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    CHICAGO -- Have you ever heard of "Sweetest Day?" Also, would you still be able to recognize your coworkers after nearly two years of working from home? Val and Ryan weigh in on these topics and more this week on Windy City Weekend.RELATED: Roz Varon's Weekender ReportBodybuilding cancer survivor shows how strong she still isOctober is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Ryan caught up with bodybuilder and survivor Erica Langley, who shows him just how strong she is, literally and figuratively!EMBED More News Videos Erica was preparing for her first bodybuilding competition when a shocking diagnosis derailed her plans. Langley was preparing for her first bodybuilding competition when a shocking diagnosis derailed her plans. After dropping a noticeable amount of weight, she felt a peach pit-sized lump on her breast which was later diagnosed as breast cancer.Langley worked with her team of doctors at The University of Chicago Medicine and underwent 20 weeks of radiation and a double mastectomy. When it was safe, she returned to the gym and began training with her coach, Bolo Young. Not only did she...
                      by Casey Harper  New polling on President Joe Biden’s federal vaccine mandate shows the majority of Americans do not think unvaccinated workers should lose their jobs. Convention of States Action released the poll Wednesday, which reports that 65% of surveyed voters “do not believe Americans should lose their jobs if they object to taking the COVID-19 vaccine.” The poll also found 22.2% believe those who refuse the mandate should lose their job, while 12.8% aren’t sure. The data comes as health care workers around the country have lost their jobs for refusing the vaccine, causing staffing problems in some hospitals. Under Biden’s rule, millions of more workers could be in the same position. Feelings on the mandate differed significantly based on political affiliation. According to the poll, “63.6% of Independent voters do not believe Americans should lose their jobs if they object to taking the COVID-19 vaccine, while 15.5% believe they should, and 20.9% aren’t sure.” Those independents tend to be key swing voters targeted by both parties in election years. The...
    The answer to all these questions is no. The vaccines worked for months, they work now and everything indicates that they will continue to work at least in the near future. Vaccinated people are going to be more protected than unvaccinated people and there is no sign of RDW. In fact, what all this means is that we are vaccinating a lot and that you always have to read beyond the headline. Why do they say that there are more hospitalized vaccinated than not vaccinated? The first thing we have to keep in mind is that most of the people hospitalized for covid-19 are people who belong to risk groups, mainly people over 60 years old. In fact, this is the main reason why these groups are precisely the first to receive the different vaccines.
    (CNN)Mask mandates are being lifted across the US. Coronavirus cases and hospitalizations are dropping. People are getting vaccinated. All these promising signs suggest the summer of 2021 could be very different from a year ago. Half of the adult population is now fully vaccinated, according to data published Wednesday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the past week, the US averaged about 28,000 daily new cases, a 19% drop compared to the previous week, according to the CDC. However, a new study underscored the importance of vaccinating more people as it detailed how some of those who had Covid-19 can suffer from symptoms months later.Nearly three-quarters of patients with moderate-to-severe Covid-19 had at least one long-term symptom, according to the analysis published Wednesday in JAMA Network Open.Read MoreResearchers from Stanford University conducted a review of 45 existing studies that followed 9,751 patients in the months after a Covid-19 infection. They found 73% of the patients had at least one symptom 60 days after diagnosis, symptom onset or hospital admission. That finding was consistent even in studies...
    The majority of those who are not planning to get vaccinated for the Chinese coronavirus say there is nothing that could change their mind and convince them to do so, an Economist/YouGov survey released this week found. The survey, taken May 1-4 among 1,500 U.S. adults, asked those who do not plan on getting vaccinated if there is “anything” that could change their mind and convince them to get vaccinated. The overwhelming majority, 79 percent, said “no,” indicating they are firm in their decision. Sixteen percent said they are “not sure,” followed by five percent who said “yes,” demonstrating a willingness to change their mind. The question follows U.S. health experts casting doubt on the United States’ ability to reach herd immunity. That coincides with Dr. Anthony Fauci continually moving the goalposts of reaching herd immunity, boosting the number to over 80 percent. “People were getting confused and thinking you’re never going to get the infections down until you reach this mystical level of herd immunity, whatever that number is,” Fauci told the New York Times in an article highlighting “experts”...
