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    A music professor from the University of Michigan has been removed from his teaching post after a student at the college complained about him showing the 1965 film Othello starring Laurence Olivier in blackface.   Bright Sheng, who teaches composition at the School of Music, Theatre & Dance in  Ann Arbor, Michigan, showed students the movie - which garnered eight Academy Award nominations - last month.  Shortly after the screening, one of those taking the class complained to higher-ups at the university.   Professor Sheng, who was born in Shanghai, China and has been at the university for 26 years, penned an apology in which he proceeded to list occasions where he had worked with 'people of color' throughout his career in an effort to display diversity, but that too was rejected by the student body.  Bright Sheng, who teaches composition at the School of Music, Theatre & Dance in Ann Arbor, Michigan, showed the 1965 film Othello starring Laurence Olivier Olivier appeared in blackface throughout the film which 'shocked' students who demanded an apology A poster of the 1965 film Sheng, who...
            by Benjamin Zeisloft  Over the past five years, nearly 1,200 Michigan State University students and staff members reported racial discrimination incidents. Only eight instances, however, truly violated the school’s bias and discrimination policies. According to data provided to the Lansing State Journal by Michigan State’s Office of Institutional Equity, affiliates reported 1,187 instances of race-based bias and discrimination between 2015 and September 2020. Of those instances, 76 revealed issues with conduct, and of those 76 issues, eight instances — less than 1 percent of all reported — constituted violations of the school’s policies. Campus Reform independently confirmed this data with Michigan State University Office of Institutional Equity spokesperson Christian Chapman. Nevertheless, Tanya Jachimiak — the head of the Office of Institutional Equity — told the Lansing State Journal that a committee is currently “looking at how and where our policy is able to address and be part of the solution to breaking down systems of oppression.” Similarly, in spite of an average of less than two racial bias incidents per year, several departments and schools at Michigan State recently released...
    The University of Michigan officially withdrew from hosting the Oct. 15 presidential debate over coronavirus concerns. “It is with great disappointment that I must ask for the University of Michigan to be released from its agreement with the Commission on Presidential Debates to host the Presidential Debate on Oct. 15, 2020,” Mark Schlissel, the president of the University of Michigan, said in a letter addressed to the Commission on Presidential Debates. The decision, announced Tuesday, was originally reported by The Detroit Free Press and was later confirmed by The University Record. The debate will move to the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, the commission announced. The debate is still scheduled for Oct. 15. (RELATED: Biden Commits To Three Debates) The University of Michigan will no longer hold a presidential debate this fall due to coronavirus concerns. Instead, the event will now be held in Miami. https://t.co/gFb7T50DMp — NPR Politics (@nprpolitics) June 23, 2020 “Given the scale and complexity of the work we are undertaking to help assure a safe and healthy fall for...
    The University of Michigan is expected to back out of its commitment to host a presidential debate between President Trump and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Ann Arbor because of the coronavirus pandemic. An unnamed official told the Detroit Free Press Monday that the university was concerned about the debates attracting media, campaign workers, and other presidential candidate supporters or protesters to the campus in a way that could spread COVID-19. The university was slated to host the second of three debates on October 15. The school announced on Monday that it plans to have students return to campus for courses in the fall with University of Michigan President Mark Schlissel saying, "We will protect our students, faculty and staff with a broad array of research-based public health measures and tools." A formal announcement on the decision to withdraw from hosting the debate is expected to be announced on Tuesday. Michigan, especially in the Detroit area, was hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic earlier this year. The state currently has the ninth-largest outbreak in the...
    The University of Michigan is planning to withdraw from hosting one of the debates between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden due to concerns about holding a large gathering during the coronavirus pandemic. The Detroit Free Press said the official announcement is expected to come on Tuesday. The debate had been scheduled for Oct. 15. Two sources told the newspaper that university officials were concerned about the large number of supporters for both candidates, along with media and others, expected to come to the Ann Arbor campus during the COVID-19 outbreak. The New York Times reported that people familiar with the debate planning said the event will be moved to Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts. The venue had hosted the first debate of the 2020 primary season last summer for the Democrats running for the party’s nomination. A spokesman for the University of Michigan declined to comment on the school’s plans. Related Stories: Biden Commits to 3 Debates Trump Campaign Seeks to Add 4th Debate Against Biden © 2020 Newsmax. All rights...
    ▶ Watch Video: Trump’s rally attendance takes a hit from pandemic as Biden preps for primaries The University of Michigan is expected to withdraw from hosting a 2020 presidential debate this fall, two sources familiar with the matter tell CBS News. The university was scheduled to host the second of three debates between President Trump and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden on October 15. A formal announcement is expected to come on Tuesday. Sources told CBS News that the decision to withdraw was made in order to avoid having thousands of reporters, protesters and other attendees descend on Ann Arbor amid the coronavirus pandemic. University of Michigan president Mark Schlissel announced Monday that the school plans to hold a mix of in-person and remote classes this fall. “We will protect our students, faculty and staff with a broad array of research-based public health measures and tools,” Schlissel said in a statement about plans for classes this fall. University of Michigan spokesperson Rick Fitzgerald told CBS News that he had no information to share about the debate. The news of the school’s expected...
    The University of Michigan is expected to withdraw from hosting a 2020 presidential debate this fall, two sources familiar with the matter tell CBS News. The university was scheduled to host the second of three debates between President Trump and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden on October 15. A formal announcement is expected to come on Tuesday. Sources told CBS News that the decision to withdraw was made in order to avoid having thousands of reporters, protesters and other attendees descend on Ann Arbor amid the coronavirus pandemic. University of Michigan president Mark Schlissel announced Monday that the school plans to hold a mix of in-person and remote classes this fall. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "We will protect our students, faculty and staff with a broad array of research-based public health measures and tools," Schlissel said in a statement about plans for classes this fall. University of Michigan spokesperson Rick Fitzgerald told CBS News that he had no information to share about the debate. The news of the school's expected withdrawal was first reported by the Detroit Free Press....
    The University of Michigan will withdraw from hosting one of the 2020 presidential debates this fall, a report said Monday. The university was scheduled to host the second of three debates between President Trump and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden on October 15. “U-M is making the move because of concerns of bringing the campaigns, media and supporters of both candidates to Ann Arbor and campus during a pandemic,” sources told The Detroit Free Press. The chaotic political climate may have also been a factor for the university’s decision. “The decision to withdraw was made in order to avoid having thousands of reporters, protesters and other attendees descend on Ann Arbor amid the coronavirus pandemic,” according to CBS News. Rick Fitzgerald, a spokesperson for the university, said Monday night they did not have any information to share about the status of the debate. Last week, the Trump campaign announced they wanted to add another presidential debate to the three that are already scheduled. The president said he was asking his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, to negotiate a fourth debate between the candidates. “We...
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