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    The Alabama Senate race will advance to a runoff between Rep. Mo Brooks and Katie Britt, the former chief of staff for outgoing Sen. Richard Shelby.  Britt was 15 points ahead of Brooks, but failed to capture 50 percent of the vote, triggering a runoff election on June 16.  With over 95 percent of the votes in, Britt was nearly 100,000 votes ahead, and led Brooks 44.7 percent to 29.2 percent.  'Thank you, Alabama! What an incredible night! We still have a lot of work to do. But I’m ready to take on the fight. We’re going to win on June 21!' Britt wrote on Twitter Tuesday night.  'WE DID IT! Tonight, we clinched our spot in the runoff election. Thank you for everything you’ve done to make this happen. But we don’t have a moment to rest—because it’s game on for the runoff starting now,' Brooks tweeted.  Katie Britt, pictured above as she arrived to talk with supporters at a watch party, led Brooks by 15 points   Trump initially endorsed, Rep. Mo Brooks, a longtime election denier, but clawed...
    (CNN)The most important election on Tuesday isn't the Georgia governor's race, where incumbent Brian Kemp is expected to romp over former Sen. David Perdue in the Republican primary. It's further down-ballot, where Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and Rep. Jody Hice appear to be in a tight GOP primary race.Whoever emerges as the Republican nominee for secretary of state will advance to the general election. The winner of that race in the fall will eventually oversee Georgia elections in 2024. And as we learned in 2020, that job could be the difference between upholding the democratic process and destroying it.A quick refresher: Raffensperger, who was a Donald Trump supporter, was elected in 2018. He was a largely unknown official until the 2020 general election, in which Joe Biden narrowly beat out Trump in the Peach State. Trump was utterly convinced that he had won the state -- despite several recounts that showed him behind -- and leaned heavily on Raffensperger to alter the results.In a January 2021 phone call with Raffensperger, Trump was blunt about his goals. "So look....
    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Daniel Donner, and Carolyn Fiddler, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Subscribe to our podcast, The Downballot! x Embedded Content Leading Off ● Primary Night: You Kemp Lose If You Don't Play: We have another big primary night in store on Tuesday as voters in Alabama, Arkansas, and Georgia head to the polls. That's not all, though, as Texas is holding runoffs for races where no one earned a majority of the vote in the March 1 primary. On top of that, both Democrats and Republicans in Minnesota's 1st Congressional District will pick nominees for an Aug. 9 special election to succeed Republican Rep. Jim Hagedorn, who died in February. And as always, we've put together our preview of what to watch.   Perhaps the biggest race on the calendar is the Democratic runoff for Texas' 28th Congressional District where Henry Cuellar, who is the last anti-choice Democrat in the House,...
    After the horrors of January 6, 2021, Donald Trump’s critics — from liberals and progressives to centrists to right-wing Never Trump conservatives — were hoping his influence on the Republican Party would end. But 16 months into Joe Biden’s presidency, countless Republican primary candidates are begging Trump for his endorsement. And some of the Trump-backed GOP candidates who have prevailed in high-profile races, journalist Alexander Bolton reports in an article published by The Hill on May 19, underscore the influence he still has on his party. Republican primary candidates who have received Trump’s endorsement and gone on to win the GOP nomination include “Hillbilly Elegy” author J.D. Vance in Ohio’s U.S. Senate race, Rep. Ted Budd in North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race and Pennsylvania State Sen. Doug Mastriano in the Keystone State’s gubernatorial race. But far-right Trump ally Rep. Madison Cawthorn was voted out of office via a congressional primary in North Carolina on Tuesday, May 17, and the disgraced and scandal-plagued but Trump-backed businessman Charles Herbster lost to GOP nominee Jim Pillen in Nebraska’s Republican gubernatorial primary. Nonetheless, the...
