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    Many parents feel guilty when their children spend hours on end staring at screens – and some even worry it could make them less clever. But a new study suggests that spending an above-average time playing video games can actually help boost children's intelligence. Researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden carried out psychological tests on more than 5,000 children in the US aged between ten and 12, to gauge their general cognitive abilities. The children and their parents were also asked about how much time the children spent watching TV and videos, playing video games and engaging with social media. The researchers then followed up with the children two years later, at which point they were asked to repeat the psychological tests. The results showed that those who played more games than the average increased their intelligence by approximately 2.5 IQ points more than the average between the two measurements.  No significant effect was observed, positive or negative, of TV-watching or social media.  Children who played more games than the average increased their intelligence by approximately 2.5 IQ points more than the...
    Neilson Barnard/Getty 11-year-old Ansel, the photographer’s son, plays Fortnite. Many parents feel guilty when their children play video games for hours on end. Some even worry it could make their children less clever. And, indeed, that’s a topic scientists have clashed over for years. In our new study, we investigated how video games affect the minds of children, interviewing and testing more than 5,000 children aged ten to 12. And the results, published in Scientific Reports, will be surprising to some. Children were asked how many hours a day they spent on social media, watching videos or TV, and playing video games. The answer was: a lot of hours. On average, children spent two and a half hours a day watching online videos or TV programmes, half an hour socialising online, and one hour playing video games. Read More From Heavy How You Can Help Ukraine: Verified Charities, GoFundMe & Ways to Support Ukrainians In total, that’s four hours a day for the average child and six hours for the top 25% – a large portion...
    An investigative journalist has claimed that doomed media tycoon Robert Maxwell didn't have any loyalties in an eye-opening new documentary, which delves into the last few years of his life at the helm of his financially struggling publishing empire. The first episode of BBC's House of Maxwell, which airs on BBC2 tomorrow at 9pm, reveals that Robert Maxwell had ties to Russia's KGB and MI6, even wanting Britain's intelligence agency to fund his publishing company. Investigative journalist, Tim Bower, who was prevented from distributing a book about the media tycoon, claimed Maxwell wanted everyone to know that he was a 'decorated war hero' but was reluctant to share his 'shady' past.  He said: 'He was working for both British intelligence and Russian intelligence. No loyalties other than to himself.' Meanwhile, in a previously unseen clip filmed in 1992, former KGB Chief Leonid Shebarshin explained: 'Maxwell was a special person, he was received as he is. Our alliance was golden, useful, efficient relation.  'A foreigner can be useful to us as a person with access to some information, who would willingly...
    An artificial intelligence algorithm used by YouTube to automatically add captions to clips, has been accidentally inserting explicit language into children's videos. The system, known as ASR (Automatic Speech Transcription), was found displaying words like corn as porn, beach as bitch and brave as rape, as reported by Wired. To better track the problem, a team from Rochester Institute of Technology in New York, along with others, sampled 7,000 videos from 24 top-tier children's channels. Out of the videos they sampled, 40 per cent had 'inappropriate' words in the captions, and one per cent had highly inappropriate words. They looked at children's videos on the main version of YouTube, rather than the YouTube Kids platform, which doesn't use automatically transcribed captions, as research revealed many parents still put children in front of the main version.    The team said that with better quality language models, that show a wider variety of pronunciations, the automatic transcription could be improved.  An artificial intelligence algorithm used by YouTube to automatically add captions to clips, has been accidentally inserting explicit language into children's videos. One example...
    PLAYING with dolls can help develop children’s emotional intelligence, according to research. A team of neuroscientists at Cardiff University have released the latest findings from a multi-year study exploring the short and long-term developmental impacts of doll play. 2Experts studied the emotional intelligence of kids who played with dollsCredit: Andy Paradise/Paradise Photo In the study’s second year, researchers investigated the importance of what kids said while they play, and found children use increased language about others’ thoughts and emotions when roleplaying alone with dolls. This is a concept known as internal state language (ISL), and in doing this, children are able to practice social skills they can utilise when interacting with people in the real world and can also be potentially beneficial to children’s overall emotional development. The study was conducted in partnership with Barbie and also found during the observation of children, an increased brain activity in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region when they spoke as though their dolls had thoughts and feelings. This region [pSTS] is heavily involved in the development of social and emotional processing...
    A US Air Force veteran has blasted America's drone policy, saying fear and a failure to collect proper intelligence led to the botched strike that killed an Afghan aid worker, two other men and seven children in Kabul in August.  Ian Fritz, served in the Air Force from 2008 to 2013 as an airborne cryptologic linguist. While he himself has not flown a drone, he has gathered intelligence and orchestrated strikes by drones and helicopter gunships. He says his Air Force record attributes him with 123 enemies killed in action.  Fritz criticized the culture around America's use of drones and its intelligence gathering skills, saying it can be blinded by 'fear of the enemy.' 'We wholeheartedly believe that our intelligence is so good, our weapons so accurate, and our mission so righteous that anyone who gets caught in the crossfire, or the Hellfire, is worth it. Even kids,' Fritz wrote in The Atlantic.  The Pentagon has revealed that Zemari Ahmadi, 43, had been mistaken for an ISIS-K terrorist as they both drove a white 1996 Toyota Corolla and intelligence officers mistook bottles of...
