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    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — An Idaho company that successfully brought genetically modified potatoes to the market announced an agreement Thursday to help a California-based plant breeding company grow strawberries they say will stay fresh longer and have a longer growing season. J.R. Simplot Company and Plant Sciences Inc., both privately-held companies, said they expect to launch the first commercially available, gene-edited strawberries within a few years. U.S. growers produced $2.2 billion in strawberries in 2020, mostly in California, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But consumers discarded an estimated 35% of the crop due to spoilage. Simplot and Plant Sciences officials said genetically modified strawberries will help reduce waste, and make them available to consumers much of the year. The strawberries will contain genes from only strawberries, selecting desirable traits that have been cultivated over decades to combine them through gene editing. “It’s the same technology we’re working on with potatoes,” said Doug Cole, director of Marketing and Biotech Affairs at Simplot. “We have the opportunity to do that with this technology.” There is no evidence that...
    The Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna for “developing a genome editing method”. His discoveries have “revolutionized the life sciences,” the Academy said during the announcement. The 51-year-old Frenchwoman and 56-year-old American became the sixth and seventh women to win a Nobel Prize in chemistry since 1901. In June 2012, the two geneticists and colleagues describe in the journal Science a new tool capable of simplifying genome modification. The mechanism is called Crispr / Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, or Regularly Spaced Clustered Short Palindromic Repeats) and is nicknamed “molecular scissors.” According to the doctor of Law specialized in Bioethics Vicente Bellver, “it is not the first technology that allows gene editing, nor was the Ford T the first car to be manufactured, but it is the one that manages to do it accurately, cheaply and easily” . While gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene into cells that have a faulty gene, such as a Trojan horse, to do the job that this bad...
    More On: genetics Prenatal test developed in collaboration with Chinese military collects gene data When you lose your virginity may be up to your genes: study Honeybee can clone itself millions of times, study shows Scientists saving endangered salmon get help from gene-slicing tool LONDON — The World Health Organization issued new recommendations Monday on human genome editing, calling for a global registry to track “any form of genetic manipulation” and proposing a whistle-blowing mechanism to raise concerns about unethical or unsafe research. The U.N. health agency commissioned an expert group in late 2018 following a dramatic announcement from Chinese scientist He Jiankui that he had created the world’s first gene-edited babies. In two reports Monday, WHO’s expert group said all studies involving human genome editing should be made public, although the committee noted that wouldn’t necessarily stop unprincipled scientists. “In the field of stem cell research, unscrupulous entrepreneurs and clinics have deliberately misused clinical trial registries by registering procedures they plan to undertake as if they were properly sanctioned clinical trials,” the group said, calling for WHO to...
    A treatment about to be tested here in the Bay Area holds the promise of possibly curing a debilitating disease, that disproportionately affects the African American community, sickle cell disease.Researchers from UCSF, UC Berkeley, and UCLA are teaming up to learn if they can defeat the disease, by changing the patient's genetics.For decades one of the best hopes for children or adults suffering from sickle cell has been a bone marrow transplant. Sometimes turning into a life or death struggle to find a match. But soon there could be a revolutionary alternative."That's challenging because you have to find a compatible donor. In this case, we're using the patient as their own donor," explains Dr. Mark Walters, M.D. of UCSF.RELATED: California doctor not worried about a 4th COVID wave explains why you shouldn't be, eitherDr. Walters is leading a groundbreaking clinical trial at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland First it helps to understand that sickle cell is a genetic condition that turns a patient's red blood cells into a hardened, sickle shape which can leave the blood unable to carry...
    A treatment about to be tested in California holds the promise of possibly curing a debilitating disease, that disproportionately affects the African American community, sickle cell disease.Researchers from UCSF, UC Berkeley, and UCLA are teaming up to learn if they can defeat the disease, by changing the patient's genetics.For decades one of the best hopes for children or adults suffering from sickle cell has been a bone marrow transplant. Sometimes turning into a life or death struggle to find a match. But soon there could be a revolutionary alternative."That's challenging because you have to find a compatible donor. In this case, we're using the patient as their own donor," explains Dr. Mark Walters, M.D. of UCSF.Dr. Walters is leading a groundbreaking clinical trial at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland First it helps to understand that sickle cell is a genetic condition that turns a patient's red blood cells into a hardened, sickle shape which can leave the blood unable to carry normal oxygen to the body."It's a hereditary disorder. It's caused by this one base pair change in their...