    SACRAMENTO —  Except for governor, the most important statewide elective office in California is attorney general. And there’ll be a pivotal vote on the job in the June 7 primary. Voters will choose the two runoff candidates to compete in the November general election. Democratic Atty. Gen. Rob Bonta is a shoo-in for one slot simply because there’s a “D” after his name in this deep-blue state. Whether he’s contested competitively in November may well hinge on whom voters select as his challenger. The top two vote-getters in the primary, regardless of party, will advance to the runoff. Citizens can vote for any candidate, regardless of their party registration. Besides governor and attorney general, half the other statewide offices could be eliminated and the only thing we’d give up would be a lot of unnecessary spending. The attorney general is powerful. The office is responsible for seeing that our laws are enforced — criminal and civil. It can appeal court decisions and bring suits. The last attorney general, Xavier Becerra, sued then-President Trump more than 100 times. Attorney general also is...
    Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – host Leahy welcomed The Tennessee Star’s national political editor, Neil McCabe, to the newsmaker line to weigh in on Tuesday night’s primary races in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Leahy: On the newsmaker line, the very best Washington correspondent in the country, national political editor for The Tennessee Star and The Star News Network, Neil W. McCabe. Neil, I have to tell you, I watched your appearance last night analyzing the primaries on Frank Speech, frankspeech.com, with Brannon Howse. That was very interesting. And the two of you had really great chemistry back and forth. That was very entertaining. So thanks for that, Neil W. McCabe. McCabe: I really enjoyed being on with Brannon. He has a nice flow to his show. And yeah, I really enjoyed the hit. I enjoy his show, too. Leahy: So Pennsylvania primary, North Carolina primary. Where do we stand in all of this back and forth? McCabe:...
    Leading Pennsylvania Democratic Senate candidate, Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, had a pacemaker installed on Tuesday, the same day as his primary, after suffering a stroke Friday and placing a vote for himself from his hospital bed. 'John Fetterman is about to undergo a standard procedure to implant a pacemaker with a defibrillator. It should be a short procedure that will help protect his heart and address the underlying cause of his stroke,' Fetterman's campaign said, explaining that it would regulate his heart rate and rhythm.  The progressive populist is running a highly-publicized race against moderate Democratic House Rep. Conor Lamb and state House Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta. Earlier Tuesday, a campaign aide released a photo of Fetterman filling out an absentee ballot from Lancaster General Hospital in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  He was already expected to miss election day events, with his wife Gisele slated to speak at Tuesday night's election night party.  Pennsylvania's Lt. Gov. John Fetterman, who is the leading Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, fills out an absentee ballot on Tuesday after suffering a stroke. His campaign later said he was getting...
    Controversy surrounding Senate candidate Kathy Barnette continues to surface as we near Pennsylvania’s Republican primary election. After tweets surfaced clearly depicting how homophobic and Islamophobic she is, the candidate’s most recent controversy has arrived in the form of photos of her participating in a march before the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. In the photos, Barnette is depicted with the white nationalist group, the Proud Boys. Prior to the photos being confirmed by NBC News on May 16, no evidence indicated Barnette attended the insurrection outside of speculation. Barnette admitted hosting multiple rallies for the “Stop the Steal” movement and organizing buses to attend a rally before the failed Capitol coup, but had never spoken about attending it herself. The newly released photos reveal not only that she attended but that she also marched alongside a member of the racist group who was later indicted for breaking into the building and attacking officers. Both the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center have noted that the Proud Boys group is violent and hateful, with "anti-Muslim and misogynistic rhetoric.” At this time, no evidence indicates Barnette breached the Capitol or engaged in...
    Share this: This article was originally published on May 10 at 8:12pm EDT by THE CITY. This summer’s primary election ballots for key positions inside the Brooklyn Democratic Party are nearly set – putting insurgents within striking distance of potentially toppling current party leadership.  
    In the 2022 midterms, many of the aggressive primary challenges that GOP incumbents are facing — from Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp to Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming — are coming from Donald Trump devotees who believe they aren’t MAGA enough. But in North Carolina, Rep. Madison Cawthorn is being primaried by fellow Republicans for a different reason: They believe the ultra-MAGA, controversy-ridden congressman has been an embarrassment. And according to the Daily Beast’s Sam Brodey, opposition research against Cawthorn from his primary rivals has gone into overdrive. “Multiple embarrassing traffic stops, a credible accusation of insider trading, photos of him sporting hoop earrings and a bra, a video of a male staffer’s hand near his crotch, another video showing him jokingly but nakedly humping the upper body of potentially the same man — his cousin — and possibly, more to come,” Brodey writes in an article published on May 10. “Few in politics have seen anything like the ever-worsening public relations train wreck that has consumed the political career of Rep. Madison Cawthorn (R-NC). The unrelenting pile-up of damaging stories,...
