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    Former Secretary of Education Arne DuncanArne Starkey DuncanStripping opportunity from DC's children Catherine Lhamon will make our schools better, fairer, and more just Providing the transparency parents deserve MORE is considering a bid to become mayor of Chicago in 2023, he told reporters this week. Duncan made the remarks while laying out a plan to remake the city’s police department, which he called “in crisis” after years of violence in Chicago neighborhoods. Chicago suffered 836 homicides in 2021, the highest yearly total since the 1990s. “All of us as citizens are just extraordinarily concerned about where we are as a city right now and want to get to a better place,” Duncan said, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “It’s just way too serious … to stay silent.” A strategist advising Duncan said the former secretary is still months away from a formal announcement. “He’s definitely thinking about it, he’s talking to folks,” the adviser said. “He’s getting close to a decision.” Duncan, 57, served as chief executive of Chicago Public Schools under Mayor Richard M. Daley before leaving in 2009...
    New York Times reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones echoed failed 2021 gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe’s comments on a parent’s role in education. NBC’s "Meet the Press" dove into the topic of "Schools, America, and Race" on Sunday, using Hannah-Jones’ "1619 Project" as a subject. The 1619 Project, as well as critical race theory, have come under controversy for appearing to influence school curriculum.  1619 PROJECT FOUNDER SAYS SHE’S NOT A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR DESPITE BEING COLLEGE FACULTY MEMBER  New York Times Magazine reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones was called out Thursday for claiming there is no need to "leave out context and inconvenient facts" from a strong argument when critics pointed out she did exactly that with her controversial "1619 Project." (Getty Images for Tribeca Festival) (Monica Schipper/Getty Images for Tribeca Festival) "Did you intend for The 1619 Project to become public school curriculum, or did you intend it to start a debate to improve the curriculum of how we teach American history?" host Chuck Todd asked.  Though Hannah-Jones said that the project was pitched as a "work of journalism," she admitted that it...
    VIDEO1:2501:25Wealth manager: How to make sure college is worth the costEarn Getting a college degree typically pays, but it's not a guarantee. Although workers with more education generally earn more, a good number of those without a college diploma are making more than college graduates. Roughly 16% of high school grads earn more than half of workers with a bachelor's degree, according to a new report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. Likewise, 28% of workers with an associate's degree earn more than half of workers with a bachelor's degree, and 36% of workers with a bachelor's degree earn more than half of workers with a master's degree. More from Personal Finance:Families massively underestimate cost of collegeFewer students are going to college because of the costHow to maximize your college financial aid "More education doesn't always get you more money," said Anthony Carnevale, the center's director and lead author of the report. "You can get less education and make more, it's true," he said. "You can get more education and make less; it all depends on...
    In early July, the U.S. Education Department under President Joe Biden canceled nearly $56 million in student loan debt for some 1,800 borrowers, bringing the administration's total to about $1.5 billion erased. While a win for many borrowers, it isn't a sign that broad-based student loan debt forgiveness will necessarily come anytime soon, experts say. That's because the latest round of canceled debt was specifically done through the "borrower defense to repayment" program. Borrower defense was created to protect people from being defrauded by schools engaging in misconduct or violating certain laws, such as falsely claiming guaranteed employment or incorrectly telling students that credits would transfer to other colleges. More from Invest in You:How to navigate the child tax credit payments processHas the 4-day workweek's time come? Some predict it will catch onChild tax credit payments will help offset loss of pandemic programs It is separate from the Biden administration's efforts to determine whether the president can legally cancel student loan debt through executive order. "They are apples and oranges," said Betsy Mayotte, president and founder of The Institute of...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Alan Page was married in 1973, midway through a Hall of Fame career with the Minnesota Vikings, and he and his wife soon went to work on covering the bare walls in the new home they had built. The remedy was art, and their collection flourished. READ MORE: Were Proud Of Our Heritage: St. Pauls Latino Restaurants Celebrate Cinco De Mayo Now, as Page’s unparalleled post-football path continues in Minnesota in the intersecting spaces of educational opportunity and racial justice, two of the couple’s most prized pieces are on the market. Diane Sims Page died in 2018, and her surviving husband and children decided the time was right. The drawings of Jean-Michel Basquiat — “The Athlete” and “Starvation” — will be included among the 400-some items in next month’s 20th century and contemporary art sale at the Phillips Auction House in New York. They’re each valued at more than $200,000. “It’s truly been an honor to actually learn more about Justice Page and his work. It really speaks to their foresight,” said John McCord, who is directing...