    Stephen Zenner/Getty Images Vaccinated Americans are far more likely to still be concerned that they might contract Covid-19 than people who have not been vaccinated, according to a new Economist/YouGov poll. Of those who do not plan to get vaccinated, 51 percent said they believe it is presently safe to travel, according to the survey released on Friday. Just 29 percent of those who had been vaccinated agreed. Reported mask usage followed a similar pattern, with 45 percent of those who rejected a vaccine saying they felt it was safe to go outside without a mask. That compared to 21 percent of Americans overall who said the same. More than 68 million Americans had been fully vaccinated against Covid-19 as of April 9, according to data compiled by the federal government, accounting for more than 20 percent of the population. More than 114 million people had received at least dose of a vaccine. Slightly more women surveyed (25 percent) said they planned to decline a Covid-19 vaccine than men (23 percent), even if one becomes available to them. Slightly more...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is facing tough questions on Friday about when he will open up vaccine eligibility for people under sixty. At a news conference in Sebastian, the governor said the age will be lowered in due time. However, DeSantis does not expect widespread vaccine demand for those under 55. READ MORE: COVID In Florida: 5,214 Additional Cases, 105 Deaths Reported On Friday “I think as you get into some of the younger demographics, where the risk is a lot lower I think less than 50 percent will opt for it.” READ MORE: Publix Makes COVID-19 Vaccine Appointments For Floridians 60 & Older “We got a little preview of that when we brought it to the hospitals. We did the front-line healthcare professionals and a lot of the nurses chose not to do it. That was their choice. I think you’ll see something similar. I think you’ll see a majority of people 55 and up will ultimately want it but I think below 45 or 40 I think it’ll be less than a majority will...
    Madison Summers December 19, 2020 0 Comments Former White House chief of staff John Kelly is defending those who work in the White House, saying most of them are “decent people.” The Atlantic’s Peter Nicholas spoke to former White House officials, including Kelly, and published their remarks on their past work in a piece titled, “Was It Worth It?” on Friday. President Donald Trump’s former chief of staff told Nicholas, “The vast majority of people who worked in the White House were decent people who were doing the best they could to serve the nation.” Kelly continued, “They’ve unfortunately paid quite a price for that in reputation and future employment. They don’t deserve that.” He added: “They deserve better than that, because they kept the train from careening off the tracks.” Additionally, Kelly noted that “the climate — the work environment — is always set by the boss,” adding, “And people, generally speaking, endured it as long as they could. Until they couldn’t.” Kelly’s remarks received some criticism, including from Joe Walsh, who ran an uphill Republican primary challenge against...
    A new poll from YouGov and the Economist shows that Americans are far more concerned about how supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden will react to a Donald Trump victory in November than they are about Trump supporters should Biden pull off a win. And most voters who believe protests will happen say they are worried things will turn violent. What are the numbers? Nearly three-quarters — 74% — of U.S. adults believe there will likely be mass protests if President Trump wins re-election, the poll showed. Republicans and independents are significantly less likely than Democrats to hold this view: 86% of Democrats expect protests after a Trump victory, compared to 73% of Republicans and independents. This is not surprising considering Democrats and progressives have announced their intentions to take to the streets should Trump win a close election. As exposed by the Daily Beast, the Fight Back Table brought progressive and left-wing groups together to game plan how protest would look following a Trump victory —...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Cook County sheriff's deputies and accused criminals on their watch are the latest combatants in a new, real-life Star Wars struggle. County law enforcement officials have started using satellite technology and global positioning to track people charged with crimes and who are awaiting trial, defendants who until recent years would have been locked up in jail.Now, they are being held virtually, in "E-Carceration," by wearing a tracking bracelet that beams their whereabouts to a Global Positioning System satellite orbiting miles overhead, instead of incarceration behind iron bars at 26th and California.The electronic monitoring system that began 25 years ago mostly for non-violent drug offenders was first based on phone lines and required in-home "control box" equipment. The new program is GPS-based and involves more streamlined technology, according to Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart who is working with University of Chicago on the program."GPS wasn't needed originally because these were non-violent offenders," Sheriff Dart told the ABC7 I-Team on Monday. "We weren't really concerned about them out there. Now we're much more concerned."The sheriff is distressed these days...
