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    People visit memorials at Uvalde Town Square for victims of Tuesday's mass shooting at a Texas elementary school. It’s been just three days since an 18-year-old gunman walked into an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, with an AR-15 rifle, opened fire, and murdered 19 children and two teachers. Now, some of the survivors of that horrifying attack are telling their stories. Amber Gonzales told the Los Angeles Times that her 8-year-old daughter Aubree hid under her desk during the shooting. “She’s terrified to go anywhere without me and her dad,” Gonzales told theTimes. “She can’t sleep by herself. She’s scared to take a shower by herself. She’s scared to even watch a movie in the living room by herself. I put her to bed last night and she told me she felt like somebody was looking at her — she’s just really shaken up by it.” RELATED STORY: Ted Cruz bolts from reporters confronting him on his paltry and pissy answers on gun reform Another boy, who did not want to be identified, told KENS-5 in San Antonio, Texas,...
    A bevy of laid off Netflix workers are airing their grievances on Twitter, and the world is watching. The layoffs come from the company's newly-launched fan site Tudum, Deadline reports. Tudum was named after the sound that Netflix makes when it opens. A Netflix spokesperson responding to Daily Voice's request for comment said only that "our fan website Tudum is an important priority for the company," and did not disclose an exact number of layoffs. Meanwhile, former employees are on the hunt for work. Netflix last week reported a significant subscriber loss, its first since 2011. The 26 percent dip in the first quarter of 2022 created a $40 billion drop in stock market value. The streaming company cited the war in Ukraine, inflation and competition as the reason for the massive loss. It also raised its subscription price by $1 or $2 early this year. The layoffs sent a shockwave through the journalism community across America. Daily Voice is currently hiring reporters for remote work. Email [email protected] to apply.
    EUROPE (CBS) – From Poland, Germany, and Kyiv, Ukraine, five Ukrainian women spoke on a video Zoom call with WBZ, recounting the last month – the scariest of their lives. “Every day we heard bombing,” said Nataliya Haidei. “Every day we heard missiles, the sound of missiles.” READ MORE: North End Restaurant Owners Plan To Sue Over Outdoor Dining FeesOn their own time, when they were ready – from three days into the war until just three days ago – the women took whoever they could from their families and fled their war-torn homes. It’s something they never had to do. “Now we understand that we were very naïve,” Maryna Mykhailova said. The women describe the constant smell of gunpowder and painful images of bodies on the street with nowhere to go. “The people were everywhere,” Mykhailova said. “I mean you just go outside and you see people lying in the streets. Nobody could take them. There is no place to take them.” Mykhailova says at first the airplanes and bombs came every few hours, then every 30 minutes,...
    NEXT weekend, the Queen will have been on the throne for an incredible 70 years. She was a 25-year-old mum of two when her father George VI died on February 6, 1952. 32To celebrate her Platinum Jubilee Sun readers share their heartwarming stories of meeting The QueenCredit: Collect A week tomorrow, she becomes the first British monarch to reach a Platinum Jubilee. Her Majesty has met thousands of people – in all walks of life, all over the world – over those decades. No one forgets the moment they came face to face with her. So we asked for your memories of the day YOU met the Queen – and they were wonderful! Today, in this Jubilee souvenir supplement, readers tell their heartwarming stories of meeting the most famous woman in the world. Most read in LifestyleIT'S TORTURE Queen DEFIANT Prince Harry & Andrew scandals can't ruin final years on throneNO RETURN Meg & Harry's 'ship has sailed' for Royal return after missing event with KateOH HALO! The Snow Angel sex position is a new take on Missionary & couples...
    People who work on Wall Street are anonymously sharing stories of suicide, verbal abuse, racism, sexism, and sexual harassment while lifting the lid on what it's really like to have a career in finance.   Wall Street Confessions — an Instagram account that has been dubbed 'Wall Street's Gossip Girl' — has become a safe haven for whistleblowers looking to expose the wrongdoings at big banks and investment firms.  Riya Sharma, a 22-year-old content strategist, launched the account in 2019 while double majoring in finance and international studies at Marymount Manhattan College.  She has since dropped out of college, and Wall Street Confessions now has more than 128,000 followers, including Jefferies CEO Rich Handler.  Professionals who work on Wall Street are anonymously lifting the lid on what it's really like to have a career in finance, from abusive bosses and burnout to issues of racism and sexism  They are sharing their stories on the Instagram account Wall Street Confessions, which has become a safe haven for whistleblowers looking to expose wrongdoings in the financial world  Posts are submitted through...
    Many people look forward to celebrating the start of a New Year with friends and family, however these confessions prove parties don't always go to plan, especially when alcohol is involved. People from around the world have taken to anonymous sharing app Whisper to confess their most scandalous behaviour at New Year's Eve parties - and they'll make you think about your own antics at past celebrations. Among the shocking admissions is a woman who says she and her boyfriend broke up while hosting a party after drinking too much alcohol, while another, from North Carolina, admits to making a drunken pass at her friend's husband.   One man, who lives in Greece, said he missed out on a New Year kiss while being sick in a random alleyway during the countdown. People from around the world have taken to anonymous sharing app Whisper to share memories from past New Year's Eve parties - including a woman, from North Carolina, who made a pass on her friend's husband  One woman, believed to be in the US, said she and her boyfriend...
