Wednesday, May 25, 2022 - 15:40:40
26 results - (0.007 seconds)

human rights of women:

Contact Newsletter-online.com: [NewsMag]

latest news at page 1:
12
    During her 2016 presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton warned us that Donald Trump and his "basket of deplorables" were a threat to American democracy. She wasn't a prophet. She was simply offering a reasonable analysis based on the available evidence — and she paid an enormous political price for daring to tell that truth in public. Two things can be true at the same time. Russian interference may well have played a role in Donald Trump's unlikely electoral victory in 2016. But it is also true that Clinton's truthful but politically unwise comment about the "deplorables" helped to swing the momentum — with the help of an eager and compliant mainstream news media — in Trump's direction. Clinton's description was in fact about much more than the disreputable people who flocked to Trump's banner. It was also a warning about the regressive politics and antisocial values that Trump's followers represented (and still do), including cruelty, racism and white supremacy, sexism and misogyny, collective narcissism, anti-intellectualism, an infatuation with violence, proud ignorance and support for fascism and authoritarianism. Whatever you...
    DENVER (CBS4) – Dozens of Coloradans attended a pro-abortion rally on Saturday hosted by the Party for Socialism and Liberation in Denver. Organizers said this is a way for them to defend Roe vs. Wade, which is a 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that provides a constitutional right to abortion. (credit: CBS) READ MORE: Some Evacuations Ordered For Miners Candle Fire Near DumontThe Supreme Court continues to hear arguments on a historic Mississippi law that would ban abortions after 15 weeks, possibly overturning Roe vs. Wade. “As a person who owns a uterus, I feel obligated to be out here,” said Sidney Fisk, one of those marching. “Injustice in one place is injustice everywhere.“ (credit: CBS) The pro-abortion advocates began their rally at the Colorado State Capitol and walked down 16th Street Mall. Organizers said they’re also calling on Congress to pass the Women’s Health Protection Act. “This is a really serious assault on what we consider fundamental rights for women and all people,” said Lillian House, with the Party for Socialism and Liberation. “This will impact...
                        Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) signed on to a letter asking President Joe Biden to help preserve the “basic human rights” of Afghan women and girls. The bipartisan letter has been signed by every female United States Senator. All 24 female senators have a message to @POTUS: We must develop an interagency plan to preserve the political, economic, social, and basic human rights of Afghan women and girls. https://t.co/OGwHQDanaY — Sen. Tammy Baldwin (@SenatorBaldwin) November 4, 2021 The senators wrote, “In the wake of the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan, we write to urge your Administration to develop an interagency plan to preserve the political, economic, social, and basic human rights of Afghan women and girls.” They asked that Biden take action to support women and girls in Afghanistan by resisting the Taliban. Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Joni Ernst (R-IA) initiated the movement within the Senate to create an “interagency plan” that “preserves the political, social, economic and basic human rights of Afghan women and girls.”...
    Every female senator called on President Biden Thursday to establish "basic human rights" protections for women and girls in Afghanistan following the Taliban takeover.  A bipartisan letter led by Sens. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., urged the administration to create an "interagency plan" and lead the international community in holding the Taliban accountable.  WATCHDOG FINDS NO MISCONDUCT IN MISTAKEN AFGHAN AIRSTRIKE Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, speaks during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the conclusion of military operations in Afghanistan and plans for future counterterrorism operations on Capitol Hill on Sept. 28, 2021, in Washington, D.C.  (Photo by Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images) "Lacking a legitimate Afghan government and military forces to protect them, women and girls are now suffering the predations of a Taliban regime," said the letter, signed by the 22 other U.S. female senators. "Women have been the victims of targeted beatings and killings and are banned from leaving home without a male guardian." Prior to the Taliban takeover, an estimated 3.5 million girls attended school while an additional 100,000 women were enrolled in universities...
    David Beckham is facing huge backlash after it was reported he will become the face of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar despite concerns surrounding human rights abuses in the country. In a deal reportedly worth up to £150million, the former England captain will act as an ambassador for the country and promote tourism as part of the deal. But Beckham is under fire for accepting the role as fans and campaigners have been quick to point out the human rights controversies surrounding the host nation of the tournament next year. Critics have accused Beckham of 'selling his soul' and described his actions as 'pure greed' after details of the deal emerged. David Beckham at the Souq Waqif Art Centre in Qatar. Over two days he also visited the city’s metro system and dined at upmarket restaurants Nobu and Banyan Tree  The Mail on Sunday has highlighted over recent weeks how the country is rife with racism, misogyny and the persecution of gay men and women. And it is against the backdrop of these controversies, fans have accused Beckham, who is...
