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    The number of California properties facing severe wildfire risk will grow sixfold over the next 30 years when considering only the impact of climate change, according to projections released Monday by a nonprofit research group. Just over 100,000 properties in the state currently have a 1% or greater annual chance of being affected by wildfire. The number is expected to reach about 600,000 by 2052, according to the data from First Street Foundation. The modeling, which marks the first effort to calculate the fire risk of each property in the United States, assumes that development will remain constant and takes into account only climate inputs, according to Jeremy Porter, the foundation’s chief research officer. The research is undergoing peer review. “When in 30 years, you have a six times increase in the most severe category, with 600,000 homes at that level, that is just unbelievable to think about when you see how quickly the impacts are changing from what are relatively small changes in heat,” said Matthew Eby, founder and executive director of the First Street Foundation. “And...
    WALNUT CREEK, Calif. (KGO) -- California water officials say saving water is a must right now because of the drought.But an owner of an East Bay landscaping company says his business has been booming with people working to fix their irrigation systems.RELATED: Despite pleas for conservation, California's March water usage jumped nearly 19%"Usually the first three months is pretty slow," says Jon Meyers of Meyers Landscaping.Meyers says that is not the case this year. The record dry weather has pushed his clients to start watering their lawns earlier and more often, and because of that, he's been busy."My irrigation repairs have increased by almost 300 percent for the first quarter January through March," says Meyers.But no leaking water in Jill Proctor's yard.VIDEO: State lawmaker calls for audit after California 'loses' billions of gallons of waterEMBED More News Videos The amount of water that was "lost" is estimated to be 700,000-acre-feet -- that's roughly 228 billion gallons of water. "We've got the drip system set up in this flower bed as well," says Proctor.Proctor had her yard redone within the past...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP/CBS13) — California’s minimum wage will jump to $15.50 per hour next year, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration announced Thursday, an increase triggered by soaring inflation that will benefit about 3 million workers. A provision in the state’s minimum wage law requires the increase when inflation increases by more than 7 percent. But it comes at a good time for Democrats in the nation’s most populous state as they rush to find ways to boost taxpayers’ bank accounts in an election year marked by rising prices that have diluted the purchasing power of consumers. READ MORE: 'The Only Parent My Kids Have Left': Lodi Woman Finds New Purpose Through Grief After Husband's Death From COVIDThursday, in a preview of his upcoming budget proposal, Newsom doubled down on his plan to send up to $800 checks to car owners to offset this year’s record-high gas prices despite opposition from Democrats in the Legislature. And he revealed a new proposal to send at least $1,000 checks to 600,000 hospital and nursing home workers in recognition of their dangerous work throughout the...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Soaring inflation will trigger an automatic increase in California’s minimum wage next year, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration announced Thursday. The minimum wage will jump to $15.50 per hour on Jan. 1, the highest of any state. That’s an increase from $15 per hour for companies with more than 25 employees and $14 per hour for companies with 25 workers or less. California lawmakers voted to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour in 2016, but the increase was phased in over several years. The law says the minimum wage must increase to $15.50 per hour for everyone if increased by more than 7%. Thursday, the California Department of Finance said they project inflation for the 2022 fiscal year — which ends June 30 — will be 7.6% higher than the year before, triggering the increase. Official inflation figures won’t be final until this summer. But the Newsom administration believes the growth will be more than enough to trigger the automatic increase. Inflation has been a problem everywhere, as consumer prices jumped 8.3% last month...
    LOS ANGELES -- Rideshare and food-delivery gig drivers on Monday held a rally outside an Uber Greenlight Hub in Los Angeles, demanding higher pay as gas prices continue to increase throughout the region."The gas is very expensive and we cannot afford to continue like," said Francisco Magdaleno, an Uber Driver. "We need more than the 55 cents that Uber has given us."Magdaleno was referring to a 55-cent per-ride surcharge that Uber put in place in March to help offset rising gas prices.The company told ABC7 that drivers are earning an average of more than $34 an hour, adding that Uber has not seen a decrease in the number of drivers.Meanwhile. gas station signs all across Southern California have been sporting even higher prices.
