: Video This article...
    Host Whoopi Goldberg said Tuesday on ABC’s “The View” that black people were “where we were under the Emancipation Proclamation” while discussing voting rights with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY). Goldberg said, “You vowed to call a vote on major voting rights legislation in time for Martin Luther King Day next week. I just want – I want to ask you this because it’s irritating me to the nth degree. Why are we still talking about my right as an American to vote?” She added, “I still feel like suddenly black people still are where we were under the Emancipation Proclamation. What is happening? Why are we still fighting this way? What’s – what’s going to change?” Schumer said, “You’re 100% right, and it’s not just staying the same. It’s going to get worse if we don’t do something. What happened is this, Donald Trump spread the big lie that the election was fraudulent. Of course, it wasn’t. He had no evidence, but state legislatures, only Republicans, very partisan, no Democrats, are now making it harder for people to vote based on that false big lie that...
    Initial US vaccination efforts were a logistical triumph. In April 2021, on a single day, 4 million people were vaccinated — more than 1 percent of the population. Since then, though, vaccination efforts slowed and then stalled. Today, only 62 percent of the population has been fully vaccinated, according to the CDC. Only 36.5 percent of people have received boosters. This is especially troublesome because boosters are vital for protection from the omicron variant that is currently leading to the worst hospitalization numbers of the pandemic. The US desperately needs more people to get vaccinated. But policy response has been lackluster. There is a good bit of public support for vaccine mandates, but local and state governments have embraced them only sporadically, and generally with an opt out in the form of regular testing. Even so, an OSHA regulation requiring vaccines or regular testing for companies with over 100 employees nationwide is facing Supreme Court scrutiny. Politicians have resorted to dire warnings and to emphasizing that people have a duty to others to get vaccinated. READ:...
    A version of this piece appeared first on Common Sense.  A few years ago, the editor-in-chief of The Hollywood Reporter pitched a story to the newsroom.  He had just come back from lunch with a well-known agent, who had suggested the paper take a look at the unintended consequences of Hollywood's efforts to diversify.  Those white men who had spent decades writing scripts—which had been turned into blockbuster movies and hit television shows—were no longer getting hired. The newsroom blew up.  The reporters, especially the younger ones, mocked the idea that white men were on the outs. The editor-in-chief, normally self-assured, immediately backtracked. He looked rattled. It was a missed opportunity.  The story wasn't just about white guys not getting jobs. Nor was it really about the economics of Hollywood.  It was about the stories Hollywood told and distributed and streamed on screens around the globe every day.  It was about this massively lucrative industry that had been birthed by outsiders and emerged, out of lemon groves, into a glamorous, glitzy mosh pit teeming with chutzpah and broken hearts and...
              by Antoinette Aho   Erec Smith is an associate professor of Rhetoric and Composition at York College of Pennsylvania. After experiencing cancel culture 2019, he has since become an advocate for viewpoint diversity, especially in the Black community. In a June 2021 “On the Media” podcast, Smith discussed the incident that led him to be “canceled” in higher education. He spoke to WNYC Studios’ Shamed and Confused podcast about “Feeling ‘canceled’ in Academia,” and was featured in a December 2021 segment on Reputation. Smith, the author of A Critique of Anti-racism in Rhetoric and Composition: The Semblance of Empowerment, received criticism online within the academic community after he voiced an opinion downplaying the leftist academics’ claim that teaching standard English perpetuates White supremacy. “I was certain that we could have a civil and intelligent conversation. And I was wrong,” Smith stated in the podcast. “I wasn’t talking to academics, I was talking to middle school mean girls.” Though Smith received backlash in 2019, he has since found success in being canceled. When speaking to Campus Reform, Smith said, “The treatment I received from the 2019 incident was meant to silence...
    Vote Lead Impact, Krysta Nicole Jones, Founder & President Voting rights will be front and center this week in Washington, while one local organization is working to make sure people in Virginia have a pool of diverse candidates to choose from. Getting Black people involved in politics has been Krysta Nicole Jones’ mission for over 15 years. While she was working on her master’s degree at George Washington University in 2006, she wrote her thesis paper on the lack of black congresspeople in Virginia. She then founded an organization, dedicated to increasing the number of blacks who run for office. Jones says Vote Lead Impact has trained people in fundraising and media relations and provides mentoring to people interested in entering politics while encouraging people to get involved in the community. Although she knows of candidates who have won races without significant financial backing, she says one of the main stumbling blocks is she sees fundraising. She says of some candidates, “They simply have not built the relationships, not necessarily on the ground in the community, but within the political...
