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    Astronomers at the United States National Science Foundation and the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration announced on Thursday that they have successfully photographed the supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Thursday's mindblowing breakthrough will be published in a forthcoming special issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. The colossal object, known as Sagittarius A*, is located 27,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius. It was first discovered in 1974 by Bruce Balick of the Astronomy Department at the University of Washington in Seattle and Cornell University's Robert Brown. Sagittarius A*'s properties were later confirmed in the 1990s by a world-renowned group of researchers – Andrea Ghez, an astrophysicist and professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles, Reinhard Genzel of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany, and the University of California Berkeley, and Oxford University's Sir Roger Penrose. Using radio telescopes to peer through the haze of interstellar dust that absorbs visible light, Ghez, Genzel, and Penrose observed stars...
    Scientists unveiled the first picture of the black hole that forms the heart of the Milky Way galaxy Thursday during a press conference hosted by the National Science Foundation with the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration in Washington, D.C. The image is the product of a team effort by the Event Horizon Telescope, or EHT Collaboration, and it was brought to life using a worldwide network of radio telescopes, according to a release from the NSF. The price tag for the effort was about $60 million, with approximately $28 million coming from the NSF, according to a report. TOM BRADY TO JOIN FOX SPORTS AS LEAD NFL ANALYST AFTER RETIREMENT The picture of the black hole, named Sagittarius A*, is proof that such a body sits at the center of the galaxy, and it can offer scientists a myriad of clues about how celestial giants operate. According to the release, the black hole itself cannot be seen, but the glowing gas represents its "telltale signature," which is a dark central area adorned with a...
    For the first time, astronomers have captured an image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. It’s the first direct observation confirming the presence of the black hole, known as Sagittarius A*, as the beating heart of the Milky Way. Black holes don’t emit light, but the image shows the shadow of the black hole surrounded by a bright ring of light, which is bent by the gravity of the black hole. Astronomers say the black hole is 4 million times more massive than our sun. It has taken years for astronomers to capture and confirm this image and discovery. Previously, scientists observed stars orbiting some invisible, massive object at the galactic center. The discovery was made possible by more than 300 researchers from 80 institutions working with a network of eight different radio telescopes around the globe that comprise the Event Horizon Telescope. The telescope is named after the “event horizon,” the point at which no light can escape from a black hole. The-CNN-Wire ™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company....
    Three years ago, scientists revealed that they had “seen what we thought was unseeable”: a picture of a black hole. In reality, we can’t outright see a black hole—an object so dense that light cannot escape it. But what the team at the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) managed to do was capture its bright silhouette, composed of extremely hot, super-charged gas and plasma that swirls around the black hole’s “event horizon,” or the point of no return. On Thursday, the EHT told the world it had gone a step further and taken the first ever photo of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole that sits at the center of the Milky Way. “This is the first image of the supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy,” Sera Markoff, an astronomer and EHT team member based at the University of Amsterdam, told reporters Thursday. “Today, we have direct evidence that this object is a black hole.” The 2019 announcement was of the supermassive black hole at the center of Messier 87 (or M87), a galaxy 53 million...
    (CNN)For the first time, astronomers have captured an image of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. It's the first direct observation confirming the presence of the black hole, known as Sagittarius A*, as the beating heart of the Milky Way. Black holes don't emit light, but the image shows the shadow of the black hole surrounded by a bright ring of light, which is bent by the gravity of the black hole. Astronomers say the black hole is 4 million times more massive than our sun.It has taken years for astronomers to capture and confirm this image and discovery. Previously, scientists observed stars orbiting some invisible, massive object at the galactic center.The discovery was made possible by more than 300 researchers from 80 institutions working with a network of eight different radio telescopes around the globe that comprise the Event Horizon Telescope. The telescope is named after the "event horizon," the point at which no light can escape from a black hole.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Astronomers reveal 1st image of the massive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Copyright © 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Astronomers have discovered an odd presence at the center of the Milky Way galaxy that is blocking cosmic rays that they don't quite understand. Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the density of cosmic rays in the central molecular zone (CMZ) is significantly lower than the surrounding 'sea' of cosmic rays. It's possible that the solar masses in the CMZ (about 60 million of them) are indeed molecular clouds and they are blocking the cosmic rays. 'We conclude that the CMZ should indeed play a role to block [cosmic rays] from entering into the very center region,' researchers wrote in the study. Astronomers have discovered a presence at the center of the Milky Way galaxy that is blocking cosmic rays. Last year, NASA took an infrared image of the center of the galaxy (pictured), spanning a distance of over 600 light-years 'Several mechanisms can impede [cosmic rays] penetration into molecular clouds, such as the effect of magnetic field compression and the self-excited magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.' 'Taking an analogy of the solar modulation effect where low-energy [cosmic rays] are...
    Earth is closer to a supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy that previously believed, new data reveals. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) found our planet is 2,000 light years closer to Sagittarius A. The initial analysis projected Earth was initially 27,700 light years away, but it is only 25,800 light years away. Along with being closer to the black hole, the new data shows Earth is orbiting the Galactic Center of the Milky Way 141 miles per second faster.  Although the findings may spark fear around the world, the results are due to new observation data that created a better model of our galaxy. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) found our planet is 2,000 light years closer to Sagittarius A. The initial analysis projected Earth was initially 27,700 light years away, but now it is only 25,800 light years away. Pictured is a new position and velocity map of the Milky Way The first projection was captured in 1985 by the International Astronomical Union, but the Japanese radio astronomy project...
    Map of the position and velocity of the Milky Way galaxy. The arrows show the position and velocity data for 224 objects used to model the Milky Way galaxy. Solid black lines show the positions of the spinning arms of the galaxy. Colors represent groups of objects that belong to the same hand. The background is a simulation image. Credit: NAOJ Earth reached a speed of 7 km / h (~ 16,000 mi), close to the miracle of 2000 light years Black hole In the center Milky Way Galaxy. But don’t worry, this does not mean that our planet is moving towards the black hole. Instead, the changes are the result of a better model of the Milky Way galaxy based on new observational data, including a list of objects observed for more than 15 years by the Japanese radio astronomical program VERA. VERA (Radio Astrometry’s VLBI Study, “VLBI” stands for Longest Baseline Interferometry) was launched in 2000 to map three-dimensional velocity and spatial structures in the Milky Way. VERA uses a technique called interferometry to combine data from radio...
    (CNN)A new map of the Milky Way by Japanese space experts has put Earth 2,000 light years closer to the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.This map has suggested that the center of the Milky Way, and the black hole which sits there, is located 25,800 light-years from Earth. This is closer than the official value of 27,700 light-years adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 1985, the release said. New type of black hole detected in massive collision that sent gravitational waves with a bangWhat's more, according to the map, our solar system is traveling at 227 kilometers per second as it orbits around the galactic center -- this is faster than the official value of 220 kilometers per second, the release added. These updated values are a result of more than 15 years of observations by the Japanese radio astronomy project VERA, according to an announcement released Thursday from the National Observatory of Japan. VERA is short for VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry and refers to the mission's array of telescopes, which use Very Long...
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