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    LAKE SALDA, Turkey – As NASA’s rover Perseverance explores the surface of Mars, scientists hunting for signs of ancient life on the distant planet are using data gathered on a mission much closer to home at a lake in southwest Turkey. NASA says the minerals and rock deposits at Salda are the nearest match on earth to those around the Jezero Crater where the spacecraft landed and which is believed to have once been flooded with water. Information gathered from Lake Salda may help the scientists as they search for fossilised traces of microbial life preserved in sediment thought to have been deposited around the delta and the long-vanished lake it once fed. “Salda … will serve as a powerful analogue in which we can learn and interrogate,” Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA associate administrator for science, told Reuters. A team of American and Turkish planetary scientists carried out research in 2019 on the shorelines of the lake, known as Turkey’s Maldives because of its azure water and white shores. A general view of Salda Lake in Burdur province, Turkey, March 1,...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Joe Biden on Tuesday said the United States was on track to have enough vaccines for every adult in the country by the end of May. Biden announced that Merck & Co Inc will help make rival Johnson & Johnson's single-shot COVID-19 vaccine in a partnership that he said was similar to those seen during World War Two. With three vaccines now available, Biden said he was confident the country would reach his goal of delivering 100 million COVID-19 vaccine doses in 100 days. (Reporting by Nandita Bose; writing by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Leslie Adler) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, vaccines, United States, coronavirus
    DUBAI (Reuters) - Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Saturday accused Israel of trying to provoke a war by planning attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq. "New intelligence from Iraq indicate that Israeli agent-provocateurs are plotting attacks against Americans — putting an outgoing (President Donald) Trump in a bind with a fake casus belli (act justifying war)," Zarif said in a tweet. "Be careful of a trap, @realDonaldTrump. Any fireworks will backfire badly," Zarif wrote. (Reporting by Dubai newsroom) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Iran, United States, Israel, Iraq, Middle East
    By Mark Hosenball WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The unprecedented cyber attack on U.S. government agencies reported this month may have started earlier than last spring as previously believed, a U.S. senator involved in cybersecurity said on Wednesday. U.S. investigators originally thought that the attack on government agencies and private industry targets began in March or April, including breaches of Treasury, State, Commerce and Energy Departments. State-backed Russian hackers were identified as the suspects. Russia has denied involvement. "The initial burrowing in may have started earlier," Democratic Senator Mark Warner of Virginia, who serves as Vice-Chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee told Reuters in an interview. Warner said extensive investigations of the hack were active but that so far the U.S. government does not have hard evidence that classified government secrets were compromised by the hackers. Warner said gaps in U.S. and international law make it difficult to track and crack down on large scale hacks and that the United States and its allies must act to tighten controls. "We still don’t have for the private sector, or for that matter the...
    BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Talks to conclude a Brexit trade could still have "some hours to run", a UK source said on Thursday amid high hopes that negotiators were about to clinch a long-elusive deal. A European Union official, agreeing that a deal could be some hours away, said the two sides were still haggling over the EU's right to fish in British waters. (Reporting by John Chalmers) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Ireland, tariffs, France, United States, Scotland, European Union, international trade, United Kingdom, Europe
    LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday there might come a moment when London would have to acknowledge that it was time to go for a no-deal Brexit and abandon talks. Asked if he would try to do a deal right up until the wire, Johnson said: "Yeah of course." "We're always hopeful but you know there may come a moment when we have to acknowledge that its time to draw stumps and that's just the way it is," said Johnson, referring to a cricketing term for the end of play. "We will prosper mightily under any version and if we have to go for an Australian solution then that's fine too." (Reporting by Sarah Young and Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Michael Holden) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Ireland, United States, European Union, international trade, United Kingdom, Europe
    Reuters September 25, 2020 0 Comments Two elderly women in small towns in Wisconsin voted by mail during April’s presidential nominating contests. Both were sheltering in place as coronavirus surged across their state. Each mailed her ballot to the local election office with a note explaining why no witness had signed the envelope, as Wisconsin’s strict voting laws require. The women didn’t want to risk virus exposure, they told Reuters in telephone interviews this month. That’s where the similarity ends. The ballot of Peggy Houglum, a 72-year-old voter in the eastern Wisconsin hamlet of Cedar Grove, was rejected due to the missing witness information. That of Judith Olson, 88, a resident of the northern town of Elk, was accepted, according to “incident” logs viewed by Reuters in which Wisconsin election offices document irregular ballots. Houglum, who plans to vote for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in November, said she was never told her ballot didn’t count. Olson wouldn’t provide her party affiliation or say whom she supports for president. Local election officials confirmed the fate of those ballots. Cedar...
    Two elderly women in small towns in Wisconsin voted by mail during April’s presidential nominating contests. Both were sheltering in place as coronavirus surged across their state. Each mailed her ballot to the local election office with a note explaining why no witness had signed the envelope, as Wisconsin’s strict voting laws require. The women didn’t want to risk virus exposure, they told Reuters in telephone interviews this month. That’s where the similarity ends. The ballot of Peggy Houglum, a 72-year-old voter in the eastern Wisconsin hamlet of Cedar Grove, was rejected due to the missing witness information. That of Judith Olson, 88, a resident of the northern town of Elk, was accepted, according to “incident” logs viewed by Reuters in which Wisconsin election offices document irregular ballots. Houglum, who plans to vote for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden in November, said she was never told her ballot didn’t count. Olson wouldn’t provide her party affiliation or say whom she supports for president. Local election officials confirmed the fate of those ballots. Cedar Grove Village Clerk Julie Brey told...
