Monday, May 16, 2022 - 14:18:32
11 results - (0.007 seconds)

For many that can:

Contact Newsletter-online.com: [NewsMag]

latest news at page 1:
1
    The star of French horror film Titane has defended the film, despite audiences being left so repulsed by it that many have 'fainted' during graphically violent scenes.  The movie tells the tale of a woman called Alexia (played by Agathe Rousselle, 33), a dancer at car shows who has a titanium plate in her head following a car accident.  Fixated on vehicles, the murderous heroine has sex with a car, becomes pregnant and gives birth to the resulting monster.  Audiences from around the world have been left shocked by the graphic film, with dozens walking out and falling ill at premieres around the world. However Agathe has brushed off any controversy, telling The Times: 'If it had been a male director — Tarantino, Cronenberg, anyone — it would’ve been less surprising.  Agathe Rousselle, star of French horror film Titane has defended the film, despite audiences being left so repulsed by it that many have 'fainted' during graphically violent scenes 'And we’re so used to men being violent and making violent movies. It’s kind of time for men to know that women...
    Prince Harry today claimed that people around the world 'stuck in jobs that don't bring them joy' should quit to put their mental health and happiness first. The Duke of Sussex said that 'with self-awareness comes the need for change' and that the many job resignations during the pandemic 'aren't all bad'. Harry added that the world was at the 'beginning of the mental health awakening' and people putting happiness before their job was 'something to be celebrated'. He was speaking in an interview with US business magazine Fast Company about his role as 'chief impact officer' with California-based mental health start-up BetterUp. And Harry's comments will be seen as a reference to how he and wife Meghan Markle stepped down as senior royals last year and left Britain for North America. The Duke of Sussex was unveiled in March as the chief impact officer at BetterUp with this corporate black and white photograph of him released at the same time The Duke and Duchess of Sussex leave the Commonwealth Service at Westminster Abbey in London on March 9 last...
    kate_sept2004 | E+ | Getty Images Putting away enough savings for retirement has always been a struggle for many Americans. One reason workers tend to fall short: They often dip into the money they have set aside for their golden years. Now, some experts and lawmakers are discussing one idea that could help workers avoid that – by enabling employers to offer emergency savings plans. The programs would work similarly to retirement savings programs many employers already offer, allowing employees to save for unforeseen events alongside the long-term funds dedicated to their later years. The idea surfaced at a recent Senate hearing on retirement security. The discussion painted a grim picture of where some Americans are with regard to retirement preparation. More from Personal Finance:A Roth IRA could help you buy a home. Here's what to knowWill your child's school mandate Covid vaccinations?You don't need to be ultra-wealthy to consider a prenup "We were facing a retirement crisis before Covid-19," Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said. "But, as with so many other things, this pandemic has just poured gasoline on the...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci issued a bleak warning to the nation on the future of eradicating the coronavirus, saying herd immunity is unlikely if too many people refuse to receive a coronavirus vaccine. In an interview with the nonprofit think tank the Aspen Institute, Fauci warned that the anti-vaccine movement could lead to reluctance for some people to get vaccinated for the coronavirus once a vaccine is developed. "There is a general anti-science, anti-authority, anti-vaccine feeling among some people in this country, an alarmingly large percentage of people relatively speaking," said the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases. The government says herd immunity, or community immunity, is an "important" reason to get vaccinated. "Germs can travel quickly through a community and make a lot of people sick. If enough people get sick, it can lead to an outbreak. But when enough people are vaccinated against a certain disease, the germs can’t travel as easily from person to person — and the entire community is less likely to get the disease," the Health and Human Services Department says on its vaccines...
    No wonder so many of us are talking about comfort-eating through the corona crisis — it’s completely understandable. These days, which of us would blame anyone for reaching for the biscuits more often than usual? While stress, anxiety and boredom levels have increased for many of us, so has the ease with which we can try to calm ourselves with carbs. And, of course, the fridge is pretty much always within reach. Or maybe you have been doing bigger shops than usual to avoid popping to the supermarket so often — and are finding yourselves digging into your stockpile a little more often than expected. Meanwhile, most of us are finding ourselves less active than before — our sedentary lives at home contrasting sharply with the demands and distractions of a busy day dashing from place to place. Shahroo Izadi who has penned a book offering advice to overhaul eating habits, shared effective exercises for overcoming comfort eating (file image) Some of us can comfort-eat quite happily — and if it’s working for you, then that’s absolutely fine. But...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — As the 4th of July approaches, many people are looking forward to the notorious firework shows that take place across the country. While people enjoy the loud noises and bright colors, the firework shows are quite scary for animals. Carol Erickson, animal advocate for the PSPCA, is reminding pet owners fireworks can cause animals to run away in fear ahead of the holiday weekend. “It’s terrifying for so many animals and of course the fireworks go on long before the 4th of July. So make sure you pay attention and that your animal is secured so that they cannot get out. This is a big time for runaways,” Erickson said. She added that the noise during thunderstorms can also scare your animals. Erickson is also reminding pet owners to make sure they keep their pets cool during the summer so they don’t overheat. Eyewitness News was at the Philadelphia Brewing Company on Saturday where the PSPCA partnered with the North Shore Animal League for an adoption RV. After rescuing more than 100 cats last week, the PSPCA...
