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    Bulloch County School district has switched back from its No/Moderate-Spread to its High-Spread COVID operating protocols: Based upon newly released data that indicate higher rates of community spread of COVID-19 and in conjunction with the Georgia Department of Public Health’s county indicator reports, the change was necessary. Superintendent Charles Wilson notified principals Tuesday evening before students returned for the first day of classes on Wednesday after the winter holiday break. Schools have implemented changes to limit large-group capacities to activities like recess, cafeteria services, and field trips. They will fully activate all other high-level protocols this week. Those include items such as more frequent sanitizing of facilities and social distancing on buses. “Up until now, the school district ​ has used the ​Department of Public Health’s COVID Indicator Reports which show a two-week picture,” said Superintendent of Schools Charles Wilson. “However, with the holidays, we have seen a rapid rise​,​ and the most recent numbers coming from the DPH Daily Reports (website was down Monday), along with the highly contagious...
    MinnPost file photo by Karl Pearson-CaterThis year’s school board elections faced an unprecedented level of scrutiny fueled by heated debate over masking mandates and critical race theory. With the election now over, the main outcome from Tuesday’s vote for Minnesota’s schools is an increase in funding from local taxpayers in many districts across the state. Now, with the dust settling, MinnPost spoke with education leaders to look ahead as to what the results means for schools. Here are the main takeaways: Ballot questions on funding schools through local taxes passed in a majority of districts — even in districts that had rejected similar questions in the past. Sixty-five districts across the state asked voters to approve or renew operating levies or to raise taxes to increase levies to help fund schools as they struggle to keep up with rising costs. Nearly two-thirds of the referendums passed, with 100 percent of the referendums passing in metro areas and 63 percent passing in rural areas. State funding has declined over the years (now only accounting for 65 percent of school funding), leaving...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — From teachers to food service workers to custodians, Anne Arundel County Public School leaders say the district is struggling to fill open roles. “We are hiring. It has been difficult. Our colleagues, both around the state and around the country, are suffering the same,” said George Arlotto, AACPS Superintendent of Schools. READ MORE: Anne Arundel County Board Of Education Approves $7.4M School Bus Driver PlanIn particular- those who take students to and from school, bus drivers. “On any given single day, we’ve got drivers that are in COVID quarantine or drivers on sick leave or other things. It’s sort of a very dynamic situation,” said Alex Szachnowicz, Chief Operating Officer, AACPS. READ MORE: 'It's Terrible': Frustrated Parents In Anne Arundel County React To School Bus Driver Shortages, Officials Say They Are Working To Resolve ProblemRight now, Anne Arundel County Public School’s Chief Operating Officer says the district is short about 60 bus drivers but, they’re doing everything they can to stay afloat and address the shortage. They have been consolidating routes, partnering up with the City...
    BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Baltimore City Schools announced their summer operating schedule. All traditional schools and the district office will be open Monday through Thursday from June 21 until July 30.  They will be closed on June 25 and July 2, 5, 9, 16, and 23. Beginning Aug. 2, the district will resume operating five days a week. Summer programs in traditional schools will operate on Monday through Thursday. City school meal sits will resume on June 28. More information can be found here: https://www.baltimorecityschools.org/meals.
    NEWARK, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Students can expect to be in school a lot more going forward in New Jersey’s largest city. “Today, we announce that we have every single school in Newark offering four days of in-person instruction with a few planning for a full week,” an official said Tuesday. READ MORE: Police: Jarrod Powell Arrested In Vicious Attack On Asian Man In East Harlem Earlier this month, students returned to classrooms for the first time in more than a year. READ MORE: Child Tax Credit: How Much Money Can Parents Expect In Monthly Payments? Schools have been operating on a hybrid model and prior to Tuesday were operating at two in-person days per week. COVID-19 safety protocols remain in place. Students have their temperatures checked, their hands and shoes sanitized, and face masks are required. MORE NEWS: Neighbors Remember NYPD Officer Anastasios Tsakos As Loving Father Who Lent A Hand School officials said they are looking forward to a full reopening in September.
    School districts in counties where a majority of voters cast their ballots for Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election are more likely to have students back in classrooms, according to a website that tracks reopenings.  The Return to Learn Tracker – a joint venture between the American Enterprise Institute and Davidson College – is monitoring more than 8,000 public school districts as to whether they are operating with full in-person, hybrid or remote-only instruction.  As of mid-March, 49% of school districts in counties that voted for Trump are operating fully in-person, while 47% are hybrid and 4% are remote-only.  Schools districts in counties that voted in favor of Donald Trump during last year's presidential election are more likely now to be offering fully in-person learning, according to data from the Return to Learn Tracker. (Fox News) WHERE ARE SCHOOLS REOPENING FROM CORONAVIRUS CLOSURES? SEE THE MAP  That is compared to just 18% of districts in majority-Biden counties that are operating fully in-person, the data shows. In those areas, 64% of districts are opting for a hybrid learning model, while 17% remain remote-only.  Last July, Trump said his administration would "very much put pressure" on governors to...