    Despite official calls to increase conservation amid worsening drought, urban water use across California increased by nearly 19% in March, according to figures released Tuesday. When compared to March 2020 — the year the current drought began — average water use in cities and towns across the state increased 18.9%, according to the California State Water Resources Control Board. The increase was even greater in the South Coast Hydrologic Region, which is home to more than half the state’s population. In this region, which includes Los Angeles, urban water use increased 26.9%. Department officials said the steep increase was due in part to March 2020 being wetter than average when compared to March of this year. The first three months of this year marked the driest start to the calendar year in California history. Also, March 2020 was 1.3 degrees cooler than average, while March 2022 was 3.6 degrees warmer than average. “It’s almost like apples and oranges because we did have quite a bit more precipitation in that March versus the one that we experienced here,” said board...
    SACRAMENTO —  It’s being called the Sacramento equivalent of the Berlin Wall falling. Or a Middle East peace pact. Long-warring enemies have suddenly negotiated a historic compromise over how much money medical malpractice victims can be awarded for pain and suffering. On most public policies, California is politically progressive. But on medical malpractice payouts, no state has been more regressive for nearly half a century. We’re also seeing a rare example of how a governor and legislature can achieve overwhelming bipartisan agreement on a contentious issue despite opposing sides being locked in their positions for decades. The key to ending this war was the desire and ability of combative private interests to lay down their arms and negotiate. Hardly anything major gets done in the state Capitol without willing powerful interests — euphemistically called “stakeholders.” Everyone wins this time, especially malpractice victims. California voters also benefit because they won’t be bombarded with a $100-million-plus barrage of disingenuous TV ads for and against a trial-lawyers-backed reform initiative on the November ballot. The initiative will be withdrawn if Gov. Gavin Newsom signs the...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- People who get hurt because of a doctor's negligence in California could soon get a lot more money in malpractice lawsuits under an agreement reached Wednesday that - if approved by the state Legislature - would avoid a costly fight at the ballot box this November while resolving one of the state's longest-running political battles.California does not limit how much money patients can win in malpractice cases for economic damages, which include things that can be counted such as medical expenses and lost wages. But since 1975, state law has limited how much money patients can win for things that can't be counted - such as pain and suffering - to $250,000.Trial attorneys and patients' rights groups have tried and failed for decades to raise that limit, noting it sometimes costs more than that to take one of these complex lawsuits to trial. Doctors have usually opposed raising the limits, saying it would result in soaring malpractice insurance premiums that could put some community health clinics out of business.
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — People who get hurt because of a doctor’s negligence in California could soon get a lot more money in malpractice lawsuits under an agreement reached Wednesday that — if approved by the state Legislature — would avoid a costly fight at the ballot box this November while resolving one of the state’s longest-running political battles. California does not limit how much money patients can win in malpractice cases for economic damages, which include things that can be counted such as medical expenses and lost wages. But since 1975, state law has limited how much money patients can win for things that can’t be counted — such as pain and suffering — to $250,000. READ MORE: Second Gunman In Pair Of Deadly Shootings Near Fair Oaks Park Turns Himself InTrial attorneys and patients’ rights groups have tried and failed for decades to raise that limit, noting it sometimes costs more than that to take one of these complex lawsuits to trial. Doctors have usually opposed raising the limits, saying it would result in soaring malpractice insurance premiums...
    MILLIONS of drivers in California are facing another increase in gas prices after lawmakers failed to reach an agreement to stop a scheduled increase in fuel taxes. The California gas tax will increase by 5.6% from 51 cents per gallon to 53.6 cents when the hike goes into effect on July 1, 2022. 1Governor Gavin Newsom had promised the annual gas tax increase would be droppedCredit: Source-AP It comes despite Californians already paying the highest gas prices in the nation, and the state boasting a budget surplus of $46billion. The revenue gained from the gas tax is spent on infrastructure projects such as roads and bridges. The state's gas tax is adjusted annually for inflation, but lawmakers were under pressure to pause the increase or scrap the tax altogether in response to spiraling prices at the pump. The average price to fill up in California is now $5.680, up from $3.996 a year ago, according to AAA. More on gas pricesFUEL HELP Walmart doubles gas discount for loyal shoppers to 10 cents a gallonGREEN LIGHT Thousands of Americans to receive...
