Wednesday, May 18, 2022 - 21:17:55
55 results - (0.009 seconds)

and many cases:

Contact Newsletter-online.com: [NewsMag]

latest news at page 1:
123
    America's outbreak of mysterious hepatitis will continue 'throughout the summer' and many cases are already undiagnosed, a top virologist warned Friday — as the global death toll hit 12 with five fatalities in the United States. Scientists are puzzled by the cause, but leading theories suggest a type of adenovirus spread by touching feces-contaminated surfaces is behind the illness. Dr Matthew Binnicker, the director of clinical virologist at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, told DailyMail.com cases will continue to crop up throughout the year as its transmission does not 'tend to be seasonal'. He warned schools and day care centers — where many children mix — were major hubs for spreading the virus. Dr Binnicker also warned many hepatitis cases among children remain undiagnosed in the U.S. because, in some cases, children will not have been unwell enough for their parents to take them to a doctor or hospital. The majority of children with the mysterious hepatitis in the U.S. have tested positive for adenovirus, but it is not clear whether the virus itself is causing the illness or the...
    Up to ten million Americans may be suffering from Alpha-gal Syndrome (AGS), which triggers an allergy to red meat, estimates suggest — but many cases are go undiagnosed because of the long time it takes the allergy to present symptoms. The condition is normally sparked by bites from the lone star tick — identified by the white spot on its back — that lives in wooded areas across the western U.S. Bites from other ticks like the black-legged tick have not been ruled out as causes either. The AGS awareness campaign says that up to three percent of Americans — or about ten million people — in some areas may be sufferers, but that the vast majority are un-diagnosed.  Dr Jonathan Oliver, a public health expert at Minnesota University, told DailyMail.com that the bug's saliva contains molecules that look similar to those from red meat. This means that when the immune system attacks the saliva, it also develops cells that target molecules from red meat — triggering the allergy. Most tick bites do not lead to the illness, Oliver said, but he warned...
    (CNN)As Covid-19 numbers reach pandemic lows across the United States, many Covid-19 testing sites have begun closing their doors.Some testing sites have been open for almost two years, many seeing hundreds or even thousands of people a day. Now, home tests are more readily available, and demand for testing sites is falling.Sarah Henderson, director of the Public Health Services Division of the Haywood County Health and Human Services Agency in North Carolina, says most states will see closures soon, if they haven't already."We were seeing an excess of 100 patients at our testing site in the first few days [of January], which doesn't sound like a lot, but our community is very small," Henderson said. "The last couple of weeks, we have seen single digits every day. I certainly won't speak for other counties, but I think we're probably heading in that direction where if they're not closing down, they're decreasing hours and staff." There is no magic moment to lift Covid-19 restrictions, researchers sayHenderson cited the difficulty of keeping sites staffed as a big part of the decision. Federal...
    (CNN)As Covid-19 hospitalizations reach new highs, more states and health care systems are cutting back services and relying on National Guard members to fill gaps in staffing.The surge from the Omicron variant, which was first detected in the US just over six weeks ago, has left frontline workers in the medical industry and others at higher risk for exposure. As health care employees need time off to isolate and recuperate, the need to treat those with Covid-19 remains. In Washington state, Gov. Jay Inslee said Thursday that hospitals will temporarily halt non-urgent procedures "so as much capacity and staff can be dedicated to emergent needs, the people who need this right now." Supreme Court blocks nationwide vaccine and testing mandate for large businesses, allows health care worker vaccine mandate to take effectMore than 155,900 Americans are hospitalized with Covid-19, according to data Thursday from the US Department of Health and Human Services, surpassing records set in last winter's surge. And hospitals are needing additional people to help provide care. In Wisconsin, National Guard members will be trained as certified nursing...
