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    SAN JOSE — Student advocates are calling on San Jose State University leaders to make good on their promise to provide resources for students who are sleeping in cars, couches, the campus library and even the streets because they can’t afford housing in one of the country’s most-expensive housing markets. The group is demanding more transparency from university officials, two years after San Jose State agreed to provide emergency funds and a shelter to students struggling with homelessness. On Wednesday, weeks away from the end of the spring semester, nearly 30 students from San Jose State University’s Student Homeless Alliance held a protest to collectively call on Interim President Stephen Perez and Vice President Patrick Day to fix its response to student homelessness for the fall, and share more information about the university’s previous commitment under former president Mary Papazian to help students. “”We’ve been calling press conferences since last October. We’ve been doing marches,” Samantha Shinagawa, a senior at the university, said. “And the administration still has been neglecting the agreement we agreed upon two years ago at this...
    Each backpack told a story. And there were 1,000 of them displayed Tuesday on the lawn at San Jose State, part of a national campaign by the nonprofit group Active Minds calling for greater attention to suicide prevention efforts. Among college-age adults, suicide is the second-leading cause of death, says Active Minds. The backpacks, scattered in the quad area between Tower Hall and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Library, were used to relay personal stories from both suicide victims and survivors. San Jose State student Mariah Ramirez pauses to reflect while viewing the suicide prevention exhibit, Send Silence Packing, that featured 1,000 backpacks laid out on the Tower Lawn representing lives lost to suicide. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)  San Jose State student Mariah Ramirez was visibly moved by the field of backpacks. Instead of continuing to the library where the film student planned to study, she paused for half an hour to write about it in her journal. “It’s so powerful,” she said. Sarah Strader-Garcia, a clinical counselor and adviser for the school’s student-run mental health club who...
    A former sports medicine director at San Jose State pleaded not guilty Tuesday to federal civil rights charges related to alleged sexual misconduct against four female student-athletes. Scott Shaw, 54, entered six not-guilty pleas during a virtual arraignment, according to USA Today and the Spartan Daily, San Jose State’s student newspaper. Court records show he faces six counts of misdemeanor deprivation of rights under the color of law. Last week, federal prosecutors charged Shaw, who served as the university’s athletic trainer, with violating the student-athletes’ civil rights by allegedly touching their breasts and buttocks without their consent and without a legitimate purpose between 2017 and 2020. He is further alleged to have acted under color of law, as an employee of the California State University system, when he sexually assaulted the victims. Shaw faces a maximum of six years in prison if convicted of all counts. California San Jose State president to resign after investigation into athlete sex abuse allegations Mary Papazian announced her resignation after the Justice Department’s findings that the university violated Title IX over...
    Former San Jose State University sports medicine director and athletic trainer Scott Shaw was charged Thursday with sexually assaulting female student athletes. According to a press release from the Department of Justice (DOJ), Shaw, 54, is being charged with civil rights violations after allegedly sexually assaulting students under the guise of treating them for injuries. Four female student athletes allege that Shaw violated them between the years of 2017 and 2020, saying that he touched their breasts and buttocks without consent and without a legitimate purpose, according to the DOJ. Shaw is further alleged to have acted under color of law when he sexually assaulted victims due to his status as a state employee for the California State University system. Shaw could face up to six years in prison if he is convicted of all counts, per the DOJ. Shaw will face the charges in the U.S. District Court in San Jose. The date for his court appearance has not yet been set. Tags California Sexual assault
    Federal prosecutors charged a former sports medicine director at San Jose State with civil rights violations for engaging in sexual misconduct with female student-athletes under the guise of treating them for their injuries. Scott Shaw, 54, who served as the university’s athletic trainer, is charged with violated the civil rights of four students who played on women’s athletics teams by touching their breasts and buttocks without their consent and without a legitimate purpose between 2017 and 2020. Shaw, as an employee of the California State University system, is further alleged to have acted under color of law when he sexually assaulted the victims. In Shaw’s case, the alleged victims are all female athletes on the university’s team rosters. He faces a maximum of six years in prison if convicted of all counts. Last. November, San Jose State announced that it reached a $3.3-million settlement with 15 former student athletes who accused the longtime sports trainer of subjecting them to sexually touching. The payout follows a federal civil rights investigation that found San Jose State did not take adequate...