    The California legislature is going to miss a May 1 deadline to kill the annual summer increase in its 51-cent gas tax, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office said. The increase goes against Newsom’s January promise to motorists that he would suspend any tax increases given that the state pays the highest amount in the nation, both in taxes and per gallon. Currently, the average price to fill up is $5.69, according to AAA. “It is clear now that the Legislature will not act in time to provide that immediate, limited relief, but we look forward to working with lawmakers on the Governor’s proposal for direct payments to Californians wrestling with rising prices,” Newsom’s press office said in a statement. “The sooner we can move this package through the legislative process, the sooner we can deliver needed relief to Californians," the office added. BATTLE RAGES FOR NEWSOM’S FIX OVER 51-CENT GAS TAX The legislature has nixed several attempts to push through a Republican bill to suspend the entire gas tax for eight months. Democrats cite concern over lost revenue, but...
    FAIRFIELD (KPIX 5) – California is seeing a boom in homeschooling. State numbers show it’s more than doubled since before the pandemic. A controversial factor is possibly driving the increase. Nicole Nowling plans to pull her four children out of the Fairfield Suisun Unified School District if California enforces a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for kids. READ MORE: UPDATE: Teen Girl Severely Hurt in 2011 San Jose Hit-and-Run Crash Dies Of Her Injuries“When you have the government essentially telling you, ‘We’re gonna tell you what to do, and what’s best.’ That’s a hard pill to swallow,” she said. Although she and her husband got the shot, they didn’t want it for their kids, all under age 12. “Nobody can actually say, ”’cause we studied for 5, 10 years that this in the long run is completely safe,'” explained Nowling. She would join an increasing number of parents who homeschool. Although the state does not count the number of homeschooled children, it does keep track of the number of private school affidavits that must be filed to independently educate five or fewer...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — California has no plans to impose new statewide pandemic restrictions despite a rise in coronavirus cases primarily due to the new highly transmissible omicron variant BA.2, the state’s top health official says. The most populous state has seen “some slow but noticeable increase in our case rates” in the last 10 days, said Dr. Mark Ghaly, secretary of the California Health and Human Services Agency. California’s slower increase contrasts with some other parts of the country, especially the Northeast. READ MORE: Bomb Threat At Novato High; Students Sheltering In PlacePhiladelphia this week became the first major U.S. city to reinstate an indoor mask mandate. Confirmed cases jumped more than 50% in 10 days and the city’s health commissioner said she wanted to intervene to head off a wave of hospitalizations and deaths. “In California, we haven’t seen a city or a county have that kind of case rate increase as of yet,” Ghaly told The Associated Press on Thursday, adding he has seen no indication local officials plan to toughen their approach. Local officials can proceed...
    Black Lives Matter issued a thinly-veiled apology on Monday night over the left-wing groups purchase of a multi-million dollar mansion that was paid for with donations raised from loyal supporters.  The purchase was fully exposed last week in an article by New York Magazine.  The property was bought for almost $6million in cash in October 2020 with funds that had been donated to BLMGNF (Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation).    On Monday night, the organization finally responded to the reports in a lengthy Twitter feed with the group noting that more 'transparency' was required going forward. Black Lives Matter has apologized following an expose that detailed how the organization had used donations to purchase a $6 million home in Los Angeles. The luxurious 6,500 square foot mansion was bought for nearly double what it was worth In a lengthy Twitter thread on Monday morning, the group vowed to be more transparent in the future 'There have been a lot of questions surrounding recent reports about the purchase of Creator's House in California. Despite past efforts, BLMGNF recognizes...