    STEVE Bannon has said that the arrest "fiasco is to stop people who want to build the wall" after being released on $5million bail. President Donald Trump’s former aide made the comments to reporters as he left the courthouse on Thursday afternoon. 14Bannon smirked as he exited the courthouseCredit: Splash News 14Steve Bannon is seen in a court sketch on August 20, 2020Credit: Reuters 14Bannon was arrested on the 'Lady May' yachtCredit: Reuters Bannon and three others were charged with allegedly defrauding donors who gave money to the "We Build The Wall" fund in 2018. The president's eldest sons, Donald Trump Jr and Eric, both allegedly "had repeated contacts" with members of former Bannon's group, according to a HuffPost analysis. Trump Jr and his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle, also featured on the We Build The Wall website and spoke at a fundraising event. "This is private enterprise at its finest," Trump Jr. said of the organization. 14Eric Trump was pictured with We Build The Wall founder Brian Kolfage at Mar-A-Lago in 2019Credit: Instagram "What you guys are doing...
    MADRID (Reuters) - The European Union is considering imposing sanctions on Belarusian individuals linked to violence and election fraud, Spanish Foreign Minister Arancha Gonzalez Laya said on Tuesday. EU leaders will discuss the situation in Belarus on Wednesday, she said. Massive protests have been held in the country following presidential elections widely seen as fraudulent. "We, in Europe, think there is room for sanctions, not against the country or against the country's citizens, but against the individuals who have instigated violence or election process fraud," she told Spanish Radio station Onda Cero. (Reporting by Inti Landauro; editing by John Stonestreet) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    By David Shepardson WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration is set to announce on Monday it will further tighten restrictions on Huawei Technologies Co, aimed at cracking down on its access to commercially available chips, officials briefed on the matter said. The U.S. Commerce Department actions will expand restrictions announced in May aimed at preventing the Chinese telecommunications giant from obtaining semiconductors without a special license - including chips made by foreign firms that have been developed or produced with U.S. software or technology. The administration will also add 38 Huawei affiliates in 21 countries to the U.S. government's economic blacklist, the sources said, raising the total to 152 affiliates since Huawei was first added in May 2019. "Huawei and its affiliates have worked through third parties to harness U.S. technology in a manner that undermines U.S. national security and foreign policy interests,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement to Reuters, adding: "this multi-pronged action demonstrates our continuing commitment to impede Huawei’s ability to do so." With U.S.-China relations at their worst in decades, Washington is pushing governments...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday said he was looking at lot of alternatives regarding Chinese firm ByteDance's TikTok video app, including the possibility of a ban. "We're looking at TikTok. We may be banning TikTok. We may be doing some others things," Trump told reporters as he left the White House on a trip to Florida. "There are a couple of options. But a lot of things are happening. So, we'll see what happens," he said. People familiar with the matter have said the United States is preparing to take action on TikTok amid concerns over the security of the personal data collected by the popular short video app. (Reporting by Nandita Bose; writing by Susan Heavey) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    By Emma Farge GENEVA (Reuters) - Governments have the right to restrict protests on public health grounds, the U.N. Human Rights Committee said on Wednesday. The committee stepped in to formulate its legal interpretation having seen a gap in the international norms being tested even before the coronavirus pandemic. But with the proliferation of Black Lives Matter protests and others demonstrations when authorities are trying to stem the spread of COVID-19, the matter has become more pressing. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, signed by 173 countries, including the United States and China, has always allowed for restrictions to be placed on the rights of peaceful assembly on grounds including public health and the new document, called a "general comment", confirmed that. "The protection of 'public health' ground may exceptionally permit restrictions to be imposed, for example where there is an outbreak of an infectious disease and gatherings are dangerous," the report said. The document's author, Christof Heyns, said the legal interpretation was intended to set out the "rules of the game not just for protesters but for...
    WARSAW (Reuters) - Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said on Friday there was no consensus among EU leaders on a proposed 750-billion-euro recovery fund to lift the bloc's economies from a recession triggered by the coronavirus pandemic. "With a high degree of probability, there may not be a deal tomorrow or the day after," Morawiecki said. "Some say there may be another round in July still. We are obviously ready for that." Morawiecki said the northern countries disagreed with their southern peers on rules for disbursement of the recovery aid, and with the east on the size of the core EU budget for 2021-27. He said Poland would need "its own path" to reach climate neutrality and warned others in the bloc not to commit to rule of law conditions on access to EU funding that Warsaw "would not feel bound by." (Reporting by Gabriela Baczynska, Kate Abnett; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    TOKYO (Reuters) - Tokyo confirmed more than 100 new coronavirus infection cases on Thursday, public broadcaster NHK said, the Japanese capital's highest daily tally in two months. The city of 14 million initially sought to hold new daily cases below 20 since Japan lifted a state of emergency on May 25, but its tally has consistently exceeded 50 recently. This week, the metropolitan government said it would move away from numerical targets and rely more on expert advice to rein in the virus and avert further economic slowdown. Tokyo's daily count last exceeded 100 on May 2. (Reporting by Chang-Ran Kim; Editing by Clarence Fernandez) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
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