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    A new study has found a potential correlation between sleeping habits and weight loss. Researchers studied a group of 80 adults who are overweight and typically sleep less than six and a half hours per night, according to the report published on Monday, Feb. 7, by JAMA Internal Medicine. During the study, the participants who were chosen to sleep for eight and a half hours for two weeks "significantly reduced their daily energy intake by approximately 270 kcal compared with the control group." Researchers reported that based on the findings, "improving and maintaining healthy sleep duration over longer periods" could be added to weight loss programs.
    Queen Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots were among the European Royals who used an intricate folding method to share their most important secrets, new research has revealed.   The letterlocking process dates back to the 13th century and involved cutting a small slit or tab into a piece of paper and combining it with a folding technique to secure the letter with intricate stiches.  It would effectively change the paper into its own envelope, preventing reading it  without breaking seals or slips, providing a means of security, and the new research has shown just how popular the practice was amongst Queens. The technique, which could take hours to successfully complete, was common for secure communication before modern envelopes came into use, and is considered to be the missing link between ancient physical communications security techniques and modern digital cryptography.   According to a new article in the Electronic British Library Journal, 16th century royals would regularly use spiral letterlocking to send notes securely, with lead author Jana Dambrogio explaining: 'You had to be highly confident to make a spiral lock. If you made a mistake,...
    Health officials have released a new study confirming that nearly half of all those who contract COVID-19 infections remain asymptomatic, confirming a long-held belief. New research found that more than 40 percent of those who tested positive for the virus have not shown symptoms, according to a new study published this week in JAMA Network Open. In the study, researchers examined nearly 100 studies between January 2020 and February 2021 of nearly 30 million people in Asia, Europe, North America, South America, and Africa. Of those millions, approximately 60 percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases among people under 20 were asymptomatic; nearly 50 people in people 20 to 39; about 32 percent in people 40 to 59, and nearly 33 percent in those over 60. According to researchers, the highest percentage of asymptomatic cases were found among nursing home residents or staff, travel professionals, and pregnant women, though they noted that those populations were the most likely to be tested or re-tested, leading to the skewed data. Those populations included in the study: Pregnant woman: 54.1 percent of COVID-19 infections were asymptomatic; Travelers...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Various versions of medical and recreational marijuana are now legalized in all but seven states. That has led to much more research into the health effects of cannabis. CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez has more on new studies that show surprising heart effects in young users. READ MORE: New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory Commission Releases First Set Of Rules For Legal Marijuana SalesFor decades, it was thought that marijuana use could not lead to a physiologic dependence on cannabis, the active ingredient in the plant. But today’s marijuana isn’t what your parents smoked at Woodstock. It is far more potent. “It felt as if my heart was going to explode out of my chest,” user Mike Stroh said. Stroh said he smoked pot nearly every day for 15 years in Canada, where it has been legal for medicinal purposes for two decades, which explains why there is significant Canadian research into health effects of cannabis. Now, a large peer-reviewed study found that while the risk remained low, those aged 18 to 44, who used cannabis at least four...
    A report released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center has segmented U.S. voters into nine political tribes - four that lean left, four that lean right, and the 'stressed sideliners,' who have a minimal interest in politics.  Pew surveyed 10,221 adults this July, but has been conducting interviews with respondents since January 2020.  While partisan polarization remained high, the research also showed that there are divisions within the Democrats and the Republicans - as members of the coalitions' views vary on issues including racial justice, abortion, taxes and the future role of former President Donald Trump.  Pew Research Center found that Americans make up nine different political tribes, according to a survey conducted in July, but with interviews starting back in January 2020  The Pew Research Center released a report Tuesday that put Americans into nine political groups - four that lean left, four that lean right, and the 'stressed sideliners,' who have a minimal interest in politics This Pew chart shows the percentages the groups make up overall (left) and then among the political right (center) and political left (right)  FLAG AND FAITH...
