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    Employees at Amazon warehouses were 20% more likely to experience an injury in 2021 than the year before, a new report says. Amazon employees continue to see their risks of injury rise, according to a report released on Tuesday by the Strategic Organizing Center, a labor union coalition. The organization found the marked increase from 2020 injuries through an analysis of federal injury data sent by Amazon to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. "Amazon workers sustained nearly 40,000 injuries in 2021. While Amazon employed 33% of all U.S. warehouse workers in 2021, the company was responsible for a staggering 49% of all injuries in the industry last year," the center said in the report. TIM COOK WARNS OF 'PROFOUND' UNINTENDED EFFECTS OF BIPARTISAN APP STORE BILL An estimated 6.8 of every 100 Amazon warehouse workers experienced serious injuries in 2021, according to the report. In contrast, only 3.3 per 100 workers were seriously injured in 2021 at non-Amazon warehouses. The study defines a serious injury as any incident that forced a worker to be...
    Shares pop on trading debut of Electric Last Mile, the latest speculative EV company to go public A guide to mutual fund investing Happy Monday, unless of course you have Gerrit Cole on your Fantasy team. You can read more about his recent struggles below. Let's focus now on pitchers who had positive weekends, like Luis Castillo and Aaron Nola. Don't look now, but Castillo has a 1.71 ERA with a 0.98 WHIP over his last five starts. I'm not ready to say he's fully back to the pitcher we were expecting, but he's close. The other was Nola, who finished with 12 strikeouts over 5.1 innings against the Mets on Friday. He still needs to string together a few more strong starts before we say he's back, but this was an amazing outing. Somebody else who's had a strong season is Casey Mize. Through 15 starts, he has a 3.46 ERA with a 1.13 WHIP, yet I think he makes for one of the better sell-high candidates right now. Not only do we have the looming innings concerns...
    The NBA has hit back at criticism from LeBron James over player safety. The four-time NBA champion sent several tweets Wednesday about how injuries are apparently out of control in the league, and somehow managed to make himself the center of attention while doing it. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) They all didn’t wanna listen to me about the start of the season. I knew exactly what would happen. I only wanted to protect the well being of the players which ultimately is the PRODUCT & BENEFIT of OUR GAME! These injuries isn’t just “PART OF THE GAME”. It’s the lack of PURE — LeBron James (@KingJames) June 16, 2021 RIM REST rest before starting back up. 8, possibly 9 ALL-STARS has missed Playoff games(most in league history). This is the best time of the year for our league and fans but missing a ton of our fav players. It’s insane. If there’s one person that know about the body and how it — LeBron James (@KingJames) June 16, 2021 works...
    Immediately following a report that Amazon’s workplace injury rates were significantly higher than those of its top rivals, the online retail giant announced a tweak to its notorious “time off task” metric, which workers and advocates say is responsible for the punishing pace that leads to many injuries. The Washington Post looked at Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) data and found that Amazon warehouses have a rate of 5.9 serious injury incidents per 100 workers, which is nearly double the rate of other retail warehouses and more than double the rate for Walmart warehouses. This despite a decrease in serious injury rates at Amazon warehouses after the company paused performance tracking to allow workers time to wash their hands and sanitize work areas during the pandemic. In response to the Post’s questions, Amazon detailed an array of efforts to improve injury rates at its warehouses, including “ergonomics programs, guided exercises at employees’ workstations, mechanical assistance equipment, workstation setup and design, and forklift telematics and guardrails—to name a few,” a company spokeswoman told the newspaper. What those efforts notably did not include was relaxing the speed requirements placed on workers...
    Peter Endig | AFP | Getty Images Amazon warehouse workers are injured at higher rates than rival companies, according to a new study. In 2020, there were 5.9 serious injuries for every 100 Amazon warehouse workers, which is nearly 80% higher than the serious injury rate at non-Amazon warehouses, the Strategic Organizing Center wrote in a new report published Tuesday. The SOC said serious incidents include any injuries that require employees to either miss work entirely, known as "lost time injuries," or be placed on light or restricted duty. The SOC, which is a coalition of labor unions including the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and the Service Employees International Union, analyzed recently released data reported by Amazon to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration covering work-related injuries between 2017 and 2020. Amazon's injury rates were also higher than Walmart, one of its closest retail competitors. Amazon's overall injury rate in 2020 was 6.5 cases for every 100 workers, according to the study. That's more than twice that of Walmart, which reported three cases for every 100 employees in 2020. Separately,...
