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    "There's simply nothing that can come close," Alex said. "Nuclear comes closest, but interestingly, it's demonized and criminalized by the same people against fossil fuels." Alex believes the discussion should not be about solutions, but rather a change in method of thinking to look at the best way to make the world livable. People think climate change is the current largest threat to our planet. But Alex says the reduction and elimination of fossil fuels is the biggest threat to our planet because we rely on low-cost energy for the world to be livable. Alex points to a current problem we are seeing as fertilizer and fuel prices go up. It causes the cost to produce food to become too expensive. Our eight billion people depend on low-cost food production to feed their families. When the agriculture industry cannot afford to grow food, people starve. Watch the video to hear more from this interesting conversation. Can't watch? Download the podcast here. Want more from Elijah and Sydney?To enjoy more thought-provoking, controversial,...
    Rep. Jim Jordan is among the Republican lawmakers trying to mislead the public about the Biden administration and its actions.Graeme Jennings/AP This story was originally published by HuffPost and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Republican lawmakers and right-wing media have responded to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by waging a misinformation campaign about the Biden administration being “at war with fossil fuels.” The goal, of course, is to leverage the crisis in Eastern Europe to provide more access and regulatory relief to an oil and gas sector that is already very profitable, heavily subsidized, has enormous sway in Washington, and is sitting on unused permits to drill across millions of acres of land and water. Sen. John Kennedy (R-La.) accused President Joe Biden of leading “a frontal assault on oil and gas.” Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) bemoaned Biden’s “backwards, America-last energy policies.” And numerous other industry-backed members of the GOP have spent the days since Russia launched its violent war peddling industry talking points and demanding Biden “unleash” America’s full oil and gas potential. The GOP campaign to blame Biden for both Russia’s...
    A fossil of a giant millipede found on a beach in northern England has revealed the "biggest bug that ever lived," paleontologists say.The fossil was discovered in January 2018 in a chunk of sandstone that had fallen from a cliff onto the beach at Howick Bay in Northumberland. The rock had cracked open, revealing the fossil."It was a complete fluke of a discovery," said Neil Davies, a lecturer in sedimentary geology at the University of Cambridge's department of earth sciences, who said the fossil was spotted by a former doctoral student."It was an incredibly exciting find, but the fossil is so large it took four of us to carry it up the cliff face," said Davies in a news statement.The fossilized remains of the creature, named Arthropleura, dated from the Carboniferous Period about 326 million years ago. That's over 100 million years before the rise of the dinosaurs.When alive, the creature was estimated to have been 55 centimeters (22 inches) wide and up to 2.63 meters (8.6 feet) in length, weighing 50 kilograms (110 pounds). That would make it the...
    (CNN)A fossil of a giant millipede found on a beach in northern England has revealed the "biggest bug that ever lived," paleontologists say. The fossil was discovered in January 2018 in a chunk of sandstone that had fallen from a cliff onto the beach at Howick Bay in Northumberland. The rock had cracked open, revealing the fossil. "It was a complete fluke of a discovery," said Neil Davies, a lecturer in sedimentary geology at the University of Cambridge's department of earth sciences, who said the fossil was spotted by a former doctoral student. "It was an incredibly exciting find, but the fossil is so large it took four of us to carry it up the cliff face," said Davies in a news statement. The fossilized remains of the creature, named Arthropleura, dated from the Carboniferous Period about 326 million years ago. That's over 100 million years before the rise of the dinosaurs. Read MoreIt took four people to carry the fossil up the cliff face. When alive, the creature was estimated to have been 55 centimeters (22 inches) wide and...
    London (CNN)Just months ago, consensus was growing that COP26 would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to hit the reset button on the climate crisis, bringing world leaders together to make new commitments to save the planet.While the summit in Glasgow, Scotland, is still of vital importance in the battle against climate change, there is now a question mark on whether it will adequately put flesh on the bones of the 2015 Paris Agreement, which is its main purpose.During a summer of extreme weather and new science showing that climate change is happening faster than we previously understood, there was a real sense that COP26 would be a huge moment for the global community to come together and lay out clear, real-world actions to halve emissions over this decade with the aim of keeping global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. But less than a week out, things are looking shaky.British government officials shared with CNN their concerns that some of the most important nations in the G20 have yet to disclose their updated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) on cutting emissions with just...