    A local resident is tested for COVID-19 at a free testing site at Farragut Square as coronavirus cases surge in the city on Dec. 21, 2021, in Washington, DC. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser reinstated the city’s indoor mask mandate at 6 AM on Tuesday and announced a vaccination mandate for government employees after COVID-19 case numbers have surged to a new high. When Cherriese Thompson heard the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) decision last week to cut quarantine time down from 10 days to five days, she was upset. At a time when hospitalizations were surging and isolation and quarantine procedures were already tricky for people to understand, Thompson, a third-year medicine resident in Northern California, felt the short quarantine window would only add confusion and put more people at risk of contracting the highly contagious omicron variant. “It’s just so upsetting,” Thompson said. “I feel like this is going to end up fueling the surge even more. It’s come to the point that we value money more than we value people’s livelihoods.” The CDC made...
    (CNN)Kristen Berthiaume remembers when George Floyd was murdered, with body cam footage revealing his struggles to breathe and cries for his mother as a police officer knelt on his neck.Berthiaume couldn't stop thinking about Floyd, his loved ones, and the Black community as nationwide protests and demands for justice were often met with what she says was blatant racism and ignorance.After talking with her family about what role they could play in promoting racial justice in their community in Homewood, Alabama, an idea was born. "Our library was closed due to Covid, but I noticed that books about racial justice were high on bestseller lists," Berthiaume, 43, told CNN. "We thought opening an antiracist little library at our house could be a way to make these crucially important books accessible to people in our area. We also wanted all kids who came to see themselves represented in the books we offered."The mother of three children -- Emma, Owen and Lily -- and her husband built a little library out of discarded red chest drawers. They added a roof and painted...
    This guy regretted not getting the jab, and for good reason. This series documents stories from the Herman Cain Awards subreddit. tracking the COVID mis- and disinformation on Facebook that is leading to so many deaths. Today’s cautionary tale was racist and transphobic and all-around obnoxious, and his change-of-heart came too late. Not as annoying as “your loved one died of COVID pneumonia,” but we can agree to disagree.  “Kamala Harris is not Black and Joe Biden has dementia.” Fact checkers: “Partly false!”  Uh, which part is partly false? The one false claim or the other false claim?  (I searched, but couldn’t find this specific fact check. Looks like some algorithm picked up part of the meme and applied a previous fact check to it.)  “Slaves were freed? What a crock of shit! Unfriend me for being so racist!" By the way, this is double racist; claiming Father’s Day is a “white” holiday—the insinuation being that Black fathers are absent or Black mothers don’t know the paternity of their children—is a common trope among the deplorables.  With the hateful Rachel...
    For people of color, including many in Congress, the attack was an eerily familiar display of white supremacist violence, this time at the very seat of American democracy. Rep. Cori Bush is no stranger to protests. She spent years marching the streets of St. Louis and Ferguson, Missouri, rising to public office on the strength of her activism. But as the Missouri Democrat looked out the window of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 — only her third day as a member of Congress — she knew what was about to take place would be no peaceful protest. The Confederate flags in the crowd, and the makeshift noose and gallows erected on the Capitol grounds, spoke to a more sinister reality. "I've been to hundreds of protests and have organized so many protests, I can't count. I know what a protest is: This is not that," Bush, who is Black, said recently in an interview with The Associated Press. The insurrection by pro-Trump supporters and members of far-right groups shattered the...
    The latest statistics are terrifying. Or, at least, they should be terrifying. In the week after New Year’s Eve, Los Angeles County recorded roughly 174,000 cases of COVID-19 — or about 1.7% of all Angelenos. On Thursday alone, we hit a record of 37,215 new infections, mostly driven by the extraordinarily contagious Omicron variant, which now accounts for about 85% of coronavirus cases countywide. The surge is so bad that city officials are canceling leave, offering overtime and ordering longer shifts just to maintain public safety services while more than 1,000 cops, firefighters and paramedics are out sick with COVID-19. Across the state and across the country, it’s much the same story. “I don’t believe we’ve seen the peak,” Rochelle Walensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told the “Today” show on Friday, adding that “hospitals right now are full of people who are unvaccinated.” And yet, in Dr. Roberto Vargas’ corner of California in South L.A., where he’s been helping lead an effort to persuade hesitant Black and Latino residents to get...
    A man is behind bars on felony charges after police say he brought a pipe-style explosive device to a Florida protest in support of a detainee charged in connection to the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot. Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri held a press conference Friday announcing the arrest of Garrett James Smith, 22, who is accused of bringing explosive devices near a lawfully organized protest at a county courthouse to oppose the incarceration of alleged Jan. 6 rioter Jeremy Brown. Deputies first spotted Smith running near the site of the protest wearing all black with a "black covering over his face" and carrying a black backpack, Gualtieri said. LIBERALS BLAST MEDIA FOR LACK OF PRO-DEMOCRATIC COVERAGE AROUND JAN. 6 Smith was arrested shortly after for loitering and prowling. In the backpack, deputies discovered the explosive device, a black helmet, and a checklist of the items he was wearing. The area around the protest was searched, though no explosive devices were located. Gualtieri said Smith's car was found nearby with M-80 fireworks inside....