    A new website has been created to show how school districts across the U.S. are tackling one of the biggest challenges in education: reopening classrooms during the coronavirus pandemic.  The Return to Learn Tracker – a joint venture between the American Enterprise Institute and Davidson College – is monitoring more than 8,000 public school districts as to whether they are operating with full in-person, hybrid or remote-only instruction.  As of mid-March, Florida leads the nation with 100% of its districts operating fully in-person, followed by Georgia with 86.1% and Nebraska with 81.7%, the data shows.  More in-person learning is happening in Florida compared to any other state in the U.S., the data shows. (Fox News) CALIFORNIA STATE LAWMAKER PROPOSES PROGRAM TO HELP PARENTS WITH OUT-OF-POCKET REMOTE LEARNING COSTS  Overall, states across the South and Southeast are offering the most full-time, in-person learning.  Hawaii leads the hybrid category with all of its districts operating in that capacity, followed by North Carolina with 96.5% and Massachusetts with 92.7%. Nearly all districts being tracked in states like North Carolina are operating in a hybrid model. (Fox News) CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP  The state taking the most cautious approach to reopening is...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff BUTLER, Pa. (KDKA) — Secondary students at Butler Area School District will continue remote instruction this week, according to the district’s superintendent. In a letter to parents dated Nov. 5, Superintendent Dr. Brian J. White Jr. said that while elementary students, students in special education and students at Center Avenue Community School would proceed with in-person learning, secondary students would still learn from home. Butler Area School District moved middle and high school students to online-only instruction on Oct. 30 amid rising coronavirus cases in the district. At that time, the district said that it would evaluate whether it was safe for secondary students to return to school in-person on Friday, Nov. 6. Related: Butler Area School District Moving Middle And High School Students Online-Only Dr. White Jr. wrote on Nov. 5 that he intended to adjust the district’s Operating Status Chart to include hybrid/cohort instruction for secondary students when community spread of the coronavirus is at 41-80 cases per 100,000 people within the district. He said that this would allow for half...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A referendum that would have significantly boosted spending per pupil in a minority-majority southern Minnesota school district has failed. Voters in Austin did not approve an operaterating referendum that would have lifted spending per student from $42 to nearly $550. According to the Minnesota Secretary of State’s Office, 966 voters approved the referendum while 1,018 voted against it. The results are with 100% of the precincts reporting as of Wednesday morning. District officials said before Election Day that if the referendum were to fail it would mean a likely increase in class sizes and cuts to English language instructors and programs. Austin has seen its enrollment grow by about 1,000 students over the last decade. Many of those students come from immigrant families who’ve found work in the city’s packing plants. The last time an operating referendum passed in Austin was in 2003. The Minnesota state average operating referendum is currently about $1,000 per student, district officials say.
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — It’s not just candidates on the ballot this election season, school referendums are up for vote too. Thirty-three school districts are seeking operating levies in Minnesota. In Austin, the school district is asking for an operating referendum for the first time since 2003. “Right now we are one of 27 or 30 districts in the state with a minority-majority population,” said Superintendent Dave Krenz. Over the past decade, Krenz has watched Austin’s school enrollment grow by about a thousand. Many of those incoming students are from immigrant families who found work at packing plants in the city. “Our operating referendum is very low, only at $42 a pupil. The state average is $1040 per pupil,” said Lori Volz, Executive Director of Finance and Operations. During a pandemic and Presidential election year, the district is asking taxpayers to help close that gap. The referendum on the table would take them from $42 per student to nearly $550 per student. If the referendum passes the owner of a $125,000 home in Austin would pay just under $10 a month....
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo threatened to yank state funding for New York City public and private religious schools on Tuesday after television cameras busted yeshivas operating in the southern Brooklyn coronavirus “red zone” in violation of new shutdown orders. “If these schools are operating, it’s easy enough to find out — N.J. Burkett [of WABC-TV, Channel 7] did it, Gothamist did it,” Cuomo told reporters during a telephone press briefing. “You’d think the local government would have the capacity to do it. If they do not, we will withhold funding from the local government.” Cuomo also threatened to withhold state funding for the private schools caught operating in the red zones, adding that the state would be “commencing with withholding funding against those schools.” His staff did not immediately respond to questions about which programs he was threatening to withhold state funding from or to provide a list of the religious schools caught flouting new state rules aimed at containing the borough’s COVID-19 outbreak. The latest funding threats from Cuomo came just hours after reporters from Channel 7 and the WNYC-owned...
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo threatened to yank state funding for New York City public and private religious schools on Tuesday after television cameras busted yeshivas operating in the southern Brooklyn coronavirus ‘red zone’ in violation of new shutdown orders. “If these schools are operating, it’s easy enough to find out — N.J. Burkett [of WABC-TV, Channel 7] did it, Gothamist did it,” Cuomo told reporters during a telephone press briefing. “You’d think the local government would have the capacity to do it. If they do not we will withhold finding from the local government.” Cuomo also threatened to withhold state funding for the private schools caught operating in the red zones, adding that the state would be “commencing with withholding funding against those schools.” His staff did not immediately respond to questions about which programs he was threatening to withhold state funding from or to provide a list of the religious schools caught flouting new state rules meant at containing the borough’s COVID-19 outbreak. The latest funding threats from Cuomo came just hours after reporters from Channel 7 and the WNYC-owned...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — After six months away, kids were back on campus at Sierra Canyon in Chatsworth on Tuesday. The private school welcomed its elementary students back for a half-day academic camp. After six months away, kids were back on campus at Sierra Canyon in Chatsworth on Tuesday. (CBSLA) “We were hoping this would be the outcome, and we’re so happy to be here,” said one parent after dropping their student off. Students got their temperatures taken as the exited their cars, and everyone was wearing a mask. “They did a successful camp over the summer, so I’m very comfortable with this move,” another parent said. Los Angeles County schools — public and private — are still prohibited from in-person learning. However, some private schools have found a way to welcome students back, despite the current health orders. “DPH has received anecdotal reports of private schools who wish to operate as day camps while schools are closed to in-person instruction,” said the L.A. County Department of Public Health in a statement. “An entity does not need permission of DPH in...
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