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    A FUTURISTIC underwater garden has produced plant life in air-tight biospheres bolted to the ocean floor. Nemo's Garden is located more than 15 feet below the surface of the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Italy. 5The underwater habitat is an eco-friendly method for growing plantsCredit: Nemo's Garden 5"Agrinauts" tending to the plants are half-submerged in seawater and half-exposed to the biome's airCredit: Nemo's Garden 5Strawberries and other edible salads have been successfully planted and grown under the surfaceCredit: Nemo's Garden Nemo's Garden was founded in 2012 by diving equipment entrepreneur Sergio Gamberini. The company's site says the project was initially "a provocation" - a rebellious statement about resourcefulness - but evolved into one of the sustainability initiatives that could define our future. Plants, both edible and aesthetic, grow fantastically in the hyper-controlled environment - harvests from Nemo's Garden have shown a higher nutrient content than crops grown by traditional methods. Nemo's Garden houses six acrylic biomes each filled with 2,000 liters of air, about 90 plants and advanced monitoring tools to keep the system alive and well. Read...
    Brassicas are a genus of plants that belong to the Brassicaceae family. Though the name might not sound familiar, cabbages, turnips, mustards, broccoli, cauliflower, arugula, radishes, and kale (to name but a few) are very familiar. In their various forms, brassicas show up on our dinner plates as intentional and delicious parts of our meals, they grow wild along roadsides and show up in force as ‘weeds’ in our gardens. Though not everyone has the space to grow rows and rows of cabbages or cauliflower, everyone, even those with just a windowsill, can carve out little space to grow some kind of brassica. In general, brassicas are rich in folate, vitamins C, E, and K, and fiber. Though, each veggie comes with its impressive nutrient profile. Take a look at this list of brassicas that are perhaps on the easier side of home growing. Kale Kale is in the same family as cabbage and is sometimes referred to as leaf cabbage. There are many different varieties of kale to choose from, and it is one of the most nutrient-dense...
    It's one of the hottest trends to hit the gardening world in years. But what exactly is cut flower gardening? 2What exactly is cut flower gardening and how do you get started?Credit: Getty What is cut flower gardening? Cut flower gardening involves growing flowers and plants for the sole purpose of cutting them and making into bouquets. The flowers are often grown in rows, much like vegetables, to make it easier for the grower to identify, pick them and turn them into beautiful bunches. It's also become a way of making money in recent months, especially since the pandemic, with people looking for ways to set up businesses from their own homes. How do I get started? According to Savvy Gardening’s Niki Jabbour, the best way to start is to make sure you’ve got the right spot.  "Flowers need plenty of sun and rich, well-drained soil," Niki said. "Prep the site before planting by loosening the soil and digging in some compost and a slow-release flower fertiliser." If you have space, a raised bed...
    Spring flowering bulbs and perennials are filling our landscapes with color. As your gardens come alive this spring, start making notes on needed improvements and provide some early season color and nectar for the pollinators. This will keep your landscape looking its best all season long and for years to come. Start a garden journal or photographic record of your garden. Make notes or take pictures of what is working in your landscape, plants that need to be removed or areas where more color or new plants are needed. These notes will help as you create a landscape filled with year-round beauty. Make sure your plants receive sufficient moisture. It is easy to overlook watering during the cool and often wet spring months. A rain gauge can help you monitor the rainfall in your yard. Plants benefit from thorough watering that encourages deep, drought and pest resistant roots. Check the soil moisture and water when the top four to six inches are crumbly and starting to dry. Established drought tolerant plants tolerate drier soil. Start pulling weeds as they appear....
    LeighAnn Ferrara is transforming her small suburban yard from grass bordered by a few shrubs into an anti-lawn — a patchwork of flower beds, vegetables and fruit trees. It didn’t happen all at once, says the mother of two young kids. “We started smothering small sections of the lawn each year with cardboard and mulch and planting them, and by now the front yard is probably three-quarters planting beds,” she says. “Every year we do more.” Her perennials and native plants require less upkeep and water than turf grass does. And she doesn’t need herbicides or pesticides — she’s not aiming for emerald perfection. For generations, the lawn — that neat, green, weed-less carpet of grass — has dominated American yards. It still does. But a surge of gardeners, landscapers and homeowners worried about the environment now see it as an anachronism, even a threat. Like Ferrara, they’re chipping away at it. “America is unique in its fixation on the monoculture lawn,” says Dennis Liu, vice president of education at the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation in Durham, North Carolina. “Our...