    SAN JOSE (KPIX) — As the Russian attack against Ukraine intensifies, some are calling for the Biden administration to grant Ukrainian citizens working or studying in the U.S. temporary protected status. Valeriia Karnaukhova is a Ukrainian citizen, studying for a masters degree at San Jose State University. But her studies have been interrupted by war. READ MORE: At Least 1 Dead in Concord Crash on Clayton RoadShe now fears for the safety of her grandparents, cousins and friends in and around Kyiv who are all under Russian attack. ”It’s a very hard time. Very hard days for all of them, [and] for me as well. I am physically here, but my heart is with them. We are talking all the time, 24-7,” Karnaukhova said. She is mostly communicating through text messages on her phone. She says her relatives are taking shelter in the subways, but they can’t sleep because of all the shelling. “They are hearing the bombs, the bombardments, and it is very scary,” Karnaukhova explained. ”There’s no way to describe how scary it really is,” agreed Santa Clara...
    San Jose State has announced that it reached a $3.3-million settlement with 15 former student athletes who were reportedly sexually harassed by a longtime sports trainer. The payout follows a federal civil rights investigation that found San Jose State did not take adequate action in response to the athletes’ reports and retaliated against two employees who raised repeated concerns to the university about Scott Shaw, the former trainer and director of sports medicine. Allegations against Shaw date back to December 2009, when several female student athletes reported that the trainer had touched their breasts, groins, buttocks and/or pubic areas during treatment that was described to them as “trigger-point therapy” or “pressure-point therapy,” according to a report released in September by the U.S. Justice Department. Former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar was accused of similar abuse. As recently as February 2020, a student alleged improper touching by Shaw, but he continued to work at the university until he retired in August 2020. Shaw’s attorney could not immediately be reached for comment. He has previously denied allegations, according to multiple news...
    San Jose State University has named the person who will lead the institution when current president Mary Papazian steps down next month. California State University Chancellor Joseph Castro announced Monday that he has appointed Stephen Perez, provost and vice president of academic affairs at Sacramento State University. Perez will serve as interim president. Perez, an economics professor, will begin his new role on Jan. 3. Papazian is set to step down on Dec. 21. Vincent Del Casino, senior vice president for academic affairs at the school, will be in charge during the brief window after Papazian leaves and Perez begins. In a statement, Castro praised Perez’s leadership. “His passion for increasing opportunity for all students and his track record of building collaborative relationships with students, faculty and staff will ensure that SJSU continues on its upward trajectory during this time of transition,” the chancellor said. Perez’s arrival comes as the school is still reeling from a sexual harassment scandal at the university’s athletics department. On Friday, the school said it had reached a $3.3 million settlement with 15 former student-athletes...
    Nearly two years have passed since San Jose State President Mary Papazian and other top university administrators vowed to address housing insecurity on campus and ensure that every student had a safe and secure place to live. And while the university has recently made some positive steps toward this ambitious goal, a group representing thousands of unhoused students on campus is frustrated by the pace at which school administrators are moving — and what they see as policies hindering access to university assistance. “Instead of broken promises, we want to see action toward change,” said San Jose State senior Samantha Shinagawa. “We want hard dates, open communication with our students and efforts made toward helping the struggling population of housing insecure at San Jose State that is ever-growing.” SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA – November 04: San Jose State University senior Samantha Shinagawa speaks during a rally on Thursday, Nov. 4, 2021, in San Jose, Calif. A group of San Jose State University students and homeless advocates held the rally to call on the school to better address the housing crisis and offer...
    San Jose State Swim Coach Sage Hopkins and the university’s former deputy athletic director, Steve O’Brien, put their careers on the line to expose allegations of sexual abuse by a longtime athletic trainer. But they don’t want the spotlight. “This is not and should not be about me,” Hopkins said during a city commendation ceremony on Tuesday. “Our thoughts, empathy and passion should be with the dozens of survivors from six separate teams at San Jose State and our focus should be on their healing.” During the course of his 14-year tenure at San Jose State, former athletic trainer Scott Shaw inappropriately touched at least 23 female student-athletes, according to report released last month by federal investigators. Shaw resigned in August 2020 and is under criminal investigation by the FBI. Hopkins in 2009 was the first to bring forward allegations of more than a dozen female swimmers who contended that Shaw inappropriately touched them, reaching under their bras and underwear, during sports massages. Although the university cleared Shaw in its initial investigation in 2010, Hopkins...