    Brave social media users have shared some of their craziest drunken sex experiences. Writing on anonymous sharing app Whisper, people from around the world revealed stories of the mistakes - and successes - they had between the sheets while under the influence. One person claimed to have finally hooked up with her crush before vomiting all over him, while another found passion in a drunken encounter with a younger man. Many to have had same-sex encounters for the first time while inebriated, especially with their best friends. A woman shared a story of her wild experience travelling around Europe, including a dalliance with a stranger in Paris  A woman from California revealed she finally had sex with her crush - but ended up vomiting over him RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next 'My fiancé's ex is like a sister to me': Woman who once saw... Still have presents to buy? FEMAIL reveal the gifts you can... 'Is there anything Kate CAN'T do?'  Duchess wows royal fans... The best premade roast potatoes revealed: Aunt...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) – After studying TV broadcasting, this week’s Jefferson Award Winner took a different path, teaching storytelling to empower people in underrepresented communities. Arabella DeLucco gives free classes so minority, neurodiverse, and formerly incarcerated people can tell their own stories. READ MORE: Longtime Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan Hit, Killed By Motorist During Morning Walk“It’s really difficult sometimes to get heard, and so I wanted to focus on underrepresented voices and take the magic and the power that is storytelling and bring it to the people we serve,” explained DeLucco, who founded WeXL in 2018. The San Francisco-based nonprofit recruits professionals to teach storytelling using media and technology. Dozens of participants have produced podcasts, video shorts, TV shows, animated films, movies and more, often on social justice topics. Fourth grade girls in New York created their own short films through WeXL’s afterschool program on live video conferencing. On this day, DeLucco invites a paid fellow to take part in scripting a show. As a past fellow, Gabriella Deyi of Oakland produced a YouTube series on mental health...
    U.S. Rep. Cori Bush (D-MO) talks to members of the press after a House Democrats closed-door meeting at the U.S. Capitol September 27, 2021 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.During a Thursday House Oversight Committee hearing about state laws blocking abortion access, representatives shared personal stories about their abortions in condemnation of SB 8, the Texas law that serves as a near-total ban on abortion.  Rep. Cori Bush (D-MO) talked about a church trip she took the summer after graduating high school during which she was raped by an older man who was “a friend of a friend.”  “I was confused, I was embarrassed, I was ashamed,” Bush said. “I asked myself, was it something that I had done?”  She realized she was pregnant after missing her period and flipped through the Yellowpages to find an abortion provider. “They’re worried they will have to delay life-saving care for people who are very sick.”  Sitting in an abortion clinic while 9 weeks pregnant, Bush recalled,...
    Democratic Reps. Cori BushCori BushGreene heckles Democrats and they fire back on Capitol steps Treasury says more rental aid is reaching tenants, preventing evictions Holding back on defensive systems for Israel could have dangerous consequences MORE (Mo.), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalDemocrats search for sweet spot below .5 trillion price tag Left warns Pelosi they'll take down Biden infrastructure bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Gears begin to shift in Congress on stalled Biden agenda MORE (Wash.) and Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by AM General — The Quad confab The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats argue price before policy amid scramble House passes sweeping defense policy bill MORE (Calif.) shared their personal stories of getting abortions in interviews airing on MSNBC's "The ReidOut" Wednesday evening, one day before a House Oversight Committee hearing on state anti-abortion laws. Speaking with NBC News’ Ali Vitali, the three lawmakers all cited their upbringings as well as their desires for privacy for not previously disclosing their abortions in public, despite advocating for reproductive rights. Bush said...
    There is no sex in an emotional affair - but these confessions prove they can still be just as damaging as full-blown infidelity.  People from around the world took to US-based secret sharing app Whisper to share details of their illicit relationships, including one woman who started seeing her boss. Another unfaithful wife told how she is embarking on an emotional affair with her best friend's husband. Meanwhile one man said he can't cut off communication with his ex.  Here, FEMAIL shares some of the most eye-opening revelations...   Can't stop: This mother-to-be can't end her emotional affair even though she is expecting a baby with her current partner. It is just one of the shocking confessions shared on Whisper Understanding? Or unbothered? A woman was surprised by her husband's laid-back reaction to discovering she had been having an emotional affair with her boss RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Man reveals how his wife poisoned him with arsenic in his... Inside Scotland's 'spiritual commune': Ben Fogle visits an... Action girl Kate! Dressed-down...