    Researchers have reported new findings on just how much Americans depend on their smartphones. A survey by global tech care company Asurion found that on average, Americans check their phones 96 times a day, meaning once every 10 minutes. This is a 20 percent daily increase compared to a similar study conducted two years earlier. Asurion also reported 18- to 24-year-olds check their phones twice as much as the national average, and this age group is more likely to attempt to limit phone use. The number one reason people surveyed reported that they use their phones is to stay in touch with friends and family. Learn more about the survey's findings here.
    PET owners take more than three months on average to get to grips with a new puppy or kitten, research has revealed. But 78 per cent now regard their arrival as their new best friend, according to a study of 2,000 UK adults who had bought a puppy or kitten over the past 12 months. 1Pet owners take more than three months on average to get to grips with a new puppy or kitten, research has revealed In the early days of welcoming their new pet, more than half of puppy and kitten owners (58 per cent) struggled with their furry friend so much that they worried whether they had made the right decision, and one in five argued with their family or partner due to the stress. Despite the hard work involved, an overwhelming majority (87 per cent) said welcoming a new puppy or kitten into their home was one of the best decisions they’d made - and they are so happy they did so. Six in 10 even said they sometimes prefer spending time with their puppy or...
    New research shows promising signs that the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines might offer protection for a longer time than previously thought. And that protection could potentially last for yearsHealth experts say this new information could affect the timeline for booster shots.The mRNA vaccines are helping scientists unravel the inner workings of our immune systems. A new report in the journal "Nature" reveals the mRNA vaccines set off a persistent immune reaction that theoretically may last a lifetime."Because it goes deep down into the immune system and produces these antibodies and teaches us how to make these antibodies so it will last," said infectious disease specialist, Dr. Suman Radhakrishna with Dignity Health California Hospital Medical Center.MORE | LA County recommends masking indoors amid spread of Delta variant EMBED More News Videos L.A. County public health officials are now "strongly" recommending everyone to wear masks in indoor public places, regardless of vaccination status, due to an increased spread of the Delta variant. The findings suggest most people who get the mRNA vaccines may not need boosters as long as the virus doesn't...
    New research has found that the COVID-19 virus was circulating in at least five states for months before the first case was officially reported in the United States. According to a National Institutes of Health study published Tuesday, June 15 in the Clinical Infectious Diseases journal found that people in five states were infected with the virus in December 2019 and early in 2020 before the pandemic truly began last year. Researchers said that there was evidence of infection in nine out of 24,079 people whose blood samples were taken between Jan. 2, 2020, and March 18, 2020, suggesting “early cases were sporadic.” The samples that tested positive for the virus came from Illinois, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. 
“Antibody testing of blood samples helps us better understand the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the U.S. in the early days of the US epidemic, when testing was restricted and public health officials could not see that the virus had already spread outside of recognized initial points of entry,” Keri Althoff, the lead author of the study and associate professor of epidemiology...
    NASA/ZUMA Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Humanity’s enormous emissions of greenhouse gases are shrinking the stratosphere, a new study has revealed. The thickness of the atmospheric layer has contracted by 400 meters since the 1980s, the researchers found and will thin by about another kilometer by 2080 without major cuts in emissions. The changes have the potential to affect satellite operations, the GPS navigation system and radio communications. The discovery is the latest to show the profound impact of humans on the planet. In April, scientists showed that the climate crisis had shifted the Earth’s axis as the massive melting of glaciers redistributes weight around the globe. The stratosphere extends from about 20 kilometers to 60 kilometers above the Earth’s surface. Below is the troposphere, in which humans live, and here carbon dioxide heats and expands the air. This pushes up the lower boundary...
