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    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida continues to see unemployment claims roll in at a pace that has remained relatively stable since May and well below the crush of claims when businesses closed or scaled back early in the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. The U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday estimated 6,770 first-time unemployment claims were filed in Florida during the week that ended Jan. 22, down from a revised count of 8,593 in the week ending Jan. 15. READ MORE: Florida Lawmakers Look At More Sites For Gopher TortoisesThe state’s average for the past four weeks is 7,441 claims, slightly higher than the weekly average of 7,276 since mid-May when state officials increased efforts to drive people back into the labor force. READ MORE: Medical Malpractice Fight Re-Emerges In FloridaMeanwhile, 260,000 claims were filed nationally last week, down 30,000 from the prior week. The country has averaged 247,000 claims over the past four weeks. On Tuesday, the Labor Department reported Florida was one of 42 states and the District of Columbia that saw their unemployment rates drop...
    A Johns Hopkins University medical professor slammed America's Ivy League universities on Tuesday for their 'anti-scientific and cruel' COVID policies. Writing for former New York Times editor Bari Weiss' Common Sense substack, Dr. Marty Markay said the policies schools such as Georgetown, Cornell, Princeton, UMass Amherst and Emerson have in place are creating an undue harm on the mental health of college students - who tend not to get severely sick from COVID. Over the last six months, Markay wrote, the risk of a person 15 to 24 dying of COVID was 0.001 percent - and all or nearly all of those deaths were among unvaccinated people with a comorbidity. But colleges in the United States are now requiring students to be vaccinated against the virus, as they also impose 10-day isolation periods for infected students, outdoor mask mandates and weekly testing - even as they charge thousands of dollars for tuition. Some are also mandating students receive a booster shot against COVID, despite the risk of myocarditis.  These policies, Markay said, are creating an undue harm on college students...
    The Hudson Valley has seen a new increase in the average number of COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people. According to information released by the state on Sunday, Nov. 21, the seven-day average was 14.1 cases per 100,000 people on Saturday, Nov. 6. But as of Saturday, Nov. 20, that average has increased to about 23.2 cases. State officials also reported that the seven-day average percentage of positive test results in the Hudson Valley was 2.87 percent as of Saturday. It had been 2.80 a day earlier and 2.77 on Thursday, Nov. 18. The average statewide is 3.77 percent. In Sunday's update, state officials also reported 6,857 new cases statewide, and 191,142 tests. "With the colder months and holiday travel season quickly approaching, we know how to prevent the spread of this deadly virus in our communities," Gov. Kathy Hochul said in a statement. "Get the vaccine if you have not already, get the booster shot to add another layer of defense, get tested before gathering with others, and stay home if you feel sick. This is no time to let our guard...
    Long Island's seven-day average number of COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people has nearly doubled since the start of the month, according to the latest update from the state. On Saturday, Nov. 6, the average was 17.6 cases per 100,000 people, but as of Saturday, Nov. 20, the average was about 31.7, the state said in new data released on Sunday afternoon, Nov. 21. The average statewide as of Saturday was 32.9 cases per 100,000 people, the state said.  State officials also reported in its update that the seven-day average of positive test results on Saturday had climbed back over four percent at 4.16 percent. It had been 3.98 percent a day earlier and 3.84 on Thursday, Nov. 18. A total of 6,857 COVID-19 cases were reported statewide in the new update, along with 191,142 tests. "With the colder months and holiday travel season quickly approaching, we know how to prevent the spread of this deadly virus in our communities," Gov. Kathy Hochul said in a statement. "Get the vaccine if you have not already, get the booster shot to add another layer of...
    COVID-19 cases among children are continuing to rise as the U.S. heads towards the holiday season, a new report finds.  A total of 122,229 kids tested positive for the virus during the week that ended on November 11, according to the American Academy and Pediatrics (AAP).  That figure is a 13 percent increase from the 107,000 cases recorded the previous week and a 22 percent increase over the past two weeks. Pediatric Covid cases have now increased for the second consecutive week after nearly two months of declines.  America as a whole is experiencing a slight increase in COVID-19 infections ahead of the holiday season, and some experts believe cold weather could be fueling the increase. New COVID-19 cases among children increased by 13% last week, from 107,000 to 122,000, the second straight week cases increased after falling for nearly two months straight Children accounted for 27% of new COVID-19 cases last week, and increase from the 24% of cases the year before Child Covid cases had decreased every week from the week that ended September 2 to the week that ended on...
