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    VLADIMIR Putin makes no secret of his desire to return his country to the glory days of the Soviet Union standing as a superpower. But over a decade before his birth, his beloved Red Army was terrorized by a single Finnish sniper - dubbed the world's deadliest. 4The White Death managed to slaughter 500 Russian soldiers during the Winter War 4Simo Hayha earned his spot as a national hero in Finland thanks to his sniper skillsCredit: BNPS Simo Hayha, ominously known on the battlefield as The White Death, shot dead over 500 Russian soldiers during the Winter War. Donning his signature white hooded snowsuit, he nestled himself amongst the thick snow and remained motionless until he spotted his prey. Despite his kill list remaining a point of national pride for Finland, Putin doesn't seem afraid of rattling the next generation of Hayha's. He was left seething after being given the cold shoulder by the Nordic nation ahead of their NATO bid. READ MORE ON WORLD NEWSHEAVEN CENT I can prove I’m world’s oldest man as I turn 113…...
    White Death. The very mention of those two words was enough to strike fear into the hearts of Red Army soldiers who crossed the Soviet Union’s border with Finland during the Winter War of 1939, a brief but brutal conflict that stained the frosted pine forests with the blood of 200,000 Russians. For this was the alias of Simo Hayha, one of the most prolific marksmen in military history. Shrouded in the white, hooded snowsuit that gave him his sinister soubriquet, this ace Finnish sniper, who had honed his craft by hunting animals in the woods where he was raised, would crouch in crevices, or holes he dug in the thick snow. That he was just 5 ft 2 in tall made it easier for him to hide. As the hours ticked by, he lay stock-still, eating only bits of bread and cubes of sugar to avoid unnecessary movement. The strips of newspaper with which he padded his flimsy cotton suit provided scant protection in temperatures of -40c. Simo Hayha is believed to have killed more than 500 men during...
    More than 50 days into Vladimir Putin’s brutal invasion, the Ukrainian people’s living nightmare remains as dark as ever.  Almost every evening brings news of more appalling Russian war crimes. Yet as horrific as the war has been, the worst may be yet to come. In yesterday’s Mail On Sunday, Ukrainian ambassador Vadym Prystaiko paid a heartfelt tribute to readers who have donated to the Mail Force campaign, which is sending half a million food boxes to his beleaguered people.  Yet more is needed, for his country faces one of the worst humanitarian catastrophes in modern European history. As Mr Prystaiko noted, Ukraine has long been renowned as the breadbasket of Europe.  A local resident prepares to cook at an entrance of a building damaged during fighting in Mariupol. Russian troops have been shelling farms, food warehouses, grain silos, shopping centres and supermarkets, and even stealing tractors and combine harvesters and driving them across the border. But the Russian invaders have pushed it to the verge of famine, shelling farms, food warehouses, grain silos, shopping centres and supermarkets, and even...
    Demonstrators chant outside of the Atlanta University Center Consortium, part of both Morehouse College and Clark Atlanta University, ahead of a speech by President Joe Biden on Jan.11, 2022 in Atlanta. In a party-line vote, Georgia's House Republicans passed an elections bill on Tuesday that would allow the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, a state agency supporting criminal investigations, to look into claims of fraud and election crimes, inspect paper ballots, and regulate nonprofit funding. The bill would “provide the Georgia Bureau of Investigation with original jurisdiction to investigate election fraud and election crimes” and “provide the Georgia Bureau of Investigation with subpoena power to further such investigations,” according to language in the proposed legislation. Republicans unfamiliar with or perhaps unaffected by voter suppression tactics used to intimidate and scare Black voters from exercising their constitutional right to vote may see no problem with the legislation. But Democrats like Rep. Renitta Shannon and Rep. Derek Mallow know better. “The use of threat of law enforcement in elections is not something new and is not conjecture,” Mallow told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “Members of the majority party are...
    Russian President Vladimir Putin wore the same outfit he wore two days ago during an unhinged speech claiming Russia created Ukraine in announcing his invasion on early Thursday morning, sparking concerns he had already taken the decision to unleash a war on Monday.    In a chilling warning to US President Biden and NATO to not intervene as the Kremlin launches a full-scale invasion to 'denazify' Ukraine, Putin could be seen wearing the same suit and red tie he wore on Monday to lay out his factually inaccurate version of Ukraine's history, saying essentially that it was always part of Russia.   In hindsight, Putin's attempts to rewrite history at his convenience, could be interpreted as evidence that he had already decided to invade Ukraine, and that he misled leaders in the West who pleaded with him for diplomacy.    Putin announced the invasion in a 5.50am speech Thursday to the Russian people, saying he wants to 'demilitarize' and 'de-Nazify' the neighboring country - not occupy it.  But within hours, Ukraine's interior ministry said there had been hundreds of casualties, CNN reported -...