    Doing away with no-fault insurance and requiring Florida drivers purchase mandatory bodily injury (MBI) coverage won’t lower Florida’s nation-leading auto insurance rates but increase them further, another auto insurer maintains. For at least 40 percent of Florida’s 16 million drivers who don’t now have MBI coverage – about 7 million – replacing the state’s no-fault system with MBI could mean annual rate increases of $600 to $1,000, according to Don Moser, president of Amwins Specialty Auto of Florida. “This will be most pronounced in the segment of our population with limited income, including a disproportionate impact on minorities,” Moser said in a Tuesday statement. “The increased costs come from roughly 80 percent of the people in the ‘non-standard’ market who currently do not purchase bodily injury coverage due to cost and/or need," he continued. “Making these people buy 25/50 bodily injury limits will add $600 to $1,000 per year to the costs for these people.” According to the American Property Casualty Insurance Association (APCIA), about 40 percent, or more than 6 million, Florida drivers now carry insurance below what...
    The smaller, lighter vehicles that women more often drive, and the types of crashes they get into, may explain why they are much more likely to suffer a serious injury in a collision than men, a new study published Thursday found. Researchers from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a research group supported by auto insurers, looked into whether there was some sort of gender bias in the research into vehicle crashes or whether body type had anything to do with the injuries. They analyzed injuries of men and women in police-reported tow-away front and side crashes from 1998 to 2015. Among the findings were that in front crashes, women were three times as likely to experience a broken bone, concussion or other moderate injury, and twice as likely to suffer a serious one like a collapsed lung or traumatic brain injury. Men and women crashed in minivans and SUVs in about equal proportions, the researchers found. But around 70% of women crashed in cars, compared with about 60% of men. And more than 20% of men crashed in pickups,...
    What makes injuries more likely to occur at Amazon’s automated warehouses is that the company has unrealistic expectations of the human employees that work there. Where workers called pickers previously had to scan about 100 items every hour, Amazon now expects them to scan up to 400 products in the same amount of time. Those employees can’t keep with the robots without hurting themselves. What’s more, Reveal found Amazon has either been slow or shown no interest in listening to federal regulators when it comes to the issue. In 2015, the Occupational Saftey and Health Administration (OSHA) outlined policies Amazon could implement to keep employees safe at a robotic warehouse in New Jersey. For example, one suggestion was that the company rotates employees between different jobs throughout their shift to avoid repetitive stress injuries. Reveal  found that Amazon has yet to implement those measures across its warehouses.  When asked about its automated warehouses, a spokesperson for Amazon told Reveal, “the use of robotics, automation and technology in our fulfillment centers is enhancing our workplace, making jobs safer and more efficient.” We’ve reached out to...
    Amazon’s warehouses with robots, which the company has claimed would help reduce worker injuries, actually have higher injury rates than warehouses without automation, according to internal Amazon records obtained by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. The stunning fact comes as part of a broader report investigating rising injury rates at Amazon warehouses across the country. Amazon’s warehouse robots are apparently so efficient that quotas have increased substantially, requiring workers to do repetitive motions over long shifts that can eventually lead to injuries. For example, workers who grab and scan items had their quotas increase from about 100 items an hour to 400 items an hour in the automated warehouses, according to the report. The rise in injury rates suggests automation could actually be creating a more dangerous environment for the workers, despite hopes that robots would take on the most dangerous tasks. Amazon piloted specific measures recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to help reduce injury risk, such as an extra rest break or rotating workers to other jobs during the day. But the measures...
    Amazon fulfillment center warehouse.Getty Images Injuries inside Amazon's warehouses continue to be on the rise, despite the company's claims that it has invested tens of millions of dollars to improve safety measures, according to a wide-ranging investigation published Tuesday by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. The probe found that Amazon's injury rates have steadily increased each year since 2016, based on internal safety reports and weekly injury numbers from 150 Amazon fulfillment centers that were obtained by Reveal. Representatives from Amazon didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.  In 2019, Amazon recorded 14,000 serious injuries across its fulfillment centers, which equates to an injury rate of 7.7 serious injuries per 100 employees, Reveal found. That's nearly double the most recent industry standard, according to Reveal.  Amazon may also be under-reporting warehouse worker injuries. A physician who inspected Amazon warehouses for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that workers at some Amazon facilities were being discouraged from reporting injuries and seeking outside medical care, according to Reveal. Another company initiative designed to curtail "lost-time injuries," or injuries...
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