    (CNN)Many countries in Latin America were hit with soaring Covid-19 death rates early in the pandemic, as coronavirus raged throughout the region. The tide is turning in many Latin American nations today, where vaccination rates are outpacing countries in Europe and North America and helping drive down deaths.The vaccine rollout was slow at the start, with just getting the vaccines in hand a major issue. Just six months ago, Latin America and the Caribbean were reporting just under half of all Covid-19 related deaths worldwide. Now, the region accounts for about 10% of Covid-19 related deaths, according to the latest data from Johns Hopkins University.That's due to the accelerated delivery of European, American, Chinese and homegrown vaccines that a number of Latin American nations have received in the second half of this year, according to Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) data. Cuba, Chile and Brazil are among the top ten countries globally in terms of those fully vaccinated, according to statistics compiled by PAHO. Cuba vaccinates children as young as 2 in strategy to reopen schools, economyOne reason for...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — On Tuesday, Mayor Eric Garcetti updated residents on the COVID-19 pandemic and Omicron as well as reminding everyone how to be safe during the holiday season.  “This is a crucial time, I’m exhausted too,” said Garcetti. “If you have guests make sure they’re [vaccinated].  READ MORE: Residents Near Bobcat Fire Burn Scar Brace For Yet Another Storm With Potential Debris and Mud FlowsGarcetti pushed for residents to protect themselves by getting vaccinated and boosted as well as getting tested as frequently as possible. He also said that testing frequently will allow residents to know about their status in real-time.  “You can get free testing at Dodger Stadium, and South L.A. and Highland Park,” he said. “In-home testing in January will be available, 500 million of those tests to Americans who can take those tests at home.” He asked residents to stay vigilant by maintaining social distancing when possible and wearing masks while indoors because especially with the highly-contagious Omicron variant looming.  READ MORE: With Spike In Omicron Infections About To Converge With The Holidays, COVID-19 Booster...
    As at home COVID-19 tests become increasingly popular in the U.S., they are causing a blind spot for many public health officials' contact tracing efforts as results typically are not reported to authorities. Rapid antigen tests such as Abbott's BinaxNOW can be purchased over the counter and taken at home, and consumers aren't required to report their results.  When a person takes a PCR test, for comparison, the results are analyzed in a laboratory and positive tests are reported to health officials. One researcher estimates that about 40 million Covid tests are performed each week, 28 million of which are rapid antigen tests - and the majority of those are taken at home, according to STAT News. The unreported test results can make it hard for public health officials to perform contact tracing or identify outbreaks, such as an outbreak at a Halloween weekend of concerts in Las Vegas. Still, experts say that making at home tests widely available is a key strategy for controlling the virus's spread, as the tests can provide people with quick and actionable information about...
    CIVIL rights attorney Ben Crump has experience in law for over 25 years and has won more than 200 cases relating to police brutality. Crump is the founder of the Tallahassee, Florida-based law firm Ben Crump Law, and is only licensed to practice law in the state of Florida.  2Ben Crump is a Florida based civil rights and personal injury attorney Who is Ben Crump? Benjamin Lloyd Crump, 52, is an American attorney who specializes in civil rights and personal injury cases.  He is the founder and president of Ben Crump Law in Florida, with over 10 associates in his legal staff representing the firm and clients.  Crump attended Florida State University and received his bachelor's degree in criminal justice in 1992, and his Juris Doctor in 1995. He has been practicing law for nearly 25 years. 2Crump has been an attorney for nearly 25 yearsCredit: Alamy Live News Most read in US NewsSNAP THEORY Gabby fiance's cause of death STILL unknown after sleuths claim a gator ate himDEATH RIDDLE Brian Laundrie 'had an American-flag covered gun in his bedroom,'...
    Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas admitted Sunday that the vast majority of Haitian migrants who crossed the southern U.S. border in recent weeks have already been released into the United States, and it is possible that more will follow them. So far, approximately 12,400 of the people are having their cases heard by immigration judges, while another 5,000 are being processed by the Department of Homeland Security. Currently,, only 3,000 are in detention. "Approximately, I think it's about ten thousand or so, twelve thousand," Mayorkas told "Fox News Sunday" when asked how many have already been released. He then acknowledged that this number could very well go up as the 5,000 other cases are processed. "It could be even higher. The number that are returned could be even higher. What we do is we follow the law as Congress has passed it," Mayorkas said. The secretary said the administration "will make determinations whether they will be returned to Haiti based on our public health and public interest authorities."
    U.S. states with the lowest vaccination rates are recording many more deaths from COVID-19 than their highly vaccinated peers.  A DailyMail.com analysis finds that 10 states - Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, Tennessee, West Virginia and Wyoming - with the lowest vaccination rates accounted for 73.9 deaths per 100,000 residents, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). By comparison, the 10 states with the highest vaccination rates - Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington - recorded 18.9 deaths per 100,000 residents. That means Americans living in the least vaccinated states are dying at a rate nearly four times as high as those in the most vaccinated states.  It comes as data show three states in the South, Alabama, Georgia and Texas are responsible for one-third of the more than 10,000 deaths in the nation last week.  Experts say that fatalities are a lagging indicator and often don't start to decline until three or four weeks after cases and hospitalizations do, which means that...