    As the military forces of a modern Russian dictator menacingly encircle Ukraine, they stir chilling memories from the past of his predecessors such as Joseph Stalin in this scruffy little town of 12,000 people that sits near a new border with Crimea.  For it is filled with exiled families who know from bitter experience the brutal reality of Kremlin rule after suffering repeated waves of ethnic cleansing over the past century – first under the Soviet Communists, then recently under Vladimir Putin. Typical is a taxi driver called Ildar. His grandmother was deported to the Urals almost a century ago, then his father put in a cattle wagon by Stalin's goons and sent to central Asia on a 20-day rail journey that only one in five people survived. It was only with the collapse of the Soviet Union that, along with about 250,000 other Tatars, Ildar returned to Crimea. But then they watched in horror as Putin followed in Stalin's footsteps with his illegal seizure of Crimea eight years ago. Ildar joined protests against Moscow's annexation but was forced to...
    How did folks react to Johnson's declaration? While the Democratic lawmaker added a tweet saying, "Reading is fundamental. It's not a legal take, it's a person's opinion. And as a few were smart enough to understand — both are protected speech," detractors still gave Johnson a harsh history lesson, particularly with regard to the fact that many prominent leftists practically made a sport of publicly declaring "F*** Donald Trump" when the Republican commander in chief was in the White House: "Really? So i assume you also condemned the vile remarks made to our 45th president for four years?" one commenter wondered. "Could you link me to those tweets? Otherwise #LetsGoBrandon." "Your party loves burning the flag, now you you're against it? Hahahahaha. Yeah, right," another user mocked. "Also, I'll delete this if you can direct me to your phony outrage (and that's exactly what this is) toward the previous occupant of the White House when far worse things were said... and done [to Trump]." And: Remember that time when Robert de Niro...
    London (CNN Business)Since its inception in 1913, the US Federal Reserve — the most important institution in charge of managing America's economy — has learned a lot about what it should and shouldn't do during a crisis. Just ask a Fed historian.What's happening: Central bankers are gathering Friday for a virtual version of the annual Jackson Hole symposium, a key event for policymakers. There, they'll discuss a question of massive importance: How soon should the Fed pull back historic support for the economy in the wake of a devastating pandemic?You should watch this nerdfest if you care about your moneyIt's a major challenge in hugely uncertain times. But the Fed has changed a lot in recent decades, helping it prepare for this moment, according to Gary Richardson, an economics professor at University of California, Irvine who previously was the Federal Reserve System historian."The Fed has intentionally created tools that allow it to deal with these unprecedented situations," he told me. As demand recovers and supply chains buckle, the Fed must contend with rising prices. That's encouraged some people to draw...
    Patricio "Pitbull" Freire. Photo by Ed Mulholland/Getty Images Patricio "Pitbull" Freire is seen as the greatest fighter in Bellator MMA history. The Brazilian told Insider this week that his legacy is something for others to decide. For now, he wants to write more history as he fights in Bellator's biggest ever battle on Saturday. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Patricio Freire makes another walk to the Bellator MMA cage Saturday as one of the pound-for-pound stars of his sport. A win would cement his place among the prizefighting Gods — those who have established their name in the weird and wild world of professional face-punching, chokeholds, and merciless ground-and-pound. From a land that produced some of the fight game's most celebrated names like Jose Aldo, Fabricio Werdum, and Anderson Silva, Freire is another Brazilian who has forged an indelible legacy in the most grueling of sports. He's already done it all. Freire's achieved rare, champ-champ status as a title-winner at featherweight and lightweight. He's won Bellator tournaments before, and he's even got a 61-second knockout win...
    Tybee Island waves crash as a couple (not the author and his wife) hold hands I got married in late November, but since we tied the knot during the start of the winter pandemic surge, we knew we’d have to wait a little bit to go on our honeymoon. One place was at the top of the list of where to go: Tybee Island, Georgia; it’s a small resort island town off of Savannah. Part of our reasoning was that we knew that even if things were still dicey on the COVID-19 front, we’d likely still be safe. After all, city officials had done their best to protect the island—even after Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp sought to sabotage them. Yet when we headed down to Tybee in late June, I got a jarring reminder of our nation’s racist past. It turned out that the island had once been segregated, and played host to one of the many “wade-ins” that took place in beach towns across the South during the civil rights era. The fight for the right to swim on Tybee...