    SACRAMENTO (AP) — California is sitting on a $600 million pile of unclaimed nickel and dime deposits on recyclable cans and bottles and now wants to give some of that back to consumers. To get the state’s nearly 40 million residents to recycle more and send more deposits back to them, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration unveiled a plan Friday to temporarily double to a dime the refund for a 12-ounce (355 milliliters) bottle or can. California already pays 10 cents on containers over 24 ounces (709 milliliters), and that would temporarily double to 20 cents. READ MORE: Mountain View Police Investigate Death of Los Altos High Student as Possible Fentanyl OverdoseThe move would make California among the highest-paying recycling programs in the country. Rachel Machi Wagoner, director of the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, said the effort would help California again become the recycling leader it was 35 years ago when it started its cash refund program. When someone in California purchases a regular-sized soda, a 5-cent charge is applied that can be recouped if the container is brought back...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The U.S is typically four to six weeks behind COVID-19 trends in Europe, which is why the White House is keeping a close eye on the United Kingdom.In the UK, the BA. 2 sub variant " growth rate has settled at approximately 80% greater relative growth for BA.2 compared to BA.1.," meaning it's growing faster than the initial omicron strain, according to the UK Health Security Agency.The U.S is actively monitoring the spread of BA.2 abroad."We are still trying to assess ultimate impact whether people are going to be sick in large numbers there or whether it increases mortality, but is concerning," said Dr. Tom Inglesby, Senior Advisor to the White House COVID-19 Response Team.RELATED: Highly-transmissible COVID subvariant increasing in CA, but expert 'doubts' lockdowns will be neededEMBED More News Videos Highly-transmissible BA.2 COVID omicron subvariant is increasing in California, but expert doubts lockdowns will be necessary. According to Dr. Inglesby the majority of BA.2 cases in the U.S are being detected in the northeast of the country."We do predict that is going to become the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- In the last two weeks, the UK and other parts of Europe are reporting a spike in COVID-19 cases due to an omicron sub-variant called BA. 2 which is believed to be 30 % more transmissible than the initial strain."It will slowly, but surely overtake omicron," said Dr. Warner Greene and added, "It's moving at a slower pace, but still it will likely become the globally dominant variant."Historically what happens in Europe with COVID, tends to happen in the U.S four to six weeks later.Dr. Warner Greene is a Senior Investigator for the Gladstone Institutes. His work in virology for over 30 years is leading him to keep a close eye on this data.RELATED: Rise in COVID cases abroad, presence of omicron subvariant may foreshadow increase in US: Experts"There are hot spots forming in the United States. For example in the Chicago area," said Dr. Greene.Throughout California, scientists are monitoring wastewater. This will be the first line of detection before any outbreaks here. Alexandria Boehm is a Professor of Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. She's part...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) -- California's already record-high gas prices are expected to get even more expensive in the coming months, according to experts, and it's all being fueled by the crisis between Russia and Ukraine.WATCH LIVE: Russia attacks Ukraine as Putin warns US, NATO; Biden to address invasion in speechThe state began setting gas price records at the end of 2021 and hasn't stopped since, hitting a new record high at $4.71 a gallon on Feb. 16.Now experts are predicting that the average price of gas in the Golden State will soon be right at $5 a gallon."If Western countries come after Russia with sanctions, Russia could just say, 'Hey, we're just going to cut off oil,'" explained Patrick De Haan of GasBuddy. "And that could cause oil prices to spike at a time that gasoline demand is continuing to recover as COVID numbers decline." If you're on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch liveAnd the pain at the pump will be even worse for certain parts of California."It's very likely that the Bay Area,...
    SAN JOSE, Calif. -- California's already record-high gas prices are expected to get even more expensive in the coming months, according to experts, and it's all being fueled by the crisis between Russia and Ukraine.The state began setting gas price records at the end of 2021 and hasn't stopped since, hitting a new record high at $4.71 a gallon on Feb. 16.Now experts are predicting that the average price of gas in the Golden State will soon be right at $5 a gallon."If Western countries come after Russia with sanctions, Russia could just say, 'Hey, we're just going to cut off oil,'" explained Patrick De Haan of GasBuddy. "And that could cause oil prices to spike at a time that gasoline demand is continuing to recover as COVID numbers decline."And the pain at the pump will be even worse for certain parts of California."It's very likely that the Bay Area, especially San Francisco and San Jose will get to that $5 gallon average," said De Haan. "Prices in the Bay Area today average about $4.81."Further complicating the California gas price...