    White Coats for Black Lives (WC4BL), a radical socialist organization of doctors and medical students, is succeeding in its mission to racialize the practice of medicine, believing that the “dominant medical practice in the United States has been built on the dehumanization and exploitation of Black people.” With at least 75 chapters at medical schools across the country, WC5BL seeks to radically redefine the practice of medicine in the United States, as it advocated “prioritizing” black patients over other patients and “unlearning toxic medical knowledge and relearning medical care that centers the needs of Black people and communities,” according to its 16-page missive. [Emphasis added]. Furthermore, the organization believes “whiteness is an invented political tool created through violence in the service of establishing domination,” “whiteness has been historically used as a violent means for stealing lives,” and “racism, capitalism, and white supremacy are interdependent systems which lead to the particular dehumanization, exploitation, and murder of Black people.” People kneel as doctors, nurses and other health care workers participate in a “White Coats for Black Lives” event in solidarity with George Floyd....
    Antonio Brown became the ultimate distraction for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at an inopportune time, but according to Fox Sports host Shannon Sharpe, the banished wide receiver is getting an unwarranted pass. “A lot of people are giving him a pass because he’s Black. Let’s be all the way real,” Sharpe claimed defiantly on Undisputed. “None of the Black Buccaneer players can come out and say what [Bruce Arians] said is true. Because then they’re gonna get labeled an Uncle Tom. They’re gonna get called a coon. Because now ‘oh you’re a slave to the White man,’ but I don’t care.” Sunday afternoon, Brown’s tenure with Tampa came to an end when he stripped his uniform off and paraded into the locker room during the third quarter of their game against the New York Jets. According to Brown, he left the field because he was injured. According to the Bucs and their head coach Bruce Arians, Brown’s outburst was over a lack of targets. One thing that remains consistent, most of Brown’s critics continue to cite concern that mental health...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Sidney Poitier, the groundbreaking actor who transformed how Black people were portrayed on screen, has died at 94. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Sidney Poitier, whose elegant bearing and principled onscreen characters made him Hollywood’s first Black movie star and the first Black man to win the best actor Oscar, has died. He was 94. Clint Watson, press secretary for the Prime Minister of the Bahamas, confirmed to CNN that Poitier died Thursday evening. Poitier overcame an impoverished background in the Bahamas and a thick island accent to rise to the top of his profession at a time when prominent roles for Black actors were rare. He won the Oscar for 1963’s “Lilies of the Field,” in which he played an itinerant laborer who helps a group of White nuns build a chapel. Many of his best-known films explored racial tensions as Americans were grappling with social changes wrought by the civil rights movement. In 1967 alone, he appeared as a Philadelphia detective fighting bigotry in small-town Mississippi in “In the Heat of the Night” and a doctor who wins over his White fiancée’s skeptical parents in “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Related Articles Public memorial for John Madden scheduled to be...
    (CNN) — Sidney Poitier, whose elegant bearing and principled onscreen characters made him Hollywood’s first Black movie star and the first Black man to win the best actor Oscar, has died. He was 94. Clint Watson, press secretary for the Prime Minister of the Bahamas, confirmed to CNN that Poitier died Thursday evening. Poitier overcame an impoverished background in the Bahamas and a thick island accent to rise to the top of his profession at a time when prominent roles for Black actors were rare. He won the Oscar for 1963’s “Lilies of the Field,” in which he played an itinerant laborer who helps a group of White nuns build a chapel. Many of his best-known films explored racial tensions as Americans were grappling with social changes wrought by the civil rights movement. In 1967 alone, he appeared as a Philadelphia detective fighting bigotry in small-town Mississippi in “In the Heat of the Night” and a doctor who wins over his White fiancée’s skeptical parents in “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Poitier’s movies struggled for distribution in the South, and...
    Airbnb hosts in Oregon will soon only see the initials of some prospective renters, not their full names, in a change designed to prevent discrimination against Black users of the online lodging marketplace. The new policy stems from the settlement of a lawsuit that claimed hosts could reject customers because they conclude the prospective renters are Black based on their first names. The change takes effect Jan. 31 and will last for at least two years. It will only apply in Oregon — it won’t even cover people from other states trying to rent an Airbnb listing in Oregon, according to the company. An Airbnb spokeswoman said Thursday that the company “will evaluate the impact of this change to understand if there are learnings from this work that can inform future efforts to fight bias.” In 2017, three Black women in Oregon sued Airbnb, claiming that the company’s requirement that customers post full names and photos enabled hosts to discriminate based on race, in violation of the state’s public-accommodations law. Airbnb changed its policy the following year so that...
