Saturday, May 21, 2022 - 21:58:49
41 results - (0.003 seconds)

NEXT Insurance:

Contact Newsletter-online.com: [NewsMag]

latest news at page 1:
123
    SURFSIDE (CBSMiami) – More money is going to the survivors and families of victims of the tragic Surfside collapse. Monday morning, commissioners approved a $2 million insurance settlement. READ MORE: Potential Summer Surge Has Health Experts Urging Vulnerable People To Get 2nd COVID BoosterThis is part of the nearly $1 billion tentative settlement in the class action lawsuit. In this insurance settlement, parties ranging from security to developers agreed to pay the cash. READ MORE: Ryder Trauma Center’s Medical Director Visits Ukraine To Train Physicians Dealing With Collateral Damage Of Russian InvasionSo, what’s next? The sale of the oceanfront property. There’s a $120 million opening bid for the land. The window for bids closes in four days, while the live auction begins next Tuesday. MORE NEWS: Biden Administration To Ease Trump-Era Restrictions On CubaThe Champlain Towers South fell June 24, killing 98 people.
    ST. CROIX FALLS, Wis. (WCCO) — With more severe weather on the way, you might be wondering what to do if you wind up with damage of your own. It’s a question Mark McKenzie in St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin, had to face Tuesday after a tree in his backyard was uprooted Monday and landed on his roof and garage. READ MORE: Jennifer Carnahan Says Man Threatened Her, Swerved Car Towards Her While Campaigning In Faribault“Really crazy. Then you’re like, ‘What do I do? Who do I call?'” McKenzie said. Tom Wertish, the owner of Options Insurance in Chaska, says to rely on contractors they trust. “Typically their insurance agent will know those contractors,” Wertish said. He warns about door-knocking roofers who show up after storms trying to persuade you to file a claim. “If it’s severe damage and you know that it’s damage, then you file the claim right away,” Wertish said. “If you’re not sure if there’s damage, we’ll typically have a roofer or contractor come out and do an inspection.” READ MORE: Developers Transforming Vacant North Minneapolis Building...
    In this article KRKroger employees put groceries and other goods into plastic totes. Those totes are gobbled up by a grid where robots help retrieve items for customers' online orders.KrogerKroger said Tuesday that it will take away paid leave for unvaccinated employees who get Covid-19 and require some of them to pay a monthly health insurance surcharge starting next year. The country's largest supermarket operator sent a company-wide memo announcing the changes, which take effect Jan. 1. A company spokeswoman said the new policies are intended to encourage staff to get the Covid vaccines. She said the company continues to offer a $100 incentive to all employees who become fully vaccinated. "As we prepare to navigate the next phase of the pandemic, we are modifying policies to encourage safe behaviors including vaccination," she said in a statement. Starting next year, salaried, non-union employees who are unvaccinated and enrolled in the company's health insurance plan must pay a monthly $50 surcharge, the company spokeswoman said. Employees who are fully vaccinated are eligible for paid Covid-19 leave, if they get a breakthrough...
    DRIVERS in Michigan are set to get car insurance refunds worth $400 per vehicle next year. The announcement was made by Governor Gretchen Whitmer and the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) today, December 7. 1Drivers in Michigan are set to get car insurance refunds worth $400 per vehicleCredit: Alamy It comes after the governor last month accused insurance companies of "hoarding" billions in cash. During the Covid pandemic, not as many drivers have been on the roads as usual which has led to fewer insurance claims. In November, Mrs Whitmer then called on the Michigan Catastrophic Claims Association (MCCA) to not hold onto the surplus funds and instead issue refunds. It agreed to this, but it's only now clear how much it'll be paying out. MCCA said it'll begin the process of refunding $400 per vehicle to Michigan drivers "immediately". Drivers are expected to receive the cash in the second quarter of 2022. Most read in MotorsMINI TROOPER Motoring nut crams into world’s smallest car to make 874-mile tripNEED FOR SPEED How many points is...
