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    (CNN)When, as journalists, we prepare for a job, we think carefully about our questions, locations and equipment. But for one of us, documentary photographer Roshan Abbas, there is an added consideration -- how much of his true identity to reveal. Abbas, co-author of this article, is a Muslim man in India. A country where, under Prime Minister Narendra Modi's watch, Muslims are being vilified and evicted from their homes, their freedom of religious expression stifled. It's oppression Abbas has experienced firsthand, choosing not to wear a kurta -- a loose, collarless shirt -- that might point to his identity as a Muslim, when traveling the country for work.The decision is cautionary. In public spaces, there looms a sense of uneasiness. Mob lynchings of Muslims who look visibly Muslim have arisen in the past. In todays India, clothing choices signal a deepening religious divideLikewise, Muslim women wearing hijab can face backlash and discrimination, even though there's no national ban on religious garments in public spaces.Read MoreAbbas also takes care not to disclose that he attends Jamia Millia Islamia -- a...
    In this article MCD Two months after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, McDonald's — the very symbol of Western capitalism — opened its first store in the Soviet Union. It was a big moment, and the restaurant drew large crowds. More than 30 years later, amid pressure from U.S. consumers to protest Russia's invasion of Ukraine, McDonald's last month announced it would be temporarily closing all 850 of its locations in Russia. Starbucks, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola likewise announced their plans to pause business activity in Russia, and Yum Brands, which franchises about 1,000 KFC restaurants and 50 Pizza Hut locations in Russia, suspended all investment and restaurant development in the country.  More than 750 companies have since curtailed operations in Russia. McDonald's has also temporarily shuttered its 108 locations in Ukraine for safety reasons. Russia and Ukraine together account for roughly 2% of McDonald's global sales and less than 3% of its operating income. There's no telling when or if McDonald's will resume its operations in Russia and Ukraine, but the company is taking a hit to...
    New York (CNN Business)Having children is expensive, no matter where in the world you live. But, while America finds itself in the middle of the cost scale, China has become one of the priciest places to raise kids.South Korea tops the list of most expensive places to raise a child from birth to age 18, measured as a percentage of per capita gross domestic product, according to research from Jefferies (JEF) which used data from Yuwa Population Research. GDP is the broadest measure of a nation's economic activity.Expecting a baby? Heres how to get your finances readyChina comes in second, followed by Italy. The United States is wedged in the middle of the top 14 most expensive places, between Germany and Japan.However, in terms of the absolute amount of money spent, China is one of the cheapest places to have kids. But it's all relative: "If we then adjust that data to percentage of average disposable income, China becomes the most expensive place to raise kids," said the Jefferies researchers. So what makes it so costly to raise kids in...
    D.C. is outpacing most other cities when it comes to healthy living. A new WalletHub survey released Monday reviewed four key categories that promote wellness, including the quality of health care, food, fitness and the amount of green spaces. And D.C. ranked No. 10 overall in WalletHub’s rankings. Researchers discovered the District ranks high in three of those four categories. D.C. scored highest in the food category, meaning the District has many places — such as farmers markets — to buy a variety of fruits and vegetables. More DC News More Local News Where the District needs to see improvement is the fitness category. The study discovered fewer adults work out in D.C. compared with other places. One reason might be the cost: It was among the cities with the highest average monthly cost for a fitness club membership. San Francisco, Seattle and San Diego were the top ranked cities overall. Laredo, Texas; Gulfport, Mississippi; and Brownsville, Texas, were at the bottom, ranked Nos. 180 through 182, respectively.
    While life during the novel coronavirus pandemic has been easy for no one, it’s been especially challenging for people who are caretakers, whether that includes children, older folks in the home, disabled family members, or so on. Caretaking is chronically undervalued, underpaid, and frankly, is rarely even recognized on a social level as it should be. During COVID-19, many folks have had to make incredibly difficult and ever-shifting decisions about whether or not to send children to day care services in terms of safety. But that’s far from the only factor. What else? As new data from the Economic Policy Institute affirms, day care is very, very expensive. How expensive? In more than 30 states, day care services for a 1-year-old cost more than in-state college tuition. Yes, you read that correctly. Yearly costs, for example, can look like more than $9,000 per year in Texas, more than $13,000 per year in Illinois, and more than $12,000 per year in Wisconsin. Now, think about paying for that on minimum wage, or if you have student or medical debt, or if...
