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    A new study conducted in Australia may have identified why babies die from the heartbreaking and mysterious condition of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS.Researchers are calling the small peer-reviewed study, published in The Lancet medical journal on May 6, a potential breakthrough in understanding SIDS and developing preventative measures to reduce the risk of disease.According to the study, babies who died from SIDS had lower levels of the enzyme butyrylcholinesterase than living babies or those who died from other causes, ABC Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton said on "Good Morning America" Friday.Butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE, is thought to be involved in brain arousal pathways, which control critical bodily functions like the drive to take a breath, Ashton said."Potentially, this would represent a target for intervention if you could screen babies, find that they have a low enzyme level and improve that. But again, this is preliminary research at this point," she said.SEE ALSO: House committee opens investigation into baby formula shortage, potential price gouging EMBED More News Videos The White House says it will crack down on price gouging...
    A Suffolk County District Attorney is pleading with a judge to overturn a 1974 rape conviction of a black man who has spent decades in prison, after his victim previously admitted she may have mistakenly identified him.  Tyrone Clark, now 66, spent 47 years in prison after he was convicted of raping and kidnapping Anne Kane, 23, in June 1973, after he broke into her Back Bay apartment and raped her at knifepoint.  Clark, who was 18 at the time, was sentenced to life with the possibility of parole. On Friday, Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins filed a motion supporting Clark's petition for a new trial, citing a 2019 letter Kane, now 71, sent to the Parole Board about Clark's innocence.  According to the letter, Kane stated: 'I am no longer absolutely sure that my identification was correct.'  Kane, who is a white woman, said she trusted the courts to provide a fair trial at the time, but now sees the overwhelming flaws within the criminal justice system.  She argues that because she didn't know any black people at the...
    We have not yet discovered life outside of Earth We are actively looking for. We usually see planets like us. Earth is the only world we support life on. That is why astronomers are looking for extraterrestrials like us. The size, composition, and atmosphere of the Earth, but also the temperature and space in the solar system, have made our planet a friendly planet for life. Hyson Worlds: Is It the Cradle of Life? Scientists believe so The latest research, published in The Astrophysical Journal, refers to the portal Gizmodo.com, Talks about New type of planets. This is especially true of the type of planets “sea worlds”.That is, the Haitian worlds that may be the cradle of life on Earth. Although we see this type of planet in vain in our solar system, we still are We find them in abundance in the galaxy. In principle, these two planets are the “children” of Earth and Neptune if they have offspring. There are Hyson planets Large and very hot, they have an atmosphere filled with hydrogen and...
    Hounslow, London, which has become one of the U.K.'s biggest hotspots for the variant of coronavirus first identified in India, on Thursday 27th May 2021.Tejas Sandhu | MI News | NurPhoto | Getty Images Cases of the Covid-19 variant first identified in India have more than doubled in England within one week, the country's health authority said on Thursday. The number of cases of the strain had reached 6,959 by May 26, an increase of 3,535 cases from the previous week. The B.1.617.2 variant, a highly contagious triple-mutant strain of the coronavirus, is likely to be more transmissible than the variant first identified in England last fall, Public Health England said. Bolton, Bedford and Blackburn are currently the most affected areas in England, according to PHE, although it said there were small numbers of cases of the variant in most parts of the country. Hospitalizations were also rising in some areas, PHE added, noting that most hospital admissions were in unvaccinated people. Research published by PHE last week showed that two doses of Covid-19 vaccines gives people high levels of...
    As Nature reports, there is some good news on the COVID-19 front. Scientists are close to identifying the factors that provide immunity from being infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and even a tiny amount of the right “neutralizing antibodies” appears to offer powerful protection. Combine that with previous studies showing that mRNA vaccines generate large amounts of these antibodies from a single dose, with new results showing that mixing doses of different vaccines can produce an even more potent response, and it appears that the world may have everything it needs to fend of the current pandemic—so long as those vaccines get to the nations, and people, who need them most.  However, the COVID-19 pandemic continues to rage across the globe, and as an article in The Lancet shows, the latest wave of cases is hitting Africa particularly hard. A higher percentage of patients are turning up critically ill, and a higher percentage of that group is dying. Why this is happening, even in places where the healthcare system has not yet been overwhelmed by cases, isn’t clear. What is clear is that over a dozen nations in...
    Authorities said the suspect in the deadly shootings at three Atlanta-area spas admitted to carrying out Tuesday evening's rampage and was on his way to Florida, where officials feared he would harm more people. "As tragic as this was … this could have been significantly worse," Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms told reporters. Captain Jay Baker of the Cherokee County Sheriff's Office said during a Wednesday morning press conference the 21-year-old suspect claimed the shootings weren't racially motivated even though six of the eight people killed were of Asian descent. Instead, the suspect indicated he "has some issues, potentially sexual addiction," Cherokee County Sheriff Frank Reynolds said. He saw the spas as a temptation that he wanted to eliminate, Baker said. Cherokee County police identified the suspect as 21-year-old Robert Aaron Long, who was taken into custody 150 miles south of Atlanta. Investigators believe he was acting alone. The targeted businesses were not on the Atlanta Police Department's radar, Bottoms said, describing the spas as "legally operating." Six of the victims were identified as women of Asian descent, CBS...