    Getty In an ongoing study, most of those interviewed seemed to recognize that they were happier in their 30s than they were in their 20s. If you could be one age for the rest of your life, what would it be? Would you choose to be nine years old, absolved of life’s most tedious responsibilities, and instead able to spend your days playing with friends and practicing your times tables? Or would you choose your early 20s, when time feels endless and the world is your oyster – with friends, travel, pubs and clubs beckoning? Western culture idealizes youth, so it may come as a surprise to learn that in a recent poll asking this question, the most popular answer wasn’t 9 or 23, but 36. Yet as a developmental psychologist, I thought that response made a lot of sense. For the last four years, I’ve been studying people’s experiences of their 30s and early 40s, and my research has led me to believe that this stage of life – while full of challenges – is...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – New research is revealing more about the psychological impact of the coronavirus. Scientists in England found people diagnosed with COVID-19 are at a greater risk of developing a range of psychological and neurological conditions. READ MORE: New Treatment Showing Promise Against COVID-19 In South Florida Researchers at Oxford University found one in three COVID patients in the U.S. developed brain or psychiatric disorders within six months of being infected. “We compared those percentages with people who’ve been ill with a range of other conditions during the pandemic era,” said Oxford professor Paul Harrison. Dr. Harrison’s team found COVID patients were treated more often for a range of disorders from common ones like anxiety and depression to rare conditions like dementia and psychosis. They hope future studies will reveal why. “Is this, for example, a direct effect of the virus getting into the brain and damaging the brain? Is it inflammation in the brain?” Dr. Harrison said. In the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry Journal, scientists also found the sicker people became from COVID, the more likely...
    The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine could provide protection against the virus for a minimum of a half a year, according to a new report published this week. A report in the New England Journal of Medicine was published this week advising that the Moderna vaccine, much like its counterpart from Pfizer, will remain effective against COVID-19 for at least six months once both doses are administered.  The latest report comes after dozens of tests of those who received the shot during the study. With this research, using three separate tests that look for antibodies, the scientists found that protective antibody activity remained high in all age groups of the 33 adults involved in this early-stage study.  Antibody levels are expected to decline over time, but it’s unclear what level of protection this will provide in the real world.  Last week, the FDA announced that it had approved Moderna to put 50 percent more vaccine dosages in each vial, allowing for more needles to be put in arms more expeditiously. Earlier story - COVID-19: FDA Approves Changes To Moderna Vaccine Pfizer and...
    New findings suggest healthy blood pressure numbers may differ for women and men, and a Northern Virginia cardiologist wants women to learn more about their specific situations and consult with their doctors. “There’s really no ‘one size fits all’ approach to medicine. We really have to look at men and women differently,” said Dr. Rachel L. Berger of Virginia Heart. Traditionally, 120 over 80 has been considered the normal upper limit for adult systolic blood pressure, but a study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai evaluated data from more than 27,000 people and found that women may have a lower “normal” blood pressure range. “While men had a correlation between high blood pressure and heart disease at a higher number, like 120 or 140, women had increased risk of heart disease even with a blood pressure as low as 100 or 110,” Berger said. Women need to know their numbers. “That means knowing what your blood pressure is and speaking to your physician and finding out if that’s an appropriate blood pressure for you,” Berger advised. Berger finds studies,...
    Worldwide economic and social lockdowns due to COVID-19 resulted in cleaner air, but a warmer planet overall, according to new research. The findings by the National Center for Atmospheric Research are a bit counterintuitive. Most people are taught that pollution in the air leads to higher temperatures - which is accurate, but there is more than that going on in the skies. Researchers said that their work highlights the influence of airborne particles or aerosols that block incoming sunlight. When emissions in aerosols dropped last spring, more of the sun’s warmth reached the planet, especially in heavily industrialized nations such as the United States and Russia, the study noted. “There was a big decline in emissions from the most polluting industries, and that had immediate, short-term effects on temperatures,” said NCAR scientist Andrew Gettelman, the study’s lead author. “Pollution cools the planet, so it makes sense that pollution reductions would warm the planet.” Temperatures over the Earth’s land surface in spring 2020 were about 0.2-0.5 degrees warmer than would have been expected with prevailing weather conditions, the study said. In...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Scheduling an appointment for a COVID-19 vaccine has been a major headache for so many. Some people are traveling long distances just to get their hands on one. And while full appointment books are one thing, new research from the University of Pittsburgh has revealed some people are living in a “vaccine desert.” RELATED: RMU To Send New Diplomas After Students Say Their Majors Were Removed Without Public Input Researchers discovered that in some communities, people are driving more than 10 miles for a coronavirus vaccine — not just because there are no appointments available, but there are no places like hospitals or pharmacies around to administer them. “With our analysis, we wanted to highlight areas with additional barriers to getting a vaccine, like long driving distance,” said University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy assistant professor Lucas Brenbrok. Using a sample population and geographical data, they made maps that pinpointed possible vaccination sites across the country. Researchers found some are hitting a speed bump in the distribution process. “We found that in 69 counties...