    White House chief of staff Ron Klain has defended Joe Biden and his administration as the presidents approval ratings continues to fall amid rapidly rising inflation and a 'cost of living' crisis. Polling from Monmouth University suggests confidence in the president is in short supply and dwindling with 42 per cent saying they are unsure of the president's ability to rescue the economy in the aftermath of COVID-19.  The figures are 12 per cent lower than when Biden took office in January when his approval rating sat at 54 percent.  White House chief of staff Ron Klain, pictured, has defended several crises afflicting the Biden administration including rising inflation, high unemployment and supply chain issues 'Things are a lot better in this country than they were a year ago with regard to covid, with regard to the economy but we have a lot of work left to do and I think voters are in a "show me, don't tell me" mode,' Klain told Jake Tapper, seen left, on CNN WH Chief of Staff Ron Klain: "Things are a lot better in...
    Russia was not invited to attend a 30-country virtual meeting to discuss ransomware on Wednesday, according to a senior Biden administration official. The country hosts many of the hacker syndicates believed to be behind an epidemic of global attacks that cost $400 million in payments last year but will not be part of a White House-led effort to find new strategies to counter the threat. 'We are having active discussions with the Russians, but in this particular forum they were not invited to participate,' said a senior administration official.  Also absent from the list of participants was the world's second biggest economy, China, which was accused of hacking Microsoft servers earlier this year.  Nations were meeting to discuss ransomware attacks, which use a type of malware that criminals use to encrypt files on a victim's computer network before demanding a ransom to restore the data. President Biden's White House is hosting a virtual ransomware summit on Wednesday but Vladimir Putin's Russia was not invited to take part. U.S. officials say Russia hosts many of the cybercriminal gangs responsible for an...
    Reginald Mathalone/AP Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.A new law that bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy—and allows any private citizen to sue both abortion providers and individuals who “aid and abet” individuals trying to obtain an abortion—has officially gone into effect in Texas after the US Supreme Court failed to take action in an emergency appeal from abortion providers. The near-total ban, as most people don’t realize they may be pregnant before six weeks, makes no exception for cases of rape or incest. As my colleague Becca Andrews wrote in May when Gov. Greg Abbott signed the bill into law: [Texas’s law] is another so-called “heartbeat” bill, which is a misnomer. At around six weeks gestation, a flickering of electricity appears within a portion of tissue that will become a heart should the embryo continue to develop. It is, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, definitively not a heartbeat. And there are other issues with these bills, which have also passed in Idaho, South Carolina,...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A recent study from Zumper looked into the median cost for rental properties in the United States, and they found that Pittsburgh ranks 50th in the country. READ MORE: Pittsburgh Police Comfort Dog Zane Passes Good Citizen Test According to the study, the average cost for a one-bedroom rental in Pittsburgh is $1,130 per month while a two-bedroom costs $1,360. The study also found that rent growth throughout the country has continued to accelerate, finding that median one-bedroom cost is up 9.2% and two-bedrooms increasing 11%, all since the second quarter of 2020. READ MORE: Law Named For Penn State Student Who Died In Hazing Incident Will Impose Stricter Penalties As of August 2021, New York City surpassed San Francisco as the most expensive market, with a median cost of $2,810, compared to $2,800 for San Francisco. Rounding out the top five most-expensive markets, Boston was third at $2,300, San Jose in fourth at $2,200, and Washington D.C. in fifth with $2,160. The cheapest median cost for a...
    By Matt Egan | CNN Business Fitch Ratings warned on Tuesday that the United States could lose its perfect credit rating due in part to the ongoing assault on democracy and worsening political polarization. The credit ratings firm said that governance is a “weakness” for the United States, specifically citing the January 6 insurrection and ongoing efforts to curb voting rights in dozens of states. “In light of developments since the last review and future risks, a deterioration in governance represents a further risk to the rating,” Fitch Ratings said in the report. Although Fitch reaffirmed America’s AAA credit rating, it said that could change due to rising debt levels and the state of politics in the world’s largest economy. “The failure of the former president to concede the election and the events surrounding the certification of the results of the presidential election in Congress in January have no parallels in other very highly rated sovereigns,” the report said. S&P Global Ratings, another credit ratings firm, downgraded the United States in 2011, setting off turmoil in financial markets. A downgrade...