    As part of CNN’s coverage of the twentieth anniversary of 9/11, they aired a segment focusing on several of the photographers and videographers employed by FEMA, who were deployed to Ground Zero to document the extensive search, rescue, and recovery efforts that occurred after the World Trade Center towers collapsed. “Let’s take a remarkable look at images recorded by two firsthand witnesses to Ground Zero that reveal, sometimes for the first time, the light of kindness and compassion that shined even on our darkest day twenty years ago,” said Jake Tapper to introduce the video. “9/11 shook the nation in a way not just physically but emotionally throughout the country,” said FEMA videographer Jim Chestnutt. “Everyone deserved to know what was being done, to see as much as possible unfiltered, and that’s what our job was.” Photographer Michael Rieger said that he had “concentrated on the human aspect and the people” as he took his pictures. Rieger described the scene as “surreal” and emotional, and told how they had been given red card passes to allow them access to the site,...
    Mike Hoyle of Riverside, NJ I was on Active Duty and supposed to attend a meeting in The Pentagon that morning. Received a call on the drive in that the meeting had been cancelled, went on to my office at Fort Belvoir, heard about the Pentagon, called my wife in New Jersey, to let her know I was not there. What has stuck with me was how fortunate I am, to an extent, that I was not there, and the outpouring of concern from friends about the issue, seeing the smoke on the horizon, knowing what it represented, and the story of the Marines who went INTO the affected areas to find and assist survivors READ MORE: Mount Holly Man Charged With Murder In Slaying Of Man Found Behind Burlington County Convenience Store Kim Carrell-Smith of Bethlehem, PA It was a beautiful sparkling September 11th Tuesday, and as usual I was running late for class. I was teaching a Lehigh University course called (prophetically?) “History and Community Memory” that semester, and the topic for the day was going to be...
    NEW YORK -- As we prepare to mark 20 years since the 9/11 terror attacks, five woman members of the FDNY who continue to move forward after the trauma are speaking out."I don't think you can work at a New York City firehouse and not think about September 11th," FDNY Battalion Chief Michele Fitzsimmons told our sister station WABC in New York.Fitzsimmons is the highest-ranking woman in the New York City Fire Department-who was a just probationary firefighter on 9/11. Six of her academy classmates were among the 343 firefighters killed that day.For the chief, 9/11 is what drives her -- even 20 years later."For me, losing the six guys from my class made me even more committed," Fitzsimmons said. "Like, they didn't get to get into the department. I felt like we had to kind of carry on their legacy."Fitzsimmons is one of just five woman New York City firefighters who responded to the World Trade Center and are still on the job today.RELATED | How reporter N.J. Burkett and his photographer escaped Twin Towers collapseEMBED More News Videos...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- As we prepare to mark 20 years since the 9/11 terror attacks, five female members of the FDNY who continue to move forward after the trauma are speaking out."I don't think you can work at a New York City firehouse and not think about September 11th," said FDNY Battalion Chief Michele Fitzsimmons.Fitzsimmons is the highest-ranking woman in the New York City Fire Department-who was a just probationary firefighter on 9/11. Six of her academy classmates were among the 343 firefighters killed that day.For the chief, 9/11 is what drives her -- even 20 years later."For me, losing the six guys from my class made me even more committed," Fitzsimmons said. "Like, they didn't get to get into the department. I felt like we had to kind of carry on their legacy."Fitzsimmons is one of just five female New York City firefighters who responded to the World Trade Center and are still on the job today.CLICK HERE for more Eyewitness News reflections, photos and stories marking the anniversary of 9/11"To see those buildings, of those sizes, just...
    LODI (CBS13) – Saturday marks 20 years since the September 11th terrorist attacks. Two survivors from Northern California were in the World Trade Center for very different reasons that day, and they both made it out at about the same time. READ MORE: South Lake Tahoe Families Celebrate Labor Day By Coming Home On September 11th, survivors ran. They tried to call their families and get home. Among them are Richard Hannaford from Natomas and Corey Daniel from Lodi. “By the grace of God, my guardian angels were really busy that day,” said Hannaford. “I ran all day. I went on foot back to my hotel,” said Daniel. They were in Tower 2, 20 floors apart. Hannaford had worked in New York City for decades as a corporate bond broker. Daniel had just arrived for a two-week training and the attack happened two days in. They both remember the shaking as they ran downstairs. “It took the impact of that plane, bowed and then righted back up,” said Daniel. ‘I didn’t know what to do except I knew that if we...
    Samsung sends ‘Chart Sanbury’ to represent Thailand Invite new generations to share stories. ‘Forward without stopping’ to beat Galaxy Z Fold 3 Innovation should be used to provide inspiration from Samsung’s mission. Ready to create a new future for the people of the planet, the brand recently launched a regional campaign called #TeamUnstoppable. We will share the story of General Z moving forward without stopping as a platform for youth and millennials in Southeast Asia. We need to send the spirit to encourage everyone to overcome all obstacles to pursue their dreams. Samsung began to provide inspiration. The release of the main campaign film # The Team Can’t Be Stopped tells the story of the first experiences of a new generation of delegates from 5 countries: Chart Sunbury of Thailand, Mohammed Imran Akhil of Malaysia, Margillin Thidal of the Philippines, Op Julian Lu and Trong Mi Ang of Singapore. In Vietnam, everyone is fighting wholeheartedly to pursue their dreams until they succeed. The film is also part of the campaign. #Lambaipatasmu It also sends courage to young people in Indonesia...
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