    MSNBC host Joy Reid laughed at the expense of parents who say they aren't "racist" for opposing critical race theory (CRT) being taught in schools.  There has been a growing push by Democrats nationwide, including by the Biden administration, to implement CRT and the controversial 1619 Project into children's education as part of the cultural reckoning following the death of George Floyd.  On Tuesday, Reid noted how some parents "aren't too pleased" by the new curriculum and played a clip of one Missouri parent expressing her opposition to CRT at a town hall. MSNBC'S JOY REID CONTINUES TO MAKE CONTROVERSIAL COMMENTS THREE YEARS AFTER HOMOPHOBIC BLOG SCANDAL "Just because I do not want critical race theory taught to my children in school does not mean I'm a racist, damn it!" a tearful mother exclaimed as she choked up.  Reid laughed.  "Actually, it does," the ReidOut host grinned. "It's just another example of Republicans turning kids into a wedge issue just like their politically motivated attacks on transgender youth who just want to play sports. VideoLast week, Republican lawmakers demanded President Biden's Department of Education block...
    Fox News host Laura Ingraham opened Monday's "Ingraham Angle" blasting the Left for its indoctrination young people, saying that through "reading, writing and inciting," they are teaching that it is acceptable to destroy your community if you don't like the outcome of a trial. INGRAHAM: Where do they learn this behavior? You ever think about that? The hateful desire to destroy communities—your own communities in some cases—and the businesses that employ neighbors and immigrants, minorities, non-minorities, it doesn’t come out of nowhere. This is learned behavior.   Young people are learning that it is O-K to riot and loot when you don’t like the outcome of a trial in a far away state.  Imagine if conservatives had the same attitude every time they lost an abortion case? Most America cities would just be mounds of rubble by now. But the pro-life community doesn’t embrace violence. Not like Auntie Maxine. ... Young people especially are being whipped up into a frenzy by an irresponsible media at their biased reporting. On social media it’s happening. And of course in schools. Enter the...
                      by Corey DeAngelis  Last week, Kentucky was the first state legislature to pass a new program to fund students instead of systems this year. The proposal, House Bill 563, would allow eligible students to access scholarships to use at approved private education providers of their families’ choosing. But the Bluegrass State’s Democratic governor, Andy Beshear, blocked educational opportunities for thousands of children by vetoing the bill on Wednesday. Kentucky requires a constitutional majority in both the House and Senate to override Beshear’s veto, and that vote is expected to happen Monday. During his press conference announcing the decision, Beshear said that the bill “would greatly harm public education in Kentucky by taking money away from public schools and sending it to unaccountable private organizations with little oversight.” But Beshear recently sent his own children to private school. I’m glad his family had that opportunity. Every family should seek out the best options for their children. But why turn around and fight against school choice for others? Why did Beshear send his children to private schools if they were “unaccountable?” And why was it okay...
    By REBECCA BOONE, Associated Press BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Lawmakers in the Idaho House have passed legislation that would require parents to opt in two weeks in advance before their kids can receive some sex education lessons in school. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Barbara Ehardt, R-Idaho Falls, passed 56-12 on a party-line vote Friday, and now goes to the Senate. If enacted, it would change the existing state law, which allows parents to opt out if they don't want their child getting sex education lessons in school. Instead, parents who want their child to take part would have to give written permission two weeks before any lesson, discussion or reading assignment that involves human sexuality or topics such as gender identity and sexual orientation. Ehardt said her bill doesn't change curriculum but encourages parental involvement in education decisions. “I'm just asking you to make sure that our parents are involved,” she told her fellow representatives. Opponents said the legislation would be challenging for teachers and parents, resulting in some kids missing out on sex education entirely because their parents...