    It’s wonderful, but it won’t solve the global health problem. In severe cases, patients receive bone-marrow transplants, a risky treatment that requires perfectly matched donors that are very difficult to find. While the CRISPR treatment also requires a bone marrow transplant, it uses the patient’s own blood stem cells. First, blood stem cells were extracted from the patient and the defective cells destroyed using chemotherapy, much like with regular bone marrow transplants. Then, researchers used CRISPR’s DNA-cutting enzyme’s and guide RNA to break BCL11A — a genetic switch that shuts off the gene for fetal hemoglobin early in life. With that gene now reactivated, fetal hemoglobin is produced that restores missing missing hemoblogin for beta-thalassemia patients and replaces flawed hemoglobin in sickle cell patients. As a result, most patients in the trials made sufficient amounts of fetal hemoglobin and no longer needed blood transfusions. Those include a teenager who can now swim pain-free, along with a young man who has gone without blood transfusions for two and half years after needing them regularly before, according to Boston Children’s Hospital. ...
    The Associated Press reported that scientists are seeing promising results from the first studies testing gene editing for a painful, inherited blood disorder that affects millions globally — especially Black people. Doctors are hopeful that a one-time treatment, which involves permanently altering DNA in blood cells with a tool called CRISPR, will treat and possibly cure sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia. Great news on a horrific and deadly disease. To understand more about sickle cell, and the role of #CRISPR gene editing treatments watch our documentary #HumanNatureFilm on Netflix. https://t.co/tD4DiNp5uo — Dan Rather (@DanRather) December 5, 2020 Some results were published by the New England Journal of Medicine and partial results were presented Saturday at an American Society of Hematology conference. Doctors detailed the progress of 10 patients who are several months removed from their treatment. The patients are now free from the pain crises that plagued their lives prior to the new treatment, and no longer require regular blood transfusions. The first patient in the sickle cell study, Victoria Gray, had long suffered severe pain that sent...
    Scientists are seeing promising early results from the first studies testing gene editing for painful, inherited blood disorders that plague millions worldwide, especially Black people. Doctors hope the one-time treatment, which involves permanently altering DNA in blood cells with a tool called CRISPR, may treat and possibly cure sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia. Partial results were presented Saturday at an American Society of Hematology conference and some were published by the New England Journal of Medicine. Doctors described 10 patients who are at least several months removed from their treatment. All no longer need regular blood transfusions and are free from pain crises that plagued their lives before. Victoria Gray, the first patient in the sickle cell study, had long suffered severe pain bouts that often sent her to the hospital. “I had aching pains, sharp pains, burning pains, you name it. That’s all I’ve known my entire life,” said Gray, 35, who lives in Forest, Mississippi. “I was hurting everywhere my blood flowed.” Since her treatment a year ago, Gray has weaned herself from pain medications she depended...
    By MARION RENAULT, Associated Press Scientists are seeing promising early results from the first studies testing gene editing for painful, inherited blood disorders that plague millions worldwide. Doctors hope the one-time treatment, which involves permanently altering DNA in blood cells with a tool called CRISPR, may treat and possibly cure sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia. Partial results were presented Saturday at an American Society of Hematology conference and some were published by the New England Journal of Medicine. Doctors described 10 patients who are at least several months removed from their treatment. All no longer need regular blood transfusions and are free from pain crises that plagued their lives before. Victoria Gray, the first patient in the sickle cell study, had long suffered severe pain bouts that often sent her to the hospital. “I had aching pains, sharp pains, burning pains, you name it. That’s all I’ve known my entire life,” said Gray, 35, who lives in Forest, Mississippi. “I was hurting everywhere my blood flowed.” Since her treatment a year ago, Gray has weaned herself from pain medications...
    STOCKHOLM (AP) – The Nobel Prize in chemistry went to two researchers Wednesday for a gene-editing tool that has revolutionized science by providing a way to alter DNA, the code of life – technology already being used to try to cure a host of diseases and raise better crops and animals. Emmanuelle Charpentier of France and Jennifer A. Doudna of the United States won for developing CRISPR-cas9, a very simple technique for cutting a gene at a specific spot, allowing scientists to operate on flaws that are the root cause of many diseases. “There is enormous power in this genetic tool,” said Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry. More than 100 clinical trials are underway to study using CRISPR to treat inherited diseases, and “many are very promising,” said Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine. The work has also opened the door to some thorny ethical issues: When editing is done after birth, the alterations are confined to that person. Scientists fear misuse of CRISPR to make “designer babies” by altering eggs, embryos or...
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