    WHETHER you're a seasoned gardener or a newbie learning the ropes, you can always benefit from an expert's advice. Asking for guidance is the best way to avoid common mistakes and misconceptions, which impede your garden's growth and may make blooms look lackluster before their time. 3Garden expert Chloe Brooks shared her tips for making a garden last longerCredit: Chloe Brooks 3With the right planting strategy, your garden can last much longer than normalCredit: Getty Chloe Brooks is a home gardening expert at Triple Oaks Nursery and Herb Garden in Franklinville, New Jersey. At the nursery, she helps customers choose the best plants for their needs. She also makes sure they'll be well taken care of when they arrive at their new homes by sharing care tips, both at the center and when customers call with questions. Brooks is also a devoted home gardener, so her knowledge is hard-won – and she wants you to avoid these common planting, pruning, and feeding mistakes. READ MORE ABOUT GARDENINGbeginner's luck I’m a gardening enthusiast – five things I wish I knew...
    THINK you need to be a gardening expert to make your outdoor space look incredible? A pro has revealed three “rules” that beginners can ignore and still enjoy a thriving garden. 1You don't need to be a professional gardener to fully enjoy your outdoor space, argues botanist James WongCredit: Getty In a Guardian article, botanist James Wong said: “It’s that time of year when even the most resolute non-gardeners look out at the spring sunshine and the riot of growth going on outside their windows and feel a pang of curiosity.  “Yet I think that many of these timid first timers often feel excluded from embracing the joys of horticulture because of a few deep-rooted cultural myths.” “Whether it’s memorising all the complex rules that daunts you, or the fear of mispronouncing Latin names, here are three ideas that we should liberate ourselves from, so we can all enjoy the wonder of the botanical world.” Here are the three things you should not worry about and ignore as a beginner…. Saying horticultural words correctly As you buy and read up...
    Feijoa (Feijoa sellowiana O. Berg.) or pineapple guava is an evergreen subtropical shrub or small tree that produces an aromatic edible fruit with a somewhat pineapple flavored pulp. Originating in Southern Brazil, Uruguay, Paraguay and parts of Argentina, it has been grown in California for decades as an ornamental shrub. Prominent French horticulturist M. Edourd Andre brought the feijoa to southern France from South America in 1890. Hearing of this new attraction on the Riviera, Dr. F. Franceschi imported seedlings of the Andre selection to Santa Barbara in 1901. These early seedings were the parents of most of the older varieties grown in Southern California. Since these early days, separate importations of seeds and plants from South America have led to the selection of additional varieties. ‘The Real Dirt’ is a column by various local master gardeners who are part of the UC Master Gardeners of Butte County.  A member of the myrtle family, feijoa leaves are oval, about 3 inches long, glossy-green above, and silvery-white beneath. Blossoms usually appear in late spring (they are in bloom right now locally)....
    We are now entering the spring-to-autumn season when Agaves propagate. This is a timely opportunity to get familiar with this interesting plant genus. Traditionally, the genus Agave includes about 170 species, but a few years ago taxonomists included a few previously separate genera as species within the genus Agave. As a result, the genus now includes about 252 species. We’ll focus on the traditional Agave species, which are succulent plants native to Mexico and Central America. Because these plants are popular among succulent gardeners, growers have introduced many cultivars, including both selected varieties and hybrids. All Agaves form rosettes of their leaves and are immediately recognizable. (South African Aloes also are rosette-forming but lack the spininess of the Agaves.) Their leaf clusters range in size from 1 foot high and wide to up to 6 feet high and wide, with flower stalks rising well above the leaves. Most Agave species have sharp terminal spines, sharp marginal teeth, or both. These present a fierce appearance and require careful handling, but some gardeners find them appealing and uniquely attractive. A few species,...