    Cruisers can’t wait to get cruising again. For the past year, travelers have had to cancel trips and vacation plans due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. While the future of the travel industry is still unclear, new research suggests at least one group of leisure-lovers can’t wait to hit the water again. Data collected by trade organization Cruise Lines International Association shows that a majority of “cruisers” are likely to go on a trip relatively soon. (iStock) Data collected by trade organization Cruise Lines International Association shows that a majority of “cruisers” are likely to go on a trip relatively soon, USA Today reports. In fact, results show 73% of cruise enthusiasts surveyed would go on a cruise within a few years. A majority of those respondents also said they would go on a cruise within one year. CARNIVAL CRUISE LINE SETS DATE FOR INAUGURAL SAILING OF ITS LARGEST-EVER SHIP This data, meanwhile, was collected before news broke of vaccines being available within the next few months. “Our data shows that cruisers are eager to cruise again and are willing to follow stringent...
    A new mobile app allows people to explore how global warming will affect the future climate of their towns and cities. Available for free download, the ESD Research app pulls temperature and rainfall projections from six major global research centers. Users can see what their hometown will be like in 2100 if global warming is limited to below 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, as called for by the 2015 UN Paris Agreement. A second scenario reveals the results of 'moderate' emission levels in 2100, with global temperatures rising approximately 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit. Users simply type in their location and the app shows simulations of the current climate and projects of the future - it is available for download in the Apple Store and Google Play.  Scroll down for video The free ESD Research app pulls temperature and rainfall projections to show users what the climate will be like in their city between 2070 and 2100 The app was developed by EarthSystemData Ltd in conjunction with the University of East Anglia's Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.  'We can now visualize any...
    Most COVID-19 cases in large US cities stem from visits to just a few types of places, a new study suggests. Restaurants, gyms, hotels and houses of worship are among the 10 percent of locations that would appear to account for 80 percent of the infections, according to research published in the journal Nature on Tuesday. “These are places that are smaller, more crowded, and people dwell there longer,” said study co-author and Stanford University Professor Jure Leskovec at a media briefing on the research, CNN reported. Reducing the establishments’ capacity to 20 percent, as opposed to shutting them down entirely, could curb transmissions by 80 percent, the prof said. “Our work highlights that it doesn’t have to be all or nothing,” Leskovec said. The study, which included researchers from Northwestern University as well as Stanford,  analyzed cell-phone data from 98 million Americans in 10 major cities, including New York, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston. The researchers tracked people’s movements to locations such as restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, gyms and hotels, as well as doctor’s offices...
    Ladies, you can put away the perfume and seductive lingerie.  For the only signal a man needs to tell if a woman is in the mood for a passionate encounter is to pay attention to their natural smells, a study shows.  Scientists found males are able to detect subtle changes in the armpit aroma of females who are aroused.  And far from being a turn-off, it gets chaps in the mood too. It is believed to be the first study to confirm men can detect pheromones in sweat when women are sexually excited.  Researchers from Kent University got 24 male students to smell cotton pads put under the armpits of young women without deodorant.  Scientists found males are able to detect subtle changes in the armpit aroma of females who are aroused. Pictured: Stock image In the first test, the women read an article about knitting and watched a short film about bridge-building.  The men, who had no idea what the other group had been doing, were asked to rate whether they found the scent stimulating or not afterwards. ...
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