    BRONZEVILLE — Chicagoans can learn more about how a “red summer” of racial violence and Black resistance more than a century ago continues to shape their communities at a historical bike ride this weekend. The opening ceremony for the third annual bike tour of sites linked to the Chicago Race Riot of 1919 begins 10 a.m. Saturday at the Chicago Military Academy, 3519 S. Giles Ave. in Bronzeville. The 5.5-mile bike ride takes place 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., with stops at the Chicago Defender and Chicago Bee offices, the newly unveiled Ida B. Wells monument, the Victory Monument and other locations in Bronzeville and Bridgeport. Following the ride, organizers will unveil a prototype for the markers they plan to install at the sites where more than three dozen people were killed during the 1919 riot. Boxed lunches from Ain’t She Sweet Cafe will be provided. Riders must bring their own bicycle and helmet. To register for the event, click here. “The mission of the project is to increase awareness” on the riot and its impact on Chicago a century later, said...
    As yoga studios go, they don't come more dramatic than the Great Hall at lavish Dorset country pile Mapperton House.  American-born Julie Montagu - officially Viscountess Hinchingbrooke - is offering free Instagram yoga lessons from one of the most historic rooms in the 17th century home - dubbed 'England's finest manor house'.  In the 18-minute online class, Montagu, 47, who has four children with her husband Luke, is seen performing classic yoga moves - including the downward-facing dog - right beneath an impressive fireplace adorned with the family crest. Wearing a simple khaki vest and loose grey loungewear, with her blonde hair tied back in a ponytail, the aristocrat tells the audience that practising yoga 'keeps me together' and says she 'doesn't know where I'd be without it'.  Viscountess Hinchingbrooke, also known as Julie Montagu, 47, grew up in the US but is married to the Earl of Sandwich and lives at the Mapperton Estate. In her latest yoga video, the aristocratic instructor takes her audience into the Great Hall at her home, which has been called 'England's finest...
    The 35-minute lesson included "plow" and "boat" yoga poses meant to mimic the story of slavery. Facebook A kindergarten teacher in Delaware is under fire for combining a yoga class with a lesson on slavery. The pre-recorded video class also incorrectly identifies Africa as a country, not a continent. The school district called the lesson "unacceptable" and has launched an investigation into the class. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A kindergarten teacher in Wyoming, Delaware, is under scrutiny after teaching a class that combined a lesson on slavery with yoga poses.  A video of the pre-recorded lesson was shared on Facebook by a parent of a McIlvaine Early Childhood Center student who was concerned not only that the teacher was trivializing the horrors of slavery by connecting it to yoga poses, but that she was getting her facts wrong.   During the 35-minute lesson, the teacher also incorrectly identifies Africa as a country, not a continent. "African people came to America on boats to become slaves," the teacher, who has not yet been identified, says in the...
    Daniel Ellsberg - Michael Ellsberg November 2, 2020 11:00AM (UTC) 'Tis the season for some progressives to argue that the best way to build a progressive political movement in America is to stick it to the centrist Democrats — who have rejected progressive nominees and platforms — by voting for a third party, even in swing states. If that helps elect what many regard as a "greater evil" Republican, some third-party supporters argue, it will radicalize significant parts of the electorate, help the third party grow, and gradually increase the prospect of victory for genuinely progressive politics. : As die-hard progressives, we strongly disagree. Few beliefs among progressives have been so thoroughly tested in empirical reality over the last 20 years — and few have been so thoroughly discredited — than the idea that running third-party candidates in swing states during close elections is a good way to build a progressive voting bloc.  In 2000, Ralph Nader, running as a Green, received 2,882,955 votes, which was 2.74% of the popular vote.  In 2004, Nader (running as an independent) received...
    By Lindsey Bahr | Associated Press On Aug. 23, 1917, four months after the U.S. had entered World War I, the all-Black 3rd battalion of the U.S. Army’s 24th Infantry Regiment mutinied in Houston. That night’s two hours of violence left nine civilians, four policemen and two soldiers dead. It resulted in the largest murder trial in U.S. history in which 110 out of 118 soldiers were found guilty. Nineteen were hanged. The riot was incited by an incident between an African American woman and the police, and their subsequent beating of one of the soldiers. But it wasn’t just that day that sparked the violence. As is most often the case with major eruptions, tensions had been brewing and indignities accumulating for some time between the African American regiment and the white police force. The white police in Houston in 1917 not only did not see the uniformed soldiers as equals but were offended by their very existence — never mind the courageous history of African American troops throughout U.S. history to that point. It’s this story that’s...
