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    Craig Bryan collaborates with his colleagues at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center about including more comprehensive questions on mental health assessments. Bryan led a new study that found gun owners are less likely to report suicidal ideation, prompting action to tailor questions to individual situations and perspectives. (Courtesy The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) Asking the right questions can better identify people at risk for suicide, especially those with access to firearms, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network. About half of those who try to kill themselves or died by suicide answered that they were not thinking about killing themselves when asked if they were thinking of taking their own life. “But for whatever reason, higher-risk gun owners are just less likely to say that they’re having thoughts about suicide, even though they are definitely thinking about ways or methods to attempt suicide,” said Craig Bryan, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral health at Ohio State University. Bryan, who has a doctorate in clinical psychology, led the study conducted...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – President Joe Biden addressed the country Wednesday, saying the U.S. is entering a “new moment” of the pandemic. “Americans are back to living their lives again. We can’t surrender that now,” he said. “That does not mean that COVID-19 is over. It means that COVID-19 no longer controls our lives.” READ MORE: Florida Reaches Opioid Settlements Topping $870 MillionHere in South Florida, infectious disease expert Dr. Aileen Marty said while COVID is still a concern, it is not the imminent threat it once was.  She said that was due to the increased immunity and treatments now available. “The virus is still here,” she explained, “but we have a lot of personal protection with the vaccines and from prior infection.” That is why, she said, many of the sweeping COVID restrictions have been safe to roll back. “From a public health perspective, it’s no longer an emergency, because we are not seeing overwhelming numbers that are using up so much care,” she said. “Because those case numbers aren’t translating to a serious rise in hospitalization, they are not...
    On Monday’s broadcast of the Fox News Channel’s “Jesse Watters Primetime,” Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) stated that we shouldn’t have to treat President Joe Biden like someone who is declining cognitively by having to help him say what he really means, Biden’s “intemperate speech” is “a national security risk.” And Biden lives “in an alternate universe where he just says they’re not true and he didn’t say them.” Host Jesse Watters asked, [relevant exchange begins around 4:25] “Are you surprised by these comments, Senator?” Paul said, “Well, you know, a lot of times when you’re around somebody who’s in cognitive decline, you find yourself trying to help them with a sentence, trying to help them complete it, and say, oh no, that’s not what you really mean. Let me help you complete the sentence. But we shouldn’t have to do that for the commander-in-chief. And it is actually a national security risk. Because he’s sending signals that no one in their right mind would want to send to Russia at this point. We aren’t trying to replace Putin in Russia,...
    Being overweight or obese at any point in life can increase a person's risk of developing colorectal cancer down the line, and the longer a person is overweight the more the risk builds, a new study finds. Researchers from the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg, just under 200 miles from Munich, found that similar to how smoking increases risk of lung cancer, being overweight will slowly build risk of developing colorectal cancer. The research team believes that the link between being overweight or obese and developing the potentially devastating  form of cancer is stronger than many believe. For a nation like the U.S.,  where 42 percent of Americans over the age of 20 are obese and 74 percent are overweight, this study has massive implications on the nation's health care system. Being overweight at any point in life can carry cause a person to have an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, a new study finds. The more overweight a person is, the more their risk increases over time (file photo) Researchers, who published their findings Thursday in JAMA...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Certain parts of Asia and Europe are seeing a dramatic rise in COVID-19 cases amid reports that the omicron subvariant is continuing to pick up speed here in the U.S.Meanwhile, a stall in federal COVID program funding could impact Southern California clinics."The population of East Los Angeles and South Los Angeles are always the hardest," said Jim Mangia, the president and CEO of St. John's Community Health.These areas were the first local epicenters of the COVID pandemic, but in two years, they've come a long way.In January, St. John's Community Health was one of the first to pilot President Joe Biden's program offering anti-viral COVID pills to eligible patients."The test-to-train is an incredible success because you have someone right there, and then you hand them medicine," Mangia said.But this program - and many others - are in immediate jeopardy.The White House said in the coming weeks, Americans will feel the impact of funding cuts to the U.S. COVID response if efforts to get more money are stalled.As a result, testing capacity could drop significantly and supplies...
