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    Charles P. Rettig, commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service, testifies during the Senate Finance Committee hearing titled The IRS Fiscal Year 2022 Budget, in Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C., June 8, 2021.Tom Williams | Pool | Reuters A leading House Democrat on Friday called on President Joe Biden to replace IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig over the agency's controversial destruction of data related to 30 million paper-filed tax returns. "The IRS is vital to public confidence in our nation and its Trump-appointed leader has failed," said Rep. Bill Pascrell of New Jersey, chairman of the oversight subcommittee of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee. "This latest revelation adds to the public's plummeting confidence in our unfair two-tier tax system," Pascrell said. "That confidence cannot recover if all the American people see at the IRS is incompetence and catastrophe," the Democrat added. "The manner by which we are learning about the destruction of unprocessed paperwork is just the latest example of the lackadaisical attitude from Mr. Rettig." The White House and the IRS did not immediately return requests for...
    courtneyk | E+ | Getty Images An audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration revealed the IRS has tossed data for millions of payers, sparking anger from the tax community. The material, known as paper-filed information returns in accounting parlance, are sent yearly by employers and financial institutions, and cover taxable activity, such as W-2 forms, with copies sent to taxpayers and the IRS. The continued inability to process backlogs of paper-filed tax returns contributed to management's decision to destroy an estimated 30 million paper-filed information return documents in March 2021," according to the report. The IRS backlog, created by years of budget cuts, understaffing, pandemic-related office closures and added duties, is expected to clear by December, according to Commissioner Charles Rettig. More from Personal Finance:How fast does inflation cut buying power? Here's a simple guideHere's why a Roth IRA conversion may pay off in a down market'Great Resignation' has changed workplace for good, says expert who coined term While the report doesn't specify which information returns the agency chucked, the news has triggered angry responses from tax...
    New York (CNN Business)A judge in Washington D.C. on Thursday dismissed a high-profile case filed by a Washington Post politics reporter who alleged that the newspaper and its former top editor subjected her to unlawful discrimination after she publicly said that she had been the victim of sexual assault.The reporter, Felicia Sonmez, had previously said that she had been prohibited from covering stories about sexual misconduct because she had been outspoken about being a sexual assault survivor herself.Sonmez had argued that the ban, which eventually was lifted after she criticized the paper both publicly and privately, had prevented her from covering some of the most consequential stories in politics, such as the allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his confirmation process, which he denied.The ban was instituted during the tenure of former Executive Editor Marty Baron, who retired from the paper last February.Sonmez's lawyer said in the suit that she had suffered "economic loss, humiliation, embarrassment, mental and emotional distress, and the deprivation of her rights to equal employment opportunities" as a result of the ban.Read MoreShe filed...
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A West Virginia businessman has filed pre-candidacy paperwork for the governor’s race in 2024. The filing this week means Chris Miller, the son of U.S. Rep. Carol Miller, can begin raising funds for the gubernatorial race, The Gazette-Mail reported. READ MORE: Emergence Of Omicron Variant Causing Flight Cancellations On ChristmasMiller is known for his appearances in the family company’s auto sales commercials. He is part of the management team of Dutch Miller Auto Group, along with his father and brother. The company operates seven car dealerships in West Virginia and North Carolina. READ MORE: Tracking Santa Claus: When Is He Coming To Western Pennsylvania?Gov. Jim Justice appointed Chris Miller to Marshall University’s Board of Governors in 2019. One other potential candidate, Terri Bradshaw, of Gandeeville, also filed papers to raise money for a campaign. MORE NEWS: Giant Eagle Closing Stores Early On Christmas Eve, Staying Closed On Christmas Day(Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    Rescue workers search in the rubble at the Champlain Towers South Condo in Surfside, Fla. Gerald Herbert/AP A third lawsuit was filed against the Champlain Towers South Condominium Association. The lawsuit was filed by Raysa Rodriguez who had lived in the building for 17 years. She said the building "swayed like a piece of paper" in her class-action lawsuit. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A third lawsuit has been filed against the condominium association of the now-collapsed Champlain Towers South in Surfside, Florida.  The lawsuit was filed by Raysa Rodriguez, who lived in Unit 907 of the condominium. According to the Miami Herald, she lived in the building for 17 years and was just a few payments short of fully paying off her mortgage. The filing is still awaiting redactions from the Miami-Dade County Clerk and has not been released to the public yet, but the Miami Herald reported that Rodriguez filed a class action suit similar to the first lawsuit filed against the Champlain Towers South Condominium Association by resident Manuel Drezner. According to the...