    A GARDENING expert has revealed the best and worst flowers to have if you suffer hay fever. With summer just around the corner, millions of Brits will be dreading their usual symptoms, such as a runny nose, itchy eyes and fatigue. 1garden, fun, portrait, girl, summer, rose, smell, fragrance,Credit: Getty And it comes amid shortages of some hay fever tablets. People with hay fever might benefit from making their garden pollen-proof to ease their condition. Some flowers and plants expel more pollen than others. Not only could this make al fresco dining in your own garden a nightmare, but the spores may blow into your home through windows and doors. Read more on hay fever DRUG DEAL Is there an antihistamine shortage and where can I buy hay fever tablets?BEAT THE BOMB Snogging to laughing... hacks to help hay fever sufferers avoid 'pollen bomb' Chris Bonnett from GardeningExpress.co.uk said: “Pollen grains are usually wind borne or picked up on the bodies of beneficial insects such as butterflies and bees. “Sufferers experience the worst symptoms between late March and September, particularly...
    SUMMER is already full of gardening jobs. From planting new blooms to mowing your lawn, any keen gardener's to-do list is already pretty full. 2Pruning is just one of the job to do for summer that you might've forgotten aboutCredit: Getty But according to Gardeners’ World, there's one summer task that always gets overlooked. It's easy to forget to prune your plants and bushes when your lawn looks totally dead, but once everything else is in order it's important to prune. The pros explained, "By pruning in summer, you can reap the rewards of better displays from ornamental plants, you’ll also encourage bigger crops from fruit trees and bushes. "Removing new summer growth before it turns woody reduces growth-promoting nitrogen, allowing potassium to build up – and more potassium means more flowers and fruit. Read more on gardeningPOOP PROBLEM How to stop pigeons ruining your garden & pooing on the car using a 25p trick "You’ll also keep plants, such as shrubs, climbers and rambling roses, within bounds and maintain an attractive shape." Hedges It's important to prune...
    The Lamiaceae family, or the mint family, is made up of an enormous variety of plants. There are said to be 236 genera and more than 7000 species within this plant family. Plants from the mint family are commonly used by humans as ornamentals, herbs, and medicine. Such plants tend to have rather aromatic leaves and small delicate flowers that pollinators are attracted to. There are a few identifying characteristics that can help you spot a plant from the mint family. Almost all of these plants have square stems and alternating, opposite leaves. The flowers of these plants tend to grow in clusters and are small and tubular. There are the more obvious members of the Lamiaceae family plus a few that might be surprising. Either way, check out this list of plants that you can grow in your backyard or pots. Source: Five-Minute Families/Youtube 1. Mint (Mentha Spp.) Well, we will have to start with the mints of the mint family! The Mentha genus is thought to have about 25 species in it with hundreds of different...
    THERE'S nothing quite like soaking up the summer sun from your very own garden, but you don't need to spend a fortune to get it looking lush. We've acquired help from a couple of green-thumbed experts who have revealed the fuss-free things every garden needs - and don't worry, your space will look amazing in no time with very minimal effort. 2The experts shared a few things you can add to your garden that are low-effort but look amazing You won't have to spend your days plucking and pruning your plants either, because these easy cheap additions to your garden are mostly self-maintaned Solar lights Gardening expert John Dempsey, from Housetastic reckons fairy lights that are powered by solar panels are a great addition to a garden as they cost absolutely nothing to run, which means they won’t be a drain on your electricity bill. "They work simply by leaving the solar panel, found at the end of the lights, to charge in bright sunshine, and typically offer up to eight hours of power," he told `Fabulous. ...
    Sometimes it can be difficult to track whether a plant has had too much or too little water. Visual signs, such as shrivelling or browning leaves, don't start until most of the plant's water is gone, while yellowing takes place after it has been drenched. To address this tricky dilemma, scientists have created a new 'smartwatch for plants', which monitors the water content in leaves and pings the owner when the plant is in need of a drink. In a similar way to how smartwatches track the electrical activity of a wearer's heart through electrodes that sit against the skin, the wearable plant sensor can be attached to leaves.  It then wirelessly transmits data to a smartphone app, allowing the owner to keep tabs on hydration levels. The new 'wearable sensor' for plant leaves is the latest in a string of gadgets that claim to help gardeners monitor the health their plants, which also include smartphone-connected soil sensors and 'smart' self-watering plant pots'. Scientists have created a new 'smartwatch for plants', which monitors the water content in leaves and pings...