    ORLANDO, Florida – For the generation of Americans who are not yet old enough to drive, the demographic future has arrived. For the first time, African-Americans and Hispanics were the majority among the population under the age of 16 in 2019, an expected demographic change that will increase in the coming decades, according to figures published Thursday by the United States Census Bureau. “This is going to be a diversified century for the United States, and it’s starting with this younger generation,” said William Frey of The Brookings Institution. At the same time, the number of non-Hispanic whites has declined in the past decade as deaths outnumbered births in this demographic aging, according to population estimates from the Census Bureau. In 2019, just under 40% of the U.S. population was African American, Hispanic, or another minority. Non-Hispanic whites are expected to be a minority in about 25 years. A natural fall derived from the number of deaths exceeding that of births, in addition to a decrease in immigration to the US, contributed to the decrease in this 2010 population...
    MARTINEZ (CBS SF) — As more Contra Costa County residents are being tested for the coronavirus, it has become clearer that an increasing proportion of those who test positive are young, between 20 and 50 years old, county health officials said Tuesday. Also those officials warned that cases are rising among all groups. “We’re seeing a rise in all indicators, regionally and in the Bay Area,” said Anna Roth, director of Contra Costa County Health Services. That fact, she said, makes it important for county residents to remember there is still a serious pandemic going on. There were 343 new COVID-19 cases in Contra Costa County in the past week, Roth said, about a week ahead of the July 1 date when bars, gyms and personal service businesses are set to reopen, along with indoor restaurant dining. “It’s clear evidence of widespread community transmission,” Roth told the Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors Tuesday. While Contra Costa County hospitals have ample resources to treat those patients at this point, some other area counties are reaching the breaking point. “San Joaquin...
    St. Paul City Attorney Lyndsey Olson announced Friday that all charges against those protesters who did not participate in any acts of violence or destruction of property will be dismissed “in the interest of justice.” Nearly 100 cases were filed in St. Paul related to the civil unrest that broke out in the days following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody on May 25. Olson says of those 100 cases, “the vast majority” likely will be dismissed. According to Olson, 87 cases are curfew violations, while others are related to additional crimes. The City Attorney’s Office will offer alternatives to traditional prosecution for cases involving conduct that went beyond peaceful protesting, including the ETHOS program, which provides “compassionate accountability” through restorative justice principles for first-time or nonviolent offenders. The ETHOS program, Olson said, would facilitate dialogue between participants and community members in order to “develop a unique plan to repair the harm to the victim and the community.” After the participant completes the program, their case will be dismissed and an expungement will be sent to...
    State officials said Saturday that a number of outsiders are fueling the destruction and rioting in the Twin Cities. Gov. Tim Walz estimated about 80 percent of the people causing problems Friday night were from outside Minnesota. Nevertheless, Hennepin County jail records and arrest records in St. Paul show the majority of those in custody are Minnesotans. Four of 18 people arrested in St. Paul between Thursday and Saturday at 6 a.m. were from out of state — from Fort Worth, Texas, La Crosse, Wis., Grand Forks and Fargo. Two did not have addresses listed. The rest of the arrests in St. Paul were people from Minnesota: Five from St. Paul Three from Woodbury Two from Minneapolis One from St. Louis Park One from Mankato. “The number of arrests we’ve made is a very, very small percent of the people who are out there causing problems,” Steve Linders, a St. Paul police spokesman, said Saturday. “We’ve been focused on protecting people and firefighters so they can protect property. I don’t think you can look at 18 people and say it...
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