    Former President Donald Trump's clout within the Republican Party will again be on the ballot Tuesday as Republican voters head to the polls in Nebraska and West Virginia. In Nebraska, Trump has backed gubernatorial candidate Charles Herbster, who has been accused of groping at least eight women - allegations he denies.  In West Virginia, Trump put his weight behind GOP Rep. Alex Mooney, who is running against GOP Rep. David McKinley to represent the newly-formed 2nd Congressional District, after the state lost a House seat due to the population shrinking.   NEBRASKA: Former President Donald Trump (right) shakes the hand of his chosen Nebraska gubernatorial candidate Charles Herbster (left), who is facing a bevy of groping allegations  WEST VIRGINIA: Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Rep. Alex Mooney in a Republican primary against Rep. David McKinley, as the two incumbents go head-to-head to represent the newly-formed 2nd Congressional District In both cases, Trump's picks have gone against the endorsement of the governors of the states.  Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, who can't run for re-election due to term limits, has put his weight behind Jim...
    What’s on the ballot in California’s 2022 primary election?
    Ohio Republican J.R. Majewski The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Stephen Wolf, Daniel Donner, and Carolyn Fiddler, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Subscribe to our podcast, The Downballot! x Embedded Content Leading Off ● OH-09: Tuesday's night's biggest surprise came in Ohio's newly gerrymandered 9th Congressional District, when J.R. Majewski, a QAnon-aligned activist who attended the Jan. 6 Trump rally that preceded the attack on the Capitol, defeated two Republican state legislators to win the nod to take on 20-term Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur. Majewski edged out state Rep. Craig Riedel 36-31, with state Sen. Theresa Gavarone taking third with 29%, and will now face Kaptur in a Toledo area constituency that would have supported Trump 51-48—a massive shift from Biden's 59-40 victory in her current district. Majewski, who previously served in the Air Force, made news in 2020 when he used paint to transform his yard into a giant "Trump 2020" banner, a move that Trump himself praised on Twitter. Majewski soon...
    Polls closed in the Ohio primary Tuesday night, offering a first glance at former President Donald Trump's hold over the Republican Party going into the 2022 midterms.  In the closely watched Republican Senate primary, early returns showed Hillbilly Elegy author neck-and-neck with state Sen. Matt Dolan, whose billionaire family owns the Cleveland Guardians.  Last month, former President Donald Trump announced he would be endorsing Vance - despite Vance being critical of the ex-president in the past.  Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance (left) shakes the hand of former President Donald Trump (right) during a Save America rally late last month after Trump gave Vance his endorsement  Early returns showed J.D. Vance neck-and-neck with state Sen. Matt Dolan (pictured), whose family owns the Cleveland Guardians baseball team. In September when Dolan announced his Senate bid, Trump said he wouldn't endorse the senator over the Guardians' name change  Your browser does not support iframes. Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance (center), who is running for U.S. Senate as a Republican, stands alongside Reps. Matt Gaetz (left) and Marjorie Taylor Greene (right) at...
    Here are our recommendations for the June 7 election. Click on the links to read the full editorials. California Senate District 10 – Lily Mei California Assembly District 20 – Shawn Kumagai District 24 – Lan Diep Alameda County Board of Supervisors, Dist. 3 – David Kakishiba District Attorney – Terry Wiley Superintendent of Schools – L.K. Monroe Contra Costa County Board of Supervisors, Dist. 1 – John Gioia Board of Supervisors, Dist. 4 – Ken Carlson Assessor – Floy Andrews Clerk-Recorder – Kristin Braun Connelly District Attorney – Diana Becton Sheriff – Benjamin Therriault Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, Dist. 1 – Johnny Khamis Assessor – Larry Stone District Attorney – Jeff Rosen Sheriff – Bob Jonsen San Jose City Council, Dist. 1 – Rosemary Kamei  San Jose City Council, Dist. 3 – Joanna Rauh San Jose City Council, Dist. 5 – Andres Quintero Ballot Measures Santa Clara County A – Water board term limit increase – No
    The Daily Kos Elections Morning Digest is compiled by David Nir, Jeff Singer, Daniel Donner, and Carolyn Fiddler, with additional contributions from David Jarman, Steve Singiser, James Lambert, David Beard, and Arjun Jaikumar. Subscribe to our podcast, The Downballot! x Embedded Content Leading Off ● NY-Gov: Thursday was the filing deadline for New York's June 28 primary, but despite much chatter and speculation, the state Board of Elections mercifully did not receive a filing from Andrew Cuomo for any office. Politico's Bill Mahoney wryly writes of the disgraced former governor, "If his supporters covertly knocked on tens of thousands of doors in recent weeks and every one of the people they interacted with kept it a secret, then he could still appear on the primary ballot if he put the signatures in a mailbox on Thursday and they arrived at the board by Monday — which is the final deadline." Needless to say, even Agent Mulder would question the existence of a clandestine statewide signature-gathering conspiracy, but if Cuomo wanted to challenge Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul as an independent,...
