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    Republican Rep. Jim Jordan sounded off about Democrats who have accuse Trump and his allies of perpetuating the 'Big Lie' of election fraud in an Oversight Committee hearing Thursday.  'How about all the lies the Democrats have told us over the last couple of years?' the Ohio Republican said at the hearing investigating the Arizona election audit.   'Democrats told us the protests in the summer of 2020 were peaceful. Democrats told us the dossier was real. Democrats told us Trump colluded with Russia.'  'Democrats told us COVID didn't start in a Chinese lab,' he continued. 'Nope, didn't start there -- it was a bat to a pangolin, to a hippopotamus, to Joe Rogan and we get bit -- no, no, no, Democrats for four years told us the 2016 election was stolen. They can investigate that for four years, we're not allowed to question some concerns we have about the 2020 election for four minutes, but they can investigate that for four years.'   Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin and Republican Rep. Andy Biggs also got into a heated exchange during the...
    Dear Amy: Last weekend I ran into a dear old friend and her college-age son. It’s been a while since I’ve seen the son, and it was great to catch up. Amy Dickinson  He has never been one to care much about his appearance, but, holy cow, it must have been a week or more since he showered. His body odor was horrible, to the point where it was hard to stand next to him. And this was an outdoor party! As he and I chatted, he mentioned that during his first year of college while staying in the dorms, he went through three roommates, all of whom “inexplicably” moved out and switched rooms after a few weeks. Amy, if he normally smells even a fraction of how badly he smelled at that party, I can’t even imagine how bad a tiny dorm room must have smelled! Related Articles Ask Amy: Is what my partner is doing considered cheating? Ask Amy: They’d be devastated if they found out about me and my ex Ask...
    (CNN)Split-second decision making, relentless focus and courage are just some of the attributes any Formula One driver needs. Charles Leclerc first stepped into a kart when he was four years old, and was hooked by the thrill of speed after he had his first lesson with his godfather and French racing driver Jules Bianchi. But the financial support required for motorsport racing was an extra barrier, and as the years progressed, his family weren't able to afford the cost of competing. That's when manager Nicolas Todt stepped in, taking on Leclerc in 2012 and paying for his next season. As Leclerc made his way, Bianchi endured a fatal crash in 2014 at the Japanese GP, spent nine months in a coma, and passed away the following year. Tragically, Leclerc's father died in 2017, two experiences that the F1 star told the Guardian were "incredibly hard," but made him "stronger as a person and as a driver." Charles Leclerc prepares to drive on the grid ahead of the Styria Grand Prix at Red Bull Ring on June 27, 2021 in...
    Getty DeVonta Smith #6 of the Alabama Crimson Tide heads to the locker room with a towel covering his right hand during the third quarter of the College Football Playoff National Championship game against the Ohio State Buckeyes. The New York Giants‘ rumored infatuation with projected first-round pick DeVonta Smith is no secret. Earlier this month, Matt Lombardo of GMEN HQ reported that the feeling inside NFL circles is that GM Dave Gettleman is “enamored” by the Alabama product. On Monday, NBC Sports’ Peter King pointed towards Smith winning over yet another prominent name within the Giants’ organization, claiming that head coach Joe Judge “loves” the All-SEC widout. It’s obvious the team has at least some interest in pulling the trigger on Smith with the No. 11 pick come Thursday — and frankly, who could blame them. The 22-year-old is fresh off one of the most prolific receiving campaigns in college football history, where he became just the fourth wideout ever to win the Heisman Trophy. Add in numerous other credentials such as being the recipient of the...