    The recent suicides of the mayor of Hyattsville, Maryland, and a former Miss USA in New York can affect even people who didn’t know them well. In the immediate aftermath of a suicide, there is a higher risk of other suicides among people who might need support, according to a Northern Virginia psychiatrist. “And also in a more long-term perspective, survivors of suicide loss are at higher risk for other mental health challenges, whether that may be post-traumatic stress, depression or even a higher risk of suicide much later on in life,” said Dr. Ross Goodwin, a psychiatrist at Kaiser Permanente in Burke, Virginia. “It’s important to recognize that many different people with relationships to the person who died of suicide — or maybe people who may not have had a direct relationship with that person but who is still exposed to the suicide — is considered a survivor of suicide loss,” Goodwin said, “and someone who is perhaps at higher risk in the aftermath of suicide and someone who’s in need of contact or support after a suicide.” Signs...
    A PAIR of game-changing antiviral drugs are set to join the UK's Covid-fighting arsenal, the Health Secretary announced today. Thousands of vulnerable Brits could bolster their fight against the virus this winter with two new treatments. 2Molnupiravir has been found to cut the risk of hospitalisation and death by halfCredit: Reuters The drugs cut the risk of the infection spreading and speed up recovery in patients who have tested positive, or been exposed to someone who has the killer bug. US drug firms Merck Sharp and Dohme (MSD) and Pfizer have developed antiviral medication, which could drastically ease Covid pressures on the NHS. The Government has secured 480,000 courses of MSD's drug molnupiravir - proven in trials to slash the risk of dying or going to hospital by half. Pfizer started a large trial of its antiviral, PF-07321332/ritonavir, in September. Their drug aims to halt Covid in adults who live in the same household as someone with a positive test. The UK Government has also secured 250,000 courses of this medication, which is in the third phase of trials. ...
    BOSTON (CBS) – “Masks & vax required” says the chalk sign outside Grendel’s Restaurant and Bar in Harvard Square. If you want to dine inside during peak hours, management wants to see your vaccination card. Since Cambridge is in Middlesex County, which just moved into the “substantial risk” category on the CDC’s list over the weekend, the restaurant just restarted weekly COVID testing for its vaccinated staff. READ MORE: NTSB: Rear Train Was Going 30 MPH At Time Of Green Line Crash “If you’re going to have break-through infections, then you can’t rely on the vaccine to make sure that you can’t be infected or infectious,” said owner Kari Kuelzer. (WBZ-TV) Eight Massachusetts counties are now listed at “high” or “substantial” risk. New signs are popping up across the state. At Starbucks in Brighton, one on the door says masks are “recommended.” “With this new variant coming up, you don’t want to hurt anyone,” said one customer who wore a mask on the way in. READ MORE: Still Missing: Family Continues To Look For Hanson Mother Last Seen In 2019...
    A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool claims to calculate a patient's risk of dying from COVID-19 and associated variants by scanning for heightened blood vessel inflammation.  Scientists at the University of Oxford trained an algorithm to spot a COVID-19 signature in chest CT scans. The technology detects abnormalities in fat surrounding blood vessels in order to measure the level of inflammation caused by cytokines in infected patients. Those with heightened blood vessel inflammation were up to eight times more likely to die in the hospital due to the virus, but were also found to respond well to an anti-inflammatory drug that had a six-fold reduction in risk of dying. The team believes the innovation could personalize treatment and allow specialists to administer anti-inflammatory drugs faster to save the person's life.   Severe cases of COVID-19 have been associated with a cytokine storm, which is caused by the immune system flooding the bloodstream with specific proteins called cytokines that cause inflammation as a response to the virus.  Scroll down for video  Using this information, scientists at the University of Oxford trained...
    Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb recently said the U.S. can start lifting indoor mask mandates, and he elaborated on Face the Nation about how vaccinations reduce your risk to a level comparable with the flu. Gottlieb told CBS News’ Jonn Dickerson Sunday, “Covid won’t disappear. We’re going to have to learn to live with it, but the risk is substantially reduced as a result of vaccination, as a result of immunity that people have acquired through prior infection.” He said people should make decisions “based on their individual risk” but now “we’re at the point right now where we could start lifting these ordinances and allowing people to resume normal activity.” “Certainly outdoors, we shouldn’t be putting limits on gatherings anymore. We should be encouraging people to go outside. In the states where prevalence is low, vaccination rates are high, and we have good testing in place and we’re identifying infections. I think we could start lifting these restrictions indoors as well on a broad basis.” In response to people’s hesitation about easing restrictions, Gottlieb emphasized that if you...
    THE risk of two-fully vaccinated people catching Covid from meeting up inside is "tiny", a scientist has claimed. Professor Tim Spector, from King's College London, said there is just a "one in 400,000 chance" of catching the bug while indoors with someone else who has been vaccinated. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 4The risk of two-fully vaccinated people catching Covid from meeting up inside is 'tiny', a scientist has claimed (stock image)Credit: Getty 4Professor Tim Spector said there is just a 'one in 400,000 chance' of catching the bug while indoors with someone else who has been vaccinatedCredit: Alamy Professor Spector told the Telegraph: "The Prime Minister recently told us that two people who have been fully vaccinated really shouldn't meet because it wasn't 100 per cent safe. "I want to give it some context. It all depends on how much virus is around in the country and currently with rates of one in 1,400 for someone who has been fully vaccinated, according to our data and the trial data, it suggests they are at...
    The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) has released updated guidance on the spread of COVID-19 on surfaces. "People can be affected with the virus that causes COVID-19 with contact with contaminated surfaces and objects," CDC Director Rochelle Walensky. "However, evidence has demonstrated the risk by this route of transmission is actually low." Cleaning with a household cleaner that contains soap or detergent reduces the amount of germs on surfaces and decreases risk of infection from surfaces, Walensky said. "This process does not necessarily kill germs, but reduces the risk of infection by removing them," Walensky said."Disinfecting uses a chemical product which is a process which kills the germs on the surfaces." In most situations, cleaning alone removes most virus particles on surfaces.  "Disinfection to reduce transmission of COVID-19 at home is likely not needed unless someone in your home is sick or if someone who is positive for COVID-19 has been in your home within the last 24 hours," Walensky said. To view the complete CDC guidance, click here.
    THE risk of catching Covid is cut by a THIRD if you live with someone who has been vaccinated, it was revealed tonight. Dr Mary Ramsay, head of immunisation at Public Health England, said data from vaccinated healthcare workers in Scotland suggests that immunised Brits are far less likely to pass on the virus. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 2Dr Mary Ramsay said the risk of catching Covid is cut by a third if you live with someone who has been vaccinatedCredit: PA Dr Mary Ramsay tonight unveiled a raft of new data that shows the real-world impact of Britain's jab rollout. She told the Downing Street briefing: “Data from Scotland suggests vaccinated healthcare workers have a 30 per cent lower chance of passing infection on to their household contacts.  “This is the first evidence we have of a reduction in transmission from vaccination. “This means the more people we vaccinate, the more we reduce the spread of infection”.  The news comes as a huge boost in the fight against the pandemic, as...
    People who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can gather indoors with other vaccinated people without masks, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said today. The recommendation is part of the long-awaited guidelines for how people who have received the shots can adjust their behavior. People who are vaccinated should still wear masks when they’re in public and while interacting with people who have not been vaccinated. “A growing body of evidence now tells us that there are some activities that fully vaccinated people can resume at low risk to themselves,” CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said during a press briefing today. People who have been vaccinated can gather indoors with unvaccinated people in other households as long as those unvaccinated people are at a low risk for a severe case of COVID-19. “If grandparents have been vaccinated, they can visit their daughter and her family even if they have not been vaccinated, so long as the daughter and her family are not at risk for severe disease,” Walensky said. The CDC is not issuing new recommendations around...
