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    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Wednesday that he will wait for more forensic study of the Champlain Towers South collapse before responding to calls for an overhaul of Florida’s building inspection laws. Condominiums in Florida are “kind of a dime a dozen, particularly in southern Florida,” he said after a briefing on Tropical Storm Elsa at the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee, noting Champlain Towers South “had problems from the start.” “We obviously want to be able to identify why did this happen,’‘ he continued. “Is this something that was unique to this building? Is it something that was unique to the person that maybe developed it – because obviously there are sister properties? Is it something that buildings of that age, that would have implications beyond that whether southern Florida or the entire state of Florida? I think we need to get those definitive answers.” The 12-story, 136-unit beachfront condominium in the Miami suburb of Surfside collapsed on June 24 at 1:25 a.m. As of Wednesday afternoon, 46 bodies had been recovered with 94 people...
    A Japanese spacecraft is returning to Earth on Saturday with a very special delivery: a capsule containing the first-ever rock samples from beneath the surface of an asteroid. When it plummets to Earth, the capsule will provide a stunning show above the Australian outback, streaking across the sky as a dazzling fireball.  Project manager Yuichi Tsuda called the mission a "rare event in human history." It marks just the second time pristine, untouched material directly from an asteroid has been brought back to Earth.  JAXA, Japan's national aerospace and space agency, is streaming the event live at 11:30 a.m. ET on Twitter and YouTube. Watch it here:  Mission Control Live:Hayabusa2 Capsule Reentry Operation by jaxasgm on YouTube Japan's Hayabusa2 probe, which is roughly the size of a refrigerator, launched in December 2014, thrilling scientists when it landed on the diamond-shaped asteroid Ryugu, which means "dragon palace" in Japanese, located 185 million miles away.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox After six years in space, it is now briefly returning to Earth before setting off on its next mission.  This computer...
    (CNN)The first sample collected from material beneath the surface of an asteroid is about to land on Earth. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa2 mission is heading toward Earth to drop off its sample collection capsule before moving on to the next part of its extended mission: visiting more asteroids. Watch the livestream of the capsule's fiery return to Earth through the JAXA YouTube channel. The mission is also sharing updates through its Twitter account, [email protected] this event is occurring between 3:30 and 4:30 a.m. Australian time on Sunday, it will occur between 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. ET Saturday. The capsule is expected to land on Earth about 15 minutes after it enters Earth's atmosphere. A fireball will streak across the early morning sky of the Australian outback during reentry.Read MoreWhat scientists learned after firing a small cannonball into a near-Earth asteroidHayabusa2 launched on December 3, 2014, and arrived at the near-Earth asteroid Ryugu in June 2018. The spacecraft collected one sample from the asteroid's surface on February 22, 2019, then fired a copper "bullet" into the asteroid to...
    (CNN)If life ever existed on ancient Mars, it may not have found a way on the surface -- but several miles below it. A new study suggests that the most habitable part of Mars in the past was likely its subsurface. The study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances.Life, as we understand it on Earth, requires some basic ingredients. Water is one of those. And for years, NASA's succession of robotic missions has been "following the water" on Mars to learn more about the planet's history, including if it ever supported life. Astronauts on a Mars mission will need to be conscientious to work well togetherWhile many scientists believe that Mars was warm and wet billions of years ago before it became the frozen desert it is today, others point to the faint young sun paradox. Four billion years ago, our sun was much fainter -- about 30% fainter. It has grown warmer and brighter over time. If that's the case, then ancient Mars would have been too cold and dry for water or life on its surface.Read...
    Chile's arid desert is said to be the closest thing to Mars that we have on Earth and a new discovery in the hellish landscape could help scientists find life on the Red Planet. A team from Cornell University uncovered diverse microbes lurking in wet clay just 11 inches below the surface of the Atacama Desert, suggesting there could be biosignatures in similar clay deposits on the Martian planet. The Gale crater on Mars is littered with similar clay-rich rocks and may have been habitable to microorganisms similar to those found in subsurface soils in the Earth-based desert. Researches note that if NASA's 2020 rover spots the same fractures around Gale Crater, the region 'should be high-priority targets for sample' in order to find life.  The study reinforce the notion that early Mars could have had a similar subsurface, particularly during the first billion years of its history.  Scroll down for video  A team from Cornell University uncovered diverse microbes lurking in wet clay just 11 inches below the surface of the Atacama Desert, suggesting there could be biosignatures...