    A quarter of all known stars in the universe are thought to host a 'perfect planet' — one the same size and temperature as Earth. There are approximately a 'zetta' of them ... that's a trillion billions — a one with 21 zeroes after it. So it is presumptuous for us to assume we are the only intelligent beings in this vast cosmos. In fact, to imagine we humans are alone in space is not merely arrogant, it is scientific nonsense. On October 19, 2017, a telescope in Maui, Hawaii's second-largest island, glimpsed the first known interstellar visitor. Without question, this object came from a distant solar system. Was this a natural phenomenon, or one engineered by an intelligent life-form? The simplest explanation is the latter: that it was created by an intelligent civilisation not of this Earth. Earth cannot possibly be the only planet that supports life. Even in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, about a quarter of the 200 billion stars are orbited by planets with the right conditions for liquid water and, thus, the chemistry of...
              Live from Music Row Monday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed guest host Ben Cunningham to the studio. During the first hour, Host Leahy and Cunningham examined the concept of intellectual dishonesty that conservatives experienced from progressives and liberals who believe they know more about governing. They also touched on social media censorship and how some states may be leading the path that may hold Facebook, Google, and Twitter’s of the world accountable and un-protected by Section 230 legislation. (David Ismay clip plays) Leahy: That’s David Ismay, Ben. Cunningham: He’s the commissioner of people control. He’s a tyrant in the making with this virtuous face of saving the planet. Those are the people that are in control of the government now. They think the ends justify the means and they are good virtuous people and their governing over a bunch of deplorable people who simply will not see the light...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — With home life and school upended by the coronavirus pandemic, kids’ letters to Santa Claus look a little different this year. CBS2’s Cory James has more on what they are asking the big man for. Through the eyes of a child, there is no doubt Christmas this year is different, so different that even letters to Santa are being crafted in an unusual way. “I was going to put in something in my letter to end it soon,” 10-year-old Fili Eisenberg said. “It” being COVID-19. MORE: COVID-19 May Make Santa Claus Wear Mask Or Sit Behind Plastic, But It Doesn’t Diminish His Christmas Message The young boy is hoping old Saint Nick can stop the spread, an outbreak he knows is impacting his wish list. “Usually, I’d get like, I’d ask for like nine or 10, but this year because of everything that has happened this year, I kinda shortened my list,” Fili said of the number of gifts he usually receives. MORE: No Crowd, But Rock Center Christmas Tree Still Sight To See Eight-year-old Finn Rooney kept...
    Encourage Your Little Chef With These Adorable Play Kitchens Top 25 roundup: Richmond upsets No. 10 Kentucky The Walking Dead chief on the possibility that HBOs rival zombie show The Last of Us will air during their final season: I think theres room for all of us © Jace Downs/AMC, Sony/NaughtyDog Scott Gimple says there's enough room for "TWD" and "TLOU" on TV side by side. Jace Downs/AMC, Sony/NaughtyDog HBO recently greenlit a TV adaptation of popular video game series "The Last of Us," which follows a zombie apocalypse. It will likely air alongside the final season of AMC's hit zombie series "The Walking Dead," which will end its 11-season run in 2022. "TWD" universe chief content officer, Scott Gimple, tells Insider he plans to watch both and hopes others do as well. "I think there's room for all of us, with zombies and the different ways of telling zombie tales," Gimple said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. HBO is currently working on an adaptation of popular zombie apocalypse video game series "The Last of Us."...
    Scott Gimple says there's enough room for "TWD" and "TLOU" on TV side by side. Jace Downs/AMC, Sony/NaughtyDog HBO recently greenlit a TV adaptation of popular video game series "The Last of Us," which follows a zombie apocalypse. It will likely air alongside the final season of AMC's hit zombie series "The Walking Dead," which will end its 11-season run in 2022. "TWD" universe chief content officer, Scott Gimple, tells Insider he plans to watch both and hopes others do as well. "I think there's room for all of us, with zombies and the different ways of telling zombie tales," Gimple said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. HBO is currently working on an adaptation of popular zombie apocalypse video game series "The Last of Us." When it premieres, there's a very good chance it will run alongside the final 11th season of "The Walking Dead," which will wrap up in 2022. "TWD" chief content officer Scott Gimple told Insider it's something those working on the universe haven't considered. "We didn't think about potentially splitting the walker...
    Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston reunited onscreen for the first time in decades on Thursday with a risqué scene during a star-studded table read of 1982 movie Fast Times At Ridgemont High. The actor, 56, took on the role of Brad Hamilton, originally played by Judge Reinhold, 63, while his ex-wife Jennifer, 51, played high school 'sex queen' Linda Barrett, portrayed by Phoebe Cates, 57, in the coming-of-age teenage dramedy. The former couple shared a screen together during the film's daydream sequence which takes place after Brad arrives at a pool party hosted by his younger sister Stacy Hamilton, played by Oscar-winning actress Julia Roberts, 52. 
    Nicholas Irving, a former Special Operations Sniper, spoke with the Daily Caller’s Samantha Renck about his time in the service, what July 4th means to him and advice for future Americans. Irving recalled his most memorable moment in the service. “I would have to say the day I think that I should have died,” Irving said. “The day that I consider the day that I died in Afghanistan, it was July. The day my life was saved by Corporal Benjamin Kopp [and] being pinned down by a Chechen enemy sniper for about three hours during the 19-hour firefight.” Irving added that he “went in with 210 rounds and left with about six, and thought I was going to die that day. I contemplated death.” He added that his favorite part of the service was “the guys, [he] loved the guys.” Irving reflected on July 4th and what the day means for him. “It’s the unison that we can all come to a commonality or a common ground that we can all agree on,” Irving said. “America, the place that we’re...
    Monday on ABC’s “The View,” comedian Jon Stewart said he thought the words “white power” played over and over in President Donald Trump’s head. Co-host Whoopi Goldberg said, “We just talk about you know whose retweet of the video of his supporters yelling white power? Just out of curiosity, you think he couldn’t hear or didn’t hear what was being said? Maybe he had, you know, wax in his ear or something.” Stewart said, “No. I think just white power is playing in his head all the time. So he hears it from somewhere else, he just thinks —I think it’s just like Muzak just kind of playing in his head all the time, so he doesn’t really listen to it. And listen, that’s The Villages in Florida. I’ve got to tell you that parade reminded me of a lot of Passover Seders I have been to. That’s pretty much how it goes. Let’s celebrate our freedom Egypt, and then you guys can curse at each other. I’ve got relatives that are to the right of Genghis Khan. So I...
    U.S. Attorney General William Barr disputed the concept of “systemic racism” in America’s police departments Thursday, telling National Public Radio “it is wrong to demonize all the police” based on cherry-picked statistics. Steve Inskeep, a host of NPR’s Morning Edition, interviewed Barr about several subjects relating to the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Trump Administration before shifting into a discussion of race and law enforcement, teed up by Barr’s recent remarks contesting “systemic racism” in the wake of several high-profile killings of black Americans like George Floyd in Minnesota and Breonna Taylor in Kentucky. “A black man in the United States, statistically, is far more likely to be shot by a police officer than someone of a different race,” Inskeep asked. “Why do you think that is?” “There are 8,000 blacks who are killed every year,” Barr replied. “Eighty-five percent of them are killed by gunshots. Virtually all of those are blacks on blacks,” he explained. If put in “perspective,” he argued, the data on police-involved shootings does not fit the narrative of the Black Lives Matter movement — which...
    COVID-19 peak dates for every state Gunmaker Remington is preparing to file for bankruptcy Incredible $49 Smart Watch Is Taking The US By Storm Ad Microsoft 20+ Gadgets We Bet You Haven't Seen Yet Ad Microsoft Transfer VHS Tapes, Film, and Photos to Digital Ad Microsoft ...
    Famous people whove had COVID-19 House passes sweeping policing bill SB Nation Reacts: What do MLB fans think of the plan for a 60-game 2020 season? Will it all happen? Welcome to SB Nation Reacts, a survey of fans across MLB. Each week, we send 30 polls to plugged in fans from each team. Nationals fans, sign up HERE to join SB Nation Reacts. Major League Baseball and the MLBPA have plans to start Spring Training 2.0 on July 1st and begin the 2020 campaign on either July 23rd or 24th. They’re going to try to play 60 games, and a regular postseason in October. The coronavirus might have other ideas, and when we asked the SB Nation Reacts folks if they thought MLB and its players would actually pull this off and finish a 60 game season and postseason, they were... let’s say pessimistic... © Provided by SB Nation That’s 59% of respondents who think it might be difficult to finish even a 60-game season in 2020, during like, you know, a pandemic. Considering that yesterday (6/24)...
    MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski tore into Donald Trump’s coronavirus testing remarks now that the White House is insisting that the president was joking during his rally in Tulsa. Morning Joe started the week by looking at how acting DHS Secretary Chad Wolf and White House trade adviser Peter Navarro claimed Trump was being humorous or “tongue in cheek” when he said, “I said to my people, ‘Slow the testing down, please!” After that, the show aired a montage with several of Trump’s most controversial statements of the last few years that he and his allies have defended as sarcasm or “clearly joking.” “When is he serious? Is he ever serious?” Brzezinski asked. “I think what we can deduce here is he’s never joking.” Scarborough then sorted through the “treason,” police brutality, the coronavirus’ death toll, and all the other topics Trump supposedly joked about according to his defenders. “Now if you think that’s funny, I guess you and I just have a different sense of humor,” Scarborough said. When twice as many people have already died of this...
    Few WWE performers have had the rivalry and relationship with The Undertaker that Paul “Triple H” Levesque has. Ahead of the final episode of the docuseries “The Last Ride” (Sunday, 10 a.m., WWE Network), Levesque talks with The Post’s Joseph Staszewski about Mark Calaway and their experiences together. (Edited for clarity and length) Q: How would you characterize your relationship with The Undertaker? A: We have a close relationship that I think was built on mutual respect for each other, but also I think we have a lot in common from a human being standpoint, the way we look at things, the way we approach things. I think there is also an understanding of, we were, it sounds cliche, a slightly different generation of performer. I think that we just had that same mentality of stuff at kind of a moment in time over the past five years, or so it feels like, we have been going through the same, to a degree, some of the same doubts and fears and anxiousness and nervousness around our careers and how do...
    Padma Lakshmi has plenty on her plate these days, and she couldn’t be prouder. The longtime judge of Bravo’s “Top Chef” has created a new Hulu docu-series titled “Taste the Nation” where she also serves as host. The show aims to celebrate the food of American immigrants and indigenous people. And the series hits close to home for the 49-year-old. Lakshmi is an Indian-America who came to the U.S. when she was just 4 years old. “Taste the Nation” takes Lakshmi to the Texas border city of El Paso where she talks to locals about the wall. She travels to South Carolina to go crabbing and explore Gullah Geechee food. The star also heads to Las Vegas to spend time with Thai immigrants, as well as Arizona to get better acquainted with Native American ingredients - just to name a few. In each episode, Lakshmi consults with community leaders, such as former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, who gets candid about being bullied as a child. BILL NYE 'THE SCIENCE GUY' REVEALS FUNNY ENCOUNTERS WITH FANS, HOW MANY BOW TIES HE...
    Kyler Murray doesn’t care whom he upsets or disappoints by kneeling during the national anthem. The Cardinals’ quarterback received backlash when he announced on Instagram his decision to protest social inequality and police brutality. “You think I give a f–k,” he responded to a fan who objected. The NFL’s Offensive Rookie of the Year explained the decision on Wednesday as doing “what’s right.” While he hasn’t dealt with issues with the police growing up, he had been pulled over and let go because he was recognizable. Murray has been encouraged by the nationwide protests following the death of black man George Floyd after a white Minneapolis police officer kept his knee on the back of Floyd’s neck. The quarterback wants to do his part. “I don’t really care what anybody thinks about me, never have, but I know a lot of people that do,” Murray said. “And for me being a black man in America, if it’s wrong I’m gonna say it’s wrong. I feel like personally, it’s on everybody to hold each other accountable. But more so, for me,...
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