    JUST one in ten people who catch coronavirus pass it on to some they live with, a study has found.  Researchers examined data on transmission in over 7,000 homes - and found that just over 10 per cent of virus patients had passed on the bug to those they shared a house with.  ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 1One in ten people who catch coronavirus pass it on to some they live with, a study has foundCredit: Alamy Scientists in Boston, USA analysed data from over 25,000 people between March 4 and May 17, 2020.  During this timeframe, 7,262 people caught the virus but only passed it on to a further 1,809 people they lived with. This resulted in a transmission rate of 10.1 per cent.  The likelihood of passing on the virus was also lower for larger households, the paper found.  Those living in homes with three to five people were found to be 20 per cent less at risk than a two-person house.  But researchers found significantly higher risk of household transmission for...
    Vapers infected with Covid are up to 17 per cent more likely to spread it because they blow the viruses around when they breathe out, a study has claimed. Experts say puffing out vapour from e-cigarettes could propel thousands of viruses towards people in the surrounding area.  And the Covid-plagued droplets could travel more than two metres, the outer limit of the UK's social distancing rules, which endorse a 'one metre plus' approach. Experts have called on vapers not to use their devices while in queues, at bus stops or other places where people are at risk of encountering a 'vape cloud'.  In the study the researchers, from Mexico, Italy and New Zealand, said it would be 'extremely intrusive' to tell people to stop vaping indoors at home but that it might be sensible to ban it in public spaces such as restaurants and train stations.  They said the risk posed by 'low intensity' vaping, which was just exhaling gently, was smaller than the risk from speaking or coughing while close to someone. The team did not compare vaping to...
    COUGHIN carries a 10 times greater risk of spreading Covid compared to spreaking and coughing than previously thought, a new study has showed. The study also shows there is a greater risk to NHS staff than originally feared. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 2Experts have called for better PPE and for improved hospital ventilation as a result of a new studyCredit: PA:Press Association The new data could explain why NHS staff are so likely to be struck down with coronavirus, The Guardian reports. Hospital workers are four times more likely to contract Covid-19 than the general population. Experts have called for better PPE and for improved hospital ventilation as a result of the joint study by the University of Bristol and North Bristol NHS Trust. The access to higher-level PPE - such as FFP3 respirator masks - was based on an assumption that ICU wards were more dangerous. It is because treatments that required continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in order to support a patients' breathing generated large amounts...
    WE all have our off days, especially during what's been a difficult 2020. But how do you know if your feelings of tiredness, irritability, or panic are not something more serious? 3Britain was already facing a mental health crisis before the pandemicCredit: Alamy The NHS has created a mood assessment tool to reveal if you have signs of anxiety or depression. It asks a broad set of 18 questions about your feelings in the past two weeks with multiple choice answers. The questions include: "How often have you been bothered by feeling tired or having little energy?", and "How often are you restless?". Then the tool will give you a score for both anxiety and depression at the end, and what steps you should take next, perhaps encouraging you to see your GP. Click here to take the test 3The NHS has created a mood assessment tool which asks about your feelings in the past two weeks 3It gives you a score, and then what to do next If left untreated with either therapy or medication, mental health problems can...
    Los Angeles county reverses ban, allows churches to hold indoor services MAP: per-state vaccination numbers across the country If Youve Decided to Be With Fam For the Holidays, Heres How to Make It Safer (Emphasis on the "Er") © John Rawlings - Hearst Owned If you've decided to be with family during the holidays, there are a few ways to make your celebration safer—though no gathering in 2020 is entirely risk-free. Listen, this is not a feel-good story about how you can definitely go see your family this Thanksgiving because you really, really, really miss them and haven't seen them since before the pandemic. We're still mid-pandemic. As of today, more than 17.3 million people in the country have been infected and more than 300,000 have died, according to the New York Times. And due to a surge of travel around Thanksgiving (when, yeah, the CDC again asked Americans not to gather), many states like California are now issuing new stay-at-home orders. “The best thing for Americans to do in the upcoming holiday season is to stay at...
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