    More On: pensions How to keep NYC from going bankrupt Chile reserves seats for indigenous as it prepares to rewrite Constitution Stop Bill de Blasio’s rancid bus deal NYC’s $890M school bus deal lets de Blasio donor avoid pension debt: experts New York City’s largest pension funds have voted to divest their portfolios of an estimated $4 billion from securities related to fossil fuel companies, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Comptroller Scott Stringer, and trustees of two of the city’s pension funds said. “The New York City Employees’ Retirement System (NYCERS) and New York City Teachers’ Retirement System (TRS) voted to approve divestments today and the New York City Board of Education Retirement System (BERS) is expected to move forward on a divestment vote imminently,” they said in a statement on Monday. In September 2018, the mayor and comptroller jointly announced a goal of doubling the pension funds’ investments in climate solutions from 1 percent to 2 percent, or about $4 billion within 3 years. Filed under bill de blasio ,  climate change ,  fossil fuel ,  mayor bill de...
    VIDEO4:0604:06Tech options market isn't as positive as it was in August: Equity research expertSquawk Alley Here are the companies making headlines in midday trading. Moderna — Shares of the biotech company rose 3.7% after Moderna announced that it had reached the number of Covid-19 cases needed in its phase-three vaccine trial to submit the preliminary data to an independent review board. The announcement signals that preliminary results could soon be announced publicly. Fossil Group — The watchmaker's stock rose more than 23% after Fossil reported an adjusted 31 cents in earnings per share on $435.5 million of net sales during the quarter. That was a 19% decline in net sales year over year, but the company managed to grow its margins, crediting cost-cutting measures. Energizer Holdings — Shares of the battery manufacturer tanked more than 11% following its disappointing earnings report. Energizer earned 59 cents per share, missing the forecast of 81 cents per share, according to Refinitiv. Revenue, however, topped estimates. Salesforce – Shares of Salesforce fell more than 1% after Morgan Stanley downgraded the cloud company to equal...
    VIDEO1:1501:15Moderna says company has enough cases to provide analysis on its Covid-19 vaccine trialClosing Bell Here's a look at the companies making headlines in after-hours trading. Moderna — The biotech stock rose 2% after Moderna said that it has had enough cases of Covid-19 in its vaccine candidate trial to take a look at the data, signaling that preliminary results could be released soon. The stock also rose more than 8% during normal trading hours Wednesday. Revolve Group — Shares of the fashion retailer fell more than 9% after the company reported a surprise year-over-year decline in net sales for the third quarter. Revolve reported $151 million in net sales for the three-month period, below the $154.2 million from the same quarter last year. The company said Covid-19 has continued to hurt performance during the early weeks of the fourth quarter. Fossil Group — Shares of the watchmaker spiked more than 30% after Fossil announced its third-quarter results that included widening margins. The company said it earned an adjusted 31 cents per share on $435.5 million of net sales during...
    Carl Pope October 29, 2020 10:00AM (UTC) Last week's final presidential debate ended with a revealing split between Donald Trump and Joe Biden on climate policy. But most of the media coverage is missing the real story, because the media ignores what is already happening in the economics of the energy sector. Biden was clear that he isn't going to ban fracking or shut down the oil industry. He mentioned ending new drilling on public lands and shutting down subsidies for coal, oil and gas. And he said we would transition away from oil —that it would take decades, but that we need to replace fossil fuels with renewables because of the climate threat. He mentioned some of the tools he'd use to speed the transition: funding 50,000 EV charging stations and beginning the retrofitting of leaky, polluting buildings.  : Trump, as he did in 2016, offered himself as a successful King Canute, and implied he had stopped the tide and effectively shut down the transition away from coal and oil. (Canute knew better — one wonders if Trump has a clue.) He pointed to his withdrawal from...