    OAKLAND (KPIX) — Whether traveling by road or in the sky, KPIX on Friday discovered many people weren’t about to put their Labor Day holiday weekend plans on hold. This Labor Day, AAA predicts a record number of people at California beaches. But it’s not just wildfires threatening weekend plans. READ MORE: SFPD Arrest Armed Suspect Following Confrontation Outside School The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a warning this week for even vaccinated travelers to think twice about going anywhere as COVID-19 cases climb worldwide. “People need to take these risks into their own consideration as they think about traveling,” said CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky. “First and foremost, if you are unvaccinated, we would recommend not traveling.” “I thought there would be smoky skies here. I was a little bit concerned,” said one traveler who just arrived in Oakland. Bertha Ansley was traveling from Albuquerque in New Mexico and has never been to California. She flew in to Oakland to visit a friend she hasn’t seen in years. “I’m happy and this is something I’m checking this...
    CNN’s Jim Acosta tore into “so-called leaders” on Saturday for dividing public trust in the Covid-19 vaccine and masking. With a chyron that read, “Why Aren’t We on the Same Team When it Comes to Covid?” Acosta began by noting several prominent athletes, such as Kirk Cousins and Lamar Jackson, have declined to disclose their vaccination status, calling it a personal decision. “Now, it would be really cathartic to sit here and go off on multimillionaire athletes acting like spoiled brats,” Acosta said. “But why attack them? They too live in this country. And too many of us have been subjected to Covid lies and anti-science hatred for well over a year.” Acosta then played a clip of parents protesting a school’s mask mandate in Tennessee, before pivoting his attention to Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) and Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL). Responding to comments from Greene earlier in the week that humans “can’t live forever” and getting sick is normal, Acosta said, “Yes, we can’t live forever. But that doesn’t mean we have to die now. You can get a vaccine and...
    It is a nightmare scenario: a mutation that makes the Covid virus both more contagious and more deadly. Could this be true of the Delta variant currently sweeping across the world? Looking at British figures for hospitalisations and deaths, the answer seems to be a reassuring no. It's true that this form of the virus is 40 to 60 per cent more transmissible, but new infections seem to be dropping in many areas and the number of people suffering with severe Covid illness has remained low.  Those who have ended up in hospital are, predominantly, unvaccinated. With almost 75 per cent of UK adults now double-jabbed, this is a minority that's rapidly shrinking. But a very different picture is emerging in America where, in some states, Covid is surging to record highs. In the press it is being called 'the Delta disaster', fuelled by the perfect storm of eased restrictions, a low vaccination uptake and this highly infectious variant. It is a nightmare scenario: a mutation that makes the Covid virus both more contagious and more deadly. Could this...
    The light at the end of the pandemic tunnel may be in sight with more than half of American adults vaccinated against COVID-19, but now experts say the virus will never be truly eradicated.  Instead of ending, COVID-19 will step down to an endemic disease, that circulates the globe annually, but less fatally, predicts Dr Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic professor of infectious diseases.  'We are going to continue to live with this virus,' he told DailyMail.com.  'We could have solved it. Instead it will always be with us.'  Dr Poland echoed warnings from experts like Dr Anthony Fauci that the burden of COVID-19 was never suppressed far enough to truly eliminate the virus from the U.S., let alone the world.  And he goes a step further, warning that without a dramatic decline in vaccine hesitancy, or a dramatic increase in Americans' willingness to to adopt masks and social distancing when the virus comes back around, variants will continue to emerge and become more vicious.  Data from Brazil - where the P1 variant, which is still rare in the...
    HARRISBURG (AP) – Pennsylvania neared 1 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus on Wednesday amid rising infections and word of a setback in the state’s accelerating COVID-19 vaccination campaign. The Department of Health reported another 4,667 new cases — the highest single-day number since early February — to bring Pennsylvania to within a few hundred of the milestone. Daily infections have risen more than 10% in two weeks, with hospitalizations beginning to drift up, too. READ MORE: New Lighting And Pavement Planned For Walnut Street In Shadyside “All of our numbers are going the wrong way,” Dr. Valerie Arkoosh, chair of the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners, said Wednesday. With health officials on alert, Pennsylvania learned that it will not get nearly as many fresh doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine as the federal government initially projected. The state said it will receive about 66,000 doses next week, not 200,000. Pennsylvania has used its federal allotment of the single-shot vaccine to inoculate more than 100,000 educators. State officials were planning to use future Johnson & Johnson allocations at regional...