    Last week, police in the small town of Moundsville, West Virginia received a military vehicle designed to withstand mines. The Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle was given to the town (population 9,318 in the 2010 census) by the federal government as part of the “1033 program,” which distributes surplus military gear to local law enforcement agencies. As we engage in a national dialog about reforming police, we should ask not only why a small town with two murders since 2005 would need such a vehicle, but how such military gear and tactics affect who chooses to become a police officer. De-militarizing our police should simply be about taking away gear that is too often used to conduct violent raids on nonviolent suspects; it should be about reforming the mindset, held by too many officers, that they are soldiers going to war against their fellow citizens. After the unrest in Ferguson in 2014, the militarization of police became a rightful object of criticism and concern. Why do our police increasingly look like soldiers in a warzone? Why do police average around...
    For lunch today I am eating a fillet of grilled fresh trout with a soy glaze, served with wasabi mayonnaise. It is a dish that now forms part of my weekly menu plan. As a food writer and chef, I thought I had always eaten well: in season, fresh, organic food, and not too much fat. But three years ago I was sitting in my GP’s surgery and was astonished to discover I was missing one vital ingredient. ‘You will be taking this for life,’ he said, writing a prescription for a vitamin D supplement 3.2 times higher than those normally available in pharmacies. I had arrived there, due to feeling tired and a bit ‘down’, and experiencing achy legs, expecting the blood tests he had taken two weeks earlier to have shown a thyroid or blood sugar problem. But at the back of my mind was something more sinister. I was 54 and entering that period when a health check will be accompanied by thoughts of cancer. So, when he announced I had the lowest vitamin D level of...
    The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's tell-all book has been denied.  Judge Royce Lamberth denied the request to block the sale of the former national security adviser's memoir, 'The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir' in a ruling Saturday.   Lamberth, a Reagan appointee, heard arguments Friday over Zoom from Bolton's lawyer Charles Cooper and Deputy Assistant Attorney General David Morrell, representing the government.  This came after the Trump administration sued Bolton on Tuesday in order to postpone the release of his book because of concerns that classified information could be exposed The book was leaked to the media the next day.  It contains a number of explosive claims about President Trump, including that he asked China for help with his re-election bid - a move similar to how Trump interacted with Ukraine, which led to him being impeached.   The Justice Department's attempt to block the release of John Bolton's (left) tell-all book has been denied. The book makes some explosive claims about President Trump (right) The federal judge ruled in favor of...
    Speaking on a landline, the patient complained of an itchy eye. On the call’s other end, physician Carla Harwell considered the possibilities, from seasonal allergies to vision-damaging herpes. Luckily, the elderly patient’s daughter was visiting during the phone consultation, so Harwell asked her to text a picture of her mom’s eye. The photo shocked Harwell. It was the worst case of bacterial conjunctivitis the doctor had ever seen. Without the picture, Harwell would have told the octogenarian patient to call back in a few days or come to her office, risking an in-patient visit during the Covid-19 pandemic. She certainly wouldn’t have prescribed the antibacterial eye drops needed to treat the infection. “I probably would not have prescribed anything,” Harwell says. “That’s a scary thought.” Read all of our coronavirus coverage here. Amid the coronavirus pandemic, more of the nation’s medical care is being delivered by telephone or videoconference, as in-person care becomes a last resort for both doctors and patients. That’s a problem for tens of millions of Americans without smartphones or speedy home internet connections. For them,...
    It's now abundantly clear that the coronavirus impacts African Americans at a disturbingly disproportionate rate. This is both an effect of America's widening racial wealth gap and a cause likely to further expand that very divide. As Steven Brown, a research associate at the Urban Institute domestic policy research organization told CNN, "When white America catches a cold, black America catches pneumonia." In Chicago, for instance, African Americans make up over 50 percent of those who have tested positive for coronavirus but represent only a third of the population. In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, the situation is worse: representing only 26 percent of the population, African Americans make up 70 percent of coronavirus deaths. This situation is similar for some other minority populations in America. While it's essential to treat the immediate symptoms of these impacts, we must also address the deeper cause of this increased vulnerability among people of color. As the chief diversity officer at John Hopkins Medicine, Sherita Golden M.D., says, in order to truly fight "racial disparity in the COVID-19 pandemic," we must "mitigate economic inequality." We...
1