    President Biden's top advisers now meet at least once a week to discuss how to tackle the supply chain crisis and curb rampant inflation.  The advisors discuss ways to relieves backlogs at US ports, how to recruit truck drivers and how to produce more semiconductors within the US, according to the New York Times.   The Biden administration is finally trying to grapple with persistent inflation that they for months insisted would be transitory. But on Monday, Treasury Sec. Janet Yellen said they expected it to persist until mid to late next year.  The consumer price index rose 5.4% in September from last year, up from August's gain of 5.3% and matching the increases in June and July.   'I agree, of course, we are going through a period of inflation that's higher than Americans have seen in a long time,' she said on CNN's State of the Union. 'And it's something that's obviously a concern and worrying them. But we haven't lost control.'  Yellen added that she expects inflation to return to a more 'normal' rate of around 2 per cent...
    The United States hit a grim milestone and surpassed 700,000 coronavirus deaths on Friday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That figure is more than the number of Americans who died during World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined  To put the figure into context, it is about equivalent to the populations of Nashville, Tennessee or Washington, DC, and just a bit smaller than the population of Denver, Colorado. More than 4.7 million people have died from COVID-19 around the world, according to Johns Hopkins, which means the U.S. accounts for 14.8 percent of all deaths, but just five percent of the global population. The heartbreaking figures come exactly three-and-a-half months after America recorded 600,000 lives lost due to the virus.  It comes as coronavirus cases continue to fall in America to the lowest levels seen in more than a month and, although deaths are on the rise, they are expected to also decline over the next few weeks.  On Friday, the U.S. surpassed 700,000 coronavirus deaths, according to data from Johns...
    Regularly testing students at school when they arrive for in-person learning can greatly increase the number of Covid cases detected, a new study finds. Researchers from the University of Nebraska Medical Center instituted a five week-pilot testing program in three schools in the local Omaha area. During the five week-program, there was a six-fold increase in the number of COVID-19 infections detected per every 1,000 students at the schools. The research finds many cases of the virus have gone unnoticed, and that the pandemic can be more easily gotten under control with regular asymptomatic testing. Researchers found that bi-weekly testing of students attending in-person classes increased the detection of COVID-19 cases six-fold from 12 per every 1,000 to 70 per every 1,000 (above) Robust testing and Covid detection programs can help limit the spread of the virus in schools and control outbreaks, which have plagued the early part of the new school year. Pictured: Students in Los Angeles, California, have their temperature checked at the start of the school day on August 30 Researchers, who published their findings...
    SANTA CRUZ (BCN/CBS SF) – All Santa Cruz County employees will now be required to get a COVID-19 vaccination or submit to weekly testing, following a vote by the board of supervisors on Tuesday. Under the vote, employees have 30 days to comply with the mandate or agree to the weekly testing. READ MORE: COVID: Lawsuit Names State Prison Leaders in Death of San Quentin Guard “This is a significant statement by the board on the importance of vaccinations to protect the health and safety of our community,” Board Chair Supervisor Bruce McPherson said. READ MORE: Lawrence Berkeley Lab Heads Effort To Collect Water Data In U.S. West The county’s workforce is the second largest in Santa Cruz County, representing 2,400 employees. Already, 85 percent of employees are vaccinated — many of which were under other existing vaccine mandates because of their role in healthcare or congregate settings — said county spokesperson Jason Hoppin. Countywide, 68.7 percent of eligible residents are fully vaccinated and 77.7 percent have at least one dose — placing Santa Cruz in 13th place of all...
    MARTINEZ (KPIX) — Contra Costa County has issued a new vaccine mandate to all its first responders. Starting Sept. 17, they will now have to show proof of vaccination or submit to weekly testing. The county says it has experienced a surge in cases and hospitalizations. In the past two weeks, positive cases have jumped 30 percent. The Contra Costa County Health Officer, Dr. Chris Farnitano, says this is to protect first responders who are at high risk of becoming infected. Some of those emergency workers say the order crosses the line. “We do support getting vaccinated for all of our members. We provided them with a lot of education on the topic but, at the same time, we have respect for their ability to make their decision,” said Vincent Wells with the United Professional Firefighters Local 1230. Wells represents firefighters from seven different counties, from Santa Clara to Napa. He says the one positive aspect of Contra Costa County’s mandate is that it provides the weekly testing alternative. Contra Costa County Fire Protection District has been requiring vaccination or...