    United Nations human rights monitors are condemning the controversial Texas abortion law that bans the procedure after a fetal heartbeat is detected, contending that the regulation is a violation of international law. Melissa Upreti, the chairwoman of the UN’s working group on discrimination against women and girls, told The Guardian that the new Texas law is “structured sex and gender-based discrimination at its worst.” She said the legislation could push abortion providers to take their services underground and lead more women to start using unsafe procedures to end pregnancies which can be fatal. A fetal heartbeat is normally able to be detected by the sixth week of pregnancy. “This new law will make abortion unsafe and deadly, and create a whole new set of risks for women and girls. It is profoundly discriminatory and violates a number of rights guaranteed under international law,” Upreti, a human rights lawyer from Nepal, said. The controversial Texas law, referred to by some as the “fetal heartbeat bill,” took effect last week after Gov. Greg Abbott (R-Texas) signed the legislation in May. It makes an exception...
    United Nations experts tasked with monitoring human rights abuses across the globe are condemning Texas' near-total abortion ban as a clear violation of international law, characterizing the state's newly imposed restrictions as "profoundly discriminatory" and dangerous. Melissa Upreti, a human rights lawyer and the chair of the U.N.'s working group on discrimination against women and girls, told The Guardian on Tuesday that the Texas ban "violates a number of rights guaranteed under international law" and represents "structural sex and gender-based discrimination at its worst." "This new law will make abortion unsafe and deadly, and create a whole new set of risks for women and girls," said Upreti, who argued that the U.S. Supreme Court's refusal to block the Texas ban "has taken the entire country backward" on reproductive rights, potentially imperiling abortion access throughout much of the nation. Known as S.B. 8, Texas' new law prohibits abortion after around six weeks of pregnancy and deputizes private citizens to enforce the ban, offering a $10,000 reward—plus legal fees—for those who prevail in litigation against abortion providers or anyone who "aids or...
    United Nations Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield boasted Tuesday the U.S. had used a "very strongly worded press statement" from the U.N. Security Council to tell the repressive Taliban it must respect women's rights and humanitarian law. As reports of violent repression against women and U.S. allies by the Taliban alarm the globe, Thomas-Greenfield told CNN's Wolf Blitzer the U.S. would be "watching" closely.  "We are hearing from people in Afghanistan that they are getting threats from the Taliban, and we have expressed in no uncertain terms here at the United Nations through a very strongly worded press statement from the Security Council that we expect the Taliban to respect human rights, including the rights of women and girls," Thomas-Greenfield said. "We have also indicated that they have to be respectful of humanitarian law and that we do not expect to see that Afghanistan will become a safe haven for terrorists. But, again, it is not their words that we will hold them to. It is their actions that we will be watching." Actress Patricia Heaton summed up the feelings of many...
    New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has begged the Taliban to uphold women's rights after the Islamists toppled the government in Kabul amid fears that the country will once again become 'a breeding ground for terror.'  'I would just again implore those who made these moves in recent days to acknowledge what the international community has called for - human rights and the safety of their people,' she said at a news conference in the capital Wellington.  'What we want to see is women and girls being able to access work and education. These are things that have traditionally not been available to them where there has been governance by Taliban.'  Ardern's mediation comes as China, Russia, Pakistan and Turkey all appear set to formally recognise Taliban rule, while others like British Prime Minister Boris Johnson have warned that no state should recognise the new government.  The terror group marched victorious into Kabul on Sunday, the culmination of a rapid advance across the country which was left open by the sudden U.S. and Nato withdrawal after 20 years of fighting post-9/11.  The...