    Washington (CNN)A version of this story appeared in CNN's Race Deconstructed newsletter. To get it in your inbox every week, sign up for free here.The noose and gallows.The Confederate Army revivalists.The White power hand gestures.Incited by then-President Donald Trump, the January 6 insurrectionists took aim not merely at democracy but also at multiracial democracy. The siege of the US Capitol fit into a history of White backlash, as yet another effort to maintain a strict racial order.Read MoreOne year on, as the House select committee probes the attack and as many Republican-led state legislatures enact laws that limit Black Americans' access to the ballot box, it's worthwhile to examine how January 6 lives on in national politics, and explore what that day might reveal about race in the US.The new Lost CauseOne way to understand January 6 is through the lens of US mythology.In the late 1800s, the myth of the Lost Cause grew in popularity. It was an attempt to revise history at least in part by recasting as honorable and valiant the men who went to war in...
    Stephen Miller Notorious xenophobe, white nationalist, and self-loathing antisemite Stephen Miller is suing the state of New York for allegedly prioritizing non-white COVID-19 patients for treatment.  Miller’s suit is based on a memo from the New York State Department of Health, released on Dec. 27, which states that “treatments are authorized for patients who meet certain criteria,” and one of the criteria is patients “having a medical condition or other factors that increase their risk for severe illness.” The memo outlines that “non-white race or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity should be considered a risk factor, as longstanding systemic health and social inequities have contributed to an increased risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19.” Miller appeared on Fox’s Tucker Carlson Tonight Tuesday, alleging the “American experiment is dead” if treatment discriminates on the basis of race.  “In the context of New York, we are seeing decisions about life and death medical care being made according to race and skin color," Miller said. "If this is allowed to survive, if this policy is allowed to endure, then in a very real sense our Constitution ceases to be...
    WASHINGTON -- Photojournalist Mel D. Cole had described Jan. 6, 2021, as "the most terrifying day" ever.One of his images, capturing pro-Trump rioters in a shoving melee outside of the U.S. Capitol, was among the few selected for National Geographic's "Year in Pictures" issue, said Whitney Johnson, Director of Visuals and Immersive Experiences for the magazine. Police officer Michael Fanone struggles against Trump supporters after they dragged him down the steps of the U.S. Capitol. Photo by Mel D. Cole Cole made his career as a music photographer but recently ventured into photojournalism, covering protests across the country following George Floyd's 2020 murder.EMBED More News VideosThe U.S. Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6, 2021, has been described as the worst attack on American democracy since the Civil War. "He's seen a lot in the last year and a half, but he said that that day was absolutely the craziest and most terrifying day for him ever," Johnson said."For him to be a Black photographer in a sea of white faces, he felt really afraid," she continued. "He said he saw that...
    Summit Fever - The FIFTY | Mt. St. Elias - Climbing & Skiing a Mythical Mountain www.youtube.com Full Circle is crowdfunding the expedition, and the group has raised more than $150,000 of $200,000 to date. The group's GoFundMe page states its mission is to help "reshape the narrative" about outdoors experiences. "Everest is not the end goal, but just the beginning. Our expedition will reshape the narrative of the outdoors to one that is inclusive and where everyone belongs. Each member of this team has a powerful story to share," the page states. "Together, we speak to many histories, traditions, and ancestries." While it is true that of the more than 10,000 people who have summited Mt. Everest only 10 have been black, climbing the world's tallest mountain is a dangerous task with barriers for most people. In fact, after one of the deadliest climbing seasons in 2019, Nepal instituted new rules for mountaineers hoping to summit Mt. Everest. Those requirements included proof of physical ability and experience summiting mountains of more than 6,500 meters. Considering that...
    Tucker Carlson speaks during the Mathias Corvinus Collegium (MCC) Feszt on Aug. 7, 2021, in Esztergom, Hungary. Just imagine if Fox News hosts were actually capable of news analysis that went beyond feeding into racist stereotypes. Well, The Daily Show, Comedy Central’s satirical news program, had some fun with just that scenario leading up to the one-year anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. The show, hosted by comedian Trevor Noah, spliced together video footage of the rioters with sound bites from a few of the conservative network’s famed talking heads. So, instead of condemning Black Lives Matter activists as the Fox News hosts intended, the edited video made it look like the hosts were criticizing actual terrorists.  Imagine phrases like “mob-like behavior” and violence that is “unacceptable in this country” applying to white people storming the Capitol. xFox News talking about BLM protesters but make the footage January 6th pic.twitter.com/GWpAGPUF5D— The Daily Show (@TheDailyShow) January 5, 2022 At one point, host Tucker Carlson said: “It’s not a protest. These aren’t children. These are adults, and they’re destroying our...