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    (CNN)President Joe Biden will deliver remarks and participate in a global Covid-19 summit convened by his administration on Thursday, two senior administration officials said.The summit is aimed at urging other wealthy countries to ramp up their coronavirus relief efforts aimed at poorer countries, but it comes as the Biden administration is struggling to secure additional funding from Congress to bolster its own coronavirus relief efforts at home and abroad.Ahead of the summit, Biden has called on upper-middle and high-income countries to donate $2 billion in coronavirus treatments, like the Paxlovid pill, and $1 billion in oxygen supplies to poorer countries, according to a source familiar with the call to action.Thursday's summit is the second global Covid-19 summit the White House has hosted, following a first one last September.This is a breaking story and will be updated.
    Here’s what’s happening Friday with the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S.: THREE THINGS TO KNOW TODAY — Advocacy groups are warning that immigrants in the U.S. may be some of the most difficult people to reach during the national drive to vaccinate the population against the virus. Some immigrants in the country illegally fear that information taken during vaccinations could be turned over to authorities and so may not seek out vaccines, while those who speak little or no English may find it difficult to access shots. — A group of fortunate Americans are getting pushed to the front of the line to get their COVID-19 vaccines as clinics scramble to get rid of extra, perishable doses by the end of the day. Some of those getting earlier than expected access just happen to be near a clinic at closing time, but clinic workers also go out looking for willing recipients. Other clinics are setting up lotteries to dispense their extra shots because the demand is so great. The process has emerged as one of the most unusual, and to...
    Here’s what’s happening Friday with the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S.: THREE THINGS TO KNOW TODAY — Advocacy groups are warning that immigrants in the U.S. may be some of the most difficult people during the national drive to vaccinate the population against the virus. Some immigrants in the country illegally fear that information taken during vaccinations could be turned over to authorities and so may not seek out vaccines, while those who speak little or no English may find it difficult to access shots. — A group of fortunate Americans are getting pushed to the front of the line to get their COVID-19 vaccines as clinics scramble to get rid of extra, perishable doses by the end of the day. Some of those getting earlier than expected access just happen to be near a clinic at closing time, but clinic workers also go out looking for willing recipients. Other clinics are setting up lotteries to dispense their extra shots because the demand is so great. The process has emerged as one of the most unusual, and to some unseemly,...
    WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The Latest on President-elect Joe Biden (all times local): 3 p.m. President-elect Joe Biden says the coronavirus relief package passed by Congress is “just the first step” and a “down payment” in addressing multiple crises facing America. Biden said Tuesday that he will put forward a plan in early 2021 that will ask Congress to send more help to firefighters, police, frontline health workers and millions of working families. He noted that the latest relief package extends unemployment benefits for 10 weeks but said “it’s going to take a lot longer than that.” Biden said he’ll also seek more resources to distribute COVID-19 vaccines and boost testing, which will be needed to reopen schools. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, infectious diseases, health, coronavirus, Maryland, lung disease, Delaware
    WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The Latest on President-elect Joe Biden (all times local): 3 p.m. President-elect Joe Biden says the coronavirus relief package passed by Congress is “just the first step” and a “down payment” in addressing multiple crises facing America. Biden said Tuesday that he will put forward a plan in early 2021 that will ask Congress to send more help to firefighters, police, frontline health workers and millions of working families. He noted that the latest relief package extends unemployment benefits for 10 weeks but said “it’s going to take a lot longer than that.” Biden said he’ll also seek more resources to distribute COVID-19 vaccines and boost testing, which will be needed to reopen schools. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    The federal government has cut 60% of its workers dedicated to various coronavirus relief efforts throughout the United States, according to Defense One. At one point, the Trump administration dispatched more than 50,000 federal employees to handle coronavirus-related projects, according to a Health and Human Services Department spokesperson. The agency said that number had been reduced since it has "completed" work. According to the COVID Tracking Project, at least 51,000 people Americans have tested positive for coronavirus on Wednesday alone. But only 916 have died from conditions related to the virus, which is down from the peak coronavirus case count in July and down from the daily death county in April. However, new coronavirus cases have increased over the last few weeks, with some states facing the worst outbreaks since the onset of the pandemic. The HHS spokesperson said the reduction in federal staff to address coronavirus is due to lower need in various states. As requests emerge to conduct additional testing, surveillance, and other mitigation efforts to stop the spread of this virus, the federal government assists with deploying...
    OF NOTE/CORONAVIRUS St. Paul-based Ecolab announced it has donated more than $3 million of cleaning and sanitizing products and more than $2 million in financial support in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The company worked with nonprofits World Emergency Relief and Global Citizen USA to distribute cleaning and sanitizing products to organizations in countries throughout the world, including Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ghana, Malawi, Mauritius, New Zealand, South Africa, the United States and Uruguay. CONSTRUCTION Adolfson & Peterson Construction, Golden Valley, welcomed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Marc Timberman. FINANCIAL SERVICES Securian Financial, St. Paul, announced it has signed the Accounting for Sustainability (A4S) Net Zero Statement of Support — joining 46 organizations worldwide in committing to publish a detailed pathway to net zero emissions. The company expects to publish a plan on its website in early 2021. … Drake Bank, St. Paul, announced that Bo Thao-Urabe and Richard Wanke have joined its board of directors. Thao-Urabe is co-founder and executive network director of the Coalition of Asian American Leaders; Wanke is an entrepreneur and...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday his administration and Democrats in Congress were far apart in their efforts to come together on a coronavirus relief bill, and he suggested he was not in a hurry to strike a deal. Trump, speaking to reporters as he departed the White House for a trip to Texas, accused Democrats of not taking care of Americans with their proposals, and said when Democratic leaders come together to do that, relief efforts could move forward. (Reporting by Alex Alper and Tim Ahmann; Editing by Chris Reese) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City It’s not always just about baseball — especially in times like these. The New York Mets, their foundation, and their Community Investment Team are poised to spend over $1 million in COVID-19 relief efforts by the end of July as they continue to support a city that was once the epicenter of the virus in the United States. Working with local businesses since the initial outbreak, the Mets have reached out to assist New York City’s medical workers and soon after, its citizens amidst the pandemic, which has had over 224,000 confirmed cases since March. The Mets have helped feed 7,500 hospital workers, donated 20,500 t-shirts and jerseys to essential workers, donated more than 5,200 plastic and tote bags to assist local food banks, and put together over 1,758 cases of food and beverages for local pantries — all while supporting 51,530 families with donations or other assistance. It all stemmed from for a need to help one of the city’s...
    An article written for The Atlantic by three law professors (Micah Schwartzman and Richard Schragger of the University of Virginia and Cornell University’s Nelson Tebbe) focuses on Trump’s total disregard for the separation of church and state during the coronavirus crisis. The Establishment Clause in the U.S. Constitution is quite clear: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” One needn’t be an atheist or an agnostic to respect that separation of church; Trump, however, has given far-right white evangelicals preferential treatment. “Under this principle of disestablishment, at the very least, the government cannot give special privileges to religious organizations beyond what is available to similarly situated nonreligious groups,” Schwartzman, Schragger and Tebbe explain in The Atlantic. “But the past few months have seen a near-complete collapse of this principle at the national level, at least with respect to government funding of religion.” The legal experts continue, “Under the Payment Protection Program, which has allocated $669 billion in subsidies to support small businesses during the coronavirus pandemic, the government has extended funding to churches...
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