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    Much like YouTube turned a generation of watchers into creators, new advances in telescope technology are allowing amateur sky watchers to make real, meaningful contributions to science. Astrophotography isn't easy. It requires an understanding of stellar coordinates, when different objects will be visible, the ability to stay up late, and patience. One firm, Unistellar, has taken a new approach to astrophotography, effectively building a camera telescope that is as easy to use as the YouTube app. This ease of use has already had direct benefits to science, with telescopes spread around the world, experts are able to use the amateur observers to gather pictures of the whole night sky, or track an object as it crosses Earth's orbit. This has proved particularly useful when it comes to tracking asteroids, particularly those that could pose a threat to the planet - but has also helped in exoplanet work. As of 2021, Unistellar citizen astronomers have already achieved almost a thousand positive detections, including 395 observations of asteroids, 413 of exoplanets and 113 detections of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). The citizen astronomers are...
    + The Importance of What We Don’t Know About Science (Photo: Emily Morter / Unsplash) “Laziness is the mother of progress. If man were not lazy to walk, he would not have invented the wheel.” And physics is a great example of how nature works and how many questions it presents to us. As far as science is concerned, this is half done because the lack of knowledge raises constant questions; In the other half you can walk away with the doubts that arise. At that “why” point you should always be a kid, bored for some, smart for the world. Find out more The same is true with our knowledge of the universe. You might think that we have already solved everything with the Big Bang model, which shows the appearance of the universe from a point of infinite density, leading to space, time and everything in it. No. Increasingly accurate experimental observations actually prove this appearance and all the epochs already described in the evolution of the universe, but this still raises many questions (so far). We...
    According to a report by ağatan Akyol from the RepublicThe position of the title “Basic Islamic Science” in announcing the post of Associate Professor opened for the Department of Psychology at Bingle University attracted a backlash. Charter of Basic Islamic Science The post of Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the Department of Spiritual Psychology at Bingle University was said to have been “personally” prepared. In the announcement, “Holds the title of Associate Professor in the field of Basic Islamic Sciences and has worked in Spiritual Psychology” Conditions happened. Many social media users, “# Psychological Psychologist Attapping” Responded to the announcement with the title. A computer teacher On the other hand, it was found that the two academics who were in the academic staff of the University’s Department of Psychology were not graduates in psychology, but rather in the fields of computer teaching and philosophy. Council of Higher Education (YÖK) on March 9th “Regulation on Regulatory Amendment Relating to the Promotion and Appointment of Faculty Members” was issued. The regulation states, “As a condition of application for the...
    Reading, science, and math scores decreased among multiple grade levels over the course of the two-to-four years leading up to 2019, according to the Nation’s Report Card. Reading scores among fourth-graders decreased by one point and three points among eighth-graders between 2017 and 2019, and two points among twelfth-graders between 2015 and 2019, the report, conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) showed. Released Tuesday, the report includes both public and non-public schools. “Once again, the lowest-performing students are falling further behind,” Peggy G. Carr, the associate commissioner of assessments at NCES said, according to a press release. “This is a repeated pattern across multiple subjects and grade levels. We need a renewed focus on the educational needs of our struggling students.” (SAEED KHAN/AFP via Getty Images) Eighth-grade reading scores, which saw the greatest decrease, placed the national average at the “basic” level. There are three achievement levels: basic, proficient, and advanced.  Fourth-graders saw an average decline by two points in science between 2015 and 2019. The score is only one point higher than the first assessment year...
    New York : Integrating foods rich in healthy fats, Omega 3, antioxidants and a lot of garlic are the best dietary recommendations for good heart health. Photo: Image by Arek Socha on Pixabay / Pixabay People with family history of heart problems, they need to resort to certain measures that help them keep their heart strong and reduce any risk. That is why daily habits, lifestyle and diet play a fundamental role in good cardiovascular health. The good news is that complementary to this, science has proven that there are 4 essential nutrients to keep the cardiovascular system healthy and strong: co-enzyme Q10, Omega 3 fatty acids, astaxanthin and garlic. Discover the immense medicinal potential of integrating its consumption into your daily diet. The heart never takes a break. Not only is it one of the most important organs of the human body, acts as a pump that propels the blood towards organs, tissues and cells. It is responsible for supplying blood and nutrients to each cell and collects carbon dioxide and waste substances...
    The Conversation Spain Covid-19 vaccines and the importance of basic research Shutterstock / anyaivanova How wonderful to have vaccines! What spectacular progress! What an extraordinary achievement for mankind! These are comments that come to us from all the countries of the world, through all the media, expressed in all languages. It is the unanimous shout of admiration as we contemplate how, after competing in the most amazing race in its history, science reaches the goal and synthesizes the vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 in record time. Yes, it is great that this recognition is made. It is fair and necessary. But… let’s pause. I invite you to have a glass of your favorite drink and delight ourselves by remembering the famous phrase that Isaac Newton, considered the greatest scientist of all time, included in a letter to Robert Hooke: If I have seen further, it is by standing on shoulders of giants. More than interesting reflections can be extracted from this resounding sentence: Newton, the most brilliant, the protagonist of the culminating moment of the scientific revolution according to Bernard Cohen, stopped...
    While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week’s Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off. It may soon do so again. Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants,” as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications. Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism. Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development of testing. And now they tantalize us with the prospect of COVID-19 treatments and ultimately a vaccine, perhaps within a few months. “This could be science’s finest hour. This could...
    By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week's Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off. It may soon do so again. Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants," as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications. Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism. Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development of testing. And now they tantalize us with the prospect of COVID-19 treatments and ultimately a vaccine, perhaps within a few months. “This could...
    While the world wants flashy quick fixes for everything, especially massive threats like the coronavirus and global warming, next week's Nobel Prizes remind us that in science, slow and steady pays off. It may soon do so again. Science builds upon previous work, with thinkers “standing on the shoulders of giants," as Isaac Newton put it, and it starts with basic research aimed at understanding a problem before fixing it. It’s that type of basic science that the Nobels usually reward, often years or decades after a discovery, because it can take that long to realize the implications. Slow and steady success in science has made researchers hopeful in the fight against the pandemic. It even offers a glimmer of climate optimism. Many years of advances in basic molecular science, some of them already Nobel Prize-winning, have given the world tools for fast virus identification and speeded up the development of testing. And now they tantalize us with the prospect of COVID-19 treatments and ultimately a vaccine, perhaps within a few months. “This could be science's finest hour. This...
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