    The Golden State will "require that all of our staff, not just teachers ... custodial staff, the bus drivers, folks that are critical to supporting the entire school eco-system, also submit a verification of vaccination and/or submit to weekly testing," Gov. Gavin Newsom said on Wednesday. The order notes that people who have previously recovered from the illness of have a prior positive antibody test will not be exempt from the weekly testing mandate for the unvaccinated. "Previous history of COVID-19 from which the individual recovered more than 90 days earlier, or a previous positive antibody test for COVID-19, do not waive this requirement for testing," the order states. The order notes that facilities must be fully compliant by Oct. 15. Many schools in the state have already started, while others will begin in the coming weeks, according to the Associated Press. According to data for the state, 63.8 percent of the population 12 and older has been fully vaccinated, while 10 percent has been partially vaccinated. That compares with 58.8 percent of the total U.S. population...
    Mandating that New York City employees either get COVID-19 vaccinations or undergo weekly testing should give vaccine-hesitant people a strong incentive to get inoculated, Mayor Bill de Blasio said. De Blasio announced the new rule, which goes into effect on September 13, during a press conference on Monday, affecting 400,000 workers. In an appearance on MSNBC's Morning Joe, the Democratic mayor said he hopes the rule encourages workers to get their shot to avoid the hassle of weekly tests. 'I want to emphasize that that either/or really creates a positive pressure for vaccination because it will be the responsibility of the employee to get tested on a regular basis, and that comes with its own challenges,' he said.   The new vaccine-or-test rules come as the highly contagious Indian 'Delta' variant of the coronavirus is pushing caseloads up in New York from an average of 245 earlier this month to 922 as of Sunday.  Health officials say the variant makes up about seven in 10 new cases in New York City.  Meanwhile, the number of vaccine doses being administered daily in...
    Gamers Dominated the WFH Challenge — Here’s Why UEFA Euro 2020 odds, picks, predictions: Soccer expert reveals best bets for Netherlands vs. North Macedonia If you're still unable to get your hands on a PlayStation 5, you're not alone: Ever since Sony's new benchmark console was unveiled to the world last November, stock issues and sky-high demand has made it virtually impossible for most shoppers to bring the console home. Restocks fly off shelves in minutes - if not seconds - and retailers generally don't announce any impending availabilities, leaving many to keep dreaming of the day when the sleek, all-white console finally becomes steadily available.  © Provided by Entertainment Weekly Insomniac Games With the console impossible to find, it was therefore unsurprising that there are no discounts or bundles on sale for the PS5 this Amazon Prime Day. However, there's good news for anyone who already owns a PS5 or the older PS4: Best-selling games such as Assassin's Creed: Valhalla, Resident Evil Village, Biomutant, Marvel's Spider-Man: Miles Morales, and more are currently up to 70 percent off as part of...
    The real earnings of American workers fell for the fifth consecutive month in May as inflation erased all of the month’s wage gains and more. Real average hourly earnings for working Americans fell 0.1 percent in May compared with April, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics released Thursday show. This decline in real earnings occurred even though average hourly earnings increased as employers scrambled to fill open positions. What happened was that these wage gains were more than offset by the increase of 0.6 percent in the Consumer Price Index. So Americans were paid more but those gains were swamped by inflation. Average weekly real earnings fell as well, dropping to $334.09 from $335.60, even though there was no change in the average hours worked. The wage decline was even more pronounced for workers the government describes as “production and nonsupervisory employees”—in other words, not the bosses. These workers saw a 0.2 percent decline in May because their 0.4 percent wage increase was overwhelmed by the rise in prices. Real average weekly earnings for these employees fell 0.4 percent over...
    When the majority of the U.S. went into lockdown more than a year ago, birth rates dramatically fell, a new study suggests. Researchers from University of Michigan saw 14 percent decline in pregnancies  following the state's stay-at-home order. Using electronic hospital records to determine how pregnancy volumes changed week by week, the team found found a steep decline compared to the previous three years.  COVID caused job loss and overall economic insecurity that caused many women to change their childbearing plans - choosing to have children later or have fewer children. However, the researchers predict a surge in pregnancies in summer 2021, though - in time with the country's pandemic recovery. Pregnancies treated by the University of Michigan hospital fell after the state-mandated stay-at-home order was placed, indicated here by the orange dashed line. The blue dashed line indicates when the stay-at-home order was lifted in June The Michigan hospital's birth rates remained constant from 2017 to 2020 - until COVID hit. As the U.S. shut down in March 2020, scientists were unsure how the stay-at-home orders would...