    Secretary of State Antony Blinken The Biden administration is set to turn back Donald Trump's attempts to promote religious conservative causes abroad at great cost to women and LGBTQ individuals, according to the Associated Press.  Secretary of State Antony Blinken is expected to "decisively" refute a report compiled by his predecessor, Mike Pompeo, that attempted to place limitations on the number of global human rights recognized and promoted abroad by the U.S. government. Human rights organizations had roundly criticized the 60-page report, issued last July, which prioritized property rights and religious freedom over international human rights agreements. The report was part of an overall effort by the Republican administration to place limits on what is considered to be a human right based on a conservative reading of the U.S. Constitution. In other words, fewer protections for fewer people— particularly those who are most vulnerable and in need of the protections. Pompeo had also nixed segments of the State Department's annual report on international human rights. The Biden administration has already turned back several Trump administration initiatives, reestablishing itself with the United Nations Human...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Minnesota Department of Human Rights has reached a settlement with a wood products manufacturer in Eagan they say would refuse to hire women. The discriminatory practice at Villaume Industries was discovered after an investigation began in 2019, according to officials. The department found Villaume would refuse to accept women applicants from an employment agency. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: Some May See Even More Money From Potential Economic Relief Package Villaume will pay a $90,000 fine as a result, as well as a donation to “an organization that supports the advancement of women in the workplace.” READ MORE: COVID Pandemic In MN: 900,000+ People Have Received At Least 1 Vaccine Dose The company also agreed to a series of workplace reforms, listed below from a Department of Human Rights release: MORE NEWS: 1 Person Rescued From Fire In North Minneapolis Fourplex Recruit and hire women. Amend all recruitment materials to explicitly state the company welcomes and values women in the workplace. Establish relationships with organizations that help employers recruit qualified women. Provide anti-bias, cultural humility,...
    (CNN)Caster Semenya, the South African Olympic champion runner, has appealed to the European Court of Human Rights to end "discriminatory" testosterone limits imposed on female athletes.Semenya is hyperandrogenous -- meaning she has naturally high levels of the male sex hormone -- and is fighting against new rules introduced in 2019 by track and field's governing body World Athletics (previously known as the IAAF) that regulate levels of the hormone in female athletes.World Athletics said the rules were about "leveling the playing field" because, it said, testosterone "provides significant performance advantages in female athletes."Semenya took the 800 meters gold at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics but the rules mean she will now need to take testosterone-reducing medication in order to compete internationally over distances between 400 meters and one mile -- something she has declined to do.Caster Semenya loses appeal in Swiss court over restriction of testosterone levelsShe is now training to qualify for the 200 meters at the postponed Tokyo Olympics, which will take place later this year.Read MoreIn April 2019, Semenya lost an appeal to the Court of Arbitration...
    Caster Semenya is going to the European Court of Human Rights to challenge "discriminatory" rules that prohibit her from competing in certain track events because of her high natural testosterone, her lawyers said Thursday. The two-time Olympic champion in the 800 meters has already lost two legal appeals against World Athletics' regulations that force her to medically lower her natural testosterone level if she wants to run in women's races from 400 meters to one mile. The South African's lawyers said there's been a "violation of her rights" and wants the human rights court to examine the rules. Semenya has one of a number of conditions known as differences of sex development. Although she has never publicly released details of her condition, World Athletics has controversially referred to her as "biologically male" in previous legal proceedings, a description that angered Semenya. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Semenya has the typical male XY chromosome pattern and levels of testosterone that are much higher then the typical female range, World Athletics says. The track and field body says that...
    CASTER Semenya is asking the European Court of Human Rights to overturn her middle distance ban. South African Semenya, 30, a double Olympic champion at 800m from London and Rio, has been unable to run further than 200m competitively since 2019. 1Semenya is hoping she will be able to compete in elite middle distance running againCredit: Getty Images - Getty World athletics chiefs won a legal battle to impose restrictions on female athletes with enhanced natural testosterone levels from running against other women over 400m, 800m and 1500m unless they took medication to reduce the levels. Semanya, born with cross-gender characteristics but assigned female from birth, fought the original ruling, arguing that the regulations - which meant medication or surgery was required for her to be able to compete - were unfair. Despite an initial decision to place her ban on hold pending further scientific study, it was reimposed and Semenya lost a challenge at the Swiss Federal Supreme Court last September. Now the 2017 world champion’s lawyers confirmed Semenya is taking the case to the Strasbourg-based Court, with a...