    (CNN Business)Fitch Ratings warned on Tuesday that the United States could lose its perfect credit rating due in part to the ongoing assault on democracy and worsening political polarization.The credit ratings firm said that governance is a "weakness" for the United States, specifically citing the January 6 insurrection and ongoing efforts to curb voting rights in dozens of states."In light of developments since the last review and future risks, a deterioration in governance represents a further risk to the rating," Fitch Ratings said in the report.Although Fitch reaffirmed America's AAA credit rating, it said that could change due to rising debt levels and the state of politics in the world's largest economy."The failure of the former president to concede the election and the events surrounding the certification of the results of the presidential election in Congress in January have no parallels in other very highly rated sovereigns," the report said.Read MoreS&P Global Ratings, another credit ratings firm, downgraded the United States in 2011, setting off turmoil in financial markets. A downgrade by Fitch could raise the country's borrowing costs, making...
    A viral TikTok video has shed light on the staggering cost of a prolonged hospital stay in the US during the pandemic. TikTok account @letstalkaboutbusiness shared the video, claiming to show the cost of a four month stay in an American hospital with COVID-19. The clip includes an itemized list of charges, from anesthesia to physical therapy to a stay in the ICU, which in total come out to a whopping $2,850,776.10.  Massive! TikTok account @letstalkaboutbusiness shared the total cost one person faced for a four-month hospital stay due to COVID-19 Crazy! The itemized list of charges includes $550,458 for respiratory therapy, $404,515 to cover intermediate ICU care, and an $324,349 ICU charge Wow! Though the list is not a bill — and is likely the charge list before insurance — it has shocked commenters The printout explicitly says that it is not a bill, but an itemized list of charges for the total cost of the stay. It is likely that it accounts for charges made before insurance is applied, which may cover most or some of the total. Most American...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — During a press conference outlining his plan to end most COVID-19 restrictions, Gov. Tim Walz spoke out about the politicization around masks, saying “it cost lives.” Walz’s comments came Thursday when he was asked why he was incentivizing the vaccine by pushing the mask mandate’s end. Walz says the goal is to get 70% of eligible Minnesotans administered at least one dose of the vaccine before lifting the mask mandate. However, it will be lifted no later than July 1. READ MORE: Stimulus Check Update: Is A Fourth Relief Payment In Your Future? “I just want to note on this. The politicization around masks, I think history is going to write as one of the worst things that’s happened to this country,” Walz said. “I think it cost lives. I think it’s stupid. It’s the least intrusive thing we can do.” Walz says he’s a fan of incentivizing the vaccine for some people, and that he’s putting the power in the people’s hands to get vaccinated. READ MORE: Raku Sushi Owners Charged With Tax Fraud...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — During a press conference outlining his plan to end most COVID-19 restrictions, Gov. Tim Walz spoke out about the politicization around masks, saying “it cost lives.” Walz’s comments came Thursday when he was asked why he was incentivizing the vaccine by pushing the mask mandate’s end. Walz says the goal is to get 70% of eligible Minnesotans administered at least one dose of the vaccine before lifting the mask mandate. However, it will be lifted no later than July 1. READ MORE: Raku Sushi Owners Charged With Tax Fraud Scheme “I just want to note on this. The politicization around masks, I think history is going to write as one of the worst things that’s happened to this country,” Walz said. “I think it cost lives. I think it’s stupid. It’s the least intrusive thing we can do.” Walz says he’s a fan of incentivizing the vaccine for some people, and that he’s putting the power in the people’s hands to get vaccinated. READ MORE: Service File Shows Commendations, Minor Reprimands For Kim Potter, Officer...