    A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that the U.K. variant of the coronavirus may have arrived sooner and be more widespread in the United States than previously believed. The CDC examined eight patients from Minnesota who had tested positive for the coronavirus between Dec. 18, 2020, and Jan. 11, 2021, and later identified as having the U.K. variant, also known as SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7. Six of the patients had traveled in the 14-day period before they either showed COVID-19 symptoms or were tested for the virus. Three had traveled internationally, two to West Africa and one to the Dominican Republic. The other three had traveled to California. That at least one of the tests examined in the study occurred in mid-December provides evidence that the variant was spreading in the U.S. well before cases of the variant were identified. The first known case of the U.K. variant in America was announced in Colorado on Dec. 30. A day later, California officials announced that state’s first case. As of Tuesday, 1,277 cases of the variant have...
    (CNN)Moon craters formed when meteorites and asteroids slammed into the lunar surface. Like fossils on Earth, they reveal something about the history of the solar system and how planets were formed. Using artificial intelligence, Chinese scientists have estimated that there are more than 100,000 craters on the moon, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. That's far more than the 9,137 officially recognized by the International Astronomical Union and largely detected manually using elevation information and images, the study said.The scientists, using data on 7,895 previously identified craters and 1,411 dated craters, were able to apply machine learning to train a deep neural network. With information from China's first and second lunar orbiters -- Chang'e 1 and Chang'e 2 -- the network identified 109,956 new craters. The two unmanned spacecraft launched in 2007 and 2010, respectively. Using artificial intelligence, Chinese scientists identified over 109,000 previously unrecognized lunar craters on the moon's surface. The moon is shown here, as seen from Buenos Aires on December 21. "Impact craters (are) the most diagnostic features of the lunar surface....
    According to interviews recorded by Bob Woodward for his book, “Rage,” Donald Trump was briefed by national security adviser Robert O’Brien on Jan. 28 of this year that the coronavirus “will be the biggest national security threat you face in your presidency,” that the virus was five times more deadly than ordinary flu, that it was spread when “you just breathe the air,” and that it would soon become a worldwide pandemic. At the moment Trump told Woodward these things, on Feb. 7, the president had one job: Persuade the American people to work together to deal effectively with this threat to their health and well-being. That would mean, in the coming months, that Trump would have to convince people it was not just in their interest, but necessary for their very survival, to do a whole bunch of stuff they would not want to do. They would have to endure lengthy “lockdowns,” when they would essentially be confined to their homes. They would have to take their kids out of school and learn to cope with “remote learning” from...
    Lucian K. Truscott IV September 12, 2020 12:00PM (UTC) According to interviews recorded by Bob Woodward for his book, "Rage," Donald Trump was briefed by national security adviser Robert O'Brien on Jan. 28 of this year that the coronavirus "will be the biggest national security threat you face in your presidency," that the virus was five times more deadly than ordinary flu, that it was spread when "you just breathe the air," and that it would soon become a worldwide pandemic. At the moment Trump told Woodward these things, on Feb. 7, the president had one job: Persuade the American people to work together to deal effectively with this threat to their health and well-being.  That would mean, in the coming months, that Trump would have to convince people it was not just in their interest, but necessary for their very survival, to do a whole bunch of stuff they would not want to do. They would have to endure lengthy "lockdowns," when they would essentially be confined to their homes. They would have to take their kids out...
    (CNN)Health officials in southern Illinois are looking for people who attended a "mini-prom" earlier this month and may been exposed to multiple confirmed cases of coronavirus. The Wabash County Health Department asked the public in a Facebook post to get in touch if they were at the August 4 event and have been experiencing coronavirus symptoms including fever, loss of taste or smell, a cough, shortness of breath or a sore throat. US leaders from coast to coast have throughout the past few months warned that young groups of people and social gatherings were driving an increase in coronavirus cases. Many of the nation's top health officials have urged Americans to avoid not just bars but any crowded indoor spaces. New CDC guidance says Covid-19 rates in children steadily increasingOn Friday, Illinois reported the highest number of daily cases since May 24, with more than 2,260 new cases. The state has now reported more than 200,000 infections and more than 7,700 deaths. The event took place in Mount Carmel, officials said, about 160 miles southeast of Springfield. It's unclear how...
    Audio recordings of interviews about the fatal encounter in which Breonna Taylor was tragically killed by Louisville, Kentucky, police suggest officers knocked and may have identified themselves before firing, contrary to early claims. Taylor, 26, an emergency medical technician, was killed in March when police were serving a “no-knock” warrant at her apartment and startled her boyfriend, who fired at what he perceived to be intruders. Police returned fire, killing Taylor. The case has joined the George Floyd killing in May among the iconic deaths that the Black Lives Matter movement seeks to redress, and cites as proof of “systemic racism” in law enforcement and society in general. However, the details of what happened are becoming murkier as investigations unfold. CNN reported Thursday: Newly-released audio from the internal investigation into Breonna Taylor’s death illustrates conflicting accounts of whether police identified themselves before ultimately breaking down Taylor’s door in an incident which led to her death. The audio, first reported by NBC News and obtained by CNN, includes the Louisville Metro Police Department’s interview with Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, on the...
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