    Rep. Steve Scalise noted how former Vice President Joe Biden’s promise to end fossil fuel consumption would damage the economic welfare of America’s “middle class” and “lower income” families, offering his remarks on Tuesday’s edition of SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Daily with host Alex Marlow. Biden and the broader Democrat Party regularly frame fossil fuel consumption as driving “global warming” and “climate change,” while implementing and proposing laws to end development of oil and gas resources. The presidential campaigns of Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) described “climate change” as a “global emergency” — making 85 separate references to “climate” — in a 110-page jointly composed political manifesto dubbed the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force Recommendations.   LISTEN: “He said he’s going to shut down the oil production,” Scalise recalled, highlighting Biden’s call to “transition” away from fossil fuels  during the third and final presidential debate last week. Biden has repeatedly made false statements about his own recorded support for ostensible environmental policies to combat “global warming” and “climate change.” He falsely claimed not to support the Green New Deal despite...
    (CNN)In the 1980s, paleontologists at the University of California Riverside visited Seymour Island, part of an island chain in the Antarctic Peninsula. They brought home a number of fossils -- including the foot bone and partial jaw bone of two prehistoric birds.For decades, the fossils sat in a museum at the University of California Berkeley -- until a graduate student named Peter Kloess started poking around in 2015.In a study published Monday in the journal "Scientific Reports," Kloess identified the birds as pelagornithids, a group of predators that roamed the Earth's southern oceans for at least 60 million years. They are known as "bony-toothed" birds because of their sharp teeth and long beaks, which helped them grab fish and squid from the ocean.The birds were huge, with wingspans reaching up to 21 feet (6.4 meters). And the specific individuals that the fossils belong to may have been the biggest of them all, the study suggests.The 5-inch segment of fossilized jaw, which was discovered in Antarctica in the 1980s, dates from 40 million years ago.Using the fossils' size and measurements, the...
    Google just made one of Big Tech’s most ambitious environmental commitments: it will work to run its operations purely on renewable energy by 2030. It also announced that as of today, it has purchased enough carbon offsets to essentially cancel out all the planet-heating carbon dioxide emissions the company has released since it was founded in 1998. Google has been carbon neutral each year since 2007, which means that it offsets the emissions it generates from burning fossil fuels by investing in renewable energy projects or other initiatives that draw carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and into storage. But relying on offsets doesn’t actually wean the company off fossil fuels. Google released 4.9 million metric tons of greenhouse gases in 2018 alone, roughly the amount that more than 1 million passenger vehicles might put out in a year. “We are already feeling those impacts today from historic wildfires” Google’s new pledge comes as California, home to Google’s headquarters, continues to burn and choke on the smoke from blazes made more devastating by climate change. “We have until 2030...
    A Lyft logo is installed on a Lyft driver's car next to an Uber sticker in Pittsburgh.Gene J. Puskar | AP Here are the stocks making headlines in midday trading. Lyft — The ridesharing stock fell more than 4% after the company reported a 61% drop in revenue for its second quarter. The company reported a loss of 86 cents per share and $339 million of revenue for the quarter, both of which beat Wall Street expectations.  Cisco – Shares of Cisco tanked 11.5% after the maker of computer networking equipment provided a disappointing forecast. Cisco called for a fourth consecutive revenue decline in its quarterly guidance. Its revenue in the fiscal fourth quarter, while topping expectations slightly, declined 9% from a year earlier. Earnings came in at 80 cents per share, versus 74 cents per share as expected by analysts, according to Refinitiv. The company also announced that its chief financial officer Kelly Kramer will be retiring. Fossil — Shares of Fossil jumped 11% after the company reported a smaller loss and more revenue than Wall Street analysts expected, according...
    Brian Kahn3 minutes ago•Filed to:joe bidenjoe biden2020 electionfossil fuelsgreen new dealSavePresumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks at McGregor Industries on July 09, 2020 in Dunmore, Pennsylvania.Photo: Spencer Platt (Getty Images) On Tuesday, Democratic presidential challenger Joe Biden released a major update to his climate plan. It has a big splashy number—$2 trillion over four years—and some solid policies. It shows, definitively, that progressives are winning by both putting forward popular policies to address the climate crisis and cranking up the pressure on the Biden campaign to move left. But the thing missing in the plan also reveals what the biggest fight of the next decade will be and the power even a weakened fossil fuel industry holds over the politics of what’s possible. The plan is structured around infrastructure, clean energy, and environmental justice. Committing to spending $2 trillion over the four years of a presidential term is a serious investment. The U.S. economy is in shambles in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, and an infusion of $2 trillion for infrastructure spending is one way to kickstart it,...
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