    Class clowns have traditionally been given the dunce treatment. But research now suggests they may actually be one of the smartest children in the room.   Scientists tested the funny-bones of 217 children in Turkey of different IQs by asking them to generate jokes for 10 comics.  Each of their contributions was then scored by a panel of scientists and cartoonists. Once all of the final scores were tallied, experts found the more intelligent children outperformed their peers in every way. Academics believe intelligent people have a better grasp of humour because they understand how to subvert people's expectations.  Lead author  Professor Ugur Sak said parents and teachers should recognise having a jokester child was a sign of their intellectual ability.   Do you have a kid who loves to crack a joke? New research has suggested that being able to see the funny side of things could also mean a child is smarter than average These are the comics that 217 Turkish children were asked to fill in to test their humourous abilities. Researchers found that the higher a child scored on a...
    U.S. CENTCOM Commander Gen. Kenneth McKenzie was grilled by reporters on Friday for admitting the August 29 Kabul strike was a mistake that killed innocent children. The U.S. military initially claimed they took out a vehicle they believed was an imminent threat to the airport in Kabul where evacuations were ongoing. However, McKenzie publicly acknowledged that in the end, no ISIS-K fighters were killed, but 10 civilians — including 7 children — were. One reporter told McKenzie rather bluntly, “This is a complete and utter failure.” McKenzie again acknowledged the strike was “a terrible mistake” that “we take full responsibility for.” “While I agree with it, this strike certainly did not come up to our standard and I profoundly regret it. I would not qualify the entire operation in those terms,” he added. Asked if anyone will be held responsible, McKenzie said they’re continuing “that line of investigation.” Another reporter asked McKenzie what this horrific tragedy says “about the reliability of future strikes.” “This was a self-defense strike taken under self-defense rules of engagement based on an imminent threat to attack...
    Children born during the Covid pandemic may have lower IQs because of reduced interactions during lockdowns, a study has claimed. Researchers from Brown University in Rhode Island found babies born since March 2020 have worse cognitive, verbal and motor skills than children who entered the world before coronavirus. Mean IQs for children aged three months to three years old dropped from around 100 in the decade before the pandemic to 79 during it.  And the drop-off was worse in boys and those from poorer backgrounds, scientists said.  Lockdowns have meant children have significantly less interaction with the outside world, leading to 'shockingly' low cognitive development.  Whether or not the fall in development will affect children in later life is uncertain, the researchers said. Babies' brains are more malleable than adults and it is likely they will be able to recover.  Paediatrician Dr Sean Deoni, lead author of the study, said the drop-off in IQ scores was significant. He told The Guardian: 'It’s not subtle by any stretch. You don’t typically see things like that, outside of major cognitive disorders.'  Children...
    A FORMER Trump national security official is sounding the alarm on China, saying the country has enough personal data through cyber theft to build a dossier on every single adult and child in the US. Matthew Pottinger, a former Trump deputy national security adviser, is warning the national intelligence community that China was looking for ways to exploit data it had stolen from Americans to influence the country. 1China has enough data to build a dossier on everyone in the country, a former Trump official warned "Assembling dossiers on people has always been a feature of Leninist regimes," Pottinger said during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Wednesday. "But Beijing’s penetration of digital networks worldwide including using 5G networks," he continued, "has really taken this to a new level." Pottinger said the Chinese government could possibly find out the most secretive of details for every American given the information it has stolen or received through other means. "So the Party now compiles dossiers on millions of foreign citizens around the world, using the material that it gathers to influence,...
    (CNN)The Justice Department has made the extremely rare move of intervening in a court case against a former top Saudi intelligence official who has been targeted by Saudi Arabia's powerful Crown Prince, in order to protect classified intelligence secrets.If the court case is allowed to proceed, the Justice Department said in a motion filed Tuesday, it could lead to "the disclosure of information that could reasonably be expected to damage the national security of the United States."The case was brought against Saad Aljabri, a former top Saudi counterterrorism official who is widely respected by US intelligence and counterterrorism officials and credited by them with saving hundreds, maybe thousands, of American lives. Aljabri -- who fled to Canada in 2017 -- became a nemesis of the Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, after working for years alongside the country's head of counterterrorism, Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, who was a rival of Salman's for the throne. A group of Saudi companies owned by the Kingdom's sovereign wealth fund, which the prince controls, then brought embezzlement cases against Aljabri, first in Canada and now...