    Raysa Rodriguez says she was asleep inside the Champlain Towers condo building in Surfside, Florida, when it started to collapse last Thursday morning. "Something work me up, and I found myself in the middle of the room," she writes in a newly filed lawsuit against the condo association that ran the property. "The building swayed like a sheet of paper." Details about the lawsuit filed by Rodriguez on Monday were reported Tuesday by Miami-based FOX station WSVN-TV. Rodriguez’s lawyer, Adam Moskowitz, says his client had been raising "red flags" about the safety conditions of the building "for months," sending complaints and photos of cracks and other damage to the building association. MIAMI CONDO COLLAPSE SURVIVOR SAYS IT'S A ‘MIRACLE’ HE ESCAPED "Nobody seemed to take any of this seriously, unfortunately," the lawyer told WSVN. "Nobody seemed to take any of this seriously, unfortunately." — Adam Moskowitz, lawyer for condo survivorIn her lawsuit, Rodriguez describes what happened as she tried to investigate what was happening. "I ran to the balcony. I open the doors, and a wall of dust hit me,"...
    More On: COVID vaccine California may require vaccinated workers to mask up after reopening US announces global vaccine sharing program — as 12 states reach shot goal Science chief wants next pandemic vaccine ready in 100 days What we know so far about the COVID variant first found in India A Chinese Communist Party military scientist who got funding from the National Institutes of Health filed a patent for a COVID-19 vaccine in February last year — raising fears the shot was being studied even before the pandemic became public, according to a new report. Zhou Yusen, a decorated military scientist for the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) who worked alongside the Wuhan Institute of Virology as well as US scientists, filed a patent on Feb. 24 2020, according to documents obtained by The Australian. The patent — lodged by the “Institute of Military Medicine, Academy of Military Sciences of the PLA” — was filed just five weeks after China admitted there was human-to-human transmission of the virus, and months before Zhou died under mysterious circumstances, the report noted. “This is...
    New York : The IRS warned earlier this year that people filing paper tax returns could have their stimulus check late. Photo: Thomas Cain / . The third stimulus check is already being deposited into some bank accounts, just one day after President Joe Biden signed the American Ransom Act. But while some households will have the money in a matter of days, others may have to wait longer. Among this group of people are those who filed their tax returns on paper. The IRS warned earlier this year that people filing paper tax returns could have the stimulus check with delays.. This is because the IRS is still grappling with catching up with filing tax returns filed in 2019, and 2020 returns filed on paper are likely to face processing delays as well. The tax agency’s delay is due, in part, to the pandemic, which prompted the IRS to have its workers perform remote work. When the health crisis hit, he stored the tax returns on paper until he could begin to process them....
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — Nearly 200 current and former California correctional officers have filed a lawsuit alleging that they were forced to take unnecessary rectal exams that amounted to sexual assault. The lawsuit was filed Thursday in Sacramento County Superior Court against the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, the Sacramento Bee reported Thursday. Several men and women told the Bee that they had been selected to become prison officers, but medical workers at a group of Sacramento clinics told them that they needed to have rectal examinations before they could start training. The exam involved the insertion of fingers into their rectums, three plaintiffs to the Bee on condition of anonymity. One woman told the paper that she was 22 when she had an invasive exam in 2014. A physician’s assistant told her it was a prostate exam, she said. Women don’t have prostates. “It was very uncomfortable, and I was really confused,” said the woman. “I just wanted to get out of there.” Some women also were given exams involving vaginal penetration, said Jamie Wright, one of the attorneys...
    Tax Day is here, with returns due by the end of July 15 — a three-month extension from the traditional April 15 filing date. Yet while your taxes are due today, you may face a long wait for your tax refund.  "We're experiencing delays in processing paper tax returns due to limited staffing," the IRS said Wednesday on its website. More than 20 million taxpayers took advantage of the later tax filing deadline, according to research from financial services firm IPX1031.  While the IRS said delays are mostly affecting people who filed paper returns, some taxpayers who filed electronically have also reported long waits for their refunds as well as trouble getting answers since the agency temporarily mothballed its Taxpayer Assistance Letters and phone lines.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Laura McGough, a college professor in Northampton, Massachusetts, said she filed her electronic return on March 10 — and is still waiting for her refund of more than $2,000. "It's really hard to wrap your head around. There's no one to call, no one to talk to." Because of...
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