    MEDICARE premiums are set to jump in 2022 by far more than what experts had estimated. The announcement came by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on November 12, 2021 - we explain what you need to know. 1Medicare premiums are on the rise How much are Medicare premiums going up by? Medicare's Part B standard premium is set to jump 14.5% in 2022, meaning those relying on the coverage will face an increase of more than $21 a month. In addition to the standard premium, the deductible for Part B will also increase next year, from $203 to $233. That's a 14.8% increase from 2021 to 2022. The Medicare Part A deductible is also on the rise and will go up by $72 to $1,556. The determining factor for Part B premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance rates is the Social Security Act, according to the CMS. Most read in MoneyPRETTY PENNY Check here to find out real value of your pocket changeIN DESPERATE NEED ‘Secret stimulus check’ sent out as calls grow for more mortgage reliefCASH TO COME...
    Getty New York Jets punter Braden Mann getting ready for another NFL contest. The New York Jets checked off several boxes on the roster formality sheet ahead of their Week 10 home matchup versus the Buffalo Bills. Gang Green placed offensive lineman Chuma Edoga on injured reserve. That’ll knock him out for a minimum for the next three weeks, but it could be longer. While he isn’t a full-time starter, Edoga is still a very important piece of the puzzle. The Jets are already down an offensive tackle with Mekhi Becton on the shelf so they’re left with George Fant and Morgan Moses. Both of those players have fared quite well, but they’re always one injury away from a next-man-up mentality. Well, that next guy up is unavailable for the foreseeable future which is hardly ideal. ALL the latest Jets news straight to your inbox! Join the Heavy on Jets newsletter here! Join Heavy on Jets! A Pair of Jets Returning to the Roster Play Official Jets Podcast: Braden Mann On The Biggest Differences Between Texas...
    These Gifts for Teens Are Perfect for Any Time of Year Ronald Koeman Fired After Barcelonas Defeat to Rayo Vallecano © Sam Wasson/Getty Images A general view shows a locked gate at the entrance to the Bonanza Creek Ranch on October 22, 2021 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Who believes that Rust — the Alec Baldwin movie that suspended production a week ago after the fatal shooting of the film’s cinematographer on a New Mexico set — will eventually be completed and released? The question isn’t the most important one following the accidental tragedy. Yet, it does inform the calculus on what’s to come. Most observers may not care about the millions of dollars put into this indie film. Very few are considering what it would be like for anyone in the cast and crew to get back on set and finish a Western that was reportedly about halfway through production before the Oct. 21 accident. Instead, most news stories that do point toward the future are speculating about the possibility of criminal charges and the potential for civil...
    FREE health insurance for unemployed workers is set to expire at the end of the month. Jobless workers have been able to stay on their previous employers plans through the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). 1Free insurance under the American Rescue package is set to expire on September 30 This was first signed into law by President Ronald Regan in 1985.  However, it's typically been an expensive option because individuals are responsible for not only their monthly premiums but the portion that their employers were paying as well. But thanks to the $1.9trillion American Rescue package, which was signed into law by President Joe Biden in March, workers without jobs were able to get free insurance through their previous employer for a limited time. This free insurance is coming to an end on September 30. It marks another blow for the unemployed, who lost their $300 unemployment benefits earlier this month. Around 7.5million were affected when those benefits expired over the Labor Day weekend, according to estimates by the Century Foundation. Most read in MoneyCASH COUNTER IRS deadline for October...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The recall election that once threatened to derail California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s political future has instead given it new life, offering a rare midterm vote of confidence that could fuel an ambitious legislative agenda featuring new coronavirus vaccine mandates, housing for the homeless and health insurance for people living in the country illegally. Nearly 64% of voters in the recall election voted to keep Newsom in office, according to early returns, giving him a larger margin of victory so far compared to his 2018 election. On Wednesday, one day after surviving the recall that a few months ago had him sweating, Newsom indicated he planned to go even bigger in 2022 as he heads into his reelection campaign. “When you face a recall … it sharpens your focus about time,” Newsom said. “Things that you may have looked at on the horizon and said, ‘You know over the next two, three years, we want to get this done,’ you start looking very differently and say, ‘What’s possible in the next two to three months?’” Newsom...
    salihkilic | iStock | Getty Images The federal government's subsidized health insurance coverage for those unemployed during the pandemic, facilitated through the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, or COBRA, will end this month. As a result, if you've been using that option, health advocates say now is the time to start thinking about other insurance options come October. The $1.9 trillion stimulus package passed in March, dubbed the American Rescue Plan, included a provision that offered many unemployed workers free health insurance coverage through COBRA for six months, starting April 1. COBRA allows people who leave a company to remain on their workplace insurance plan, but it's usually prohibitively expensive because it requires an individual to cover their own usual share of their monthly premium, plus the part their former employer was paying. The typical annual premium for job-based coverage in 2020 was $7,470 for individuals and $21,342 for families, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. More from Personal Finance:What Social Security funds' new depletion dates could mean for benefitsHow to invest with the environment in mindHow retirement plan tax breaks may widen racial wealth gaps There was...