    The whopping $1.9 trillion so-called “American Rescue Plan” signed into law by President Biden last week is a national disgrace. Before putting his pen to paper on the bill, the president claimed that “this historic legislation is about rebuilding the backbone of this country” and “giving people in this nation, working people, middle-class folks, the people who built this country, a fighting chance.” Either Biden was intentionally misleading the public, or he didn’t read the thing, because it does nothing of the sort. The nearly two trillion-dollar stimulus bill is packed with more pork than a five hundred pound pig, including $86 billion for union pensions and $100 billion for state pension funds. In total, the legislation allocates around $350 billion for state and local governments, even though most are not experiencing the predicted tax revenue shortfall many thought would result from the pandemic. This is nothing less than a blatant wealth transfer to bankrupt blue states whose economic woes began years before COVID emerged. And as for the economic suffering caused by the pandemic — it wasn’t. The economic...
    Old growth forests are one of the most important parts of the Earth's ecosystem. These trees last for generations, even millennia (or longer!), and provide protection to hundreds of thousands of species of plants and animals, and do the very work to keep the planet alive and habitable for the human race. The trees that make up forests are highly sought after. They're incredibly durable. and useful in so many different functions. Unfortunately, every tree cut down is a tree gone forever, leaving a hole that cannot be replaced, even by replanted trees. The indiscriminate felling of these trees is not just folly, it's potentially suicidal, leading to an acceleration of climate change that could make human life on the surface of the planet completely untenable. I think about those forests a lot when I think about what's going on amongst healthcare providers in the United States of America. As an ER nurse, I've written about the effect the COVID-19 crisis has had on emergency and acute services providers on more than one occasion, but I think it's clear there are a lot of people...
    The United Kingdom has become the first country to approve the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, which has a lower cost and is easier to store than other vaccines that have already been approved. Health secretary Matt Hancock hailed the approval of the critical vaccine on Wednesday saying it means the UK will be 'out' of the coronavirus crisis by the Spring - but also signalled that millions more people are being put into lockdown.  In a massive boost after the country racked up a record 50,000 daily cases on Tuesday, Hancock insisted a rapid rollout of the jab - developed by Oxford University and pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca - now offers 'high confidence' the pandemic will be past within months. The UK has ordered 100 million doses of the vaccine with supplies due to arrive today or tomorrow and the first jabs starting on Monday.  AstraZeneca boss Pascal Soriot said deliveries would start tomorrow, adding: 'Vaccination will start next week and we will get to one million a week and beyond that very rapidly. We can go to two million.'  Top experts have warned...
    Periods are a biological predisposition of being born a female, and the average female will spend roughly 7 years of her life menstruating, but many women and girls around the world cannot afford period products. On Tuesday, Scotland became the first country to legislatively combat this issue by making menstrual products free in public facilities nationwide.  The Scottish Parliament confirmed in a tweet on Tuesday that the bill had passed unanimously. According to the parliament's website, the law requires the Scottish Government to set up a universal system so that anyone in need of period products can get them for free. Schools, colleges and universities will also be required to make free menstrual products available in restrooms. Local authorities and education providers will be responsible for ensuring free products are made available under the law. There are roughly 1.57 million menstruating individuals in Scotland, according to the bill's associated financial memorandum. Based on that figure, it's estimated the new law will cost the Scottish government roughly £8.7 million in 2022/23, although the real cost will depend on how many individuals use...
    VIDEO16:4516:45International college students and how they matter to the U.S. economyColleges & Universities As cases of coronavirus surge, far fewer international students are choosing to study in this country, costing the United States billions. It's also putting a severe strain on colleges and universities nationwide. The number of international students in the U.S. fell for the first time during the 2019-20 academic year, down 1.8%, according to the latest Open Doors report, released Monday by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the Institute of International Education. In the fall 2020 semester, the tally of international students studying in the U.S. and online at U.S. institutions sank even further — plunging 16% — due to the impact of the pandemic, according a fall snapshot also conducted by the Institute of International Education. The sudden decline in international student enrollment already cost the U.S. economy $1.8 billion last year, according to a separate report by NAFSA: Association of International Educators. More from Personal Finance:Colleges are slashing tuition to entice students backIn-person or online: More colleges change...
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