    New York City Police announced Saturday that $54,000 worth of illegal fireworks have been seized in recent weeks, ahead of the Fourth of July holiday. The fireworks were collected in three NYPD Intelligence Bureau operations conducted in June and early July, involving multiple city offices and the NYC Fireworks Task Force, which includes the New York State Police, New Jersey State Police and the Port Authority Police. Investigators made 22 fireworks-related arrests and seized six illegal firearms. Nearly half of those arrested live in Brooklyn, including two individuals with 42 and 33 prior arrests, respectively.
    (CNN)Barring the sudden emergence of a collective conscience, Senate Republicans will confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday. They have told the public - and reiterated with a 12-0 vote of her nomination out of the Senate Judiciary Committee - that this is a perfectly legitimate path forward, and that Barrett is a highly qualified judge who will follow the law. What they have not mentioned is her extreme ideology. Those claims are also an insult to our intelligence. This confirmation, which breaks both well-established norms and formal Senate rules, is highly unusual, and profoundly disrespectful.Jill FilipovicBarrett's Catholic faith in particular has been the subject of much conservative defensiveness -- leading Republicans claim, often citing an inartful comment from Sen. Dianne Feinstein during Barrett's 2017 confirmation hearing for the 7th Circuit, that she's being targeted by liberals for being religious, and that any question of how her faith may impact her jurisprudence is akin to an unconstitutional religious test. But it's Barrett herself who brought religion into it, making clear in her writings that her personal...
    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris say they spoke to Jacob Blakes family Facebook warns that Apples privacy changes will decimate a small part of its advertising business Praise the Process Not the Talent: How to Build a Growth Mindset In Kids Your child brings home a good grade on a reading or math assignment. You are understandably proud and want to acknowledge this achievement and encourage them to keep trying. What do you say? The words are probably out of your mouth before you’ve thought about it: “You’re so smart!” you declare, sticking the assignment to the fridge. © Provided by Fatherly But that might actually be the wrong thing to say.  Parents influence whether or not their children develop what psychologists call a “growth mindset” — a belief that intelligence can be developed over time. Children with this mindset are more likely to take on challenges, bounce back from failure, and believe they can improve with hard work. When parents deliver praise, react to failure, and even gesture and point with their babies, they affect how their children...
    A former Saudi minister of state and intelligence official has filed an explosive lawsuit against Mohammed bin Salman (MBS), Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, alleging that he “orchestrated an ongoing multi-year conspiracy by a Saudi government-sanctioned ‘death squad’ to torture and assassinate” the ex-intel officer on both U.S. and Canadian soil. The plaintiff, Dr. Saad Aljabri, who is characterized in the complaint as a “trusted partner of U.S. intelligence officials,” claims that the Saudi leader first dispatched a 50-person kill team dubbed the “tiger squad” in October 2018 – just two weeks after the murder of Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi in Turkey – to Ontario, Canada, with an intention to take him out. “The ‘Tiger Squad’ that was deployed to Canada included forensic personnel experienced with the clean-up of crime scenes, who carried with them two bags of forensic tools,” the suit alleges. “The kill team was thwarted by attentive Canadian border security officials who were suspicious of their behavior at an airport checkpoint.” BEIRUT EXPLOSION: FRANCE'S MACRON PROMISES FOREIGN AID WON'T FALL INTO 'CORRUPT HANDS' AS OUTRAGE...
    Stocks Reverse, Twitter Hack Raises Concerns 2021 Airstream Basecamp Goes Big With New 20 and 20X Models 9 Everyday Things To Do To Raise Emotionally Intelligent Kids It’s natural for parents to be concerned about their children’s academic prowess and “IQ,” but these days, more are seeing the importance of developing emotional intelligence, or “EQ.” © Camille Tokerud via Getty Images Parents play an integral role in children's emotional development.  “Being emotionally intelligent helps kids manage their feelings in constructive ways, resolve conflict, and solve problems,” said Donna Housman, a clinical psychologist with 30 years of experience in early childhood development. “The ability to manage one’s own emotions, and cope with the emotions of others, along with an increased sensitivity to how others feel, is key to developing empathy, compassion, understanding and acceptance of differences between and among us.” Research also suggests that emotional intelligence is linked to greater success in school, stronger communication skills, better relationships, self-awareness, resilience, improved mental health, and other positive outcomes. The good news is parents can help lay the foundation for this success...
    This spot-on predictor of who will win the 2020 presidential election is not the stock market or even opinion polls 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Test: The Best Mustang of All Time Why EQ Is The Most Important Thing You Can Teach Your Kids Our kids have had an exceptionally bad hand dealt to them the past few months. They’ve been separated from their entire social structure, their classrooms and all sense of normalcy. And parents have certainly struggled (to put it mildly) to keep up. So how can parents use this time at home ― whatever that looks like  ― to teach their children other important life skills and foster their emotional intelligence? Enter EQ Not IQ, a package from HuffPost Parenting.  © Tom Werner via Getty Images For decades, parents searching for a clearer picture of their children’s supposed brainpower turned to IQ (“intelligence quotient”) tests. They’ve largely fallen out of favor, partly because experts say they don’t work but also because parents’ values in terms of what they want for their kids and expect of them...
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