    San Jose State University President Mary Papazian will resign at the end of the fall semester, an announcement that comes two weeks after the Department of Justice released findings over the university’s failure to properly address allegations of sexual abuse by a former athletic trainer. The university agreed to pay $1.6 million in late September to more than a dozen female athletes as part of its settlement with the Justice Department, which found the university in violation of Title IX — the civil rights law that prohibits sex-based discrimination at any federally funded education program. The university failed to take adequate action in response to athletes’ reported allegations, which surfaced in 2009, and retaliated against two employees who raised repeated concerns over the then-director of sports medicine, Scott Shaw, the report said. Papazian stepped in as president in 2016 and launched an investigation into the allegations against Shaw in 2019. She has received criticism over her administration’s handling of the investigation by outside groups as well as the Justice Department. “On September 25, after thoughtful consideration and discussions with...
    San Jose State University will pay $1.6 million to 13 female student-athletes who were sexually harassed by its former director of sports medicine, federal prosecutors said. The Department of Justice announced the settlement Tuesday following a Title IX investigation that found the university "failed for more than a decade" to adequately respond to complaints, including sexual assault, against San Jose State athletic trainer Scott Shaw. "Beginning in 2009, female student-athletes reported that the trainer subjected them to repeated, unwelcome sexual touching of their breasts, groins, buttocks, and/or pubic areas during treatment in the campus training facilities," the Department of Justice said in a statement. "The department concluded that for years, SJSU’s ineffective response exposed additional student-athletes to harm." A San Jose State Spartans helmet on the sidelines during the game between the San Jose State Spartans and the Idaho Vandals at the Kibbie Dome on November 3, 2012 in Moscow, Idaho. (William Mancebo/Getty Images) COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2020: RETURN TO NORMAL WRAPPED IN CHANGE Shaw, who resigned in August 2020, was initially cleared by San Jose State in May 2010 following...
    As part of a new settlement, San Jose State University agreed to shell out a total of $1.6 million to student athletes sexually abused by an athletic trainer who was allowed to continue working for years after they came forward to report the mistreatment. In an investigation, the U.S. Department of Justice said the school had not only failed to take appropriate action, but botched its own investigation a decade ago into the trainer’s behavior, thus allowing him to inappropriately touch more victims. It also found the university retaliated against employees, including a coach trying to bring the behavior to light. In the next several years, the school must do much more than pay victims. Here’s a look at some of what SJSU must do under the resolution agreement: Title IX office The school must restructure its Title IX office, which investigates claims of sex discrimination, in part by clarifying that the Title IX coordinator has the authority and responsibility to implement consistent campus-wide responses to reports of sexual harassment and assault. Athletics  SJSU must identify all female student athletes...
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — San Jose State University will pay $1.6 million for failing to adequately respond to reports of sexual assault of student-athletes, federal prosecutors announced Tuesday. The U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California said its Title IX investigation of SJSU’s response to reports of a former trainer assaulting female student-athletes exposed additional victims to harm. According to the complaint, SJSU failed for more than a decade to respond adequately to reports of sexual harassment and assault, starting in 2009. READ MORE: Pelosi Tells House Democrats to Prepare for "Adjustments" to $3.5 Trillion Spending Plan The department found SJSU also retaliated against two university employees, one who repeatedly alerted school officials about the athletic trainer, and another employee who was ultimately fired after opposing any retaliation against the first employee. In April, SJSU President Mary Papazian apologized to women who allege they were groped by the school’s former athletic trainer, calling it a “breach of trust” in a letter to students, faculty and staff. “I am determined...