    Despite repeated assurances that corrections officials have made progress in controlling spread of the coronavirus, California prisons are in the midst of a deadly surge. At least 46 inmates have died from COVID-19 since Dec. 25, along with two staff members. They include one of America’s most prolific serial killers, Samuel Little, and Officer George Solis, a husband and father of two who died on Christmas Day. “The prison system is not doing their part to keep them safe,” said Terressa Johnson, whose sister is an inmate at the women’s facility in Chowchilla, where there are more than 300 active cases. “In the last six months, it’s gotten worse.” More than 160 people have died in the prison system from causes attributed to COVID-19, according to the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, with nearly 44,000 infected. Since a crackdown on staff safety protocols in recent weeks, active infections have fallen by about half compared to a highpoint in December, when coronavirus cases topped more than 10,000. Still, the prison system has a rate of confirmed cases of 461 per...
    The South African government has announced a new ban on alcohol sales and made masks mandatory after a surge in coronavirus cases in the country.   President Cyril Ramaphosa reintroduced restrictions on Monday after South Africa became the continent's first to record one million coronavirus cases. As well as the mask rule and the alcohol ban, many of the country's beaches will also be closed.   Ramaphosa justified the raft of new measures by pointing to a 'rapid rise' in infections, most by a new strain of the virus feared to be more contagious. He blamed 'super-spreader' social events and an 'extreme lack of vigilance over the holiday period' for the surge. 'We have let down our guard, and unfortunately we are now paying the price,' the president said during a solemn televised speech.  People sunbathe and swim at Bay beach as tourists obey social distance and mask rules in Cape Town President Cyril Ramaphosa reintroduced restrictions on Monday after South Africa saw surge in cases Africa's worst-hit country previously banned alcohol sales in March when it was battling its...
    Hospitals and health departments in many states are once again facing a looming shortage of protective gear - especially N95 masks - amid surging case rates across the nation.  In an unwelcome bout of deja vu, parts of Michigan, New Mexico, Montana and Wyoming are all running low on N95s, according to the Wall Street Journal.  And states that were hit hardest in the first wave of the pandemic in the US, including New Jersey, New York and California, are telling hospitals to stockpile protective gear and brace for another deluge of coronavirus cases.  Even manufacturers report that they're struggling to keep up with demand, despite ramping up production.  Reports of shrinking supplies of masks come as the US reports a record-high increase of more than 100,000 new COVID-19 cases in a single day.  Many of the same states that are seeing record coronavirus hospitalization rates are reporting their hospitals only have enough N95 masks to last a matter of weeks or days (file) In New Mexico, nearly all (95 percent) hospitals are already reusing their N95 masks to...
    (CNN)The US is adding an average of more than 74,000 new Covid-19 cases to the national total every day -- a record high in a pandemic that experts say is likely to worsen.The seven-day average is part of a fall surge that has brought the national case count to more than 8.8 million, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Four of the five highest number of cases in a single day were recorded in the last seven days, with the top two reported on Friday and Saturday. And 41 states are reporting at least 10% more cases compared to the week before.US may not be back to normal until 2022, Fauci says When it comes to the climbing metric, the US is "not in a good place," director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a virtual Q&A on Wednesday. Health experts have pushed measures against the virus to bring the baseline of infections down before colder months drove them back up. But rising records of cases and hospitalizations are making up...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Personal FinanceWayne Gretzky is selling his $22.9 million Sherwood Country Club mansion NHL legend Wayne Gretzky and his wife, Janet, have a soft spot for the sparkling estate they built with the help of architect Richard Landry back in 2002.Even vampire bats practice social distancing when they get sick: study Animals often isolate to avoid spreading disease in their communities — yet many humans refuse to do so ‘It is now a full-blown depression for domestic workers.’ Nannies, house cleaners and home-care workers continue to struggle even as other job sectors bounce back Meanwhile, some highly-educated nannies are finding work for families dealing with remote schooling.I offered my son $30K for a down payment on a home. His fiancée wants a written agreement for my gift to be split 50/50 ‘My son had already agreed that any house they buy would be split 50/50 in case they divorced. She is still paying off student debt and has little savings.’What’s covered by renters insurance—and what’s not There’s a reason insurance policies have all that...
123