    Seismic tests for geological formations that could contain oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska could begin in December under a plan proposed by the federal Bureau of Land Management posted online Friday. The Marsh Creek East Seismic Exploration project – to be conducted by the Kaktovik Iñupiat Corporation – intends to survey 487.8 square miles with equipment that will produce three-dimensional images of the subsurface. Seismic exploration generates acoustic waves that are picked up by sensors as the waves bounce off subsurface formations, the Bureau of Land Management said on its website. From this information, images can be created that show subsurface topography and formations including those areas of potential hydrocarbons. The project would begin in early December by using forward-looking infrared radar – or FLIR – to search for polar bear dens. A second survey for bear dens would occur in January followed by the seismic tests, which would not occur until average snow depths reach 9 inches. Advance crews would conduct surveys to substantiate snow depths to verify adequate snow cover to protect the tundra...
    LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's defence minister said on Wednesday that China was seeking to build the world's biggest surface and subsurface maritime fleet. "China is growing the largest maritime surface and subsurface fleet in the world," Defence Secretary Ben Wallace told the Atlantic Future Forum. "Our competitors continue to challenge us in the grey zone between war and peace." (Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Kate Holton) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, Africa, Russia, United States, coronavirus, crime, Asia, United Kingdom, Europe
    By: Tech Desk | New Delhi | Up-to-date: August 18, 2020 3:43:01 pm Lava tubes (Source: University of Bologna) Planet Earth has many lava tubes, also called as volcanic caves that act as “channels of rivers of lava that at some previously time flowed downslope from a volcanic vent or fissure”. Like Earth, Mars and Moon also have these lava tubes on their subsurface. Even so, according to a the latest research released in the intercontinental journal Earth-Science Opinions, these tubes are 100 and 1,000 greater than Earth on Moon and Mars respectively. “Lava tubes could supply secure shields from cosmic and solar radiation and micrometeorite impacts which are often taking place on the surfaces of planetary bodies,” the study’s lead author, Franceso Sauro, explained in a statement. “Moreover, they have wonderful probable for providing an ecosystem in which temperatures do not change from day- to nighttime. House businesses are now fascinated in planetary caves and lava tubes, as they depict a to start with phase towards foreseeable future explorations of the lunar floor (see also NASA’s challenge Artemis)...
    Lava tubes under the surface of both the moon and Mars are large enough to be the homes of planetary bases as humanity further explores the cosmos, a newly published study suggests. The research notes the tubes are likely between 100 and 1,000 times the size of those on Earth and can shield humans from cosmic radiation. The tubes are also likely up to 100 feet wide and upwards of 25 miles long. “Lava tubes could provide stable shields from cosmic and solar radiation and micrometeorite impacts which are often happening on the surfaces of planetary bodies,” the study’s lead author, Franceso Sauro, said in a statement. “Moreover, they have great potential for providing an environment in which temperatures do not vary from day- to nighttime. Space agencies are now interested in planetary caves and lava tubes, as they represent a first step toward future explorations of the lunar surface (see also NASA’s project Artemis) and toward finding life (past or present) in Mars subsurface.” To come up with their findings, Sauro and the other researchers looked at lava...
    Lava tubes under the surface of both the moon and Mars are large enough to be the homes of planetary bases as humanity further explores the cosmos, a newly published study suggests. The research notes the tubes are likely between 100 and 1,000 times the size of those on Earth and can shield humans from cosmic radiation. The tubes are also likely up to 100 feet wide and upwards of 25 miles long. "Lava tubes could provide stable shields from cosmic and solar radiation and micrometeorite impacts which are often happening on the surfaces of planetary bodies," the study's lead author, Franceso Sauro, said in a statement. "Moreover, they have great potential for providing an environment in which temperatures do not vary from day- to nighttime. Space agencies are now interested in planetary caves and lava tubes, as they represent a first step toward future explorations of the lunar surface (see also NASA's project Artemis) and toward finding life (past or present) in Mars subsurface." (Credit: University of Bologna) ANCIENT MARS MAY HAVE BEEN COVERED IN ICE, NOT WATER, STUDY SUGGESTS...
    Scientists have used radar technology to shed new light on the subsurface of the moon. Researchers used the Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) instrument on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft to analyze the moon. In a statement, NASA explained that the lunar subsurface might be richer in metals, like iron and titanium, than previously thought. The space agency is keen to gain as much information as possible on the moon's resources. NASA's Artemis program aims to land American astronauts on the lunar surface by 2024 and establish a sustainable human presence on Earth’s natural satellite. SCIENTISTS EXPLAIN 'STRANGE ASYMMETRY' MYSTERY FOR THE FAR SIDE OF MOON IN NEW RESEARCH “Substantial evidence points to the moon as the product of a collision between a Mars-sized protoplanet and young Earth, forming from the gravitational collapse of the remaining cloud of debris,” said NASA in the statement. “Consequently, the moon’s bulk chemical composition closely resembles that of Earth.” This image based on data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft shows the face of the Moon we see from Earth. (Credits: NASA/GSFC /Arizona State University) However, there are key differences...
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