    The Education Department, in its first major decision under the Biden administration, told states that they will be granted significant flexibility in how and when they administer annual tests, but they will not be exempt from administering them – a blow to teachers unions who had been pushing the White House to release states from the federal standardized testing requirement. "The Department of Education is committed to supporting all states in assessing student learning during the pandemic to help target resources and support to the students with the greatest needs," said Ian Rosenblum, acting assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education. "We also recognize that at a time when everything in our education system is different, there need to be different ways that states can administer state tests like moving them to the fall so that precious in-person learning time this year can be spent on instruction. Balancing these priorities is the best approach." [ READ: CDC: Teachers ‘Central’ to School Virus Spread ]Department officials said they are prepared to extend the testing window into the summer or fall, make allowances...
    On Monday, Gov. Tim Walz announced the Due North Education Plan, and several officials touted it but didn’t mention how it would be funded. The two-page plan mentions vague goals but gives no hard metrics to achieve. Officials claimed the Due North Education Plan aims to ensure every child in Minnesota receives a high-quality education, no matter their race or zip code. “As a former classroom teacher for over 20 years, I’ve seen firsthand how a high-quality education shapes students’ lives for years to come,” Walz said in a statement. “The Due North Education Plan guides us toward a future where every child receives a high-quality education, no matter their race or zip code.” The plan claims to help students recover from learning loss this year while also closing the opportunity gap. The plan is built from the Governor’s Education Roundtable, the School Finance Working Group, the Minnesota Department of Education’s Strategic Plan, and input from educators, school leaders, education organizations, students, and families. “One of the powers of the Governor’s office is to...
    Election Day is almost here, and President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden are spending much of their time before Tuesday frantically crossing the country in search of undecided votes. But as the election winds down, how do the candidates compare to one another? How are they different and how are they similar? Here are where the candidates stand on key issues, according to the Washington Post. COVID-19 responseTrump Doesn’t support a nationwide mask mandate. Supports expanded testing. Supports a fast-track to a vaccine. Supports the reopening of schools. Supports a withdrawal from the World Health Organization. Biden Supports a nationwide mask mandate. Supports expanded testing. Supports a fast-track to a vaccine. Supports the reopening of schools with an emphasis on local districts making the decisions based on safety. Doesn’t support a withdrawal from the World Health Organization. Economy/taxesTrump Has been receptive to having a $15 minimum wage during presidency, but his campaign hasn’t made a definitive stance. Supports an eviction moratorium. Supports maintaining his 2017 tax cut. Doesn’t support extending the $600-per-month federal...
    Washington (CNN)The US Department of Education's muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates. The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public. That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts."Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough," said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment. "Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right now."Read MoreThe concern over unreported child abuse stems from the premise that teachers, coaches and other adults who interact with children and are legally required to report signs of abuse can't always see red flags...
    Speaking before state legislators recently, New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut said it was unlikely remote instruction would resume on a statewide basis this fall, but some schools may need to incorporate it based on specific concerns. In comments published in the Concord Monitor, Edelblut said with the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to evolve, it would be difficult to predict what may happen in the future. “But my sense today would be that we will not find ourselves again in the circumstance where statewide we have to go to remote instruction and support,” he said. “I suspect … that there may be incidences that happen in our institutions that will result in a transition to some type of remote instruction model. And that could be for some kind of a classroom or wing of a classroom, or perhaps even a school building.” Following the Department of Education’s July 20 release of statewide survey results on school reopening, Edelblut spoke to a joint panel of state lawmakers at a July 21 hearing. Edelblut said he stood behind...
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