    Dartanian Stovall looks at the house that collapsed with him inside during the height of Hurricane Ida in New Orleans.Michael DeMocker | USA TODAY Network via Reuters If you've winced at the destruction caused by Hurricane Ida along the Gulf Coast, you may want to consider whether you're prepared in case the next big storm hits your neighborhood. One part of that evaluation should be a review of the insurance coverage for your house. While homeowners policies cover some forms of damage caused by weather events, they don't cover everything. And, there may be different deductibles that apply depending on the particular cause of the damage. "Double check with your insurance agent," said Spencer Houldin, co-president of Ericson Insurance Advisors. "And don't do it two days before the storm hits because at that point, any requested changes probably won't be accepted."VIDEO2:5202:52Insurers prepare for massive damage assessments following Hurricane IdaSquawk on the StreetIda, which slammed into Louisiana on Sunday as a category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph, follows two other destructive storms in recent weeks — Fred...
    martin-dm | E+ | Getty Images When Covid-19 hit early last year and most travel ground to halt worldwide, would-be vacationers scrambled to get refunds from hotels, airlines, cruise lines and other travel suppliers — or to file travel insurance claims for canceled trips. They often hit a wall on both fronts. Suppliers struggled, or sometimes stonewalled, with refunds — making those without insurance wish they'd bought some. Meanwhile, the "insured" often discovered the plans they'd purchased didn't cover Covid-related travel or medical expenses. "People were trying to get their money back, trying to navigate through credits versus refunds, and put in travel insurance claims," said James Ferrara, co-founder and president of the Delray Beach, Florida-based InteleTravel network of some 60,000 home-based travel advisors. "They were also looking at travel insurance for their next [trip] and making sure that insurance would cover another occurrence of a pandemic because this all caught a lot of people by surprise — including the insurance industry." More from Personal Finance:Theme parks, fans still keen on high-tech tools developed during CovidHere's why you might want...
    BENSALEM, Pa. (CBS) — One day after parts of the area got more than 10 inches of rain, flooding has caused major damage to cars and homes, especially in Bucks County. The Red Cross has set up a temporary relief center at the Cornwells Fire Station to help families left without a home or a place to go. And unfortunately, so many of them still have so many unanswered questions. “The calls have been coming in all day today,” Southeastern Pennsylvania Red Cross Regional CEO Guy Triano said. At the Red Cross relief center set up inside the Maltese Center in Bensalem, families left without a home after Monday’s historic rain and flooding came to try to figure out what’s next. “They’re just trying to figure out a safe place right now and when they can get back and if they can get back,” Triano said. “I talked to the landlord. They don’t know what’s going on right now, everything is up in the air. You keep hearing that they are condemning it, that they are going to fix it,”...
    RealPeopleGroup | E+ | Getty Images If you're one of the millions of Americans who have quit their job in recent months, you may be eager to move on to whatever is next for you. Yet because our work and the rest of our lives are often interwoven in a number of important ways, you'll likely need to take a few steps before you can completely wash your hands of your old job. Here are some of them:Figuring out health insuranceNearly half of Americans get their health insurance through their employer. If you've just left your job, you'll want to figure out how to get new coverage as soon as possible. Most people who quit will lose their employer-sponsored health insurance at the end of the calendar month, said Laurel Lucia, director of the Health Care Program at the University of California Berkeley's Center for Labor Research and Education. If you don't have another job lined up that will provide health insurance, you may be eligible for Medicaid or a subsidized plan on the Affordable Care Act's marketplace. Medicaid typically...