    On Aug. 23, 1917, four months after the U.S. had entered World War I, the all-Black 3rd battalion of the U.S. Army’s 24th Infantry Regiment mutinied in Houston. That night’s two hours of violence left nine civilians, four policemen and two soldiers dead. It resulted in the largest murder trial in U.S. history in which 110 out of 118 soldiers were found guilty. Nineteen were hanged. The riot was incited by an incident between an African American woman and the police, and their subsequent beating of one of the soldiers. But it wasn’t just that day that sparked the violence. As is most often the case with major eruptions, tensions had been brewing and indignities accumulating for some time between the African American regiment and the white police force. The white police in Houston in 1917 not only did not see the uniformed soldiers as equals but were offended by their very existence — never mind the courageous history of African American troops throughout U.S. history to that point. It’s this story that’s told in writer-director Kevin Willmott’s “...
    With the Covid pandemic shattering the parameters of working life, increasing numbers of city dwellers are dreaming of decamping to the countryside. Their desire for a fresh start, however, poses particular dilemmas. How easy will it be for those entrenched in office culture to earn a living out in the sticks? How much affordable housing is available in rural areas? And with so many seeking an escape to the country, how will society adapt? Topical questions, then — but by no means unique to 2020. Indeed, they were being asked long before coronavirus wreaked havoc on our world — by the Daily Mail, more than a century ago. Back in 1907, this newspaper launched a 'social experiment' to discover how feasible it was for those living in cities and towns to start a new, happier, life in the countryside. The brainchild of Daily Mail proprietor Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe, the paper advertised an opportunity for one reader to live and work on a farm. Applicants had to be based in urban areas — the less experience of country life...
    When COVID-19 stormed America in March, Christine King Mitchell took a break from her job as a docent at the Old Slave Mart Museum in Charleston, S.C. Mitchell, 64, is an historian who has made education and research on the enslavement of African-Americans from 1619 to 1865 her life’s work. But how to keep going during a global pandemic, in a moment when the May 25 police killing of George Floyd and subsequent anti-racism protests have triggered a broad cultural push to acknowledge the longstanding oppression of Black Americans more fully? “ ‘It takes a village to tell a story.’ ” — Christine King Mitchell, author of the forthcoming book, ‘The Business of Slavery: Evidence of Control, Power, and Wealth in South Carolina’ Like millions of others in the time of coronavirus, Mitchell is working from home. And like many others, she’s moved her work online — and the shift could be a positive one that helps this self-taught historian bring her passion to a wider audience. She’s now focused on designing online lesson plans to educate American...
    How to Watch and Live Stream Macys 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular Think tank explains why its pointless to delist Chinese companies from U.S. stock markets Pinehurst history lesson: Tyler Strafaci adds another North & South title to the family collection The last two men left standing at the North & South Amateur on Saturday afternoon each has a certain history at Pinehurst. William Holcomb V produces magic there, having played his way into the U.S. Amateur quarterfinals at Pinehurst No. 2 less than a year ago. Tyler Strafaci, on the other hand, had another chapter of family history to write. © Provided by Golfweek In the end, the iconic Putter Boy trophy went to Strafaci, a 21-year-old who recently finished his fourth year at Georgia Tech. By winning the long-running amateur event, he and grandfather Frank Strafaci become the first grandfather-grandson duo to pull off such a feat. Both men now have the honor of having their name in clubhouse history hall. They’ll both have a locker, too. Scores: North & South Amateur “I first came to Pinehurst...
    Catholics and other supporters showed up on Saturday to defend a statue of St. Louis’ namesake from desecration and destruction by hundreds gathered to protest alleged racism. As Catholic leaders and followers prayed openly in front of the statue of King Louis IX and even offered a “history lesson” to angered protesters, assaults erupted and vandalism was committed. “The Rev. Stephen Schumacher, a priest with the St. Louis Archdiocese is attempting to provide a history lesson on King Louis IX,” reported Joel Currier of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “He’s being shouted down.” The Rev. Stephen Schumacher, a priest with the St. Louis Archdiocese is attempting to provide a history lesson on King Louis IX. He’s being shouted down. pic.twitter.com/lMP1aHhEUO — Joel Currier (@joelcurrier) June 27, 2020 Rev. Schumacher, in a video which can be viewed below, attempted to inform protesters about King Louis IX. “St. Louis was a man who had authority thrust upon him, he didn’t do anything to earn it. You’re right, he didn’t do anything to earn it,” started the priest. “What did he do with...
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