    More On: crime French investigators question fugitive auto titan Carlos Ghosn in Beirut Four more Oath Keepers charged in Jan. 6 insurrection: report Texas neo-Nazi arrested for planning mass shooting at Walmart: cops Cops looking for man who launched anti-gay attack in NYC Serious crime spiked across most major categories amid another plunge in arrests last week, NYPD statistics showed Monday — and sources said the bloodshed would have been even worse if not for the lousy weekend weather. And amid a doubling of incidents in the transit system and a more-than fourfold skyrocketing of hate crimes, the only bright spots were drops in murders and burglaries. “The rain this weekend saved the city. A lot of people weren’t outside. There were no barbecues,” said a veteran cop with two decades on the job. Another veteran cop said that “the rain and the cold…kind of drives crime indoors.” “But as the weather warms up that will change,” the cop warned. “The weather will always dictate crime except in the subway.”  NYPD officers at a crime scene in Harlem on...
    Opioid deaths in Canada jumped by 135 percent during the COVID-19 pandemic, with younger people being hit especially hard, a new study finds. Researchers from the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network, St Michaels University and Drexel University gathered overdose death data from the province of Ontario and compared the first six months of the pandemic to overdose deaths in previous six month timespans. Weekly opioid deaths in the country jumped from 23 in September 2019 to 54 in March 2020. Additionally, weekly deaths among those 35 and younger jumped from five to 21, an increase of 320 percent in the same time span.  The results show that Canada's largest province also dealt with a surge in opioid deaths last year across North America. The findings also reflect similar trends in the US, with with at least 42 states reporting an increase in fatalities, since the crisis began, according to the American Medical Association.  A new study finds that weekly opioid deaths surged by 135% the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ontario, Canada, with weekly deaths among those...
    Weekly COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. could decline by as much as 71 percent, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now predicts.  CDC's latest forecasts suggest that between 1,200 and 4,600 people will die of COVID-19 during the week ending in June 12. By then, the agency predicts that the overall death toll could rise to somewhere between 594,000 and 604,000.   That would be a decrease of more than 70 percent from the more than 4,000 people who died of Covid last week in the U.S.  To-date, more than 587,000 Americans have died of coronavirus since the pandemic began. Deaths rose Tuesday with 857 new fatalities, driving the seven-day rolling average up from about 600 to 626.  It comes as vaccines drive down new infections, hospitalizations and deaths nationwide. The U.S. recorded fewer than 30,000 new infections on Tuesday for the fourth day in a row, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.    In further evidence that the shots are working, states with high rates of vaccination like Vermont and Massachusetts have seen rapid declines in weekly cases...
    AMERICANS living in Montana, Wyoming, and North Dakota can earn more on unemployment benefits than working due to increased weekly stimulus aid.  US businesses are raising concerns that they are having difficulties in encouraging people back to work as the extra $300 per week in unemployment is discouraging Americans from looking for a job.  7Americans living in Montana, Wyoming, and North Dakota can earn more on unemployment benefits 7President Joe Biden’s unemployment benefit has now been rejected by 11 states President Joe Biden’s unemployment benefit has now been rejected by 11 states, with Republican governors saying “it’s impossible to fill jobs.” Initially, five governors refused the federal coronavirus aid offered by Biden in their states. But six more joined their ranks earlier this week and more look set to follow with GOP lawmakers saying they want to push people back to work. According to an analysis carried out by Business Insider, Montana, Wyoming, and North Dakota are the only states where the total average weekly state plus federal benefits is higher than the average weekly wage.  7Hundreds of unemployed Kentucky...
    Half of U.S. adults now have received at least 1 Covid shot Mars didnt lose all of its water at once, based on Curiosity rover find © Provided by Entertainment Weekly Matthew McConaughey Matthew McConaughey did more than alright, alright, alright in a new poll surveying support for Texas' next governor. The actor, who hasn't announced his candidacy yet but has teased interest in running, beat incumbent Greg Abbott by double digits. Forty-five percent of Texas registered voters said they would vote for McConaughey compared to 33 percent who would vote for Abbott and 22 percent who would select someone else. The poll, released Sunday by The Dallas Morning News and the University of Texas at Tyler, surveyed 1,126 registered voters. Matthew McConaughey talks almost quitting acting on The Oprah Conversation Entertainment Weekly See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Here Are the Performances to Look Out for in Season 2 of ‘Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist’ Entertainment Weekly Kate Winslet’s Unpretentious Turn in ‘Mare of Easttown’ Is a Role Unlike Any...
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