    US increasingly unlikely to meet Bidens July 4 vax goal Bipartisan negotiators making progress on police reform bill LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KAIT/KARK) - The state board of finance met on Tuesday to discuss options on what they can do to keep public school employee’s insurance available. © KARK-TV The state of Arkansas is an estimated $70 million short related to public school employees’ benefits for the year 2022 According to a report from KARK, if nothing were to be done, the program will be short by an additional $70 million next year. Load Error The board discussed different ways to increase rates and benefit changes to bring revenues for the program up. “So what you’re looking at now is what I would consider a repeat, and it’s all based on what we’re seeing with the experience and utilization of the plan,” said Secretary of Education Johnny Key. Larry Walther, secretary of the Department of Finance and Administration, says that utilization of the program is on premature births, which are very expensive and can strain the plan as a...
    U.S. Senator Bernie SandersJemal Countess | Getty Images Sen. Bernie Sanders hopes to include a Medicare expansion in Democrats' upcoming economic recovery plan. The Vermont independent and Senate Budget Committee chair hopes to lower the eligibility age for coverage to either 60 or 55 from the current 65, a Sanders aide confirmed Friday. Sanders also wants to ensure Medicare covers dental visits and glasses, among other medical needs. He aims to fund the coverage expansion by allowing Medicare to negotiate prices directly with drug companies. Politico first reported the senator's plans. Sanders wants to include the provision in Democrats' next budget reconciliation bill, which can pass with no Republican votes in the Senate split 50-50 by party. The party may have to pass part or all of its sprawling infrastructure and economic recovery package — which could top $3 trillion — through the process. The GOP has generally opposed the growth of government-run health-care programs. President Joe Biden plans to unveil more details about his infrastructure proposal during a speech in Pittsburgh next week. Democrats want to address not only...
    Photo by engin akyurt on UnsplashThe levels of tragedy and loss caused by the COVID-19 pandemic are almost unimaginable to comprehend. Amidst the loss of 500,000 American lives, we’ve faced economic devastation, school closures, and socially isolating health measures― all leading to associated increases of stress, anxiety and depression. In less than a year, the COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare many harsh realities about our vulnerabilities as a society. That includes the unavoidable conclusion that our country requires sweeping transformations to ensure all Americans can have access to affordable health care. Fortunately, the rate of people with strong, baseline health insurance has remained very stable over the past year. As an industry, insurers rallied to make sure that access to COVID-related treatment and testing was widely available at no cost. And yet, we cannot be complacent. The good news is that updates to the Affordable Care Act in the COVID relief package signed Thursday by President Joe Biden will help millions more Americans achieve coverage. Trends over the last year show how public and private insurance can work together to...
    Ika84 | E+ | Getty Images It could become more affordable for laid-off workers to keep their employer-sponsored health insurance, thanks to a provision in the Covid relief bill making its way through Congress. As part of the $1.9 trillion stimulus package, the government would pay for former employees to maintain health coverage from their old job through COBRA, or the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. COBRA typically allows people who leave a company with 20 or more employees to pay to continue their workplace insurance plan for as long as 18 months. But the option tends to be pricey because individuals are now shouldering the entire cost of the plan without any company support. More from Personal Finance:Unemployed and eligible for Social Security? What you need to knowMore than half of Americans can't pass a basic quiz on Social SecurityHow the coronavirus pandemic is shaking retirement confidence The average annual premium for job-based coverage in 2020 was $7,470 for individuals and $21,342 for family coverage, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Now, the government would subsidize those costly premiums. How many Americans...
    Getty Images The latest updates to the $1.9 trillion federal coronavirus relief package could save millions of people from a surprise tax bill. The Senate on Saturday passed a version of the Covid relief package that is slightly different than the one passed by the House. Senate Democrats agreed to lower additional unemployment aid to $300 per week from $400 but extended the payments through the end of September. They also included a provision to waive taxes on the first $10,200 in unemployment income for those who made less than $150,000 in 2020. Making the first $10,200 of unemployment insurance income untaxable is aimed at keeping families from being hit with a surprise tax bill at a difficult time for many. In 2020, roughly 40 million Americans collected unemployment insurance benefits, according to a February research paper written by Brian Galle and Elizabeth Pancotti for The Century Foundation.   More from Invest in You:Lost jobs, no child care: A year into the pandemic, women are not OKThe IRS got 35 million tax returns in one week as Americans race to...
123