    April’s changeable weather and the recent return of near-freezing nights have been enough to try a gardener’s patience. Now, finally, May is here, the last frost date is past, and your tender seedlings can be transplanted into the garden. Like many living things, plants can benefit from some acclimatization when they change environments. So, here are some easy, but important things to do: About a week before planting out, cut back on water, and put the plants in a cooler environment. (Turn off the heat mat, set them away from direct sunlight.) Gradually introduce your seedlings to the outdoor environment; an hour or two at first in dappled sunlight is plenty, then gradually increase the amount of time they’re allowed out. Make sure to keep the containers watered — they’ll dry out more quickly outside. Place the seedling containers on a table, out of reach of dogs or cats. If you need to, set an alarm so you don’t forget the plants and leave them out too long. Another way you can get toughen up your seedlings is to brush...
    WHEN you wake up, you might not start thinking about your lawn right away. There's one common breakfast ingredient that can help keep ants, snails, and slugs off your lawn, and help your grass reach a lush green. 2A common household item can give you a stunning green lawn, experts sayCredit: Getty According to the experts at Joe's Lawn Care, one thing you probably do every morning doubles as a cheap way to keep pests out of your garden. When you make a cup of coffee in the morning, set your coffee grounds aside. "Instead of throwing the remainder of your ground coffee into the bin (or compost pile), use it to keep lawn pests like ants, snails, and slugs away," the experts advised. Once you've amassed a few days' worth of coffee grounds, you can head outside with them. READ MORE ABOUT GARDENINGOUT OF SIGHT I’m a gardening expert – kill weeds with little effort using cheap Amazon buyMOW-WAY I'm a gardening pro and always check these five things to prepare my lawn mower The best method for distributing...
    WITH summer around the corner, many beautiful spring flowers may be starting to fade. However, a gardening expert has revealed why you should not be tempted to cut them down just yet.  1A gardening expert has revealed when you should cut back your tulipsCredit: Getty On The Spruce, it explains: “It's tempting to want to cut them [spring bulbs] down and be done with them, but if you want the bulbs to bloom again next year, you have to resist the urge to cut the leaves or even make them look tidier. “Flowering bulbs need their leaves to photosynthesize and make food after they finish flowering.  “Each year, bulbs must store enough food to not just get them through the remainder of the year, but also to set new buds. That takes a lot of energy.” But when is it safe to cut back flowering bulb leaves? The website says that bulbs that have emerged and bloomed in April need to be left standing for eight weeks or so, which is in June. The flower stalks can be cut back...
    A new conspiracy theory on the right—that a marauding band of arsonists and kamikaze pilots have been sabotaging the national food supply—has captivated Donald Trump supporters with the help of a big name: Tucker Carlson. The theory has no basis in fact. Last week, an image began circulating on Facebook showing local news headlines about fires and other accidents at American food processing plants that produce everything from Hot Pockets to potatoes. The implication was that something was afoot with the food supply, even if the conspiracy theory’s proponents themselves couldn’t explain what it was. The image spread to Telegram, the social media messaging app that's become popular on the American right, with conservative figures like Jan. 6 rally organizer Ali Alexander reposting it. But despite a total lack of evidence that anything out of the ordinary is going on, that didn’t stop Carlson from running a Fox News segment on the debunked supposition. “Industrial accidents happen, of course, but this is a lot of industrial accidents at food processing facilities,” Carlson said during an April 21 segment on his...
    IN TONIGHT'S episode of Spring Gardening with Carol Klein - she reveals how to make the most of your bog garden. If you don't have one - don't worry, the gardening expert reveals how to make the most of your bog garden. 1Carol Klein, a British gardening expert revealed how to create your own bog garden without a pondCredit: Knickerbocker Glory TV She revealed that a bog garden is a part of the garden which has no running water or pond, yet the soil is still exceptionally moist. Carol revealed how to make the most of this part of your garden. The gardening expert revealed her favourite flowers to plant in these areas - which will thrive in damp soil. These included - Irises, Primulas, and Globe flowers. READ MORE GARDENING STORIESHOME RUN I'm a gardening expert - these cheap DIY improvements will add £26k to your home If you don't have a natural bog garden Carlo said there was...