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    Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-SC) said, 'The shameful conduct of corporate executives pursuing profit at any cost during a crisis and government officials eager to do their bidding regardless of resulting harm to the public must never be repeated.' During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as the virus spread rapidly among workers, according to a congressional report released Thursday. The report by the House's Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis said meat companies pushed to keep their plants open even though they knew workers were at high risk of catching the coronavirus. The lobbying led to health and labor officials watering down their recommendations for the industry and culminated in an executive order President Donald Trump issued in spring 2020 designating meat plants as critical infrastructure that needed to remain open. Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn, who leads the subcommittee, said U.S. Department of Agriculture officials and the industry prioritized production and profits over the health of...
    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as the virus spread rapidly among workers, according to a congressional report released Thursday. The report by the House’s Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis said meat companies pushed to keep their plants open even though they knew workers were at high risk of catching the coronavirus. The lobbying led to health and labor officials watering down their recommendations for the industry and culminated in an executive order President Donald Trump issued in spring 2020 designating meat plants as critical infrastructure that needed to remain open. Cargill plant in Fort Morgan shown in April 2020. (credit: CBS) Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn, who leads the subcommittee, said U.S. Department of Agriculture officials and the industry prioritized production and profits over the health of workers and communities as at least 59,000 workers caught the virus and 269 died. “The shameful conduct of corporate executives pursuing profit at...
    By Josh Funk | Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — At the height of the pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as COVID-19 spread rapidly among workers, according to a Congressional report released Thursday. The report by the House’s Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis said meat companies pushed to keep their plants open even though they knew workers were at high risk of catching the virus. The lobbying led to health and labor officials watering down their recommendations for the industry and culminated in an executive order President Donald Trump issued in the spring of 2020 designating meat plants as critical infrastructure that needed to remain open. Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn, who leads the subcommittee, said USDA officials and the industry prioritized production and profits over the health of workers and communities as at least 59,000 workers caught the virus and 269 workers died. “The shameful conduct of corporate executives pursuing profit at any cost during a crisis and government officials eager...
    Iconic activist Cleve Jones Since the day I walked among the thousands of panels of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, as it stretched across the grass for what felt like miles on the Washington Monument in the late 1980s, I’ve been a fan of the tireless work of LGBTQ human rights activist and author Cleve Jones.  Jones has spent most of his 67 years of life in activism. From his early days in the 1970s as a mentee of Harvey Milk—California’s first openly gay elected official—to his latest work as an organizer with Unite Here, a hospitality workers’ union representing about 300,000 workers in the U.S. and Canada, Jones has never stopped fighting.  RELATED STORY: Atlanta pastor used science with scripture to keep his all-Black congregation COVID-19-free “The most important day of my life, unquestionably, was when I saw Harvey's dead body on the floor of City Hall,” Jones tells Daily Kos. “That was the moment when I knew that this is what I would be doing for the rest of my life.”  Jones tells Daily Kos that Milk was in many ways a...
    Since the pandemic’s beginning, I’ve thought a good deal about some of the jobs I’ve had in my career. When I hear about violence directed against teachers and school board members, I look back to issues I wrote about as a speechwriter for former U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley. Though I never remember covering anything like this current violence. When I see how flight attendants are being attacked by passengers, I think of my time as a Northwest Airlines spokesperson. Though I don’t recall having to handle anything the like of which we hear about on a nearly daily basis on planes throughout the country. But given the death and illness this pandemic has delivered, I most often think of the years I spent as a University of Minnesota medical center spokesperson. I was at the center, then as now renowned for its work in organ and bone marrow transplantation, when nearly every transplant done was the subject of some type of news story. When getting rid of Obamacare/the Affordable Care Act becomes a fighting topic, I think of...
    Dan Bongino, host of "The Dan Bongino Show" on Fox Nation, told "Fox & Friends" Monday it’s "offensive" that health care workers of New York have been sent the message to "get a vaccine or you’re fired."  FEDERAL JUDGE BLOCKS NEW YORK CITY COVID-19 VACCINE MANDATE FOR EDUCATION DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES DAN BONGINO:  I had a caller call on my radio show a while ago. He said, Dan, you know, if the Democrats were trying to destroy the country, if it was like a battle plan, like a 12-step plan. Would you do anything different than what they're doing now? And I'm thinking, no I wouldn't, I'd pretty much follow this. This is like step 11.5 out of a 12-step program.  Think about how offensive this is to people. So you have these frontline health care workers who remember. I mean, we're all obviously old enough to remember just a year and a half ago, two years ago. When this first hit, nobody knew the fatality rate, how infectious it was. … These health care workers go to work anyway. They’re...
    Republican California Rep. Darrell Issa questioned Secretary of State Antony Blinken on the Biden administration’s public claims that Afghanistan would not fall to the Taliban. “You received an urgent dissent memo from 23 U.S. embassy personnel in Kabul, warning at the advances of the Taliban and the rapid collapse of Afghanistan,” Issa said, referencing an Aug. 19 Wall Street Journal (WSJ) report on a memo the embassy workers reportedly sent July 13. The congressman also noted Biden’s July 8 comment that a Taliban takeover was “highly unlikely,” juxtaposing it with the terror group’s July 9 claim that it controlled 85% of the country. “You knew that a major portion of people in the embassy believed that they were going to quickly be overrun,” Issa said, noting that State Department spokesman Ned Price told WSJ that Blinken “reads every dissent and reviews every reply.” WATCH: “The question really is, how do we regain confidence in the State Department and its spokespeople, yourself included, and the president, if in fact, we can not square what we receive, members of Congress, both...
    SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. (KABC) -- It was one year ago when Dr. Danny Fernandez began to treat his first COVID positive patients."I remember it was frightening because we didn't know much about it," said Dr. Fernandez.The emergency room doctor at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center said despite his emergency training the virus was unpredictable as a disease."With COVID it seems like any symptom was possible. So, it was really difficult to identify," he said.As the world went into lockdown, public health agencies were also scrambling to deal with the unknown erecting field hospitals and outdoor tents to deal with a potential surge in patients. San Bernardino County Public Health Director Corwin Porter stepped into his role in May just as the Summer surge was about to take off. He explained while the county was prepared with a pandemic plan COVID-19 had them adapting."There was no time to get ready you just jumped in and you did it. I think at some point in the future I will think about that but it was really all hands on deck it was immediate...
    Fans were convinced that Gareth Bale was watching the Masters instead of playing for Wales The Winery Everyone Is Talking About In Your State The economy as we knew it might be over, Fed Chairman says The Covid-19 pandemic brought the economy to a screeching halt, and while it has started its long road to recovery, the economy we knew is probably a thing of the past, said Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Thursday. © Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images "We're recovering, but to a different economy," Powell said during a virtual panel discussion at the European Central Bank's Forum on Central Banking. Load Error The pandemic has accelerated existing trends in the economy and society, including the increasing use of technology, telework and automation, he said. This will have lasting effects on how people live and work. While technological advances are generally positive for societies over the long term, Powell said, on a short-term basis they create disruption, and as the market adjusts to the new normal the pain isn't shared evenly. For example, it's likely that...
    Opinion: LGBTQ rights may be safe at the Supreme Court -- for now This Grocery Store Chain Has Seen Over 1,000 Sick Employees This Year A poll worker knew she had the coronavirus and worked Election Day anyway. She died soon after. Less than a week before Election Day, an election judge supervisor in Missouri who was scheduled to work the polls got her coronavirus test results. She was positive, a private lab told her on Oct. 30, which meant she had to isolate for two weeks. © Morry Gash/AP In this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, workers count Milwaukee County ballots at Central Count in Milwaukee. Instead, the unidentified St. Charles County, Mo., resident showed up and worked the polls on Tuesday. She died soon afterward, the St. Charles County Department of Public Health revealed Thursday. As of late Thursday evening, the woman’s exact time and cause of death was not known, Mary Enger, a spokeswoman for St. Charles County, told The Washington Post. Authorities have not made the woman’s identity public. ...
    MLB playoffs: Best photos from baseballs Wild Card Series Personalized gifts, from hilarious to heartfelt Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/12 SLIDES © Shutterstock.com Love it or hate it, tipping is here for now. The practice of tipping has become so embedded in American culture that refusing to do so might result in some serious side-eye. But tipping is more than just a form of social etiquette. In fact, it’s evolved into a necessary system that allows service industry workers to make a decent wage. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employers are only required to pay tipped employees a minimum of $2.13 an hour, if the worker’s tips can add up to the federal minimum wage — $7.25 — or more. But this varies state by state. For example,...
    Face masks in public spaces, alternating office days, questionnaires on health status – workers sent home when the coronavirus pandemic took hold in March are facing major adjustments as they slowly return to a changed office environment. Sign up for Newsletters and Alerts Subscribe Follow Us Facebook Twitter Instagram RSS Most Popular Here’s your list of 20+ places offering State Fair food & drinks in lieu of the Fair 17-year-old arrested after 2 killed during unrest in Kenosha Son pleads guilty to killing former Viking, wife in central Minnesota home last year Gopher athlete sexually assaulted woman in her on-campus apartment, charges say Amid concerns over noise, Afton considers limits on residents’ excessive gunfire Coronavirus Wednesday update: Minnesota death toll grows by 14
    By Rachana Pradhan and Victoria Knight As the coronavirus crisis deepened in April, Georgia officials circulated documents showing that to get through the next month, the state would need millions more masks, gowns and other supplies than it had on hand.[ SEE: The Latest News on the Coronavirus Outbreak ]The projections, obtained by KHN and other organizations in response to public records requests, provide one of the clearest pictures of the severe PPE deficits states confronted while thousands fell ill from rising COVID-19 cases, putting health workers at risk. Georgia on April 19 had 932,620 N95 respirator masks — one of the best protections for health workers against infection — and expected to burn through nearly 7 million within a month. It urgently needed to buy 1.4 million more, according to documents obtained by the Brown Institute for Media Innovation and shared with KHN. For gowns, officials expected to go through 16.1 million in 30 days, a staggering amount compared with the 21,810 the state had at the time.Photos: States Pause ReopeningView All 18 Images"Making progress with PPE needs. Biggest challenge now...
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