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — San Jose State University will pay $1.6 million for failing to adequately respond to reports of sexual assault of student-athletes, federal prosecutors announced Tuesday. The U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California said its Title IX investigation of SJSU’s response to reports of a former trainer assaulting female student-athletes exposed additional victims to harm. According to the complaint, SJSU failed for more than a decade to respond adequately to reports of sexual harassment and assault, starting in 2009. READ MORE: Pelosi Tells House Democrats to Prepare for "Adjustments" to $3.5 Trillion Spending Plan The department found SJSU also retaliated against two university employees, one who repeatedly alerted school officials about the athletic trainer, and another employee who was ultimately fired after opposing any retaliation against the first employee. READ MORE: COVID: San Francisco International Airport Implements Vaccination Requirement For All Workers “No student should be subjected to sexual harassment at a college or university in our country, especially by an employee who wields a position...
    San Jose State University will pay $1.6 million to student athletes sexually harassed by an athletic trainer as part of a settlement with the U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California. Under the settlement, announced Tuesday, the university must also improve its process for responding to complaints of sexual harassment, improve its Title IX office, prevent retaliation and other steps. For more than a decade, the Justice Department said, SJSU failed to adequately respond to reports of sexual harassment and sexual assault of female student-athletes, exposing more students to harm in the process. An athletic trainer, multiple student athletes said, touched their breasts, groins and other areas during on-campus treatments. As this news organization previously reported, the university’s athletic program came under fire for allowing former athletic trainer Scott Shaw to work with athletes years after swimmers came forward with the disturbing allegations. In May, the school reassigned athletic director Marie Tuite to a fundraising role. Tuite said in August she had left the school altogether. The Justice Department said...
    SAN JOSE (KPIX) — After years of pleading for help, struggling San Jose State University students are finally getting their demands met. The college began offering one dozen beds inside dormitories at the beginning of this semester. In 2018, a group of students marched to the president’s office demanding that parking spots be made available for students to sleep safely at night in their cars. The group also demanded that a dozen beds be made available. SJSU’s Student Housing Alliance reported that year that more than 4,300 students had experienced homelessness. READ MORE: San Jose Opens First City-Sanctioned RV Site For Homeless People Amid Protests From Neighbors “Most of our students need a form of bridge housing, maybe just a couple days,” said San Jose State Associate Vice-President of Health, Wellness and Student Services Catherine Vossplaxton. “We’ve never said ‘no’ to a student who needs housing support.” The pilot program will offer the beds inside student housing so that no one can identify a struggling, unhoused student. They’ll be given dining passes as well, Vossplaxton said. Instead of parking...
    SAN JOSE — In a standoff with police Sunday evening, dozens of activists gathered near the home of San Jose State President Mary Papazian, protesting what they consider a cover-up of the 2008 death of Black student Gregory Johnson, Jr., found hanging in a fraternity basement. After shouting at police officers and chanting “no justice, no peace,” the protest ended peacefully around 8:30 p.m.. It wasn’t clear whether Papazian was at her home in San Jose’s Rose Garden neighborhood at the time. Johnson’s death was ruled a suicide in 2009, but his parents believe he was the victim of a hate crime and have called for the case to be reopened. In October, 300 protesters gathered in downtown San Jose in front of the Sigma Chi fraternity, demanding it be shut down. Several organizations that were involved in the George Floyd protests last summer, including HeroTent and Black Outreach, helped organize the protest near Papazian’s home. They were particularly upset that Papazian didn’t join a virtual meeting of San Jose State’s Associated Students Board of Directors in February to address...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. True measure of a strong mayor lies in leadership When I read about the strong-mayor ballot initiative my reaction was it was a good idea. However, after reading the articles by Charles Davidson (“Why San Jose should not switch to strong mayor system,” June 30) and Les White and Debra Figone (“Why San Jose voters should reject strong-mayor system,” July 7), I have changed my mind. Most importantly, when we elect a mayor or any other public official, we expect the new incumbent to be an effective leader. That is where their most important power derives from, not the formal authority vested in the position. There is no question that being a mayor of a major city is an incredibly challenging job. However, whether it is Mayor Sam Liccardo or a future mayor of San Jose, their track record will be judged by what they accomplished for their community through their leadership, not through the exercise of the power vested in the position. Leadership is...
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