    What will this year’s midterm elections look like, and what are the most important issues we should be paying attention to? This week, Daily Kos Political Director David Nir joined Joe Sudbay on The Michelangelo Signorile Show to discuss races to keep a watch on. Thirty-four Senate seats, all 435 members of the House, 36 gubernatorial races, and 80 to 90 legislative bodies are up for elections this year. “So this a major election [year],” Sudbay said. “You need to treat this like a presidential election—there’s that much at stake.” “Let’s start at a 30,000 foot level. What’s your sense of how this year is shaping up?” Sudbay asked. Nir broke his analysis down into two pieces, focusing on redistricting and then an overview of the actual midterm races themselves. Starting with redistricting, Nir explained that the process hasn’t exactly shaken out as Democrats expected, in a good way: A lot of progressives had very good reason to fear what redistricting was going to look like overall because really, as a party, we did not do particularly well downballot in 2020 when all...
    Stewart Parks, the latest candidate to announce that he is actively running in the Republican primary for Tennessee’s Fifth Congressional District, is also facing charges stemming from the January 6 Capitol incident. Currently, Parks is collecting qualifying petitions. The Tennessee Star confirmed with Parks that he is indeed the individual that is facing federal charges in connection with the events of January 6, 2021. Parks told to The Star, “I did nothing wrong.” He also said that he believes the charges will have no logistical effect on his ability to campaign for TN-5. Parks is facing five misdemeanor federal charges based on his alleged actions that took place during the January 6th incident at the Capitol. Parks is charged with: Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building or Grounds, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1752(a). Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building or Grounds, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1752(a). Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building, in violation of Title 40, United States Code, Section 5104(e)(2)(D). Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing...
    After five years of behind-the-scenes work, the Common Sense Party recently came closer to qualifying for the California ballot than any other aspiring political party has in more than a decade. But the Secretary of State says the group, along with nine others attempting to qualify before the June 7 primary, still didn’t drum up enough support to make this year’s ballot. Leaders from the Common Sense Party — which bills itself as a political haven for frustrated current and former Republicans and Democrats — are still researching how they fell short and pledging to build on what they’ve started in hopes of being able to back candidates on the 2024 ballot. They’re also asking about how the party qualification process works in California, and whether one change to registration reporting requirements might make it easier for other aspiring parties down the road. Breaking up the partisan divide that comes with a system controlled by two major parties is a concept most Californians and Americans of all stripes — in survey after survey  — say they support. But in California it’s not...
    Live from Music Row Tuesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed State Representative Tim Rudd (R-TN-34) to the newsmaker line to discuss the bill passed on Monday by the Tennessee State Senate, SB2616, which would establish a three-year residency requirement for candidates for the U.S. House and U.S. Senate to qualify for the 2022 primary ballot. Rudd addressed the constitutionality of that bill. In addition, he noted that he served on the Tennessee Republican Party State Executive Committee for 18 years, and that ” based on what members of the party are telling me, Winstead, Baxter Lee, Morgan, and Starbuck, those four [candidates for the Republican nomination in the new Fifth Congressional District of Tennessee] do not meet the bona fide status,” and therefore are not eligible, based on the Tennessee Republican Party bylaws, to be placed on the August 4 Republican primary ballot. You can read the transcript of the interview here: Leahy: We welcome to the...