    COVIDs so wicked: Families confront losing multiple loved ones Taiwan denies Hong Kong film tycoon residency © Michael Dodge—Getty Images Caster Semenya of South Africa celebrates wins gold in the Women's 800m final during athletics on day nine of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Game on April 13, 2018 on the Gold Coast, Australia. South African athlete Caster Semenya is bringing her legal fight to participate in women’s sports to the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR), her latest bid to “put an end to the longstanding human rights violations by World Athletics against women athletes.” The lawsuit from the two-time Olympic champion challenges restrictions on testosterone levels in female athletes that prevents certain women from participating in international sports competitions. In a tweet Thursday morning, Semenya shared a press release from her lawyers, Norton Rose Fulbright, which said “Semenya’s ongoing fight for dignity, equality, and the human rights of women in sport took a crucial step forward with the filing of an application” to the ECHR. The lawsuit asks that the Strasbourg court find that “Switzerland has failed...
    By GERALD IMRAY, AP Sports Writer CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — Caster Semenya is going to the European Court of Human Rights to challenge “discriminatory” rules that prohibit her from competing in certain track events because of her high natural testosterone, her lawyers said Thursday. The two-time Olympic champion in the 800 meters has already lost two legal appeals against World Athletics' regulations that force her to medically lower her natural testosterone level if she wants to run in women's races from 400 meters to one mile. The South African's lawyers said there's been a “violation of her rights” and wants the human rights court to examine the rules. Semenya has one of a number of conditions known as differences of sex development. Although she has never publicly released details of her condition, World Athletics has controversially referred to her as “biologically male” in previous legal proceedings, a description that angered Semenya. Semenya has the typical male XY chromosome pattern and levels of testosterone that are much higher then the typical female range, World Athletics says. The track and...
    This picture taken February 10, 2021 in Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh shows a woman viewing a tweet posted by the sister of Saudi activist Loujain al-Hathloul, Lina, showing a screenshot of them having a video call following Hathloul's release after nearly three years in detention.Photo by FAYEZ NURELDINE | AFP via Getty Images Prominent women's rights activist Loujain al-Hathloul was released from prison in Saudi Arabia Wednesday night after nearly three years, in a case that's been decried by the United Nations and rights groups around the world. The 31-year old Saudi national was arrested in May 2018 along with several other rights activists after she posted videos of herself driving online, in an act of resistance against the kingdom's longtime ban on women driving. The ban was rescinded the following month as part of socially liberalizing reforms enacted by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, but al-Hathloul and several other women remained in jail. Al-Hathloul and her family say that she endured torture and sexual abuse in prison, allegations that the Saudi government denies.  Al-Halthoul was charged with...
    Five former NY1 anchors and reporters may have settled their age and gender discrimination lawsuit against the New York City-focused cable outlet late last year. But on Monday, the women filed a new complaint—this time with the city’s human rights commission—alleging further retaliation. Roma Torre, Amanda Farinacci, Vivian Lee, Jeanine Ramirez, and Kristen Shaughnessy sued NY1 in 2019, alleging that managers had forced them off the air in favor of younger, less experienced talent. “We feel we are being railroaded out of the place,” said Torre, one of the network’s longest-serving anchors, at the time. The group additionally alleged that after filing the complaint, their bosses and several colleagues retaliated against them by actively isolating and marginalizing the women. The network settled the complaint in December, requiring the five women to leave NY1 and sign non-disclosure agreements. On Monday, the women—who collectively have more than 100 years of on-camera experience combined—filed a brand-new complaint with the New York City Commission on Human Rights (NYCCHR), alleging that NY1’s ownership Charter Communications has continued to retaliate against them by reneging on an...
    Human rights activists are denouncing FIFA President Gianni Infantino’s starring turn in a promotional video for the Saudi Arabian government in which he claims the kingdom has made important changes. The slick 3½-minute PR campaign was posted on Twitter by the Saudi ministry of sport on Thursday, featuring Infantino participating in a ceremonial sword dance and sweeping shots of the palaces of Diriyah. “It’s an amazing scenery, it’s an incredible history,” Infantino says in part. “This is something that the world should come and see.” The video, which also features Infantino praising how “a lot has changed” in Saudi Arabia, was filmed while on a trip that saw him meet with the crown prince, who has been credited with introducing social changes while cracking down on activists who pushed for reforms. “It should be abundantly clear to everyone at FIFA that Saudi Arabia is attempting to use the glamour and prestige of sport as a PR tool to distract from its abysmal human rights record,” Amnesty International said in a statement to The Associated Press. Infantino overlooked FIFA’s own significant...
12